devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Extract pages pdf preview control application platform web page azure wpf web browser 01254614-part62

5-21
Figure  5-19.   Photos of Pressuremeter Equipment, including Menard-type pressure panel, SBP
probe, SBP cutter teeth, hydraulic jack, and monocell-type probe.
The pressuremeter provides four independent measurements with each test:
1.
Lift off stress, corresponding to the total horizontal stress, 
F
ho
= P
o
;
2.
An "elastic" region, interpreted in terms of  an equivalent Young's modulus (E
PMT
) during the initial
loading ramp.  An unload-reload cycle removes some of the disturbance effects and provides a
stiffer value of E.  Traditionally, the elastic modulus is calculated from:
E
PMT
=  2(1+
<
) (V/
)
V) 
)
P
(5-17)
where V = V
o
)
V = current volume of probe, V
o
= initial probe volume, 
)
P = change in pressure
in elastic region, 
)
V = measured change in volume, and 
<
= Poisson’s ratio. Alternative procedures
are available to directly interpret the shear modulus (G), as given in Clark (1989). 
3.
A "plastic" region, corresponding to the shear strength (i.e., an undrained shear strength, s
uPMT
for
clays and silts; or an effectivefriction angle 
NN
for sands).
4.
Limit pressure, P
L
(related to a measure of  bearing capacity) which is an extrapolated value of
pressure where the probe volume equals twice the initial volume (V = 2V
o
).   This is analogous to
)
V = V
o.
.   Several graphical methods are proposed to determine P
L
from measured test data.  One
common extrapolation approach involves a log-log plot of  pressure vs. volumetric strain (
)
V/V
o.
)
and when log(
)
V/V
o.
) = 0, then P = P
L
Figure  5-19  shows  a  representative  curve  of  pressure  versus  volume  from  a  PMT  in  Utah.  The
recompression, pseudo-elastic, and plastic regions are indicated, as are the corresponding interpreted values
of parameters.  
Extract pages pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
add and remove pages from pdf file online; cut pages from pdf
Extract pages pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract one page from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
5-22
0
1
2
3
4
5
0
200
400
600
Volume Change (cc)
Pressure (tsf)
0
1
2
3
4
5
0
10
20
30
40
50
Creep (cc/min)
Pressure (tsf)
Figure 5-20.   Menard-type Pressuremeter Results for Utah DOT Project.
The conduct of the test permits the direct use of  cylindrical cavity expansion (CEE) theory.  For the simple
case of undrained loading, CCE gives:
P
L
 P
o
+  s
u
[ln(G/s
u
) + 1]
(5-18)
so that all four measurements are interrelated by this simple expression.  Moreover, the zone of soil affected
by this expansion can be related to the soil rigidity index (I
= G/s
u
).  Here, the size of the region that is
plasticized by the failure is represented by a large cylinder of radius r
p
which is calculated from:
(5-19)
R
o
p
I
r
r =
where r
o
= initial radius of the probe.  Additional details on calibration, procedures, and interpretation for
the PMT are given in Baguelin, et al. (1978), Briaud (1989), and Clarke (1995).  
5.6    SPECIALIZED PROBES AND IN-SITU TESTS
In addition to the common in-situ tests, there are many novel and innovative tests for special applications
or needs.  These are discussed elsewhere (Jamiolkowski, et al. 1985; Robertson, 1986) and  include the
Large Penetration Test (LPT) which is similar to the SPT, yet larger size for use in gravelly soils.   The
Becker Penetration Test (BPT) is essentially an instrumented steel pipe pile that is used to investigate
deposits of gravels to cobbles.  A number of tests attempt to directly measure the in-situ lateral stress state
(i.e., K
0
) including the Iowa stepped blade (ISB), push-in spade cells and total stress cells (TSC), and
hydraulic fracturing method (HF) that is used extensively in rock mechanics.   The borehole shear test
(BST) is in essence a downhole direct shear test that applies normal stresses to platens and then measures
the  shearing  resistance  to  pullout. The  BST  intends  to determine  c
r
and 
Nr
in the  field,  although
considerations of excess porewater pressures may be necessary in certain geologic formations.  The plate
load test (PLT) mimics a small shallow foundation while the screw plate load test (SPLT) consists of a
downhole circular plate that is inserted at the bottom of a boring and loaded vertically to evaluate the stress-
displacement characteristics of soil at depth.
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
acrobat export pages from pdf; extract one page from pdf file
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
convert selected pages of pdf to word; extract pages from pdf files
5-23
5.7   GEOPHYSICAL METHODS
There are several kinds of geophysical tests that can be used for stratigraphic profiling and delineation of
subsurface geometries.  These include the measurement of mechanical waves (seismic refraction surveys,
crosshole, downhole, and spectral analysis of surface wave tests), as well as electromagnetic techniques
(resistivity, EM, magnetometer, and radar).  Mechanical waves are additionally useful for the determination
of elastic properties  of subsurface media,  primarily  the  small-strain shear  modulus. Electromagnetic
methods can help locate anomalous regions such as underground cavities, buried objects, and utility lines.
The geophysical tests do not alter the soil conditions and therefore classify as nondestructive, and several
are performed at the surface level (termed non-invasive).
ADVANTAGES OF GEOPHYSICS
DISADVANTAGES OF GEOPHYSICS
!
Nondestructive and/or non-invasive
!
No samples or direct physical penetration
!
Fast and economical testing
!
Models assumed for interpretation
!
Theoretical basis for interpretation
!
Affected by cemented layers or inclusions.
!
Applicable to soils and rocks
!
Results influenced by water, clay, & depth.  
5.7.1   MECHANICAL WAVES
Geophysical mechanical wave techniques utilize the propagation of waves at their characteristic velocities
for determining layering, elastic stiffnesses, and damping parameters.  These tests are usually conducted
at very small strain levels (
,
.
10
-3
percent) and thus truly contained within the elastic region of soils. There
are four basic waveforms generated within a semi-infinite elastic halfspace:  compression (or P-waves),
shear (or S-waves), surface or Rayleigh (R-waves), and Love waves (L-waves).  The P- and S-waves are
termed body waves and the most commonly-utilized in geotechnical site characterization (Woods, 1978).
The other two types are special types of hybrid compression/shear waves that occur at the free boundary
of the ground surface (R) and soil layer interfaces (L).   Herein, we shall discuss methods of determining
the P- and S-waves.
The compression wave (V
p
) is the fastest wave and moves as an expanding spherical front that emanates
from the source.  The amplitude of the compression wave is optimized if the source is a large impact-type
(falling weight) or caused by explosive means (blasting).  Magnitudes of P-waves for soils are in the typical
range of 400 m/s 
#
V
p
#
2500 m/s, whereas rocks may exhibit P-waves between 2000 and 7000 m/s,
depending upon the degree of weathering and fracturing. Figure 5-20 indicates representative values for
different geomaterials.  Since water has a compression wave velocity of about 1500 m/s, measurements of
V
p
for soils below the groundwater can become difficult and unreliable. 
The shear wave (V
s
) is the second fastest wave and expands as a cylindrical front having localized motion
perpendicular to the direction of travel.  Thus, one can polarize the wave as vertical (up/down) or horizontal
(side to side).   Since water cannot sustain shear forces, it has no shear wave and therefore does not interfere
with V
s
measurements in soils and rocks.   S-wave velocities of soil are generally between 100 m/s 
#
V
s
#
600 m/s, although soft peats and organic clays may have lower velocities.  Representative values are
presented in Figure 5-21.  In geomechanics,  the shear wave is the most important wave-type since it relates
directly  to the shear modulus.  Therefore, several different methods have  been  developed for direct
measurement of V
s
, as reviewed by Campanella (1994). 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; delete pages out of a pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
extract pages from pdf file online; deleting pages from pdf
5-24
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
 Compression Wave Velocity
,
 Vp (m/s)
Fresh Water
  Sea Water
  Clay
  Sand
Till
I
ce
Weathered Rocks
I
ntact Rocks
Steel
P - Wave Velocities
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
 Shear Wave Velocity
,
 VS (m/s)
Fresh Water
  Sea Water
  Clay
  Sand
Till
I
ce
Weathered Rocks
I
ntact Rocks
Steel
S - Wave Velocities
Figure 5-21.   Representative Compression Wave Velocities of Various Soil and Rock Materials.
Figure 5-22.   Representative Shear Wave Velocities of Various Soil and Rock Materials.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
crop all pages of pdf; delete page from pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
extract one page from pdf reader; cut pages from pdf online
5-25
The small-strain shear modulus (G
max 
or G
0
) is evaluated from the expression:
G
0
=  
D
T
V
s
2
(5-20)
where 
D
T
(
T
/g = total mass density of the geomaterial, 
(
T
= total unit weight, and g = 9.8 m/sec
2
=
gravitational acceleration constant.  Note that this value of modulus applies to shear strain levels that are
very small (on the order of 10
-3
percent or less).  Most foundation problems (i.e. settlements) and retaining
wall situations involve strains at higher levels, on the order of 0.1 percent (Burland, 1989) and would
therefore require a modulus reduction factor.  In addition to static (monotonic) loading, the G
0
is useful in
assessing ground motions during seismic site amplification and dynamically-loaded foundations.
5.7.2   Seismic Refraction (SR)
Seismic refraction is generally used for determining the depth to very hard layers, such as bedrock.  The
seismic refraction method is performed according to ASTM D 5777 procedures and involves a mapping of
V
p
arrivals using a linear array of geophones across the site, as illustrated in Figures 5-22 and 5-23 for a
two-layer stratification.   In fact, a single geophone system can be used by moving the geophone position
and repeating the source event.   In the SR method, the upper layer velocity must be less than the velocity
of the lower layer.  An impact on a metal plate serves as a source rich in P-wave energy.  Initially, the P-
waves travel soley through the soil to arrive at geophones located away from the source.  At some critical
distance from the source, the P-wave can actually travel through soil-underlying rock-soil to arrive at the
geophone and make a mark on the oscilloscope.  This critical distance (x
c
) is used in the calculation of depth
to rock. The SR data can also be useful to determine the degree of rippability of different rock materials
using heavy construction equipment.  Most recently, with improved electronics, the shear wave profiles may
also be determined by SR.  
Figure 5-23.   Field Setup & Procedures for Seismic Refraction Method.
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
add and delete pages from pdf; extract pages from pdf file
C# Word - Extract or Copy Pages from Word File in C#.NET
Images. Convert Word to ODT. Convert PDF to Word. Convert ODT to Word. Document Page: Delete Word Pages. Page: Move Word Page Position. Page: Extract Word Pages.
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; copy web page to pdf
5-26
Figure 5-24.  Data Reduction of SR Measurements to Determine Depth to Hard Layer.
5.7.3  Crosshole Tests (CHT)
Crosshole seismic surveys are used for determining profiles of V
p
and V
s
with depth per ASTM D 4428.
The crosshole testing (CHT) involves the use of a downhole hammer and one or more downhole vertical
geophones in an horizontal array of two or three boreholes spaced about 3 to 6 meters apart to determine
the travel times of different strata (Hoar & Stokoe, 1978).  A simple CHT setup using direct arrival
measurements and two boreholes is depicted in Figure 5-24.  The boreholes are most often cased with
plastic pipe and grouted inplace.  After setup and curing of the grout, the borehole verticality must be
checked with an inclinometer to determine changes in horizontal distances with depth, particularly if the
investigations extends to depths exceedings 15 m.  Special care must be exercised during testing to assure
good coupling of the geophone receivers with the surrounding soil medium.  Usually, inflatable packers or
spring-loaded clamps are employed to couple the geophone to the sides of the plastic casing.
A special downhole hammer is preferably used to generate a vertically-polarized horizontally-propagating
shear wave.  An “up” strike generates a wave that is a mirror image of a “down” strike wave. The test is
advantageous in that it may be conducted to great depths of up to 300 meters or more.  On the other hand,
there is considerable expense in pre-establishing the drilled boreholes & grouted casing, waiting for curing,
inclinometer readings, and performing of the geophysical tests.  A more rapid procedure is to drill the source
hole to each successive test depth, insert a split spoon sampler and strike the drill rod at the surface with a
trigger hammer.  The disadvantage of this procedure is the absence of an “up” striking providing somewhat
greater difficulty in distinguishing the initiation of each wave signal. 
C# PowerPoint - Extract or Copy PowerPoint Pages from PowerPoint
Conversion. Convert PowerPoint to PDF. Convert PowerPoint Pages. Page: Delete PowerPoint Pages. Page: Move Page: Extract PowerPoint Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text
export one page of pdf preview; cut pages from pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages. Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins
extract page from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
5-27
Figure 5-25.  Setup and Data Reduction Procedures for Crosshole Seismic Test.
Since  the P-wave  arrives first,  its trace  is  already  recorded  on  the oscilloscope or  analyzer  screen.
Therefore, the arrival of the S-wave is often masked because its waveform comes later.  It is desirable to
use a source rich in shear to increase the amplitude of the shear wave and help delineate its arrival.  With
reverse polarization, filtering, and signal enhancement, the S-wave signal can be easily distinguished.
5.7.4  Downhole Tests (DHT)
Downhole surveys can be performed using only one cased borehole.  Here, S-waves are propagated down
to the geophone from a stationary surface point.  No inclinometer survey is needed as the vertical path
distance (R) is calculated strongly on depth. In the DHT, a horizontal plank at the surface  is statically
loaded by a vehicle wheel (to increase normal stress) and struck lengthwise to provide an excellent shear
wave source, as indicated in Figure 5-25.  The orientation of the axis of the downhole geophone must be
parallel with the horizontal plank (because shear waves are polarized and directional). The results are paired
for successive events (generally at 1-m depth intervals) and the corresponding shear wave at mid-interval
is calculated as V
s
)
R/
)
t, where R = the hypotenuse distance from plank to geophone and t = arrival time
of the shear wave.  Added accuracy is obtained by conducting both right and left strikes for same depth and
superimposing the mirrored recordings to follow the crossover (Campanella, 1994).
A recent version of the downhole method is the seismic cone penetration test (SCPT) with an accelerometer
located within the penetrometer.  In this manner, no borehole is needed beforehand.  Figure 5-26 shows the
summary of shear wave trains obtained at each 1-m intervals during downhole testing by SCPTu at Mud
Island in downtown Memphis/TN.
5-28
Figure 5-26.  Setup and Data Reduction Procedures for Conducting a Downhole Seismic Survey.
Figure 5-27.   Summary Shear Wave Trains from Downhole Tests at Mud Island, Memphis, TN.
5-29
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
0
2
4
6
8
q
T
(MPa)
Depth (m)
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
0
100
200
300
f
s
(kPa)
U
b
(kPa)
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
-100
0
100
200
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
0
100
200 300 400
V
s
(m/s)
Figure 5-28.   Results of Seismic Piezocone Sounding in Residual Soils in Coweta County, Georgia
showing four independent readings with depth.   Note:   Penetration porewater pressures allowed to
dissipate at each rod break.  
The seismic cone is a particularly versatile tool as it is a hybrid of geotechnical penetration coupled with
downhole geophysical measurements (Campanella, 1994).   The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu)
is therefore an economical and expedient means for geotechnical site characterization as it provides four
independent readings with depth from a single sounding.   Detailed information is obtained about the
subsurface stratigraphy, soil types, and responses at complete opposite ends of the stress-strain curve.   The
CPT measurements are taken continously with depth and downhole shear wave surveys are normally
conducted at each rod change (generally 1-meter intervals).  The penetration data (q
t
, f
s
, u
b
) reflect failure
states of stress, whereas the shear wave (V
s
) provides the nondestructive  response that corresponds to the
small-strain stiffness. Taken together, an entire stress-strain-strength representation can be derived for all
depths in the soil profile (Mayne, 2001).  
Illustrative results from a SCPTu sounding in residual silts and sands of the Piedmont geology are shown
in Figure 5-27.   In addition to the continuous readings taken for the CPT portion, the porewater pressures
were allowed to dissipate to equilibrium at each rod break.   These dissipation phases provide information
about the flow characteristics of the soil (namely, coefficient of consolidation and permeability), as
discussed further in Chapter 6.
5-30
5.7.5  Surface Waves
The spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) is useful for developing profiles of shear wave velocity with
depth.  A pair of geophones is situated on the ground surface in linear array with a source. Either a transient
force or variable vibrating mass is used to generate surface wave distuburbances.  The geophones are re-
positioned at varying distances from the source to develop a dispersion curve (see Figures 5-28 and 5-29).
The SASW method utilizes the fact that surface waves (or Rayleigh waves) propagate to depths that are
proportional to their wavelength.  Thus, a full range of frequencies, or wavelengths, is examined to decipher
the V
s
profile through a complex numerical inversion.  An advantage here is that SASW surveys require no
borehole and are therefore noninvasive.
Figure 5-29.   Field Setup for Conducting Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW).
Figure 5-30.   Spectrum Analyzer and Data Logging Equipment for SASW.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested