devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Extract pages from pdf online application control tool html azure asp.net online AppleScriptLanguageGuide3-part551

C H A P T E R   2
Overview of AppleScript
Statements
31
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Most scripters don’t need to be concerned about Apple events or the 
AppleScript extension. You just use the AppleScript language to request the 
actions or results that you want. To find out what scriptable actions an 
application provides, see “Dictionaries” (page 34).
Statements
2
Every script is a series of statements. Statements are structures similar to 
sentences in human languages that contain instructions for AppleScript to 
perform. When AppleScript runs a script, it reads the statements in order and 
carries out their instructions. Some statements cause AppleScript to skip or 
repeat certain instructions or change the way it performs certain tasks. These 
statements, which are described in Chapter 7, are called control statements.
All statements, including control statements, fall into one of two categories: 
simple statements or compound statements. Simple statements are statements 
such as the following that are written on a single line.
tell application "Finder" to close the front window
Compound statements are statements that are written on more than one line 
and contain other statements. All compound statements have two things in 
common: they can contain any number of statements, and they have the word 
end
(followed, optionally, by the first word of the statement) as their last line. 
The simple statement above is equivalent to the following compound 
statement.
tell application "Finder"
close the front window
end tell
The compound Tell statement includes the lines 
tell
application "Finder"
and 
end tell
, and all statements between those two lines.
A compound statement can contain any number of statements. For example, 
here is a Tell statement that contains two statements: 
Extract pages from pdf online - application control tool:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract pages from pdf online - application control tool:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   2  
Overview of AppleScript
32
Commands and Objects
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
tell application "Finder"
set windowName to name of front window
close front window
end tell
This example illustrates the advantage of using a compound Tell statement: you 
can add additional statements within a compound statement.
Notice that the previous example contains the statement 
close front window
instead of 
close the front window
. AppleScript allows you to add or remove 
the word 
the
anywhere in a script without changing the meaning of the script. 
You can use the word 
the
to make your statements more English-like and 
therefore more readable.
Here’s another example of a compound statement:
if the name of the front window is "Fred" then
close front window
end if
Statements contained in a compound statement can themselves be compound 
statements. Here’s an example: 
tell application "Finder"
if the name of the front window is "Fred" then
close front window
end if
end tell
Commands and Objects 
2
Commands are the words or phrases you use in AppleScript statements to 
request actions or results. Every command is directed at a target, which is the 
object that responds to the command. The target of a command is usually an 
application object. Application objects are objects that belong to an application, 
such as windows, or objects in documents, such as the words and paragraphs in 
a text document. Commands can also be targeted at system objects, which 
specify objects that belong to the Mac OS, such as a desktop printer, a user or 
application control tool:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Free online source code for extracting text textMgr = PDFTextHandler. ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content for text extraction from all PDF
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation. If you want to extract text from a PDF document using Visual Basic .NET programming language
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   2
Overview of AppleScript
Commands and Objects
33
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
group object from the Users & Groups control panel, or a theme object from the 
Appearance control panel.
Each application or system object has specific information associated with it 
and can respond to specific commands.
For example, in the Finder, window objects understand the Close command. 
The following example shows how to use the Close command to request that 
the Finder close the front window.
tell application "Finder"
close the front window
end tell
The Close command is contained within a Tell statement. Tell statements 
specify default targets for the commands they contain. The default target is the 
object that receives commands if no other object is specified or if the object is 
specified incompletely in the command. In this case, the statement containing 
the Close statement does not contain enough information to uniquely identify 
the window object, so AppleScript uses the application name listed in the Tell 
statement to determine which object receives the Close command.
In AppleScript, you use references to identify objects. A reference is a 
compound name, similar to a pathname or address, that specifies an object. For 
example, the following phrase is a reference:
front window of application "Finder"
This phrase specifies a window object that belongs to a specific application. 
(The application itself is also an object.) AppleScript has different types of 
references that allow you to specify objects in many different ways. You’ll learn 
more about references in Chapter 5, “Objects and References.”
Objects can contain other objects, called elements. In the previous example, the 
front window is an element of the Finder application object. Similarly, in the 
next example, a file element is contained in a specific folder element, which is 
contained in a specific disk. You can read more about references to Finder 
objects in Chapter 5, “Objects and References.”
file 1 of folder 1 of startup disk
Every object belongs to an object class, which is simply a name for objects with 
similar characteristics. Among the characteristics that are the same for the 
application control tool:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   2  
Overview of AppleScript
34
Dictionaries
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
objects in a class are the commands that can act on the objects and the elements 
they can contain. An example of an object class is the Folder object class in the 
Finder. Every folder visible in the Finder belongs to the Folder object class. The 
Finder’s definition of the Folder object class determines which classes of 
elements, such as files and folders, a folder object can contain. The definition 
also determines which commands, such as the Close command, a folder object 
can respond to. 
Dictionaries
2
To examine a definition of an object class, a command, or some other word 
supported by an application, you can open that application’s dictionary from 
the Script Editor. A dictionary is a set of definitions for words that are 
understood by a particular application. Unlike other scripting languages, 
AppleScript does not have a single fixed set of definitions for use with all 
applications. Instead, when you write scripts in AppleScript, you use both 
definitions provided by AppleScript and definitions provided by individual 
applications to suit their capabilities.
Dictionaries tell you which objects are available in a particular application and 
which commands you can use to control them. You can view an application’s 
dictionary by dropping the application’s icon on the Script Editor’s icon, or by 
opening the application with the Script Editor’s Open Dictionary command. 
Figure 2-6 shows the Finder’s dictionary, with the Item class displayed. For 
more information on using the Script Editor, refer to the AppleScript section of 
the Mac OS Help Center.
To use the words from an application’s dictionary in a script, you must indicate 
which application you want to manipulate. You can do this with a Tell 
statement that lists the name of the application:
tell application "Finder"
clean up the front window
end tell
application control tool:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class. Free trial SDK library download for Visual Studio .NET program. Online source codes for
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   2
Overview of AppleScript
Dictionaries
35
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Figure 2-6
The Finder’s dictionary, with Item class displayed
When it encounters a Tell statement, AppleScript reads the words in the 
specified application’s dictionary and uses them to interpret the statements in 
the Tell block. For example, AppleScript uses the words in the Finder dictionary 
to interpret the Clean Up command in the previous script sample.
When you use a Tell statement or specify an application name completely in a 
statement, the AppleScript extension gets the dictionary resource for the 
application and reads its dictionary of commands, objects, and other words. 
Every scriptable application has a dictionary resource (of resource type 
'aete'
that defines the commands, objects, and other words script writers can use in 
scripts to control the application. Figure 2-7 shows how AppleScript gets the 
words in the Finder’s dictionary.
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment
www.rasteredge.com
C H A P T E R   2  
Overview of AppleScript
36
Values and Constants
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Figure 2-7
How the Script Editor accesses the Finder’s dictionary
In addition to the terms defined in application dictionaries, AppleScript 
includes its own standard terms. Unlike the terms in application dictionaries, 
the standard AppleScript terms are always available. You can use these terms 
(such as If, Tell, and First) anywhere in a script. This guide describes the 
standard terms provided by AppleScript.
The words in system and application dictionaries are known as reserved words. 
When defining new words for your script—such as identifiers for variables—
you cannot use reserved words. 
Values and Constants
2
A value is a simple data structure that can be represented, stored, and 
manipulated within AppleScript. AppleScript recognizes many types of values, 
including character strings, real numbers, integers, lists, and dates. Values are 
fundamentally different from application objects, which can be manipulated 
Finder application
AppleScript
extension
Script Editor application
Commands and objects 
in the dictionary resource
Commands:
Objects:
...
clean up
eject
empty
...
...
disk
file
folder
...
window
...
C H A P T E R   2
Overview of AppleScript
Expressions
37
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
from AppleScript, but are contained in applications or their documents. Values 
can be created in scripts or returned as results of commands sent to 
applications.
Values are an important means of exchanging data in AppleScript. When you 
request information about application objects, it is usually returned in the form 
of values. Similarly, when you provide information with commands, you 
typically supply it in the form of values.
A fixed number of specific types of values are recognized by AppleScript. You 
cannot define additional types of values, nor can you change the way values are 
represented. The different types of AppleScript values, called value classes, are 
described in Chapter 3, “Values and Constants.”
A constant is a reserved word with a predefined value. AppleScript provides 
constants to help your scripts perform a variety of tasks, such as retrieving 
information about an object’s properties, performing comparisons, and 
performing arithmetic operations. Chapter 3, “Values and Constants,” describes 
AppleScript’s constants.
Expressions 
2
An expression is a series of AppleScript words that corresponds to a value. 
Expressions are used in scripts to represent or derive values. When you run a 
script, AppleScript converts its expressions into values. This process is known 
as evaluation. 
Two common types of expressions are operations and variables. An operation is 
an expression that derives a new value from one or two other values. A variable 
is a named container in which a value is stored. The following sections 
introduce operations and variables.
n
“Operations” (page 38)
n
“Variables” (page 38)
For more information about these and other types of expressions, see Chapter 6, 
“Expressions.”
C H A P T E R   2  
Overview of AppleScript
38
Expressions
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Operations
2
The following are examples of AppleScript operations and their values. The 
value of each operation is listed following the comment characters (
--
). 
3 + 4
--value: 7
(12 > 4) and (12 = 4)
--value: false
Each operation contains an operator. The plus sign (
+
) in the first expression, as 
well as the greater than symbol (
>
), the equal symbol (
=
) symbol, and the word 
and
in the second expression, are operators. Operators transform values or pairs 
of values into other values. Operators that operate on two values are called 
binary operators. Operators that operate on a single value are known as unary 
operators. Chapter 6, “Expressions,” contains a complete list of the operators 
AppleScript supports and the rules for using them.
You can use operations within AppleScript statements, such as:
tell application "Finder"
open folder (3 + 2) of startup disk
end tell
When you run this script, AppleScript evaluates the expression (
3 + 2)
and 
uses the result to tell the Finder which folder to open.
Variables
2
When AppleScript encounters a variable in a script, it evaluates the variable by 
getting its value. To create a variable, simply assign it a value:
copy "Mark" to myName
The Copy command takes the data—the string 
"Mark"
—and puts it in the 
variable 
myName
. You can accomplish the same thing with the Set command: 
set myName to "Mark"
Statements that assign values to variables are known as assignment statements. 
C H A P T E R   2
Overview of AppleScript
Script Objects
39
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
You can retrieve the value in a variable with a Get command. Run the following 
script and then display the result in the Script Editor’s result window. (You can 
use the Show Result command to open the result window.)
set myName to "Mark"
get myName
The result window shows that the value in 
myName
is 
"Mark"
, the value you 
stored with the Set command. 
You can change the value of a variable by assigning it a new value. A variable 
can hold only one value at a time. When you assign a new value to an existing 
variable, you lose the old value. For example, the result of the Get command in 
the following script is 
"Robin"
.
set myName to "Mark"
set myName to "Robin"
get myName
AppleScript does not distinguish uppercase letters from lowercase variables in 
variable names; the variables 
myName
myname
, and 
MYNAME
all represent the same 
value. For related information, see “Case Sensitivity” (page 45).
Script Objects
2
Script objects are objects you define and use in scripts. Like application objects, 
script objects respond to commands and have specific information associated 
with them. Unlike application objects, script objects are defined in scripts.
Script objects are an advanced feature of AppleScript. They allow you to use 
object-oriented programming techniques to define new objects and commands. 
Information contained in script objects can be saved and used by other scripts. 
For information about defining and using script objects, see Chapter 9, “Script 
Objects.” You should be familiar with the concepts in the rest of this guide 
before attempting to use script objects.
C H A P T E R   2  
Overview of AppleScript
40
Scripting Additions
5/5/99  ã Apple Computer, Inc.
Scripting Additions
2
Scripting additions are files that provide additional commands or coercions 
you can use in scripts. A scripting addition file must be located in the Scripting 
Additions folder (in the System Folder) for AppleScript to recognize the 
additional commands it provides. 
A single scripting addition file can contain several commands. For example, the 
Standard Additions scripting addition distributed with AppleScript, includes 
commands for using the Clipboard, obtaining the path to a file, speaking and 
summarizing text, and more.
Unlike other commands used in AppleScript, scripting addition commands 
work the same way regardless of the target you specify. For example, the Beep 
command, which is part of the standard additions, triggers an alert sound no 
matter which application you sen
d
the command to.
A coercion is software that converts a value from one class to another, such as 
from an integer value to a real value. Many standard coercions are built in to 
AppleScript.
For information about the standard additions distributed with AppleScript, see 
the AppleScript section of the Mac OS Help Center, or see the AppleScript 
website at
<http://www.apple.com/applescript/
>
Dialects
2
AppleScript is designed so that scripts can be displayed in several different 
dialects, which are representations of AppleScript that resemble human 
languages or programming languages. However, the English dialect is currently 
the only dialect supported. The English Dialect file is stored in the Dialects 
folder, a folder in the Scripting Additions folder in the System Folder.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested