devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Convert selected pages of pdf to word online Library control class asp.net web page azure ajax 01254616-part64

6 - 3
Figure 6-1.
Representative Details of Observation Well Installations. (a) Drilled-in-place Stand-
Pipe Piezometer, (b) Driven Well Point.
Piezometers are available in a number of designs.  Commonly used piezometers are of the pneumatic and
the vibrating wire type.  Interested readers are directed to Course Module No. 11 (Instrumentation) or
Dunnicliff (1988) for a detailed discussion of the various types of piezometers.  
6.2.4 Water Level Measurements
A number of devices have been developed for sensing or measuring the water level in observation wells.
Following is a brief presentation of the three common methods that are used to measure the depth to
groundwater.  In general, common practice is to measure the depth to the water surface using the top of the
casing as a reference, with the reference point at a common orientation (often north) marked or notched on
the well casing.
Convert selected pages of pdf to word online - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
deleting pages from pdf online; delete pages from pdf reader
Convert selected pages of pdf to word online - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages from pdf document; deleting pages from pdf in preview
6 - 4
Chalked Tape
In this method a short section at the lower end of a metal tape is chalked.  The tape with a weight attached
to its end is then lowered until the chalked section has passed slightly below the water surface.  The depth
to the water is determined by subtracting the depth of penetration of the line into water, as measured by the
water line in the chalked section, from the total depth from the top of casing.  This is probably the most
accurate method, and the accuracy is useful in pump tests where very small drawdowns are significant.  The
method is cumbersome, however, when taking a series of rapid readings, since the tape must be fully
removed each time.  An enameled tape is not suitable unless it is roughened with sandpaper so it will accept
chalk.  The weight on the end of the tape should be small in volume so it does not displace enough water
to create an error.  
Tape with a Float
In this method, a tape with a flat-bottomed float attached to its end is lowered until the float hits the water
surface and the tape goes slack.  The tape is then lifted until the float is felt to touch the water surface and
it is just taut; the depth is then measured.  With practice this method can give rough measurements, but its
accuracy is poor.  A refinement is to mount a heavy whistle, open at the bottom, on a tape.  When it sinks
in the water, the whistle will give an audible beep as the air within it is displaced.
Electric Water-Level Indicator
This battery operated indicator consists of a weighted electric probe attached to the lower end of a length
of electrical cable that is marked at intervals to indicate the depth. When the probe reaches the water a
circuit is completed and this is registered by a meter mounted on the cable reel.  Various manufacturers
produce the instrument, utilizing as the signaling device a neon lamp, a horn, or an ammeter. The electric
indicator has the advantage that it may be used in extremely small holes.
The instrument should be ruggedly built, since some degree of rough handling can be expected.  The
distance markings must be securely fastened to the cable.  Some models are available in which the cable
itself is manufactured as a measuring tape.  The sensing probe should be shielded to prevent shorting out
against metal risers.  When the water is highly conductive, erratic readings can develop in the moist air
above the actual water level.  Sometimes careful attention to the intensity of the neon lamp or the pitch of
the horn will enable the reader to distinguish the true level.  A sensitivity adjustment on the instrument can
be useful.  If oil or iron sludge has accumulated in the observation well, the electric probe will give
unreliable readings.
Data Loggers
When timed and frequent water level measurements are required, as for a pump test or slug test, data loggers
are useful. Data loggers are in the form of an electric transducer near the bottom of the well which senses
changes in water level as changes in pressure.  A data acquisition system is used to acquire and store the
readings.   A data logger can eliminate the need for onsite technicians on night shifts during an extended
field permeability test.  A further significant saving is in the technician’s time back in the office.  The
preferred models of the data logger not only record the water level readings but permit the data to be
downloaded into a personal computer and, with appropriate software, to be quickly reduced and plotted.
These devices are also extremely useful for cases where measurement of artesian pressures is required or
where data for tidal corrections during field permeability tests is necessary.  
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page2 }; // Specify a position for inserting the selected pages. doc2.InsertPages( pages, pageIndex); // Output the new document Insert Blank Page to PDF File in
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; extract pages from pdf files
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
page2} ' Specify a position for inserting the selected pages. doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using
a pdf page cut; delete pages of pdf preview
6 - 5
6.3
FIELD MEASUREMENT OF PERMEABILITY
The  permeability (k) is a measure  of how easily water  and other fluids are transmitted through the
geomaterial and thus represents a flow property.   In addition to groundwater related issues, it is of particular
concern    in  geoenvironmental  problems.    The  parameter  k  is  closely  related  to  the  coefficient  of
consolidation  (c
v
)  since  time  rate  of  settlement  is  controlled  by  the  permeability.    In  geotechnical
engineering, we designate small k = coefficient of permeability or hydraulic conductivity (units of cm/sec),
which follows Darcy's law:
q = k
@
i
@
A
(6-1)
where q = flow (cm
3
/sec), i = dh/dx = hydraulic gradient, and A = cross-sectional area of flow. 
Laboratory permeability tests may be conducted on undisturbed samples of natural soils or rocks, or on
reconstituted specimens of soil that will be used as controlled fill in embankments and earthen dams.  Field
permeability tests may be conducted on natural soils (and rocks) by a number of methods, including simple
falling head, packer (pressurized tests), pumping (drawdown), slug tests (dynamic impulse), and dissipation
tests.  A brief listing of the field permeability methods is given in Table 6-1.
The hydraulic conductivity (k) is related to the specific (or absolute) permeability, K (cm
2
) by:
K =  k
:
/
(
w
(6-2)
where 
:
= fluid viscosity and 
(
w
= unit weight of the fluid (i.e., water).  For fresh water at T = 20°C, 
:
=
1.005
@
E-06 kN-sec/m
2
and 
(
w
= 9.80 kN/m
3
 Note that K may be given in units of darcies (1 darcy =
9.87
@
E-09 cm
2
).  Also, please note that groundwater hydrologists have confusingly interchanged k 
º
K in
their nomenclature and this conflict resides within the various ASTM standards.  The rate at which water
is transmitted  through a unit width of an  aquifer under a hydraulic gradient i = 1 is defined as the
transmissivity (T) of the formation, given by:
 = k
@
b
(6-3)
where b = aquifer thickness.
The coefficient of consolidation (c
v
for vertical direction) is related to the coefficient of permeability by the
expression:
c
v
 k
@
D
N
/
(
w
(6-4)
where D
N
= (1/m
v
) = constrained modulus obtained from one-dimensional oedometer tests (i.e., in lieu of
the well-known e-log 
F
v
N
curve, the constrained modulus is simply D = 
)
F
v
N
/
)
,
v
).  In conventional one-
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Support to insert note annotation to replace PDF text. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
cut pages from pdf file; cut pages from pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Support to insert note annotation to replace PDF text. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; extract pages from pdf file
6 - 6
dimensional vertical compression, c
v
is often determined from the time rate of consolidation:
c
v
 T H
2
/t
(6-5)
where T = time factor (from Terzaghi theory), H = drainage path length, and t = measured time.  For field
permeability, it may be desirable to distinguish between vertical (c
v
) and horizontal consolidation (c
h
).
TABLE  6-1.
   F
I
ELD METHODS FOR MEASUREMENT OF 
PERMEAB
I
L
ITY
Test Method
Applicable Soils
Reference
Various Field Methods
Soil & Rock Aquifers
ASTM D 4043
Pumping tests
Drawdown in soils
ASTM D 4050
Double-ring infiltrometer
Surface fill soils
ASTM D 3385
Infiltrometer with sealed ring
Surface soils
ASTM D 5093
Various field methods
Soils in vadose zone
ASTM D 5126
Slug tests.
Soils at depth
ASTM D 4044
Hydraulic fracturing
Rock in-situ
ASTM D 4645
Constant head injection
Low-permeability rocks
ASTM D 4630
Pressure pulse technique
Low-permeability rocks
ASTM D 4630
Piezocone dissipation
Low to medium k soils
Houlsby & Teh (1988)
Dilatometer dissipation
Low to medium k soils
Robertson et al. (1988)
Falling head tests
Cased borehole in soils
Lambe & Whitman (1979)
6.3.1
Seepage Tests
Seepage tests in boreholes constitute one means of determining the in-situ permeability.  They are
valuable in the case of materials such as sands or gravels because undisturbed samples of these materials
for laboratory permeability testing are difficult or impossible to obtain.  Three types of tests are in
common use: falling head, rising head, and constant water level methods.
In general, either the rising or the falling level methods should be used if the permeability is low enough
to permit accurate determination of the water level.  In the falling level test, the flow is from the hole to
the surrounding soil and there is danger of clogging of the soil pores by sediment in the test water used.
This danger does not exist in the rising level test, where water flows from the surrounding soil to the
hole, but there is the danger of the soil at the bottom of the hole becoming loosened or quick if too great
a gradient is imposed at the bottom of the hole.  If the rising level is used, the test should be followed
by sounding of the base of the hole with drill rods to determine whether heaving of the bottom has
occurred.  The rising level test is the preferred test.  In those cases where the permeability is so high as
to preclude accurate measurement of the rising or falling water level, the constant level test is used.
VB.NET PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in vb.
Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete
extract pages from pdf without acrobat; cut pages from pdf reader
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
doc1 = new DOCXDocument(inputFilePath1); // Specify a position for inserting the selected page. Add and Insert Multiple Word Pages to Word Document Using C#.
export pages from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf
6 - 7
Holes in which seepage tests are to be performed should be drilled using only clear water as the drilling
fluid.  This precludes the formation of a mud cake on the walls of the hole or clogging of the pores of
the soil by drilling mud.  The tests are performed intermittently as the borehole is advanced.  When the
hole reaches the level at which a test is desired, the hole is cleaned and flushed using clear water pumped
through a drill tool with shielded or upward-deflected jets.  Flushing is continued until a clean surface
of undisturbed material exists at the bottom of the hole.  The permeability is then determined by one of
the procedures given below.  Specifications sometimes require a limited advancement of the borehole
without casing upon completion of the first test at a given level, followed by cleaning, flushing, and
repeat testing.  The difficulty of obtaining satisfactory in situ permeability measurements makes this
requirement a desirable feature since it permits verification of the test results.
Data which must be recorded for each test regardless of the type of test performed include:
1.
Depth from the ground surface to groundwater surface both before and after the test,
2.
Inside diameter of the casing,
3.
Height of the casing above the ground surface,
4.
Length of casing at the test section,
5.
Diameter of the borehole below the casing,
6.
Depth to the bottom of the boring from the top of the casing,
7.
Depth to the standing water level from the top of the casing, and
8.
A description of the material tested.
Falling Water Level Method
In this test, the casing is filled with water, which is then allowed to seep into the soil.  The rate of drop
of the water surface in the casing is observed by measuring the depth of the water surface below the top
of the casing at 1, 2 and 5 minutes after the start of the test and at 5-minute intervals thereafter.  These
observations are made until the rate of drop becomes negligible or until sufficient readings have been
obtained to satisfactorily determine the permeability.  Other required observations are listed above.
Rising Water Level Method
This method, most commonly referred to as the “time lag method” (US Army Corps of Engineers, 1951),
consists of bailing the water out of the casing and observing the rate of rise of the water level in the
casing at intervals until the rise in the water level becomes negligible.  The rate is observed by measuring
the elapsed time and the depth of the water surface below the top of the casing.  The intervals at which
the readings are required will vary somewhat with the permeability of the soil.  The readings should be
frequent enough to establish the equalization diagram.  In no case should the total elapsed time for the
readings be less than 5 minutes.  As noted above, a rising level test should always be followed by a
sounding of the bottom of the hole to determine whether the test created a quick condition.
Constant Water Level Method
In this method water is added to the casing at a rate sufficient to maintain a constant water level at or
near the top of the casing for a period of not less than 10 minutes.  The water may be added by pouring
from calibrated containers or by pumping through a water meter.  In addition to the data listed in the
above general discussion, the data recorded should consist of the amount of water added to the casing
at 5 minutes after the start of the test, and at 5-minute intervals thereafter until the amount of added water
becomes constant.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Online C# class source codes enable the ability to rotate int rotateInDegree = 270; // Rotate the selected page. C#.NET Demo Code to Rotate All PDF Pages in C#
acrobat extract pages from pdf; copy pdf page into word doc
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Access to freeware download and online VB.NET class to provide users the most individualized PDF page image as Png, Gif and TIFF, to any selected PDF page with
cut pages from pdf preview; cut pages out of pdf online
6 - 8
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
1. Highlight text. Click to highlight selected PDF text content. 2. Underline text. Click to underline selected PDF text. 3. Wavy underline text.
cut pages from pdf online; extract pages from pdf file online
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
1. Highlight text. Click to highlight selected PDF text content. 2. Underline text. Click to underline selected PDF text. 3. Wavy underline text.
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
Figure 6-3.  A General Configuration and Layout of Piezometers for a Pumping Test.
The pump used for these tests should have a capacity of 1.5 to 2 times the maximum anticipated flow
and should have a discharge line sufficiently long to obviate the possibility of the discharge water
recharging the strata being tested.  Auxiliary equipment required include an air line to measure the water
level in the test well, a flow meter, and measuring devices to determine the depth to water in the
observation well.  The air line, complete with pressure gage, hand pump, and check valve, should be
securely fastened to the pumping level but in no case closer than 0.6 m beyond the end of the suction
line.  The flow meter should be of the visual type, such as an orifice.  The depth-measuring device for
the observation well may be any of the types described in Section 6.2.
The test procedure for field pumping tests  is as follows:  Upon completion of the well or borehole, the
hole is cleaned and flushed, the depth of the well is accurately measured, the pump is installed, and the
well is developed.  The well is then tested at 1/3, 2/3 and full capacity.  Full capacity is defined as the
maximum discharge attainable with the water levels in the test and observation wells stabilized.  Each
of the discharge rates is maintained for 4 hours after further drawdown in the test and observation well
has ceased, or for a maximum of 48 hours, whichever occurs first.  The discharge must be maintained
constant during each of the three stages of the test and interruptions of pumping are not permitted.  If
pumping should accidentally be interrupted, the water level should be permitted to return to its full non-
pumping level before pumping is resumed.  Upon completion of the drawdown test, the pump is shut off
and the rate of recovery is observed.
The basic test well data which must be recorded are:
1.
Location, top elevation and depth of the well,
2.
The size and length of all blank casing in the well,
3.
Diameter, length, and location of all screen casing used; also the type and size of the screen
opening and the material of which the screen is made, 
4.
Type of filter pack used, if any,
5.
The water elevation in the well prior to testing, and
6.
Location of the bottom of the air line.
6 - 12
Information required for each observation well are:
1.
Location, top elevation, and depth of the well,
2.
The size and elevation of the bottom of the casing (after installation of the well),
3.
Location of all blank casing sections,
4.
Manufacturer, type, and size of the pipes etc.
5.
Depth and elevation of the well and
6.
Water level in the well prior to testing.
Pump data required include the manufacturer’s model designation, pump type, maximum capacity, and
capacity at 1800 rpm. The drawdown test data recorded for each discharge rate consist of the discharge
and drawdowns of the test well and each observation well at the time intervals shown in Table 6-1.
TABLE 6-2.
TI
ME 
I
NTERVALS FOR READ
I
NG DUR
I
NG 
PUMP
I
NG TEST
Elapsed Time
Time Interval for Readings
0-10 min
10-60 min
1-6 hour
6-9 hour
9-24 hour
24-48 hour
>48 hour
0.5 min
2.0 min
15.0 min
30.0 min
1.0 hour
3.0 hour
6.0 hour
The required recovery curve data consist of readings of the depth to water at the test location and
observation wells at the same time intervals given in Table 6-2.  Readings are continued until the water
level returns to the prepumping level or until adequate data have been obtained.  A typical time-
drawdown curve is shown in Figure 6-4.   Generally, the time-drawdown curve becomes straight after
the first few minutes of pumping.  If true equilibrium conditions are established, the drawdown curve
will become horizontal.
Field drawdown tests may be conducted using 2 or more cased wells and measuring the drop in head
with time.  A submersible pump at a central well is used for the drawdown and the head loss at two radial
distances may be measured manually or automated via pore pressure transducers.  Sowers (1979)
discusses the details briefly for two cases:  (1) an unconfined aquifer over an impervious layer and (2)
artesian aquifer.  If the gradient of the drawdown is not too great (< 25° slope), then the head loss in the
drawdown well may be used itself (r
1
= well radius) and only two cased wells are necessary.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested