devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Delete page from pdf preview software control project winforms web page asp.net UWP 01254610-part58

4 - 15
Fine-Grained Soils
Fine-grained soils are those in which 50 percent or more pass the No. 200 sieve (fines) and the fines are
inorganic or organic silts and clays.   To describe the fine-grained soil types, plasticity adjectives, and soil
types as adjectives should be used to further define the soil type's texture and plasticity.  Based on
correlations and laboratory tests, the following simple field identification tests can be used to estimate the
degree of plasticity of fine-grained soils.
Shaking (Dilatancy) Test
:  Water is dropped or sprayed on a part of basically fine-grained soil mixed and held
in the palm of the hand until it shows a wet surface appearance when shaken or bounced lightly in the hand
or a sticky nature when touched.  The test involves lightly squeezing the soil pat between the thumb and
forefinger and releasing it alternatively to observe its reaction and the speed of the response.  Soils which are
predominantly silty (nonplastic to low plasticity) will show a dull dry surface upon squeezing and a glassy
wet surface immediately upon releasing of the pressure.  With increasing fineness (plasticity) and the related
decreasing dilatancy, this phenomenon becomes less and less pronounced.
Dry Strength Test
:  A portion of the sample is allowed to dry out and a fragment of the dried soil is pressed
between the fingers.  Fragments which cannot be crumbled or broken are characteristic of clays with high
plasticity.  Fragments which can be disintegrated with gentle finger pressure are characteristic of silty
materials of low plasticity.  Thus, materials with great dry strength are clays of high plasticity and those with
little dry strength are predominantly silts.
Thread Test
:  (After Burmister, 1970) Moisture is added or worked out of a small ball (about 40 mm
diameter) and the ball kneaded until its consistency approaches medium stiff to stiff (compressive strength
of about 100 KPa), it breaks, or crumbles.  A thread is then rolled out to the smallest diameter possible before
disintegration.  The smaller the thread achieved, the higher the plasticity of the soil.  Fine-grained soils of high
plasticity will have threads smaller than 3/4 mm in diameter.  Soils with low plasticity will have threads larger
than 3 mm in diameter.
Smear Test
:  A fragment of soil smeared between the thumb and forefinger or drawn across the thumbnail
will, by the smoothness and sheen of the smear surface, indicate the plasticity of the soil.  A soil of low
plasticity will exhibit a rough textured, dull smear while a soil of high plasticity will exhibit a slick, waxy
smear surface.
Table 4-6 identifies field methods to approximate the plasticity range for the dry strength, thread, and smear
tests.
Highly Organic Soils
Colloidal and amorphous organic materials finer than the No. 200 sieve are identified and classified in
accordance with their drop in plasticity upon oven drying (ASTM D 2487).  Additional identification markers
are:
1.
dark gray and black and sometimes dark brown colors, although not all dark colored soils are
organic; 
2.
most organic soils will oxidize when exposed to air and change from a dark gray/black color to a
lighter brown; i.e., the exposed surface is brownish, but when the sample is pulled apart the freshly
exposed surface is dark gray/black; 
Delete page from pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
export pages from pdf online; extract one page from pdf reader
Delete page from pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; crop all pages of pdf
4 - 16
TABLE 4-6.
F
I
ELD METHODS TO DESCR
I
BE 
PLASTI
C
ITY
Plasticity
Range
Adjective
Dry Strength
Smear Test
Thread Smallest
Diameter, mm
0
nonplastic
none  -  crumbles  into  powder
with mere pressure
gritty or
rough
ball cracks
1 - 10
low plasticity
low  -   crumbles into powder
with some finger pressure
rough to
smooth
6 to 3
>10 - 20
medium plasticity medium - breaks into pieces or
crumbles with considerable
finger pressure
smooth and
dull
1-1/2
>20 - 40
high plasticity
high  - cannot be broken with
finger pressure;  spec. will break
into pieces between thumb and a
hard surface
shiny
3/4
>40
very plastic
very  high  -  can’t  be broken
between  thumb  and  a  hard
surface
very shiny
and waxy
½
3.
fresh organic soils usually have a characteristic odor which can be recognized, particularly when the
soil is heated; 
4.
compared to non-organic soils, less effort is typically required to pull the material apart and a friable
break is usually formed with a fine granular or silty texture and appearance; 
5.
their workability at the plastic limit is weaker and spongier than an equivalent non-organic soil; 
6.
the smear, although generally smooth, is usually duller and appears more silty; and 
7.
the organic content of these soils can also be determined by combustion test method (AASHTO T
267, ASTM D 2974).
Fine-grained soils, where the organic content appears to be less than 50 percent of the volume (about 22
percent by weight) should be described as soils with organic material or as organic soils such as clay with
organic material or organic clays etc.  If the soil appears to have an organic content higher than 50 percent
by volume it should be described as peat.  The engineering behavior of soils below and above the 50 percent
dividing line presented here is entirely different. It is therefore critical that the organic content of soils be
determined both in the field and in the laboratory (AASHTO T 267, ASTM D 2974).  Simple field or visual
laboratory identification of soils as organic or peat is neither advisable nor acceptable.
It is very important not to confuse topsoil with organic soils or peat. Topsoil is the thin layer  of deposit found
on the surface composed of partially decomposed organic materials, such as leaves, grass, small roots etc.
It contains many nutrients that sustain plant and insect life. These should not be classified as organic soils
or peat and should not be used in engineered structures.
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
RasterEdge XDoc.Word provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the word document file. You can be able to get a preview of this word
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; cut pages from pdf online
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
XDoc.PowerPoint provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the PowerPoint document file. You can be able to get a preview of this
copy pdf pages to another pdf; extract page from pdf file
4 - 17
Minor Soil Type(s)
In many soil formations, two or more soil types are present.   When the percentage of the fine-grained  minor
soil type is less than 30 percent but greater than 12 percent or the total sample or the coarse-grained minor
component is 30 percent or more of the total sample, the minor soil type is indicated by adding a "y" to its
name ( i.e., f. gravelly, c-f. sandy, silty, clayey, organic).  Note the gradation adjectives are given for granular
soils, while the plasticity adjective is omitted for the fine-grained soils.)
When the percentage of the fine-grained minor soil type if 5 to 12 percent or for the coarse-grained minor soil
type if less than 30 percent but 15 percent or more of the total sample, the minor soil type is indicated by
adding the descriptive adjective “with” to the group name (i.e., with clay, with silt, with sand, with gravel,
and/or with cobbles ).  
Some local practices use the descriptive adjectives “some” and “trace” for minor components.
C
"trace" when the percentage is between 1 and 12 percent of the total sample; or
C
"some" when the percentage is greater than 12 percent and less than 30 percent of the total sample.
Inclusions
Additional inclusions or characteristics of the sample can be described by using "with" and the descriptions
described above.  Examples are given below:
C
with petroleum odor
C
with organic matter
C
with foreign matter (roots, brick, etc.)
C
with shell fragments
C
with mica
C
with parting(s), seam(s), etc. of (give soils complete description)
Layered Soils
Soils of different types can be found in repeating layers of various thickness.  It is important that all such
formations and their thicknesses are noted.  Each layer is described as if it is a nonlayered soil using the
sequence for soil descriptions discussed above.  The thickness and shape of layers and the geological type of
layering are noted using the descriptive terms presented in Table 4-7.  Place the thickness designation before
the type of layer, or at the end of each description and in parentheses, whichever is more appropriate.
Examples of descriptions for layered soils are:
C
Medium stiff, moist to wet 5 to 20 mm interbedded seams and layers of:  gray, medium plastic, silty
CLAY; and lt. gray, low plasticity SILT; (Alluvium).
C
Soft moist to wet varved layers of:  gray-brown, high plasticity CLAY (5 to 20 mm); and nonplastic
SILT, trace f. sand (10 to 15 mm); (Alluvium).
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents: Embedded page thumbnails.
copy web page to pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
It makes users easy to view PDF document and edit PDF document in preview. PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
delete blank page from pdf; delete page from pdf reader
4 - 18
TABLE 4-7.
DESCR
I
P
TI
VE TERMS FOR LAYERED SO
I
LS
Type Of Layer
Thickness
Occurrence
Parting
< 1.5 mm
Seam
10 to 1.5 mm
Layer
300 to 10 mm
Stratum
>300 mm
Pocket
Small erratic deposit
Lens
Lenticular deposit
Varved (also layered)
Alternating seams  or  layers of silt and/or clay and
sometimes fine sand
Occasional
One or less per 0.3 m of thickness or laboratory sample
inspected
Frequent
More than one per 0.3 m of thickness or laboratory
Geological Name
The soil description should include the field supervisor’s assessment of the origin of the soil unit and the
geologic name, if known, placed in parentheses or brackets at the end of the soil description or in the field
notes column of the boring log.   Some examples include:
a.   Washington, D.C. - Cretaceous Age Material with SPT-N values between 30 and 100 bpf:
Very hard gray-blue silty CLAY (CH), damp [Potomac Group Formation]
b.  Newport News, VA - Miocene Age Marine Deposit with SPT- N values around 10 to 15 bpf:
Stiff green sandy CLAY (CL) with shell fragments, calcareous [Yorktown Formation].
4.6.2
Soil Classification
As previously indicated, final identification with classification is best performed in the laboratory.  This will
lead to more consistent final boring logs and avoid conflicts with field descriptions.  The Unified Soil
Classification System (USCS) Group Name and Symbol (in parenthesis)appropriate for the soil type in
accordance with AASHTO M 145, ASTM D 3282, or ASTM D 2487  is the most commonly used system
in geotechnical work and is covered in this section.  For classification of highway subgrade material, the
AASHTO classification system (see Section 4.6.3) is used and is also based on grain size and plasticity. 
The Unified Classification System 
The Unified Classification System (ASTM D 2487) groups soils with similar engineering properties into
categories base on grain size, gradation and plasticity.  Table 4-8 provides a simplification of the group
breakdown and Table 4-9 provides an outline of the complete laboratory classification method.  Following
are the procedures along with charts and tables for classifying coarse-grained and fine-grained soils.  
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
cut and paste pdf pages; cut pages out of pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
extract pdf pages acrobat; deleting pages from pdf in preview
4 - 19
Classification of Coarse-Grained Soils
The flow chart to determine the group symbol and group name for coarse-grained soils, those in which 50
percent or more are retained on the No. 200 sieve (0.075 mm) is given in Figure 4-6.  This figure is identical
to that of Figure 2 in ASTM D 2487 except for the recommendation to capitalize the primary soil type; i.e.,
GRAVEL.
TABLE 4-8.
THE UN
I
F
I
ED CLASS
I
F
I
CATI
ON SYSTEM
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete
extract page from pdf document; delete pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage. a specific image from PDF document page in VB Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
extract page from pdf acrobat; delete page from pdf file online
4 - 20
TABLE 4-9.
SO
I
L CLASS
I
F
I
CATI
ON CHART (LABORATORY METHOD)
Criteria for Assigning Group Symbols and Group Names Using
Laboratory Tests
a
Soil Classification
Group
Symbol
Group Name
b
GRAVELS
CLEAN
GRAVELS
C
U
$
4 and 1
#
C
C
#
3
e
GW
Well-graded
Gravel
More than
50% of coarse
Less than 5%
fines
C
U
#
4 and 1
$
C
C
$
3
e
GP
Poorly-graded
Gravel
f
Fraction
retained on
No. 4
GRAVELS
WITH FINES
Fines classify as ML or MH
GM
Silty Gravel
f,g,h
Sieve
More than 12%
of fines
c
Fines classify as CL or CH
GC
Clayey Gravel
f,g,h
SANDS
CLEAN
SANDS
C
U
$
6 and 1
#
C
C
#
3
e
SW
Well-graded
Sand
i
50% or more
of coarse
Less than 5%
fines
d
C
U
#
6 and 1
$
C
C
$
3
e
SP
Poorly-graded
Sand
i
Fraction
retained on
No. 4
SANDS WITH
FINES
Fines classify as ML or MH
SM
Silty Sand
g,h,i
Sieve
More than 12%
fines
d
Fines classify as CL or CH
SC
Clayey Sand
g,h,i
SILTS AND
CLAYS
Inorganic
PI > 7 and plots on or above
"A" line
j
CL
Lean Clay
k,l,m
Liquid limit
less than 50%
PI < 4 or plots below "A" line
j
ML
Silt
k,l,m
Organic
Organic
Clay
k,l,m,n
OL
Organic Silt
k,l,m,o
SILTS AND
CLAYS
Inorganic
Pl plots on or above "A" line
CH
Fat Clay
k,l,m
Liquid limit
more than 50% 
Pl plots below "A" line
MH
Elastic Silt
k,l,m
Organic
Organic Silt
k,l,m,p
OH
Organic Silt
k,l,m,q
Highly fibrous
organic soils
Primary organic matter, dark in color, and
organic odor
Pt
Peat and
Muskeg
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
RasterEdge XDoc.Excel provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the Excel document file. You can be able to get a preview of this
add or remove pages from pdf; cut pdf pages online
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF class source code able to help users delete text characters to pull text out of selected PDF page or all
extract pages from pdf reader; delete pages of pdf
4 - 21
TABLE 4-9.  (Continued)
SO
I
L CLASS
I
F
I
CATI
ON CHART (LABORATORY METHOD)
NOTES:
a
Based on the material passing the 75-mm sieve.
b
If field sample contained cobbles and/or boulders, add “with cobbles and/or boulders” to
group name.
c
Gravels with 5 to 12% fines require dual symbols:
GW-GM well-graded gravel with silt
GW-GC well-graded gravel with clay
GP-GM poorly graded gravel with silt
GP-GC poorly graded gravel with clay
d
Sands with 5 to 12% fines require dual symbols:
SW-SM well-graded sand with silt
SW-SC well-graded sand with clay
SP-SM poorly graded sand with silt
SP-SC poorly graded sand with clay
e
C
D
D
Uniformity Coefficient alsoUC
U
=
=
60
10
(
)
C
D
D
D
Coefficient of Curvature
C
=
=
(
)
(
)(
)
30
2
10
60
f
If soil contains 
$
15% sand, add “with sand” to group name.
g
If  fines classify as CL-ML, use dual symbol GC-GM, SC-SM.
h
If fines are organic, add “with organic fines” to group name.
i
If soil contains 
$
15% gravel, add “with gravel” to group name.
j
If the liquid limit and plasticity index plot in hatched area on plasticity chart, soil is a CL-
ML, silty clay.
k
If soil contains 15 to 29% plus No. 200, add “with sand” or “with gravel”, whichever is 
predominant.
l
If soil contains 
$
30% plus No. 200, predominantly sand, add “sandy” to group name.
m
If soil contains 
$
30% plus No. 200, predominantly gravel, add “gravelly” to group name.
n
Pl 
$
4 and plots on or above “A” line.
o
Pl < 4 or plots below “A” line.
p
Pl plots on or above “A” line.
q
Pl plots below “A” line.
FINE-GRAINED SOILS (clays & silts):   50%  or more passes the No. 200 sieve
COARSE-GRAINED SOILS (sands & gravels):  more than 50% retained on No. 200 sieve
4 - 22
Figure 4-6. Flow Chart to Determine the Group Symbol and Group Name for Coarse-grained
Soils.  (From U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Soil Classification Handbook, 1960)
4 - 23
Classification of Fine-Grained Soils
Fine-grained soils, those in which 50 percent or more pass the No. 200 sieve (fines), are defined by the
plasticity chart (Figure 4-7) and, for organic soils, the decrease in liquid limit (LL) upon oven drying (Table
4-9).  Inorganic silts and clays are those which do not meet the organic criteria as given in Table 4-9.  The
flow charts to determine the group symbol and group name for fine-grained soils are given in Figure 4-8a and
b.  These figures are identical to Figures 1a and 1b in ASTM D 2487 except that they are modified to show
the soil type capitalized; i.e., CLAY.  Dual symbols are used to indicate the organic silts and clays that are
above the "A"-line.  For example, CL/OL instead of OL and CH/OH instead of OH.  To describe the fine-
grained soil types, plasticity adjectives, and soil types as adjectives should be used to further define the soil
type's texture , plasticity, and location on the plasticity chart; see Table 4-10.  Examples using Table 4-10
are given in Table 4-11.
As an example, the group name and symbol has been added to the example descriptions given in the previous
section:
Fine-grained soils:
Soft, wet, gray, high plasticity CLAY, with f. Sand; Fat CLAY (CH); (Alluvium)
Coarse-grained soils: Dense, moist, brown, silty m-f SAND, with f. Gravel to c. Sand; Silty SAND (SM);
(Alluvium)
Some local practices omit the USCS group symbol (e.g., CL, ML, etc.) but include the group symbol at the
end of the description.  
Figure 4-7.   Plasticity Chart for Unified Soil Classification System  (ASTM D 2488).
4 - 24
TABLE 4-10.
SO
I
PLASTI
C
ITY DESCR
I
P
TI
ONS
Plasticity
Index Range
Plasticity
Adjective
Adjective for Soil Type, Texture, and Plasticity Chart
Location
ML & MH
(Silt)
CL & CH
(Clay)
OL & OH
(Organic Silt or Clay)
1
0
nonplastic
-
-
ORGANIC SILT
1 - 10
low plasticity
-
silty
ORGANIC SILT
>10 - 20
medium plasticity
clayey
silty to no adj.
ORGANIC clayey SILT
>20 - 40
high plasticity
clayey
-
ORGANIC silty CLAY
>40
very plastic
clayey
-
ORGANIC CLAY
1
Soil type is the same for above or below the “A”-line;  the dual group symbol (CL/OL or CH/OH)
identifies the soil types above the “A”-line.
TABLE 4-11.
EXAMPLES OF DESCR
I
P
TI
ON OF F
I
NE-
GRA
I
NED SO
I
LS
Group
Symbol
PI
Group Name
Complete Description For Main Soil Type (Fine-Grained
Soil)
CL
9
lean CLAY
low plasticity silty CLAY
ML
7
SILT
low plasticity SILT
ML
15
SILT
medium plastic clayey SILT
MH
21
elastic SILT
high plasticity clayey SILT
CH
25
fat CLAY
high plasticity silty CLAY or high plasticity CLAY, depending
on smear test (for silty relatively dull and not shiny or just
CLAY for shiny, waxy)
OL
8
ORGANIC SILT low plasticity ORGANIC SILT
OL
19
ORGANIC SILT medium plastic ORGANIC clayey SILT
CH
>40
fat CLAY
very plastic CLAY
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested