devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader SDK software API .net winforms asp.net sharepoint 01254612-part60

5-1
CHA
P
TER 5
.
0
I
N-S
ITU GEOTECHN
I
CAL TESTS
Several in-situ tests define the geostratigraphy and obtain direct measurements of soil properties and
geotechnical parameters. The common tests include: standard penetration (SPT), cone penetration test
(CPT),  piezocone (CPTu), flat dilatometer (DMT), pressuremeter (PMT), and vane shear (VST).  Each test
applies different loading schemes to measure the corresponding soil response in an attempt to evaluate
material characteristics, such as strength and/or stiffness.  Figure 5-1 depicts these various devices and
simplified procedures in graphical form. Details on these tests will be given in the subsequent sections. 
Figure 5-1.   Common In-Situ Tests for Geotechnical Site Characterization of Soils.
Boreholes are required for conducting the SPT and normal versions of the PMT and VST.  A rotary drilling
rig and crew are essential for these tests.  In the case of the CPT, CPTU, and DMT, no boreholes are needed,
thus termed “direct-push” technologies.  Specialized versions of the PMT (i.e., full-displacement type) and
VST can be conducted without boreholes.  As such, these may be conducted using either standard drill rigs
or mobile hydraulic systems (cone trucks) in order to directly push the probes to the required test depths.
Figure  5-2  shows  examples  of  the  truck-mounted  and  track-mounted  systems  used  for  production
penetration testing.  The enclosed cabins permit the on-time scheduling of in-situ testing during any type
of weather.  A disadvantage of direct-push methods is that hard cemented layers and bedrock will prevent
further penetration.  In such cases, borehole methods prevail as they may advance by coring or noncoring
techniques.  An advantage of direct-push soundings is that no cuttings or spoil are generated.
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf in reader
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; extract page from pdf preview
5-2
Figure 5-2.   Direct-Push Technology:  (a) Truck-Mounted and (b) Track-Mounted Cone Rigs.
5.1   STANDARD PENETRATION TEST
The standard penetration test (SPT) is performed during the advancement of a soil boring to obtain an
approximate measure of the dynamic soil resistance, as well as a disturbed drive sample (split barrel type).
The test was introduced by the Raymond Pile Company in 1902 and remains today as the most common
in-situ test worldwide.  The procedures for the SPT are detailed in ASTM D 1586 and AASHTO T-206.
The SPT involves the driving of a hollow thick-walled tube into the ground and measuring the number of
blows to advance the split-barrel sampler a vertical distance of 300 mm (1 foot).  A drop weight system is
used for the pounding where a 63.5-kg (140-lb) hammer repeatedly falls from 0.76 m (30 inches) to achieve
three successive increments of 150-mm (6-inches) each.  The first increment is recorded as a “seating”,
while the number of blows to advance the second and third increments are summed to give the N-value
("blow count") or SPT-resistance (reported in blows/0.3 m or blows per foot).   If the sampler cannot be
driven 450 mm, the number of blows per each 150-mm increment and per each partial increment is recorded
on the boring log.  For partial increments, the depth of penetration is recorded in addition to the number of
blows. The test can be performed in a wide variety of soil types, as well as weak rocks, yet is not
particularly useful in the characterization of gravel deposits nor soft clays.  The fact that the test provides
both a sample and a number is useful, yet problematic, as one cannot do two things well at the same time.
ADVANTAGES
DISADVANTAGES
!
Obtain both a sample & a number
!
Obtain both a sample & a number*
!
Simple & Rugged
!
Disturbed sample (index tests only)
!
Suitable in many soil types
!
Crude number for analysis
!
Can perform in weak rocks
!
Not applicable in soft clays & silts
!
Available throughout the U.S.
!
High variability and uncertainty
Note:  *Collection simultaneously results in poor quality for both the sample and the number. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete pages of pdf online
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete page from pdf acrobat
5-3
Figure 5-3.   Sequence of Driving Split-Barrel Sampler During the Standard Penetration Test.
The SPT is conducted at the bottom of a soil boring that has been prepared using either flight augers or
rotary wash drilling methods.  At regular depth intervals, the drilling process is interrupted to perform the
SPT.  Generally, tests are taken every 0.76 m (2.5 feet) at depths shallower than 3 meters (10 feet) and at
intervals of 1.5 m (5.0 feet) thereafter.  The head of water in the borehole must be maintained at or above
the ambient groundwater level to avoid inflow of water and borehole instability.
In current U.S. practice, three types of drop hammers (donut, safety, and automatic) and four types of drill
rods (N, NW, A, and AW) are used in the conduct of the SPT.  The test in fact is highly-dependent upon
the equipment used and operator performing the test.  Most important factor is the energy efficiency of the
system.  The theoretical energy of a free-fall system with the specified mass and drop height is 48 kg-m
(350 ft-lb), but the actual energy is less due to frictional losses and eccentric loading.  A rotating cathead
and rope system is commonly used and their efficiency depends on numerous factors well-discussed in the
open literature (e.g., Skempton, 1986), including: type of hammer, number of rope turns, conditions of the
sheaves and rotating cathead (e.g., lubricated, rusted, bent, new, old), age of the rope, actual drop height,
vertical plumbness, weather and moisture conditions (e.g., wet, dry, freezing), and other variables.  Trends
in recent times are towards the use of automated systems for lifting and dropping the mass in order to
minimize these factors.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete page from pdf preview; crop all pages of pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
extract one page from pdf; extract one page from pdf reader
5-4
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
0
10
20
30
40
50
Measured N-values
Depth (meters)
Donut
Safety
Sequence
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
0
10
20
30
40
50
Corrected N
60
Depth (meters)
Donut
Safety
Trend
A calibration of energy efficiency for a specific drill rig & operator is recommended by ASTM D-4633
using instrumented strain gages and accelerometer measurements in order to better standardize the energy
levels.  Standards of practice varies from about 35% to 85% with cathead systems using donut or safety
hammers, but averages about 60% in the United States.  The newer automatic trip-hammers can deliver
between 80 to 100% efficiency, but specifically depends on the type of commercial system.  If the efficiency
is measured (E
f
), then the energy-corrected N-value (adjusted to 60% efficiency) is designated N
60
and given
by:
N
60
 (E
f
/60) N
meas
(5-1)
The measured N-values should be corrected to N
60
for all soils, if possible.  The relative magnitudes of
corrections for energy efficiency, sampler lining, rod lengths, and borehole diameter are given by Skempton
(1986) and Kulhawy & Mayne (1990), but only as a general guide.  It is mandatory to measure E
f
to get the
proper correction to N
60
.  
The efficiency may be obtained by comparing either the work done (W = F
@
d = force times displacement)
or the kinetic energy (KE = ½mv
2
) with the potential energy of the system (PE = mgh), where m = mass,
v = impact velocity, g = 9.8 m/s
2
= 32.2 ft/s
2
= gravitational constant, and h = drop height. Thus, the energy
ratio (ER) is defined as the ratio of ER = W/PE or ER = KE/PE.  It is important to note that geotechnical
foundation practice and engineering usage based on SPT correlations have been developed on the basis of
the standard-of-practice, corresponding to an average ER 
.
60 percent.
Figure 5-4 exemplifies the need for correcting N-values to a reference energy level where the successive
SPTs were conducted by alternating use of donut and safety hammers in the same borehole.  The energy
ratios were measured for each test and gave 34 < ER < 56 for the donut hammer (average = 45%) and
ranged 55 < ER < 69 for the safety hammer (average = 60%) at this site.  The individual trends for the
measured N-values from donut and safety hammers are quite apparent in Figure 5-4a, whereas a consistent
profile is obtained in Figure 5-4b once the data have been corrected to ER = 60%.
Figure 5-4.  SPT-N values from (a) Uncorrected Data and (b) Corrected to 60% Efficiency.
(Data modified after Robertson, et al. 1983)
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
extract pages from pdf online; delete page from pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
extract pages from pdf document; extract page from pdf reader
5-5
In some correlative relationships, the energy-corrected N
60
value is further normalized for the effects of
overburden stress, designated (N
1
)
60
, as described in Sections 9.3 and 9.4.   The (N
1
)
60
involves evaluations
in clean sands for interpretations of relative density, friction angle, and liquefaction potential.
The SPT can be halted when 100 blows has been achieved or if the number of blows exceeds 50 in any
given 150-mm increment, or if the sampler fails to advance during 10 consecutive blows.  SPT refusal is
defined by penetration resistances exceeding 100 blows per 51 mm (100/2"), although ASTM D 1586 has
re-defined this limit at 50 blows per 25 mm (50/1").  If bedrock, or an obstacle such as a boulder, is
encountered, the boring may be further advanced using diamond core drilling or noncore rotary methods
(ASTM D 2113;  AASHTO T 225) per the discretion of the geotechnical engineer.  In certain cases, this
SPT criterion may be utilized to define the top of bedrock within a particular geologic setting where
boulders are not of concern or not of great impact on the project requirements.
5.2   CONE PENETRATION TESTING (CPT)
The cone penetration test is quickly becoming the most popular type of in-situ test because it is fast,
economical, and provides continuous profiling of geostratigraphy and soil properties evaluation.  The test
is performed according to ASTM D-3441 (mechanical systems) and ASTM D 5778 (electric and electronic
systems) and consists of pushing a cylindrical steel probe into the ground at a constant rate of 20 mm/s and
measuring the resistance to penetration.  The standard penetrometer has a conical tip with 60° angle apex,
35.7-mm diameter body (10-cm
2
projected area), and 150-cm
2
friction sleeve. The measured point or tip
resistance is designated q
c
and the measured side or sleeve resistance is f
s
 The ASTM standard also permits
a larger 43.7-mm diameter shell (15-cm
2
tip and 200-cm
2
sleeve).
The CPT can be used in very soft clays to dense sands, yet is not particularly appropriate for gravels or
rocky terrain.  The pros and cons are listed below.   As the test provides more accurate and reliable numbers
for analysis, yet no soil sampling, it provides an excellent complement to the more conventional soil test
boring with SPT measurements.
ADVANTAGES of CPT
DISADVANTAGES of CPT
!
Fast and continuous profiling
!
High capital investment
!
Economical and productive
!
Requires skilled operator to run
!
Results not operator-dependent
!
Electronic drift, noise, and calibration.
!
Strong theoretical basis in interpretation
!
No soil samples are obtained.
!
Particularly suitable for soft soils
!
Unsuitable for gravel or boulder deposits*
*Note:  Except where special rigs are provided and/or additional drilling support is available.
The history of field cone penetrometers began with a design by the Netherlands Department of Public
Works in 1930.  This "Dutch" penetrometer was a mechanical operation using a manometer to read loads
and paired sets of inner & outer rods pushed in 20-cm intervals .  In 1948, electric cones permitted
continuous measurements to be taken downhole.  In 1965, the addition of sleeve friction measurements
allowed an indirect means for classifying soil types.  Later, in 1974, the electric cone was combined with
a piezoprobe to form the first piezocone penetrometer.  Most recently, additional sensors have been added
to form specialized devices such as the resistivity cone, acoustic cone, seismic cone, vibrocone, cone
pressuremeter, and lateral stress cone.  Also, signal conditioning, filtering, amplification, and digitization
have been incorporated within the probe itself, thus making electronic cones (Mayne, et al. 1995).
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete pages from pdf online; extract page from pdf document
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe reader.
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages from pdf reader
5-6
Figure 5-5.   Various Cone Penetrometers Including Electric Friction and Piezocone Types.
Most electric/electronic cones require a cable that is threaded through the rods to connect with the power
supply and data acquistion system at the surface.  An analog-digital converter and pentium notebook are
sufficient  for  collecting  data  at  approximate  1-sec  intervals.    Depths  are  monitored  using  either  a
potentiometer (wire-spooled LVDT), depth wheel that the cable passes through, or ultrasonics sensor.
Systems can be powered by voltage using either generator (AC) or battery (DC), or alternatively run on
current.  New developments include: (1) the use of audio signals to transmit digital data up the rods without
a cable and (2) memocone systems where a computer chip in the penetrometer stores the data throughout
the sounding.
Piezocone Penetration Testing (PCPT or CPTu)
Piezocones are cone penetrometers with added transducers to measure penetration porewater pressures
during the advancement of the probe.  In clean sands, the measured penetration pore pressures are nearly
hydrostatic (u
meas
.
u
o
) because the high permeability of the sand permits immediate dissipation.  In clays,
however, the undrained penetration results in the development of high excess porewater pressures above
hydrostatic.  These excess 
)
u can be either positive or negative, depending upon the specific location of
the porous element (filter stone) along the cone probe.  If the penetration is arrested, the decay of porewater
pressures can be monitored with time and used to infer the rate of consolidation and soil permeability.
The measurement of porewater pressures requires careful preparation of the porous elements and cone
cavities to ensure saturation and reliable measurements of 
)
u during testing.  Porous filter stones can be
made of stone, ceramics, sintered steel or brass or copper, and plastic.  Polypropylene is economical for
replacement and discard for each sounding, particularly important if clogging or smearing is considered
problematic.  However, in certain soil types, the compressibility of the filter material can affect the
measured results (Campanella & Robertson 1988).  Although water can be used for saturation, glycerin or
silicon offer a better means of penetrating through unsaturated zones to avoid losing cone saturation before
encountering the groundwater table.
Commercial penetrometers have the porous element either midface (designated u
t
or u
1
), or at the shoulder,
just behind the cone tip (designated u
b
or u
2
), as depicted in Figure 5-6.  As a rule, measured porewater
pressures are such that u
1
> u
2
.  For Type 1 piezocones, the measured porewater pressures are always
positive.  For Type 2 cones, however, measured u
2
are positive in soft to stiff clays, but are zero or negative
in fissured overconsolidated clays and dense dilatant sands.  The "standard" piezocone penetrometer has
a shoulder position (u
2
) because of a necessary correction for the measured tip stress q
c
.  
5-7
Figure 5-7.  Correction Detail for Porewater
Pressures Acting on Cone Tip Resistance.
Figure 5-6.   Geometry and Measurements Taken by Cone and Piezocone Penetrometers.
The measured cone resistance (q
c
) must be corrected for porewater pressures acting on unequal areas of the
cone tip.  This correction is most important for soft to firm to stiff clays and silts and for very deep
soundings where high hydrostatic pressures exist.  Usually in sands, the correction is minimal because q
c
>> u
2
 The corrected resistance is given by (Lunne,
et al. 1997):
q
T
 q
c
+ (1-a
n
)u
2
(5-2)
where a
n
= net area ratio determined from calibration
of the cone in a triaxial chamber.  Penetrometers with
values of a
n
$
0.8 are desired in order to minimize
the  corrections,  yet  provide  sufficient  steel  wall
thickness of the cylinder against buckling. Most 10-
cm
2
commercial penetrometers have 0.75 < a
n
#
0.82
and many 15-cm
2
cones show 0.65 < a
n
< 0.8, yet
several older models indicate values as low as a
n
.
0.35.  The value of a
n
should be provided by the
manufacturer.   For a type 1 cone,  the correction
cannot  be  made  reliably  because  an  assumed
conversion from u
1
to u
2
pressures must be made, but
this  depends  on  stress  history,  sensitivity,
cementation, fissuring, and other effects (Mayne et
al., 1990).  In soils where the measured u
2
.
0 (or
slightly negative), the use of a type 1 piezocone is
warranted because the correction is negligible and
better stratigraphic detailing of the subsurface profile
is obtained.
5-8
Tip Resistance
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
5
10
15
20
q
T
(MPa)
Depth (m)
Sleeve Friction
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
100
200
300
f
s
(kPa)
Porewater Pressure
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
200
400
600
800
1000
U
2
(kPa)
Friction Ratio
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
2
4
6
8
FR (%)
Prior to (and after) each sounding, a stable set of baseline readings should be taken and recorded in the field
book.  The computer operation & data collection depend often on the particular commercial system that is
utilized.    The  sounding  should  only  commence  once  all  channels  are  stable  in  their  initial  values
(Reasonable ranges of initial values are often provided by the manufacturer).  After the sounding is
completed and the cone removed from the ground, the initial & final baselines should be compared to verify
that they are similar, otherwise adjustments may be necessary to the recorded data.
The equipment should be maintained in proper condition in order to collect quality and reliable data.  Thus,
the field engineer or technician should inspect the penetrometer system for obvious defects, wear, and
omissions prior to usage.  Detailed recommendations are given in ASTM D 5778 and Lunne, et al. (1997).
Briefly, these may include periodic cleaning of the penetrometer and rods, replacement of worn tips &
sleeves, inspection of  the  electronic  cables and power connections, removal of bent rods,  and other
maintenance issues.
Figure 5-9.   Piezocone Results next to Mississippi River, Memphis, TN.
CPT Profiles
The results of the individual channels of a piezocone penetration test are plotted with depth, as illustrated
in Figure 5-8.  With the continuous records and three independent channels, it is easy to discern detailed
changes in strata and the inclusion of seams and lenses with the subsurface profile. 
Since soil samples are not obtained with the CPT, an indirect assessment of soil behavioral type is inferred
by an examination of the readings.  The numbers can be processed for use in empirical chart classification
systems (as given in Chapter 9), or the raw readings easily interpreted by eye for soil strata changes.  For
example, clean sands are generally evidenced by q
T
> 5 MPa (50 tsf), while soft to stiff clays & silts
evidence q
T
< 2 MPa (20 tsf).  Generally, penetration porewater pressures in loose sands exhibit u
b
.
u
o
,
whereas dense sands show u
b
< u
o
 In soft to stiff intact clays, penetration porewater pressures are several
times  hydrostatic  (u
b
>>  u
o
).  Notably,  negative  porewater  pressures  are  observed  in  fissured
5-10
overconsolidated materials.   The sleeve friction, often expressed in terms of a friction ratio FR = f
s
/q
T
, also
is a general indicator of soil type.  In sands, usually 0.5% < FR < 1.5 %; and in clays, normally 3% < FR
< 10%.   A notable exception is that in sensitive and quick clays, a low FR is observed.  In fact, an
approximate estimate of the clay sensitivity is suggested as 10/FR (Robertson & Campanella, 1983).
In the above sounding (Figure 5-8), a variable interlayered sandy stratum with clay and silt  lenses occurs
from the ground surface to a depth of 10 meters.  This is underlain by a thick layer of silty clay  to depths
of 25 meters, as evidenced by the low q
t
and high u
b
readings (well above hydrostatic), as well as the FR
values from 3.5 up to 4.0%.   Beneath this layer, a sandy silt layer is noted to 33 m that is underlain by
dense sand within the termination depth of the sounding.  Additional details and information on soil
behavioral classification by CPT is given in Section 9.2.
5.3   VANE SHEAR TEST (VST)
The vane shear test (VST), or field vane (FV), is used to evaluate the inplace undrained shear strength  (s
uv
)
of soft to stiff clays & silts at regular depth intervals of 1 meter (3.28 feet).  The test consists of inserting
a four-bladed vane into the clay and rotating the device about a vertical axis, per ASTM D 2573 guidelines.
Limit equilibrium analysis is used to relate the measured peak torque to the calculated value of s
u
 Both the
peak and remolded strengths can be measured; their ratio is termed the sensitivity, S
t.
A selection of vanes
is available in terms of size, shape, and configuration, depending upon the consistency and strength
characteristics of the soil.  The standard vane has a rectangular geometry with a blade diameter D = 65 mm,
height H = 130 mm (H/D =2), and blade thickness e = 2 mm.  
The test is best performed when the vane is pushed beneath the bottom of an pre-drilled borehole. For a
borehole of diameter B, the top of the vane should pushed to a depth of insertion of at least df = 4B. Within
 minutes  after  insertion,  rotation  should  be  made  at  a  constant  rate  of    6°/minute  (0.1°/s)  with
measurements of torque taken frequently.  Figure 5-9 illustrates the general VST procedures.  In very soft
clays, a special protective housing that encases the vane is also available where no borehole is required and
the vane can be installed by pushing the encasement to the desired test depth to deploy the vane.  An
alternative approach is to push two side-by-side soundings (one with the vane, the other with rods only).
Then, the latter rod friction results are subtracted from the former to obtain the vane readings.  This alternate
should be discouraged as the rod friction readings are variable, depend upon inclination and verticality of
the rods, number of rotations, and thus  produce unreliable and questionable data.  
ADVANTAGES of VST
DISADVANTAGES of VST
!
Assessment of undrained strength, s
uv
!
Limited application to soft to stiff clays
!
Simple test and equipment
!
Slow and time-consuming
!
Measure in-situ clay sensitivity (S
t
)
!
Raw s
uv
needs (empirical ) correction
!
Long history of use in practice
!
Can be affected by sand lenses and seams
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested