devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Extract pages pdf Library application component asp.net azure html mvc 01254611-part59

4 - 25
Figure 4-8a.  Flow Chart to Determine the Group Symbol and Group Name for Fine-Grained Soils.
Figure 4-8b.  Flow Chart to Determine the Group Symbol and Group Name for Organic Soils.
Extract pages pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
cut pages from pdf reader; delete page from pdf
Extract pages pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages of pdf reader; extract pages from pdf on ipad
4 - 26
4.6.3
AASHTO Soil Classification System
The AASHTO soil classification system is shown in Table 4-12.  This classification system is useful in
determining the relative quality of the soil material for use in earthwork structures, particularly embankments,
subgrades, subbases and bases.  
According to this system, soil is classified into seven major groups, A-1 through A-7.  Soils classified under
groups A-1, A-2 and A-3 are granular materials where 35% or less of the particles pass through the No. 200
sieve.  Soils where more than 35% pass the No. 200 sieve are classified under groups A-4, A-5, A-6 and A-7.
These are mostly silt and clay-type materials. The classification procedure is shown in Table 4-12.  The
classification system is based on the following criteria:
I. Grain Size: The grain size terminology for this classification system is as follows:
Gravel:fraction passing the 75 mm sieve and retained on the No. 10 (2 mm) sieve.
Sand:fraction passing the No. 10 (2 mm) sieve and retained on the No. 200 (0.075 mm) sieve
Silt and clay: fraction passing the No. 200 (0.075 mm) sieve
ii
Plasticity: The term silty is applied when the fine fractions of the soil have a plasticity index of 10 or
less.  The term clayey is applied when the fine fractions have a plasticity index of 11 or more.
iii. If cobbles and boulders (size larger than 75 mm) are encountered they are excluded from the portion of
the soil sample on which classification is made.  However, the percentage of material is recorded.
To evaluate the quality of a soil as a highway subgrade material, a number called the group index (GI) is also
incorporated along with the groups and subgroups of the soil.  This is written in parenthesis after the  group
or subgroup designation.  The group index is given by the equation
Group Index:     GI=(F-35)[0.2+0.005(LL-40)] + 0.01(F-15) (PI-10)
(4-1)
where F is the percent passing No. 200 sieve, LL is the liquid limit and PI is the plasticity index.  The first
term of Eq. 4-1 is the partial group index determined from the liquid limit.  The second term is the partial
group index determined from the plasticity index.  Following are some rules for determining group index:
C
If Eq. 4-1 yields a negative value for GI, it is taken as zero.
C
The group index calculated from Eq. 4-1 is rounded off to the nearest whole number, e.g., GI=3.4 is
rounded off to 3; GI=3.5 is rounded off to 4.
C
There is no upper limit for the group index.
C
The group index of soils belonging to groups A-1-a, A-1-b, A-2-4, A-2-5, and A-3 will always be zero.
C
When calculating the group index for soils belonging to groups A-2-6 and A-2-7, the partial group index
for PI should be used, or
GI=0.01(F-15) (PI-10)
(4-2)
In general, the quality of performance of a soil as a subgrade material is inversely proportional to the group
index.
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; copying a pdf page into word
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
extract one page from pdf online; crop all pages of pdf
4 - 27
TABLE 4-12.
AASHTO SOIL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM (AASHTO M 145, 1995)
GENERAL
CLASSIFICATION
GRANULAR MATERIALS
(35 percent or less of total sample passing No. 200)
SILT-CLAY MATERIALS
(More than 35 percent of total 
sample passing No. 200)
GROUP
CLASSIFICATION
A-1
A-3
A-2
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
A-1-a
A-1-b
A-2-4
A-2-5
A-2-6
A-2-7
A-7-5,
A-7-6
Sieve analysis,
percent passing:
2 mm (No. 10)
0.425 mm (No. 40)
0.075 mm (No.
200)
50 max.
30 max.
15 max.
50 max.
25 max.
51 min.
10 max.
35 max.
35 max.
35 max.
35 max.
36 min.
36 min.
36 min.
36 min.
Characteristics of
fraction passing
0.425 mm (No. 40)
     Liquid limit
     Plasticity index
6 max.
NP
40 max.
10 max.
41 min.
10 max.
40 max.
11 min.
41 min.
11 min.
40 max.
10 max.
41 min.
10 max.
40 max.
11 min.
41 min.
11 min.*
Usual significant
constituent
materials
Stone fragments,
gravel and sand
Fine sand
Silty or clayey gravel and sand
Silty soils
Clayey soils
Group Index**
0
0
0
4 max.
8 max.
12 max.
16 max.
20 max.
Classification procedure:  With required test data available, proceed from left to right on chart; correct group will be found by process of elimination.  The
first group from left into which the test data will fit is the correct classification.
*Plasticity Index of A-7-5 subgroup is equal to or less than LL minus 30. Plasticity Index of A-7-6 subgroup is greater than LL minus 30 (see Fig 4-9).
**See group index formula (Eq. 4-1) Group index should be shown in parentheses after group symbol as: A-2-6(3), A-4(5), A-6(12), A-7-5(17), etc.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
deleting pages from pdf in reader; extract one page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
cut pages out of pdf; extract page from pdf preview
4 - 28
Figure 4-9.  Range of Liquid Limit and Plasticity Indices for Soils in Soil Classification 
Groups A-2, A-4, A-5, A-6 and A-7  (AASHTO Standard M 145, 1995).
4.7 LOGGING PROCEDURES FOR CORE DRILLING
As with soil boring logs, rock or core boring logs should be as comprehensive as possible under field
conditions, yet be terse and precise.  The level of detail should be keyed to the purpose of the exploration as
well as to the intended user of the prepared logs.  Although the same basic information should be presented
on all rock boring logs, the appropriate level of detail should be determined by the geotechnical engineer
and/or the geologist based on project needs.  Borings for a bridge foundation may require more detail
concerning degree of weathering than rock structure features.  For a proposed tunnel excavation, the opposite
might be true.  Extremely detailed descriptions of rock mineralogy may mask features significant to an
engineer, but may be critical for a geologist.
4.7.1
Description of Rock
Rock descriptions should use technically correct geological terms, although local terms in common use may
be acceptable if they help describe distinctive characteristics.  Rock cores should be logged when wet for
consistency of color description and greater visibility of rock features.  The guidelines presented in the
"International Society for Rock Mechanics Commission on Standardization of Laboratory and Field Tests"
(1978, 1981), should be reviewed for additional information regarding logging procedures for core drilling.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
extract page from pdf online; add and delete pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
extract page from pdf reader; delete pages from pdf reader
4 - 29
The rock's lithologic description should include as a minimum the following items:
C
Rock type
C
Color
C
Grain size and shape
C
Texture (stratification/foliation)
C
Mineral composition
C
Weathering and alteration
C
Strength
C
Other relevant notes
The various elements of the rock's description should be stated in the order listed above.  For example:
"Limestone, light gray, very fine-grained, thin-bedded, unweathered, strong"
The rock description should include identification of discontinuities and fractures.  The description should
include a drawing of the naturally occurring fractures and mechanical breaks.
4.7.2
Rock Type
Rocks are classified according to origin into three major divisions: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic,
see Table 4-13.  These three groups are subdivided into types according to mineral and chemical composition,
texture, and internal structure.  For some projects a library of hand samples and photographs representing
lithologic rock types present in the project area should be maintained.
4.7.3
Color
Colors should be consistent with a Munsell Color Chart and recorded for both wet and dry conditions as
appropriate.
4.7.4
Grain Size and Shape
The grain size description should be classified using the terms presented in Table 4-14.  Table 4-15 is used
to further classify the shape of the grains.
4.7.5
Stratification/Foliation
Significant nonfracture structural features should be described.  The thickness should be described using the
terms in Table 4-16. The orientation of the bedding/foliation should be measured from the horizontal with
a protractor.
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
delete page from pdf file online; cut pages from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
cut pages out of pdf online; delete page from pdf reader
4 - 30
TABLE 4-13.
ROCK GROUP
S AND TYPES
I
GNEOUS
Intrusive
(Coarse Grained)
Extrusive
(Fine Grained)
Pyroclastic
Granite
Syenite
Diorite
Diabase
Gabbro
Peridotite
Pegmatite
Rhyolite
Trachyte
Andesite
Basalt
Obsidian
Pumice
Tuff
SED
I
MENTARY
Clastic (Sediment)
Chemically Formed
Organic Remains
Shale
Mudstone
Claystone
Siltstone
Sandstone
Conglomerate
Limestone, oolitic
Limestone
Dolomite
Gypsum
Halite
Chalk
Coquina
Lignite
Coal
METAMORPH
I
C
Foliated
Nonfoliated
Slate
Phyllite
Schist
Gneiss
Quartzite
Amphibolite
Marble
Hornfels
4 - 31
TABLE 4-14.
TERMS TO DESCR
I
BE GRA
I
N S
IZE OF (TYP
I
CALLY FOR) SED
I
MENTARY ROCKS
Description
Diameter
(mm)
Characteristic
Very coarse grained
Coarse grained
Medium grained
Fine grained
Very fine grained
> 4.75
2.00 -4.75
0.425 -2.00
0.075-0.425
< 0.075
Grains sizes are greater than popcorn kernels
Individual grains can be easily distinguished by eye
Individual grains can be distinguished by eye
Individual size grains can be distinguished with difficulty
Individual grains cannot be distinguished by unaided eye
TABLE 4-15.
TERMS TO DESCR
I
BE GRA
I
N SHA
PE (FOR SED
I
MENTARY ROCKS)
Description
Characteristic
Angular
Showing very little evidence of wear.  Grain edges and corners are sharp.  Secondary
corners are numerous and sharp.
Subangular Showing definite effects of wear.  Grain edges and corners are slightly rounded off.
Secondary corners are slightly less numerous and slightly less sharp than in angular grains.
Subrounded Showing considerable wear.  Grain edges and corners are rounded to smooth curves.
Secondary corners are reduced greatly in number and highly rounded.
Rounded
Showing extreme wear.  Grain edges and corners are smoothed off to broad curves.
Secondary corners are few in number and rounded.
Well-
rounded
Completely worn.  Grain edges or corners are not present.  No secondary edges or corners
are present.
TABLE 4-16.
TERMS TO DESCR
I
BE STRATUM TH
I
CKNESS
Descriptive Term
Stratum Thickness
Very Thickly bedded
Thickly bedded
Thinly bedded
Very Thinly bedded
Laminated
Thinly Laminated
> 1 m
0.5 to 1.0 m
50 mm to 500 mm
10 mm to 50 mm
2.5 mm to 10 mm
< 2.5 mm
4 - 32
4.7.6
Mineral Composition
The mineral composition should be identified by a geologist based on experience and the use of appropriate
references.  The most abundant mineral should be listed first, followed by minerals in decreasing order of
abundance.  For some common rock types, mineral composition need not be specified (e.g. dolomite,
limestone).
4.7.7
Weathering and Alteration
Weathering as defined here is due to physical disintegration of the minerals in the rock by atmospheric
processes while alteration is defined here as due to geothermal processes.  Terms and abbreviations used to
describe weathering or alteration are presented in Figure 4-5.
4.7.8
Strength
The point load test, described in Section 8.2.1, is recommended for the measurement of sample strength in
the field.  The point-load index (I
s
) may be converted to an equivalent uniaxial compressive strength and noted
as such on the records.  Various categories and terminology recommended for describing rock strength based
on the point load test are presented in Figure 4-5.  Figure 4-5 also presents guidelines for common qualitative
assessment of strength while mapping or during primary logging of core at the rig site by using a geological
hammer and pocket knife.  The field estimates should be confirmed where appropriate by comparison with
selected laboratory tests.
4.7.9
Hardness
Hardness is commonly assessed by the scratch test. Descriptions and abbreviations used to describe rock
hardness are presented in Table 4-17.
TABLE 4-17.
TERMS TO DESCR
I
BE ROCK HARDNESS
Description (Abbr)
Characteristic
Soft (S)
Reserved for plastic material alone.
Friable (F)
Easily crumbled by hand, pulverized or reduced to powder and is too soft to be cut with a
pocket knife.
Low Hardness (LH)
Can be gouged deeply or carved with a pocket knife.
Moderately Hard (MH)
Can be readily scratched by a knife blade; scratch leaves a heavy trace of dust and scratch
is readily visible after the powder has been blown away.
Hard (H)
Can be scratched with difficulty; scratch produces little powder and is often faintly visible;
traces of the knife steel may be visible.
Very Hard (VH)
Cannot be scratched with pocket knife.  Leave knife steel marks on surface.
4 - 33
4.7.10 Rock Discontinuity
Discontinuity is the general term for any mechanical crack or fissure in a rock mass having zero or low tensile
strength.  It is the collective term for most types of joints, weak bedding planes, weak schistosity planes,
weakness zones, and faults.  The symbols recommended for the type of rock mass discontinuities are listed
in Figure 4-5.
The spacing of discontinuities is the perpendicular distance between adjacent discontinuities.  The spacing
should be measured in centimeters or millimeters, perpendicular to the planes in the set.  Figure 4-5 presents
guidelines to describe discontinuity spacing.
The discontinuities should be described as closed, open, or filled.  Aperture is used to describe the
perpendicular distance separating the adjacent rock walls of an open discontinuity in which the intervening
space is air or water filled.  Width is used to describe the distance separating the adjacent rock walls of filled
discontinuities.  The terms presented in Table 4-18 should be used to describe apertures.
Terms  such as "wide", "narrow" and "tight" are used to describe the width of discontinuities such as
thickness of veins, fault gouge filling, or joints openings.  Guidelines for use of such terms are presented in
Figure 4-5.
For the faults or shears that are not thick enough to be represented on the boring log, the measured thickness
is recorded numerically in millimeters.
In addition to the above characterization, discontinuities are further characterized by the surface shape of the
joint and the roughness of its surface.   Refer to Figure 4-5 for guidelines to characterize these features.
Filling is the term for material separating the adjacent rock walls of discontinuities.  Filling is characterized
by its type, amount, width (i.e., perpendicular distance between adjacent rock walls) and strength.  Figure
4-5 presents guidelines for characterizing the amount and width of filling.  The strength of any filling material
along discontinuity surfaces can be assessed by the guidelines for soil presented in the last three columns of
Table 4-2.  For non-cohesive fillings, then identify the filling qualitatively (e.g., fine sand).
TABLE 4-18.
TERMS TO CLASS
I
FY D
I
SCONTI
NU
ITI
ES BASED ON A
PERTURE S
IZE
Aperture
Description
<0.1 mm
0.1 - 0.25 mm
0.25 - 0.5 mm
Very tight
Tight
Partly open
"Closed Features"
0.5 - 2.5 mm
2.5 - 10 mm
> 10 mm
Open
Moderately open
Wide
"Gapped Features"
1-10 cm
10-100 cm
>1 m
Very wide
Extremely wide
Cavernous
"Open Features"
4 - 34
4.7.11 Fracture Description
The location of each naturally occurring fracture and mechanical break is shown in the fracture column of
the rock core log.  The naturally occurring fractures are numbered and described using the terminology
described above for discontinuities.
The naturally occurring fractures and mechanical breaks are sketched in the drawing column. Dip angles of
fractures should be measured using a protractor and marked on the log.  For nonvertical borings, the angle
should be measured and marked as if the boring was vertical.  If the rock is broken into many pieces less than
25 mm long, the log may be crosshatched in that interval, or the fracture may be shown schematically.
The number of naturally occurring fractures observed in each 0.5 m of core should be recorded in the fracture
frequency column.  Mechanical breaks, thought to have occurred due to drilling, are not counted.  The
following criteria can be used to identify natural breaks:
1. A rough brittle surface with fresh cleavage planes in individual rock minerals indicates an artificial
fracture.
2. A generally smooth or somewhat weathered surface with soft coating or infilling materials, such as talc,
gypsum, chlorite, mica, or calcite obviously indicates a natural discontinuity.
3. In rocks showing foliation, cleavage or bedding it may be difficult to distinguish between natural
discontinuities and artificial fractures when these are parallel with the incipient weakness planes.  If
drilling has been carried out carefully then the questionable breaks should be counted as natural
features, to be on the conservative side.
4. Depending upon the drilling equipment, part of the length of core being drilled may occasionally rotate
with the inner barrels in such a way that grinding of the surfaces of discontinuities and fractures occurs.
In weak rock types it may be very difficult to decide if the resulting rounded surfaces represent natural
or artificial features.  When in doubt, the conservative assumption should be made; i.e., assume that they
are natural.
The results of core logging (frequency and RQD) can be strongly time dependent and moisture content
dependent in the case of certain varieties of shales and mudstones having relatively weakly developed
diagenetic bonds.  A not infrequent problem is "discing", in which an initially intact core separates into discs
on incipient planes, the process becoming noticeable perhaps within minutes of core recovery.  The
phenomena are experienced in several different forms:
1. Stress relief cracking (and swelling) by the initially rapid release of strain energy in cores recovered
from areas of high stress, especially in the case of shaley rocks.
2. Dehydration cracking experienced in the weaker mudstones and shales which may reduce RQD from
100 percent to 0 percent in a matter of minutes, the initial integrity possibly being due to negative pore
pressure.
3. Slaking cracking experienced by some of the weaker mudstones and shales when subjected to wetting
and drying.
All these phenomena may make core logging of fracture frequency and RQD unreliable.  Whenever such
conditions are anticipated, core should be logged by an engineering geologist as it is recovered and at
subsequent intervals until the phenomenon is predictable.  An added advantage is that the engineering
geologist can perform mechanical index tests, such as the point load index or Schmidt hammer test (see
Chapter 8), while the core is still in a saturated state.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested