devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Delete pages from pdf control software platform web page windows wpf web browser AppleScriptLanguageGuide26-part545

C H A P T E R   7
Control Statements
Try Statements
261
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
If the error occurs within a subroutine and AppleScript does not find a Try 
statement in that subroutine, AppleScript checks to see if the statement that 
invoked the current subroutine is contained in a Try statement. If that statement 
is not contained in a Try statement, AppleScript continues up the call chain, 
going to the statement that invoked that subroutine, if any, and so on. If none of 
the calls in the call chain is contained in a Try statement, AppleScript stops 
execution of the script.
Writing a Try Statement
7
A Try statement is two-part compound statement. The first part, which begins 
with the word 
try
, is a collection of AppleScript statements. The second part, 
which begins with the words 
on error
, is an error handler—a series of 
statements that is executed if any of the statements in the first part causes an 
error message. The Try statement ends with the word 
end
(followed
optionally 
by 
error
or 
try
).
The error handler can include up to five parameter variables (also called formal 
parameters) that represent the actual information sent in the error message 
when the error occurs. When the error handler is called, the parameter variables 
become local variables in the error handler.
Try
7
A Try statement is a compound statement consisting of a list of AppleScript 
statements followed by an error handler to be executed if any of the statements 
cause an error message.
SYNTAX
try
statement
]...
on error 
¬
errorMessageVariable
¬
[ number 
errorNumberVariable
¬
[ from 
offendingObjectVariable
¬
[ partial result 
resultListVariable
¬
Delete pages from pdf - control software platform:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages from pdf - control software platform:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   7  
Control Statements
262
Try Statements
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
[ to 
expectedTypeVariable
]
[ global 
variable
[, 
variable
]...]
[ local 
variable
[, 
variable
]...]
statement
]...
end [ error | try ]
where
statement is any AppleScript statement.
errorMessageVariable (an identifier) You use this parameter variable within the 
error handler to refer to the error expression, usually a string, that describes the 
error. 
errorNumberVariable (an identifier) You use this parameter variable within the 
error handler to refer to the error number, an integer. 
offendingObjectVariable (an identifier) You use this parameter variable within the 
error handler as a reference to the application object that caused the error. 
resultListVariable (an identifier) You use this parameter variable within the error 
handler to refer to partial results for objects that were handled before the error 
occurred. Its value is a list that can contain values of any class. This parameter 
applies only to commands that return results for multiple objects. For example, 
if an application handles the command 
get words 1 thru 5
and an error occurs 
when handling word 4, the 
partial result
parameter contains the results for 
the first three words.
expectedTypeVariable (an identifier) This parameter variable identifies the 
expected value class (a class identifier)—that is, the value class to which 
AppleScript was attempting to coerce the value of offendingObjectVariable. If an 
application receives data of the wrong class and cannot coerce it to the correct 
class, the value of this parameter variable is the class of the coercion that failed. 
(The example at the end of this definition demonstrates how this works.)
variable (an identifier) This parameter variable is either a global variable or a 
local variable that can be used in the handler. The scope of a local variable is the 
handler. You cannot refer to a local variable outside the handler. The scope of a 
global variable can extend to any other part of the script, including other 
handlers and script objects. For detailed information about the scope of local 
and global variables, see “Scope of Script Variables and Properties” (page 311).
control software platform:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   7
Control Statements
Try Statements
263
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
EXAMPLES
The following Try statement provides an error handler for the Choose File 
command, one of the scripting addition commands distributed with 
AppleScript. The Choose File command returns an error if the user clicks the 
Cancel button in the Choose File dialog box. If the user doesn’t choose a file, the 
error handler asks whether to continue, using a default file. If the user chooses 
to continue, a second dialog confirms the choice and displays the name of the 
default file.
set fileName to "Generic Prefs" -- Use if no filename chosen.
try
choose file -- Ask user to choose a file.
-- If the user cancels, the next statement won't be executed.
set fileName to result
on error errText number errNum
if (errNum is equal to -128) then -- User cancelled.
display dialog "No file chosen. Use the default file?"
if button returned of result is equal to "OK" then
display dialog "The script will continue " & ¬
"using the default file \"" & fileName & "\"."
end if
else
-- If any other error, do nothing.
end if
end try
The next example demonstrates the use of the To keyword to capture additional 
information about an error that occurs during a coercion failure. 
try
repeat with i from 1 to "Toronto"
i
end repeat
on error from obj to newClass
log {obj, newClass} -- Display from and to info in log window.
end try
The Repeat statement fails because the string 
"Toronto"
is the wrong class—it’s 
a string, not an integer. The error handler simply writes the values of 
obj
(the 
offending value, 
"Toronto"
) and 
newClass
(the class of the coercion that failed, 
integer
) to the Script Editor’s Event Log window. The result is “(*Toronto, 
control software platform:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   7  
Control Statements
264
Try Statements
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
integer*)”, indicating the error occurred while trying to coerce “Toronto” to an 
integer. You can open the Script Editor’s Event Log window from the Controls 
menu or by typing Command-E. For more information on using the Event Log 
window, see “Debugging Scripts” (page 47) and the AppleScript section of the 
Mac OS Help Center.
Signaling Errors in Scripts
7
A script can signal an error—which can then be handled by an error handler—
with the Error command. This allows scripts to define their own messages for 
errors that occur within the script. 
Error
7
The Error command signals an error in a script.
SYNTAX
error 
¬
errorMessage
¬
[ number 
errorNumber
¬
[ from 
offendingObject
¬
[ partial result 
resultList
¬
[ to 
expectedType
]
where
errorMessage is a string describing the error. Although this parameter is not 
required, you should provide descriptive expressions for errors wherever 
possible, and you should always provide an expression if you do not include a 
number
parameter. If you do not include an error expression, an empty string 
(
""
) is passed to the error handler.
errorNumber is the error number for the error. You do not have to include an 
error number, but if you do, the number must not be any of the error numbers 
listed in “Error Numbers and Error Messages” (page 384). In general, positive 
numbers from 500 to 10,000 do not conflict with error numbers for AppleScript, 
control software platform:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   7
Control Statements
Try Statements
265
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
the Mac OS, or Apple events. If you do not include a 
number
parameter, the 
value 
-2700
(unknown error) is passed to the error handler.
offendingObject is a reference to the object, if any, that caused the error. If you 
provide a partial reference, AppleScript completes it using the value of the 
default object (for example, the target of a Tell statement).
resultList applies only to commands that return results for multiple objects. If 
results for some, but not all, of the objects specified in the command are 
available, you can include them in the 
partial result
parameter. If you do not 
include a 
partial
result
parameter, an empty list 
({})
is passed to the error 
handler.
expectedType is a class identifier. If a parameter specified in the command was 
not of the expected class, and AppleScript was unable to coerce it to the 
expected class, then you can include the expected class in the 
to
parameter.
EXAMPLES
The following example uses the Error command to resignal an error. The error 
handler resignals the error exactly as it was received, causing AppleScript to 
display an error dialog.
try
word 5 of "one two three"
on error number errNum from badObj
-- statements that handle the error
error number errNum from badObj
end try
In the next example, an Error command in an error handler resignals the error, 
but changes the message that appears in the error dialog. It also changes the 
error number to 
600
.
try
word 5 of "one two three"
on error
-- statements that determine the cause of the error
error "There are not enough words." number 600
end try
control software platform:C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
www.rasteredge.com
control software platform:C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   7  
Control Statements
266
Try Statements
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
The following example shows how to signal an error to handle bad data, and 
how to provide a handler that deals with other errors. The 
SumIntegersInList
subroutine expects a list of integers. If any item in the passed list is not an 
integer, 
SumIntegersInList
signals error number 750 and returns 0. The 
subroutine includes an error handler that displays a dialog if the error number 
is equal to 750; otherwise it uses the Error command to resignal the error. That 
allows other statements in the call chain to handle the unknown error number. 
If no statement handles the error, AppleScript displays an error dialog and 
execution stops.
on SumIntegerList from itemList
try
-- Initialize return value.
set integerSum to 0
-- Before doing sum, check that all items in list are integers.
if ((count items in itemList) is not equal to ¬
(count integers in itemList)) then
-- If all items aren’t integers, signal an error.
error number 750
end if
-- Use a Repeat statement to sum the integers in the list.
repeat with currentItem in itemList
set integerSum to integerSum + currentItem as integer
end repeat
return integerSum -- Successful completion of subroutine.
on error errStr number errorNumber
-- If our own error number, warn about bad data.
if the errorNumber is equal to 750 then
display dialog "All items in the list must be integers."
return integerSum -- Return the default value (0).
else
-- An unknown error occurred. Resignal, so the caller
-- can handle it, or AppleScript can display the number.
error number errorNumber
end if
end try
end SumIntegerList
Let’s look at how the 
SumIntegersInList
subroutine handles various error 
conditions.
C H A P T E R   7
Control Statements
Try Statements
267
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
A Successful Call
7
This first call completes without error.
set sumList to {1, 3, 5}
set listTotal to SumIntegerList from sumList --result: 9
A Call With Bad Data
7
The following call passes bad data—the list contains an item that isn’t an 
integer.
set sumList to {1, 3, 5, "A"}
set listTotal to SumIntegerList from sumList
if listTotal is equal to 0 then
-- The subroutine didn’t total the list--do something
-- to handle the error. (Not shown.)
The 
SumIntegerList
routine checks the list and signals an error 750 because the 
list contains at least one non-integer item. The routine’s error handler 
recognizes error number 750 and puts up a dialog to describe the problem. The 
SumIntegerList
routine returns 0. The script checks the return value and, if it is 
equal to 0, does something to handle the error.
An Unknown Error Occurs and Is Not Handled By the Caller
7
Suppose some unknown error occurs while 
SumIntegerList
is processing the 
integer list in the previous call. When the unknown error occurs, the 
SumIntegerList
error handler calls the Error command to resignal the error. 
Since the caller doesn’t handle it, AppleScript displays an error dialog and 
execution halts. The 
SumIntegerList
routine does not return a value.
An Unknown Error Is Handled By the Caller
7
Finally, suppose the caller has its own error handler, so that if the subroutine 
passes on an error, the caller can handle it. Assume again that an unknown 
error occurs while 
SumIntegerList
is processing the integer list.
try
set sumList to {1, 3, 5}
set listTotal to SumIntegerList from sumList
on error errMsg number errorNumber
C H A P T E R   7  
Control Statements
268
Considering and Ignoring Statements
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
display dialog "An unknown error occurred:  " ¬
& errorNumber as string
end try
In this case, when the unknown error occurs, the 
SumIntegerList
error handler 
calls the Error command to resignal the error. Because the caller has an error 
handler, it is able to handle the error by displaying a dialog that includes the 
error number. Execution can continue if it is meaningful to do so.
Considering and Ignoring Statements 
7
Considering statements allow you to control the way AppleScript executes 
operations and commands by listing specific characteristics, called attributes, to 
be taken into account as the operations and commands are executed. Ignoring 
statements work the same way, except that you list specific attributes to be 
ignored. 
The attributes you can use include
n
case, white space, and others that affect string comparisons 
n
an attribute called 
application responses
that controls whether or not 
AppleScript waits for responses from commands sent to applications
The following is an example of a string comparison without a Considering 
statement:.
"This" = "this"
--result: true
The value of the string comparison is 
true
, because by default, AppleScript does 
not distinguish uppercase from lowercase letters.
Here’s the same comparison within a Considering statement:
considering case
"This" = "this"
end considering
--result: false
C H A P T E R   7
Control Statements
Considering and Ignoring Statements
269
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
The Considering statement specifies that a particular attribute of strings—their 
case—is to be used in comparisons. As a result the comparison
"This" = "this"
is now 
false
, because the uppercase “T” in 
"This"
does not match the lowercase 
“t” in 
"this"
.
Considering/Ignoring
7
Considering and Ignoring statements cause AppleScript to consider or ignore 
specific characteristics, called attributes, as it executes groups of statements.
SYNTAX
considering 
attribute
[, 
attribute 
... and 
attribute
Ø
[ but ignoring 
attribute
[, 
attribute 
... and 
attribute
] ]
statement
]...
end considering
ignoring 
attribute
[, 
attribute 
... and 
attribute
Ø
[ but considering 
attribute
[, 
attribute 
... and 
attribute
] ]
statement
]...
end ignoring
where
statement is any AppleScript statement.
attribute is an attribute to be considered or ignored. Attributes are listed next 
under “Attributes”. 
ATTRIBUTES
An attribute is a characteristic that can be considered or ignored in a 
Considering or Ignoring statement. A Considering or Ignoring statement can 
include any of the following attributes:
application responses
: AppleScript waits for a response from each 
application command before proceeding to the next statement or operation. The 
response indicates if the command completed successfully, and also returns 
results and error messages, if there are any. If this attribute is ignored, 
C H A P T E R   7  
Control Statements
270
Considering and Ignoring Statements
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
AppleScript does not wait for responses from application commands before 
proceeding to the next statement, and ignores any results or error messages that 
are returned. Results and error messages from AppleScript commands, 
scripting additions, and expressions are not affected by the 
application 
responses
attribute.
case
: In string comparisons, uppercase letters are not distinguished from 
lowercase letters. If this attribute is considered, uppercase letters are 
distinguished from lowercase letters. See “Greater Than, Less Than” (page 224) 
for a description of how AppleScript sorts letters, punctuation, and other 
symbols.
diacriticals
: Diacritical marks (such as ´, `, ˆ, ¨, and ˜) are considered in string 
comparisons. If this attribute is ignored, 
"résumé"
is considered equal to 
"resume"
, and so on. See “Greater Than, Less Than” (page 224) for a description 
of how AppleScript sorts letters with diacritical marks.
expansion
: In string comparisons, AppleScript treats the characters æ, Æ, œ, 
and Œ as identical to the character pairs ae, AE, oe, and OE, respectively. If this 
attribute is ignored, AppleScript treats these characters like single characters; 
for example æ would be considered not equal to the character pair ae.
hyphens
: In string comparisons, hyphenated words are considered different 
from their nonhyphenated counterparts. If this attribute is ignored, the strings 
are compared as if any hyphens were not present; for example 
"anti-war"
would be considered equal to 
"antiwar"
punctuation
: The punctuation marks (. , ? : ; ! \ ' " `) are considered in string 
comparisons. If this attribute is ignored, the strings are compared as if these 
punctuation marks were not present; for example 
"This!"
would be considered 
equal to 
"This"
white space
: Spaces, tab characters, and return characters are considered in 
string comparisons. If this attribute is ignored, the strings are compared as if 
these characters were not present; for example 
"Brick house"
would be 
considered equal to 
"Brickhouse"
EXAMPLES
"BOB" comes before "bob" --result: false
considering case
"BOB" comes before "bob" --result: true
end considering
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested