devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Extract page from pdf reader control SDK system web page .net asp.net console 01254615-part63

5-31
Shelby Forest VS Comparison
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
Shear Wave Velocity, V
s
(m/s)
Depth (m)
SCPT - F5
SCPT - F1
SCPT - F6b
SCPT - F6a
Borehole DHT
Reflection
SASW
Figure 5-31.   Comparison of Shear Wave Profiles from Different Geophysical Techniques.
A comparison of results of shear wave velocity measurements from different geophysical methods are
presented in Figure 5-30 in aeolian and sedimentary soils at a USGS test site north of Memphis, TN.   The
methods include conventional downhole performed in a cased borehole (DHT), several.sets of seismic
piezocone soundings (SCPTu), spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW), as well as a new research
method using a reflection-based evaluation.  In the SASW approach, the layering profile depends on the
actual penetration of the surface waves, usually assumed to be reach a depth approximately equal to one-
third the wavelength and depends on the frequency components.   Overall, the four methods give reasonable
agreement in their V
s
profiles.  
In terms  of practice, the  downhole  test (DHT) provides direct  reliable measurements  of V
s
that are
comparable to CHT results, yet at considerably less expense.  For soil profiles, the DHT is facilitated by
the SCPT because no site preparation of cased boreholes is needed beforehand.  For S-wave profiling in
weathered rocks and landfills, the SASW is advantageous, as no penetration of the medium is needed.
Extract page from pdf reader - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
cut pages out of pdf; extract page from pdf reader
Extract page from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages from pdf acrobat; reader extract pages from pdf
5-32
5.7.6   Electromagnetic Wave Methods
Electromagnetic methods include the measurement of electrical and magnetic properties of the ground, such
as  resistivity,  conductivity  (reciprocal  of  resistivity),  magnetic  fields,  dielectric  characteristics,  and
permittivity.  Detailed descriptions of these properties and their measurements are provided by Santamarina,
et al. (2001).   The wave frequencies can be varied greatly from as low as 10 Hz to as much as 10
22
Hz, with
corresponding wavelengths ranging from 10
7
m down to 10
-14
m.   In terms of increasing frequency, the
electromagnetic waveforms the include: radio, microwaves, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, x-ray, and gamma
rays.   Surface mapping of electromagnetic waves over a gridded coverage can provide relative or absolute
information about the surface conditions, as these waves penetrate the ground.
Several electromagnetic wave techniques are available commercially for noninvasive imaging and mapping
of the ground.  These can provide approximate locations of buried anomalies such as underground utility
lines, wells, caves, sinkholes, and other features.  The methods include :
Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)
Electrical Resistivity Surveys (ER)
Electromagnetic Conductivity (EM)
Magnetometer Surveys (MS)
Resistivity Piezocone (RCPTu)
With recent improvements in electronics hardware, filtering, signal processing, inversion, micro-electronics,
and software, the use & interpretation of these electromechanical wave methods has become easy, fast, and
economical.  A brief description of these techniques is given here with illustrative examples and more
detailed information can be found at the websites in Appendix B (page B-3).  As the commercial equipment
comes with its data-reduction software, only final results of the measurements are shown here for sake of
brevity.
Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)
Short impulses of a high-frequency electromagnetic wave are transmitted into the ground using an pair of
transmitting & receiving antennae.   The GPR surveys are made by gridding the site and positioning or
pulling the tracking cart across the ground surface.  Changes in the dielectric properties of the soil (i.e.,
permittivity) reflect relative changes in the subsurface environment.   The EM frequency and electrical
conductivity of the ground control the depth of penetration of the GPR survey.   Many commercial systems
come with several sets of paired antennas to allow variable depths of exploration, as well as accommodate
different types of ground (Figure 5-31).   A recent development (GeoRadar) uses a variably-sweeping
frequency to capture data at a variety of depths and soil types.
Figure 5-32.   Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Equipment from Xadar, GeoVision, 
and EKKO Sensors & Software.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET. Extract all images from whole PDF or a specified PDF page.
copy page from pdf; delete page from pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File. Advanced Visual
extract one page from pdf online; copy one page of pdf to another pdf
5-33
Figure 5-33.  GPR Results: (a) Buried Utility Locations and (b) Soil Profile of Fill over Soil
(from EKKO Sensors & Software: www.sensoft.on.ca
)
Figure 5-33 (c)  GPR Locating of Underground Tanks and Pipes (GeoVision/Geometrics).
The GPR surveys provide a quick imaging of the subsurface conditions, leaving everything virtually
unchanged and undisturbed.   This can be a valuable tool used to define subsoil strata, underground tanks,
buried pipes, cables, as well as to characterize archaelogical sites before soil borings, probes, or excavation
operations.  It can also be utilized to map reinforcing steel in concrete decks, floors, and walls.  Several
illustrative examples of GPR surveys are shown in Figure 5-32.   The GPR surveys are particularly
successful in deposits of dry sands with depths of penetration up to 20 m or more (60 feet), whereas in wet
saturated clays, GPR is limited to shallow depths of only 3 to 6 meters (10 to 20 feet).
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified region on PDF page, then get image
deleting pages from pdf document; delete pages of pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text This page will supply users with tutorial for extracting text from PDF using VB.
extract one page from pdf file; delete pages from pdf online
5-34
1
10
100
1000
10000
 Bulk Resistivity
,
ρ
 (ohm
-
meters)
Clay
 Loam
Loose Sands
Sands & Gravels
Glacial Till
Weathered Rocks
Resistivity Values (ConeTec & GeoProbe, 1997)
Figure 5-34.   Representative Values of Resistivity for Different Geomaterials.
Electrical Resistivity Survey (ER) or Surface Resistivity Method
Resistivity is a fundamental electrical property of geomaterials and can be used to evaluate soil types and
variations of pore fluid and changes in subsurface media (Santamarina et al., 2001).  The resistivity (
D
R
) is
measured in ohm-meters and is the reciprocal of electrical conductivity (k
E
= 1/
D
R
).  Conductivity is
reported in siemens per meter (S/m), where S = amps/volts.  Using pairs or arrays of electrodes embedded
into the surface of the ground, a surface resistitivity survey can be conducted to measure the difference in
electrical potential of an applied current across a site.  The spacing of the electrodes governs the depth of
penetration by the resistivity method and the interpretation is affected by the type of array used (Wenner,
dipole-dipole, Schlumberger).   The entire site is gridded and subjected to parallel arrays of SR-surveys if
a complete imaging map is desired.  Mapping allows for relative variations of soil types to be discerned,
as well as unusual features.  
In general, resistivity values increase with soil grain size.  Figure 5-33 presents some illustrative values of
bulk resistivity for different soil and rock types.  This resistivity technique has been used to map faults,
karstic features, stratigraphy, contamination plumes and buried objects, and other uses.  Figure 5-34 shows
the field resistivity equipment and illustrative results from an ER survey in karst to detect caves and
sinkholes.   Downhole resistivity surveys can also be performed using electronic probes that are lowered
vertically down boreholes, or are direct-push placed.   The latter can be accomplished using a resistivity
module that trails a cone penetrometer, termed a resistivity piezocone (RCPTu).   Downhole resistivity
surveys are particularly advantageous in distinguishing the interface between upper freshwater and lower
saltwater  zones  in  coastal  regions.    They  are  also  used  in  detecting  fluid  contaminants  during
geoenvironmental investigations. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File in C#. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in C#.NET.
extract pages from pdf file online; cut pages out of pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Please follow the sections below to learn more. DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
extract pages from pdf; export pages from pdf preview
5-35
(a)                                                                                      (b)                  
(c)
Figure 5-35.   Electrical Resistivity Equipment and Results: (a) Oyo System; (b) Advanced Geosciences Inc.;
(c) Two-Dimensional Cross-Section Resistivity Profile for Detection of Sinkholes and Caves in Limestone
(from Schnabel Engineering Associates).
Electromagnetic Techniques
Several types of electromagnetic (EM) methods can
be used to image the ground and buried features,
including:  induction,  frequency  domain,  low
frequency, and time domain systems.  This is best
handled by mapping the entire site area to show
relative variations and changes.  The EM methods
are excellent at tracking buried metal objects and
well-know in the utility locator industry.  They can
also be used to detect buried tanks, map geologic
units,  and  groundwater  contaminants,  generally
best within the upper one or two meters, yet extend
to depths of 5 m or more.
Figure 5-36.  EM Survey to Detect Underground Storage   
Tanks (Geonics EM-31 Survey by GeoVision).
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
delete page from pdf preview; add remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
delete pages from pdf in reader; acrobat remove pages from pdf
5-36
Magnetic Surveys
The earth’s magnetic field, as well as local anomalies
and variations within the ground, can be mapped with
magnetometer equipment at the ground surface.  The
relative readings can be used to develop color-enhanced
maps that  show the  changes  in  total magnetic field
across the property.  Either 2-d magnetic surveys (MS)
or  full areal grids  can be  performed to  provide full
coverage  of  buried  metal  objects  and  underground
features.  Figure 5-32 shows results from magnetometer
surveys for locating abandoned oil wells.
Additional details on SR, EM, GPR, and MS can be
found in Greenhouse, et al. (1998) and the geophysical
information portion of the Geoforum website at:
http://www.geoforum.com/info/geophysical/
Figure 5-37.  Magnetometer Survey                 
Results (Geometrics).
5.8  SUMMARY ON IN-SITU GEOTECHNICAL & GEOPHYSICAL METHODS 
In-situ physical and geophysical testing provide direct information concerning the subsurface conditions,
geostratigraphy, and engineering properties prior to design, bids, and construction on the ground.  The
electromagnetic wave geophysics (GPR, EM, ER, MS) are non-invasive and non-destructive.  By mapping
the entire  surface area of the site,  these techniques are useful in imaging the  generalized subsurface
conditions and detecting utilities, hidden objects, boulders, and other anomalies.   The mapping is conducted
on a relative scale of measurements that reflect changes across the property. They may aid in finding
underground cavities, caves, sinkholes, and erosional features in limestone and dolostone terrain.  In pre-
occupied land, they may be used to detect underground utility lines, buried tanks and drums, and  objects of
environmental concern.
Mechanical wave geophysics (CHT, DHT, SASW, SR) provide important measurements of compression (P),
shear (S), and Rayleigh (R)  wave velocities that determine geostrata layering and small-strain  properties
of soil and rock.   The SR provides P-wave velocities and SASW obtains S-wave profiles and both are
conducted at the surface of the ground and are therefore non-invasive as well as non-destructive.  The CHT
and DHT require cased boreholes, yet the seismic penetrometer (SCPT) now offers a quick and economical
version of DHT for routine application.  In geotechnical applications, the shear wave velocity (V
s
) provides
the fundamental measurement of small-strain stiffness, in terms of low-amplitude shear modulus (G
0
D
T
V
s
2
), where 
D
T
is the total mass density of the ground.  Traditionally, the stiffness from  shear wave velocity
measurements has been used in site amplification analyses during seismic ground hazard studies and the
evaluation of dynamically-loaded foundations supporting machinery, yet in recent findings, this stiffness has
been shown of equal importance and relevance to small-strain behavior of static and monotonic loading,
including deflections of pile foundations, excavations, and walls, as well as foundation settlement evaluations
(Burland, 1989; Tatsuoka & Shibuya, 1992).
5-37
0.0001
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
1000
Grain Size (mm)
In-Situ Test Method
S
P
T
CP
T
DMT
PMT
VST
Geophysics
CLAYS            SILTS                     SANDS                     GRAVELS       Cobbles/Boulders
5-38
[BLANK]
6 - 1
CHA
P
TER 6
.
0
GROUNDWATER 
I
NVESTI
GATI
ONS
6.1
GENERAL
Groundwater conditions and the potential for groundwater seepage are fundamental factors in virtually all
geotechnical analyses and design studies.  Accordingly, the evaluation of groundwater conditions is a basic
element of almost all geotechnical investigation programs.  Groundwater investigations are of two types
as follows:
Determination of groundwater levels and pressures and 
Measurement of the permeability of the subsurface materials.  
Determination  of  groundwater  levels  and  pressures  includes  measurements  of  the  elevation  of  the
groundwater surface or water table and its variation with the season of the year; the location of perched
water tables; the location of aquifers (geological units which yield economically significant amounts of
water to a well); and the presence of artesian pressures.  Water levels and pressures may be measured in
existing wells, in boreholes and in specially-installed observation wells.  Piezometers are used where the
measurement of the ground water pressures are specifically required (i.e. to determine excess hydrostatic
pressures, or the progress of primary consolidation).
Determination of the permeability of soil or rock strata is needed in connection with surface water and
groundwater studies involving seepage through earth dams, yield of wells, infiltration, excavations and
basements,  construction  dewatering,  contaminant  migration  from  hazardous  waste  spills,  landfill
assessment, and other problems involving flow.  Permeability is determined by means of various types of
seepage, pressure, pumping, and flow tests.
6.2
DETERMINATION OF GROUNDWATER LEVELS AND PRESSURES
Observations of the groundwater level and pressure are an important part of all geotechnical explorations,
and the identification of groundwater conditions should receive the same level of care given to soil
descriptions  and  samples.  Measurements  of  water  entry  during  drilling  and  measurements  of  the
groundwater level at least once following drilling should be considered a minimum effort to obtain water
level  data,  unless  alternate  methods,  such  as  installation  of    observation  wells,  are  defined  by  the
geotechnical engineer.  Detailed information regarding groundwater observations can be obtained from
ASTM D 4750, “Standard Test Method For Determining Subsurface Liquid Levels in a Borehole or
Monitoring Well”  and ASTM D 5092 “Design and Installation of Groundwater Wells in Aquifers”.
6.2.1
Information on Existing Wells
Many states require the drillers of water wells to file logs of the wells.  These are good sources of
information of the materials encountered and water levels recorded during well installation.  The well
owners, both public and private, may have records of the water levels after installation which may provide
extensive information on fluctuations of the water level. This information may be available at state agencies
regulating the drilling and installation of water wells, such as the Department of Transportation, the
Department of  Natural  Resources, State Geologist, Hydrology  Departments, and Division of Water
Resources.
6 - 2
6.2.2
Open Borings
The water level in open borings should be measured after any prolonged interruption in drilling, at the
completion of each boring, and at least 12 hours  (preferably 24 hours) after completion of drilling.
Additional water level measurements should be obtained at the completion of the field exploration and at
other times designated by the engineer.  The date and time of each observation should be recorded.
If the borehole has caved, the depth to the collapsed region should be recorded and reported on the boring
record as this may have been caused by groundwater conditions.  Perhaps, the elevations of the caved depths
of certain borings may be consistent with groundwater table elevations at the site and this may become
apparent once the subsurface profile is constructed (see Chapter 11).
Drilling mud obscures observations of the groundwater level owing to filter cake action and the higher
specific gravity of the drilling mud compared to that of the water.  If drilling fluids are used to advance the
borings, the drill crew should be instructed to bail the hole prior to making groundwater observations.
6.2.3
Observation Wells
The  observation well, also referred to as piezometer, is the fundamental means for measuring water head
in an aquifer and for evaluating the performance of dewatering systems.  In theory, a “piezometer” measures
the pressure in a confined aquifer or at a specific horizon of the geologic profile, while an “observation
well” measures the level in a water table aquifer (Powers, 1992).  In practice, however, the two terms are
at times used interchangeably to describe any device for determining water head.   
The term “observation well” is applied to any well or drilled hole used for the purpose of long-term studies
of groundwater levels and pressures.  Existing wells and bore holes in which casing is left in place are often
used to observe groundwater levels.  These, however, are not considered to be as satisfactory as wells
constructed specifically for the purpose.  The latter may consist of a standpipe installed in a previously
drilled exploratory hole or a hole drilled solely for use as an observation well.  
Details of typical observation well installations are shown in Figure 6-1.  The simplest type of observation
well  is formed by a small-diameter polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe set in an open hole.  The bottom of the
pipe is slotted and capped, and the annular space around the slotted pipe is backfilled with clean sand.  The
area above the sand is sealed with bentonite, and the remaining annulus is filled with grout, concrete, or soil
cuttings.  A surface seal, which is sloped away from the pipe, is commonly formed with concrete in order
to prevent the entrance of surface water.  The top of the pipe should also be capped to prevent the entrance
of foreign material; a small vent hole should be placed in the top cap.  In some localities, regulatory
agencies may stipulate the manner for installation and closure of observation  wells.
Driven or pushed-in well points are another common  type for use in granular soil formations and very soft
clay  (Figure 6-1b).  The well is formed by a stainless steel or brass well point threaded to a galvanized steel
pipe (see Dunnicliff, 1988 for equipment variations).  In granular soils, an open boring or rotary wash
boring is advanced to a point several centimeters above the measurement depth and the well point is driven
to the desired depth.  A seal is commonly required in the boring above the well point with a surface seal at
the ground surface.  Note that observation wells may require development (see ASTM D 5092) to minimize
the effects of installation, drilling fluids, etc.  Minimum pipe diameters should allow introduction of a bailer
or other pumping apparatus to remove fine-grained materials in the well to improve the response time.
Local or state jurisdictions may impose specific requirements on “permanent”observation wells, including
closure and special reporting of the location and construction  that must be considered in the planning and
installation.  Licensed drillers and special fees also may be required.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested