Table of Contents...
Creating Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint ...............3
What is a Presentation? ..........................................................................................3
Accessibility and PowerPoint ...............................................................5
Defining Accessibility ..............................................................................................6
Introduction to Digital Media ................................................................7
Access Strategies for Digital Media ........................................................................8
Web Standards .....................................................................................................15
Applying Standards to Content .............................................................................16
Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as ammended in 1998. .................16
WCAG 2.0 (http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/) ......................................................19
Legal Issues .........................................................................................21
Federal Laws ........................................................................................................21
California State Laws ............................................................................................21
California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office Legal Opinions ....................22
Basic Workflows for PowerPoint ........................................................27
Slide Titles and Content ........................................................................................27
Images ..................................................................................................................27
Tables ....................................................................................................................29
Charts and Graphs ................................................................................................29
Starting with the Outline View ...............................................................................29
Distributing PowerPoint Presentations ..................................................................31
LecShare Pro ........................................................................................35
Using LecShare ....................................................................................................39
Alternate Text Missing Error ..................................................................................39
Missing Caption/Summary - Tables ......................................................................40
Missing Caption/Summary - Charts ......................................................................41
Duplicate Title Warning .........................................................................................41
Setting the Reading Order ....................................................................................42
Adding Audio to Slides ..........................................................................................42
Exporting the Presentation ....................................................................................42
Camtasia Studio ...................................................................................45
Basic Use of Camtasia to Record PowerPoint Presentations ...............................46
Adding Captions with Camtasia Studio .................................................................47
Speech Recognition Captions ...............................................................................49
Delete page from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
export pages from pdf preview; delete pages of pdf preview
Delete page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract one page from pdf acrobat; add remove pages from pdf
HTCTU
For electronic versions of training manuals, a list of upcoming 
trainings, and other resources, visit our website: www.htctu.net
Copyright 2013 • High Tech Center Training Unit
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 
Unported License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/deed.en_US
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. This page is aimed to help you learn how to delete page from your PDF document in VB.NET application.
delete pages from pdf online; copy pdf pages to another pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
export one page of pdf preview; extract page from pdf preview
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
3
HTCTU
Creating Accessible Web Presentations from 
PowerPoint
Microsoft PowerPoint provides an easy to use authoring environment 
with a freely distributed playback environment that has become 
synonymous with “presentation”. Unfortunately, it is equally easy to 
create presentations that are totally inaccessible to people with dis-
abilities if you do not follow some basic best practices. In some cases 
the best option for creating an accessible version of your PowerPoint 
presentation will be to convert it to another format that can be made 
more accessible.
In order to figure it all out, we need to first determine exactly what it 
is we are trying to accomplish.
What is a Presentation?
Literally, a presentation is simply the act of sharing information with 
an audience. Typically, presentations can be differentiated by the 
intended means of delivery, live or recorded. While the specific access 
concerns will differ based on whether the presentation will be deliv-
ered live or recorded, the basic process to ensure access is the same: 
define the core digital media used in the presentation and provide the 
appropriate access strategies for each type of digital media.
Live presentations are typically comprised of live narration, some vi-
sual aids, and a handout. When you consider each individual compo-
nent of the live presentation, you can usually identify the best tech-
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
deleting pages from pdf document; delete pages of pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
cut pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf in reader
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
4
HTCTU
nique for ensuring accessibility. Typically, the visual aids will require 
the attention and skill of the presenter to render them accessible for 
people who can not see them, the handouts will require transforma-
tion into alternate formats, and the live narrative will have to be 
interpreted through ASL or live captions (or both).
Recorded presentations may incorporate handouts, visual aids, and 
narration, or they may exclude any of these components. The format 
of digital media used to record the presentation will also affect the se-
lection of access strategies to employ. Adding to the complexity is the 
variety of digital formats, editing/authoring tools, and capabilities of 
the technology used to store and distribute the final presentation.
When we talk about presentations for the Web, or even presentations 
focused on PowerPoint, we are still left with the question of whether 
the presentation will be delivered as a live “event” or if it will be de-
livered as a downloadable digital file that can be viewed anytime and 
anywhere. The main factor for these presentations is that everything 
will be delivered digitally.
Live Web Presentations
Delivering a live presentation on the Web will require some interme-
diating technology such as a webinar system or Learning Manage-
ment System (LMS). In these cases the aspects of communicating 
with the audience need to be assessed for accessibility, and all hand-
outs and materials used as visual aids need to be made accessible 
and available as separate downloads, with corresponding free play-
back tools that are also accessible.
Recorded Web Presentations
Presentations that are not delivered live comprise the majority of 
presentations we typically encounter. While the basic strategy is to 
apply the appropriate access strategy to each of the core digital me-
dia types, the nature of these core digital media types should depend 
on the nature of your presentation.
A PowerPoint presentation can be as simple as a series of text-based 
slides, or it can be a combination of text, images, audio, video, and 
even interactive elements, with the potential of an audio narrative. 
Each of these elements will require a specific access strategy, and de-
pending on the nature of the final production, it may be necessary to 
convert the presentation to another format such as HTML or a digital 
video file in order to provide the requisite access.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
extract pages from pdf online; delete page from pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
cut pdf pages online; cut pages out of pdf
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
5
HTCTU
Accessibility and PowerPoint
A PowerPoint presentation is not always the most accessible experi-
ence for individuals who are blind or visually impaired, specifically, 
but it can also be difficult for individuals with a variety of disabilities 
to effectively navigate and use PowerPoint files.
The most general advice for achieving the best results for accessible 
presentations is to use the pre-defined input areas for your slides. 
For every digital file you insert into your PowerPoint presentation, 
you will need to apply the appropriate access strategy for that digital 
media type. You will need to avoid things like text boxes, word art, 
and “smart shapes”, unless you can guarantee that any meaning they 
might convey is also provided in the main slide bullets. Hyperlinks 
need to be labeled in a way that makes it apparent what will happen 
when the user clicks on the link.
General Advice for Accessibility in PowerPoint:
•  Use pre-defined input areas on slide templates
•  Employ appropriate access strategy for media you insert
•  Start in “Outline” view
•  Label hyperlinks
•  Use the “Notes” field to include information
•  Consider saving as an accessible PDF or captioned movie
Specific recommendations will vary based on the media you are us-
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
pdf extract pages; delete blank pages from pdf file
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete pages out of a pdf file; deleting pages from pdf file
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
6
HTCTU
ing, and the ultimate distribution technology you will use to deliver 
the presentation. Ultimately, you will need to maximize the acces-
sibility of the PowerPoint file, and consider file format options for 
converting the PowerPoint presentation into, in order to deliver the 
most accessible experience possible for your audience.
Defining Accessibility
There are many definitions for the word “accessible”. Consider the 
following:
Capable of being reached; “a town accessible by rail”
Capable of being read with comprehension; “readily accessible to 
the nonprofessional reader”; “the tales seem more accessible than 
his more difficult novels”
Easily obtained; “most students now have computers accessible”; 
“accessible money”
Easy to get along with or talk to; friendly; “an accessible and ge-
nial man”
(Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University)
Above: An accessible instructor
However, we are focussing on the meaning of accessibility that com-
bines all of these definitions with the intention of creating digital 
materials that are easily used and truly accessible for a specific group 
of individuals who may otherwise have difficulties using PowerPoint 
presentations.
Determining the level of accessibility is somewhat subjective based 
on the abilities of any given individual trying to access the material, 
but there are technical standards to help define the basic require-
ments that should help achieve accessibility. Finding a balance be-
tween technical accessibility, where the content meets a specific stan-
dard, and usable accessibility, where the content is truly usable by 
everyone, is our goal. The basic concepts involve making your content 
perceivable, understandable, and functionally usable for everyone 
who needs to view your presentation.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
copy pages from pdf to word; cut pages from pdf online
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
extract pages pdf preview; add and remove pages from pdf file online
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
7
HTCTU
Introduction to Digital Media
Electronic or digital media includes a wide range of technologies 
and content. When properly designed these media can encourage in-
terest and participation by students in otherwise dry or uninspiring 
subjects. Naturally, this is recognized as a great tool in designing 
and delivering Web based instruction.
One of the powerful aspects of electronic media is the potential to 
increase the complexity and density of information in learning ma-
terials while simultaneously offering the end-user control over how 
they receive or experience the information. To properly utilize this 
power requires understanding and following the best practices for 
proper design.
When an individual has a disability that prevents them from utiliz-
ing a particular sense or ability, often an Assistive Technology (AT) 
will be used to provide this or similar functionality. In the context 
of digital media, AT is used to translate information from one medi-
um to another in order to provide a means for individuals to navi-
gate and interact with the content.
Some information is obviously going to be difficult if not impossible 
for people with certain disabilities to access without AT. This is 
where AT comes in and creates an alternative format of the infor-
mation that can be accessed via a different sensory system. For 
individuals who are blind or who have low vision, visually-oriented 
information can be converted into audio and/or tactile information. 
For individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, verbal information 
can be delivered as text, charts, tables, and illustrations.
Human ability and disability exist on a continuum, just as the 
range of digital media and technology provide a continuum of op-
tions and considerations for representing information. The facts, 
principles, concepts, and procedures of most disciplines should be 
able to transcend different digital media limitations. Typically, by 
following the prescribed standards and best practices for any given 
technology you can produce the most usable and functional content 
possible. Often, this is enough to provide access to students using 
AT.
Digital Media Categories
Digital media brings amazing power to communicate and engage 
an audience. Whatever combinations of media that may be used for 
education or entertainment, the final product can be broken down 
into five basic categories:
Text
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
8
HTCTU
Images
Audio
Video
Complex
Complex media includes combinations of the first four media types, 
as well as any digital media that allows for interaction by the end-
user.
These classifications of media effectively cover the majority of options 
for delivering Web-based instructional content. Each media type has 
certain advantages and considerations in regards to accessibility, 
but with a little understanding they can all be used to deliver digital 
content in an accessible way.
With any digital media, it is always important to understand the 
playback context the student will open the content in.
Access Strategies for Digital Media
Following is a table of basic access strategies for the basic digital 
media types:
Media Type
Access Strategy
Text
Generally readable by most assistive tech-
nologies such as screen readers and elec-
tronic reading systems, text becomes usable 
and accessible when semantic structure is 
applied.
Images
Provide a textual equivalent that can be ren-
dered into an accessible format via assistive 
technology for non-sighted viewers.
Audio
Provide a text transcript of the audio infor-
mation that can be rendered into an acces-
sible format via Assistive Technology for 
non-sighted viewers.
Video
Captioning should be put in place (open or 
closed) in order to provide an equivalent 
experience for individuals who are unable to 
hear the audio content.
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
9
HTCTU
Complex
Complex media containing other media 
types (text, images, audio, and video) must 
begin with the best practices for accessibil-
ity in each of the included media types. In 
addition, appropriate markup of headings 
and other content must be applied to the 
different media constructs throughout the 
media file. By applying appropriate markup 
and definition to content, assistive technolo-
gies can better process and interact with the 
material.
We’ll be discussing these media types in more detail throughout the 
following sections.
Text
As the most common form of digital information, digital text has 
many advantages in the number of AT applications that can access 
it. Text is often thought of as the base-level digital format for pro-
viding access to information, as most AT can process digital text.
However, there is more to providing access than simply allowing 
information to be represented in alternate formats. Access to infor-
mation in general, and to education specifically, is increased when 
effective organizational structures are provided. By organizing the 
content into sections defined by headers we are allowing a means 
for the end user to efficiently navigate and interact with the materi-
al. In providing this structure we also increase the overall usability 
of the information for all students, regardless of disability.
Digital text comes in a variety of formats, and it is common to 
denote the type of file format with a three or four letter extension 
following a period, indicated here in parenthesis after each file type.
There is a range of accessibility and usability potential among the 
digital text flavors, running from simple to powerful. Starting with 
Plain Text (.txt), which is quite literally, plain text with no format-
ting, moving to Rich Text Format (.rtf) documents, spanning pro-
prietary document formats like Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) and 
InDesign (.indd), etc., and ending up with the ever common HTML 
(.htm or .html) and PDF (.pdf).
Digital Text Formats in Order of Potential Usability: 
HTML
RTF
Accessible Web Presentations from PowerPoint
10
HTCTU
TXT
Digital Text Formats in Order of Intrinsic Accessibility:
TXT 
RTF 
HTML
Technical accessibility really refers to the ability of assistive technol-
ogy to process the information. Usability is the degree to which an 
individual can understand and make use of your content. In order 
to maximize the effectiveness of your digital text, it is important to 
emphasize the USABILITY of your content, not just the technical ac-
cessibility.
Proprietary Issues
There are many digital file formats that use digital text, but not all 
file formats will open interchangeably without owning the proper ap-
plication. Because of this, a key consideration is to use a non-propri-
etary file format or ensure that the necessary technology to open the 
file is also available to the student.
Of all the digital text formats, properly formatted HTML provides a 
high level of access and usability while being freely distributable and 
easily viewed by many freely available applications.
Images
Images have a unique power to instill emotions and affect attitudes 
in ways that textual information can not. Images also take advantage 
of our visual ability to decode complex and sophisticated informa-
tion, allowing us to quickly and automatically make sense of it while 
organizing it under different categories. It is easy to see how digital 
images can be a tremendous asset in designing and delivering Web-
based instruction.
Sometimes a powerful instructional image is conveying complex in-
formation that is most effectively represented as graphic information, 
and sometimes it is just a pretty picture. Either case may be appro-
priate or even vital to your course content, but in the case of images 
that contain information significant to the instruction, you will need 
to provide a textual description of the content.
Containing the Image
Whatever the ultimate purpose and instructional value of an image 
may be, most of the time images will be contained in some sort of 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested