devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Delete pages from pdf without acrobat control application system azure html asp.net console 01254617-part65

6 - 13
Figure 6-4.   Drawdown in an Observation Well Versus Pumping Time (Logarithmic Scale).
For the case of measured drawdown pressures in an unconfined aquifer (shown in Figure 6-5), the
permeability (k in cm/s) of the transmitting medium is given by:  
q ln(r
2
/r
1
)
Unconfined:
 =     
)))))))))))
(6-7)
B
[(h
2
)
2
-(h
1
)
2
]
where q = measured flow with time (cm
3
/s), r = radial distance (cm), and h = height of water above the
reference elevation (cm).  
For a confined aquifer where an impervious clay aquiclude caps the permeable aquifer, the permeability
is determined from:
q ln(r
2
/r
1
)
Confined:
 =  
))))))))))
(6-8)
2
B
b (h
2
-h
1
)
where b = thickness of the aquifer (Figure 6-6).
Delete pages from pdf without acrobat - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract page from pdf document; cutting pdf pages
Delete pages from pdf without acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pages from pdf on ipad; extract pages from pdf file online
6 - 14
Figure 6-5.   Definitions of Terms in Pumping Test Within an Unconfined Aquifer.
Figure 6-6.   Definitions of Terms in Pumping Test Within a Confined Aquifer System.
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete page from pdf preview; copy one page of pdf
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
extract pdf pages online; extract one page from pdf online
6 - 15
6.3.4
Slug Tests
Using mechanical slug tests (ASTM 4044) in which a solid object is used to displace water and  induce
a sudden change of head in a well to determine permeability has become common in environmental
investigations.  Figure 6-7 presents the slug test procedure.  It is conducted in a borehole in which a
screened (slotted) pipe is installed.  The solid object, called a “slug”, often consists of a weighted plastic
cylinder.  The slug  is submerged below the water table until equilibrium has been established; then the
slug is removed suddenly, causing an “instantaneous” lowering of the water level within the observation
well.  Finally, as the well gradually fills up with water, the refill rate is recorded.  This is termed the
“slug out” procedure. 
The permeability, k, is then determined from the refill rate.  In general, the more rapid the refill rate, the
higher the k value of the screened sediments.
It is also possible to run a “slug in” test.  This is similar to the slug out test, except the plastic slug is
suddenly dropped into the water, causing an “instantaneous” water level rise.  The decay of this water
level back to static is then used to compute the permeability.  A slug in and slug out test can be
performed on the same well.
Alternatively, instead of using a plastic slug, it is possible to lower the water level in the well using
compressed air (or raising it using a vacuum) and then suddenly restore atmospheric pressure by opening
a quick-release valve.
Figure 6-7.  General Procedure for Slug Test in as Screened Borehole.
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete page from pdf reader; deleting pages from pdf
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete page from pdf document; cut pdf pages
6 - 16
With either method, a pressure transducer and data logger are used to record time and water levels.  In
instances where water-level recovery is slow enough, hand-measured water levels (see Section 6.2) are
adequate.  Once, the data have been collected, drawdown is graphed versus time, and various equations
and/or curve-matching techniques are used to compute permeability.
Much  of  the  popularity  of  these  tests  results  from  the  ease  and  low  cost  of  conducting  them.
Unfortunately, however, slug tests are  not  very reliable.  They can  give wrong answers, lead to
misinterpretation of aquifer characteristics, and ultimately, improper design of dewatering or remediation
systems.  Several shortcomings of the slug tests may be summarized as follows (Driscoll, 1986):
1.
Variable accuracy: Slug tests may be accurate or may underestimate permeability by one or two
orders or magnitude. The test data will provide no clue as to the accuracy of the computed value
unless a pumping test is done in conjunction with slug tests.
2.
Small zone of investigation: Because slug tests are of short duration, the data they provide
reflect aquifer properties of just those sediments very near the well intake.  Thus, a single slug
test does not effectively integrate aquifer properties over a broad area.
3.
Slug tests cannot predict the storage capacity of an aquifer.
4.
It is difficult to analyze data from wells screened across the water table.
5.
Rapid slug removal often causes pressure transients that can obscure some of the early test data.
6.
If the true static water level is not determined with great precision, large errors can result in the
computed permeability values.
Therefore, it is crucial that a qualified hydrogeologist assesses the results of the slug tests and ensures
that they are properly applied and that data from them are not misused.  Although the absolute magnitude
of the permeability value obtained from slug tests may not be accurate, a comparison of values obtained
from tests in holes judiciously located throughout a site being investigated can be used to establish the
relative permeability of various portions of the site.
6.3.5   Piezocone Dissipation Tests
In a CPT test performed in saturated clays and silts, large excess porewater pressures (∆u) are generated
during penetration of the piezocone.   Soft to firm  intact clays will exhibit measured penetration
porewater pressures which are 3 to 6 times greater than the hydrostatic water pressure, while values of
10 to 20 times greater than the hydrostatic water pressure will typically be measured in stiff to hard intact
clays.  In fissured materials, zero or negative porewater pressures will be recorded.   Regardless, once
penetration is stopped, these excess pressures will decay with time and eventually reach equilibrium
conditions which correspond to hydrostatic values.   In essence, this is analogous to a push-in type
piezometer.   In addition to piezometers and piezocones, excess pressures occur during the driving of
pile foundations, installation of displacement devices such as vibroflots for stone columns and mandrels
for vertical wick-drains, as well as insertion of other in-situ tests including dilatometer, full-displacement
pressuremeter, and field vane.  How quickly the porewater pressures decay depends on the permeability
of the surrounding medium (k), as well as the horizontal coefficient of consolidation (c
h
), as per equation
6-4.    In clean sands and gravels that are pervious, essentially drained response is observed at the time
of penetration and the measured porewater pressures are hydrostatic.  In most other cases, an initial
undrained response occurs that is followed by drainage.  For example, in silty sands, generated excess
pressures can dissipate in 1 to 2 minutes, while in contrast, fat plastic clays may require 2 to 3 days for
complete equalization. 
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
copy pdf page to clipboard; delete page from pdf online
6 - 17
P
iezocone Dissipations at NGES,
 Amherst
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
1
10
100
1000
10000
Time (sec)
Porewater Pressures, u  (MPa)
u
0
Hydrostatic at
Z = 15.2 m depth 
u
2
(shoulder)
u
1
(midface)
∆u = 50%
Penetration
Values  (
u = 0 %)
∆u = 100%
t
50
= 450 seconds
Figure 6-8.   Porewater Pressure Dissipation Response in Soft Varved Clay at Amherst NGES.
(Procedure for t
50
determination using U
2
readings shown)
Representative dissipation curves from two types of piezocone elements (midface and shoulder) are
presented in Figure 6-8.   These data were recorded at a depth of 15.2  meters in a deposit of soft varved
silty clay at the National Geotechnical Experimentation Site (NGES) in Amherst, MA.  Full equalization
to hydrostatic conditions is reached in about 1 hour (3600 s).   In routine testing, data are recorded to just
50 percent consolidation in order to maintain productivity.   In this case, the initial penetration pressures
correspond to 0 percent decay and a calculated hydrostatic value (u
0
) based on groundwater levels
represents the 100 percent completion.  Figure 6-8 illustrates the procedure to obtain the time to 50
percent completion (t
50
). 
The aforementioned approach applies to soils that exhibit monotonic decay of porewater pressures with
logarithm of time.  For cases involving heavily overconsolidated and fissured geomaterials, a dilatory
response can occur whereby the porewater pressures initially rise with time, reach a peak value, and then
subsequently decrease with time.   
6 - 18
1.E-08
1.E-07
1.E-06
1.E-05
1.E-04
1.E-03
1.E-02
1.E-01
0.1
1
10
100
1000
10000
t
50   (sec)
Hydraulic Conductivity, k (cm/s)
Sand and 
Gravel
Sand
Silty Sand
to Sandy Silt
Silt
Clay
u
Parez & Fauriel (1988)
For type 2 piezocones with shoulder filter elements, the t
50
reading from monotonic responses can be
used to evaluate the permeability according  to the chart provided in Figure  6-9.     The average
relationship may be approximately expressed by:
(6-9)
1.25
50
251
1
( / / )
t
s
k cm
where t
50 
is given in seconds.   The interpretation of the coefficient of consolidation from dissipation test
data is discussed in Chapter 9 and includes a procedure for both monotonic and dilatory porewater
pressure behavior. 
Figure 6-9.    Coefficient of Permeability (k = Hydraulic Conductivity) from Measured 
Time to 50% Consolidation (t
50
) for Monotonic Type 2 Piezocone Dissipation Tests
(from Parez & Fauriel, 1988).
7 - 1
CHA
P
TER 7
.
0
LABORATORY TESTI
NG FOR SO
I
LS
7.1
GENERAL
Laboratory testing of soils is a fundamental element of geotechnical engineering.  The complexity of testing
required for a particular project may range from a simple moisture content determination to specialized
strength and stiffness testing.  Since testing can be expensive and time consuming, the geotechnical engineer
should recognize the project’s issues ahead of time so as to optimize the testing program, particularly strength
and consolidation testing.
Before describing the various soil test methods, soil behavioral under load will be examined and common soil
mechanics terms introduced.  The following discussion includes only basic concepts of soil behavior.
However, the engineer must grasp these concepts in order to select the appropriate tests to model the in-situ
conditions. The terms and symbols shown will be used in all the remaining modules of the course.  Basic soil
mechanics textbooks should be consulted for further explanation of these and other terms.
7.1.1
Weight-Volume Concepts
A sample of soil is usually composed of soil grains, water and air.  The soil grains are irregularly shaped
solids which are in contact with other adjacent soil grains.  The weight and volume of a soil sample depends
on the specific gravity of the soil grains (solids), the size of the space between soil grains (voids and pores)
and the amount of void space filled with water.  Common terms associated with weight-volume relationships
are shown in Table 7-1.  Of particular note is the void ratio (e) which is a general indicator of the relative
strength and compressibility of a soil sample, i.e., low void ratios generally indicate strong soils of low
compressibility, while high void ratios are often indicative of weak & highly compressible soils.   Selected
weight-volume (unit weight) relations are presented in Table 7-2.
TABLE 7-1.
TERMS 
I
N WE
I
GHT-VOLUME RELATI
ONS (After
Cheney
and
Chassie,
1
993)
Property
Symbol
Units
1
How obtained
(AASHTO/ASTM)
Direct Applications
Moisture Content
w
D
By measurement
(T 265/ D 4959)
Classification and in weight-
volume relations
Specific Gravity
G
s
D
By measurement
(T 100/D 854)
Volume computations
Unit weight
(
FL
-3
By measurement or from
weight-volume relations
Classification and for pressure
computations
Porosity
n
D
From weight-volume
relations
Defines relative volume of solids
to total volume of soil
Void Ratio
e
D
From weight-volume
relations
Defines relative volume of voids
to volume of solids
1
F = Force or weight; L = Length;  D = Dimensionless.  Although by definition, moisture content is a
dimensionless fraction (ratio of weight of water to weight of solids), it is commonly reported in percent by
multiplying the fraction by 100.
7 - 2
γ
γ
T
s
w
w
e
G
=
+
+
(
)
(
)
1
1
TABLE 7-2.
UN
IT WE
I
GHT-VOLUME RELATI
ONSH
I
P
S
Case
Relationship
Applicable Geomaterials
Soil Identities:
1.    G
s
w =  S e
2.  Total Unit Weight:
All types of soils & rocks
Limiting Unit Weight
Solid phase only:  w = e = 0:
γ
rock
 G
s
γ
w
Maximum expected value for
solid silica is 27 kN/m
3
Dry Unit Weight
For w = 0 (all air in void space):
γ
d
= G
s
γ
w
/(1+e)
Use for clean sands and dry
soils above groundwater table
Moist Unit Weight
(Total Unit Weight)
Variable amounts of air & water:
γ
t
= G
s
γ
w
(1+w)/(1+e)
with e = G
s
w/S 
Partially-saturated soils above
water table; depends on degree
of saturation (S, as decimal).
Saturated Unit Weight Set S = 1 (all voids with water):
γ
sat
=  γ
w
(G
s
+e)/(1+e)
All soils below water table;
Saturated clays & silts above
water table with full capillarity.
Hierarchy:
γ
d
#
γ
t
#
γ
sat
< γ
rock
Check on relative values
Note: γ
w
= 9.8 kN/m
3
(62.4 pcf) for fresh water 
7.1.2
Load-Deformation Process in Soils
When a load is applied to a soil sample, the deformation which occurs will depend on the grain-to-grain
contact (intergranular) forces and the amount of water in the voids.  If no porewater exists, the sample
deformation will be due to sliding between soil grains and deformation of the individual soil grains.  The
rearrangement of soil grains due to sliding accounts for most of the deformation.  Adequate deformation is
required to increase the grain contact areas to take the applied load.  As the amount of pore water in the void
increases, the pressure it exerts on soil grains will increase and reduce the intergranular contact forces. In
fact, tiny clay particles may be forced completely apart by water in the pore space.
Deformation of a saturated soil is more complicated than that of dry soil as water molecules, which fill the
voids, must be squeezed out of the sample before readjustment of soil grains can occur.  The more permeable
a soil is, the faster the deformation under load will occur.  However, when the load on a saturated soil is
quickly increased, the increase is carried entirely by the pore water until drainage begins.  Then more and
more load is gradually transferred to the soil grains until the excess pore pressure has dissipated and the soil
grains readjust to a denser configuration.  This process is called consolidation and results in a higher unit
weight and a decreased void ratio.
7 - 3
7.1.3
Principle of Effective Stress
The consolidation process demonstrates the very important principle of effective stress, which will be used
in all the remaining modules of this course.  Under an applied load, the total stress in a saturated soil sample
is composed of the intergranular stress and porewater pressure (neutral stress).  As the porewater has zero
shear strength and is considered incompressible, only the intergranular stress is effective in resisting shear
or limiting compression of the soil sample.  Therefore, the intergranular contact stress is called the effective
stress.  Simply stated, this fundamental principle states that the effective stress (
F
’) on any plane within a
soil mass is the net difference between the total stress (
F
) and  porewater pressure (u).
When pore water drains from soil during consolidation, the area of contact between soil grains increases,
which increases the level of effective stress and therefore the soil’s shear strength.  In practice, staged
construction of embankments is used to permit increase of effective stress in the foundation soil before
subsequent fill load is added.  In such operations the effective stress increase is frequently monitored with
piezometers to ensure the next stage of embankment can be safely placed.
Soil deposits below the water table will be considered saturated and the ambient pore pressure at any depth
may be computed by multiplying the unit weight of water (
(
w
) by the height of water above that depth.  For
partially saturated soil, the effective stress will be influenced by the soil structure and degree of saturation
(Bishop, et. al., 1960).   In many cases involving silts & clays, the continuous void spaces that exist in the
soil behave as capillary tubes of variable cross-section.  Due to capillarity, water may rise above the static
groundwater table (phreatic surface) as a negative porewater pressure and the soils may be nearly or fully
saturated. 
7.1.4
Overburden Stress
The purpose of laboratory testing is to simulate in-situ soil loading under controlled boundary conditions.
Soils existing at a depth below the ground surface are affected by the weight of the soil above that depth.  The
influence of this weight, known generally as the overburden stress, causes a state of stress to exist which is
unique at that depth for that soil.  When a soil sample is removed from the ground, that state of stress is
relieved as all confinement of the sample has been removed.  In testing, it is important to reestablish the in-
situ stress conditions and to study changes in soil properties when additional stresses representing the
expected design loading are applied.  In this regard, the effective stress (grain-to-grain contact) is the
controlling factor in shear, state of stress, consolidation, stiffness, and flow.  Therefore, the designer should
try to re-establish the effective stress condition during most testing.
The test confining stresses are estimated from the total, hydrostatic, and effective overburden stresses.  The
engineer’s first task is determining these stress and pressure variations with depth.  This involves determining
the  total unit weights (density) for each soil layer in the subsurface profile, and determining the depth of the
water table.  Unit weight may be accurately determined from density tests on undisturbed samples or
estimated from in-situ test measurements.  The water table is routinely recorded on the boring logs, or can
be measured in open standpipes, piezometers, and dissipation tests during CPTs and DMTs .  
The total vertical (overburden) stress (
F
vo
) at any depth (z) may be found as the accumulation of total unit
weights (
(
t
) of the soil strata above that depth:
F
vo
  
I
(
t
dz    
.
E
(
t
)
z          
(7-1)
7 - 4
For soils above the phreatic surface, the applicable value of total unit weight may be dry, moist, or saturated
depending upon the soil type and degree of capillarity (see Table 7-2).   For soil elements situated below the
groundwater table, the saturated unit weight is normally adopted. 
The hydrostatic pressure depends upon the degree of saturation and level of the phreatic surface and 
is determined as follow:
Soil elements above water table:
u
o
=
0    
(Completely dry)
(7-2a)
u
o
(
w
(z- z
w
   (Full capillarity)
(7-2b)
Soil elements below water table:    u
o
(
w
(z- z
w
)
(7-2c)
where z = depth of soil element, z
w
= depth to groundwater table.  Another  case involves partial saturation
with intermediate values between (7-2a and 7-2b) which literally vary daily with the weather and can be
obtained via tensiometer measurements in the field. Usual practical calculations adopt (7-2a) for many soils,
yet the negative capillary values from (7-2b) often apply to saturated clay & silt deposits.
The effective vertical stress is obtained as the difference between (7-1) and (7-2):
F
vo
F
vo
- u
o
(7-3)
A plot of effective overburden profile with depth is called a 
F
/
v
diagram and is extensively used in all aspects
of foundation testing and analysis (see Holtz & Kovacs, 1981; Lambe & Whitman, 1979).
7.1.5
Selection and Assignment of Tests
Certain considerations regarding laboratory testing, such as when, how much, and what type, can only be
decided by an experienced geotechnical engineer.   The following minimal criteria should be considered while
determining the scope of the laboratory testing program:
C
Project type (bridge, embankment, rehabilitation, buildings, etc.)
C
Size of the project
C
Loads to be imposed on the foundation soils
C
Types of loads  (i.e., static, dynamic, etc.)
C
Critical tolerances for the project (e.g., settlement limitations)
C
Vertical and horizontal variations in the soil profile as determined from boring logs and visual
identification of soil types in the laboratory
C
Known or suspected peculiarities of soils at the project location (i.e., swelling soils, collapsible soils,
organics, etc.)
C
Presence of visually observed intrusions, slickensides, fissures, concretions, etc.
The selection of tests should be considered preliminary until the geotechnical engineer is satisfied that the test
results are sufficient to develop reliable soil profiles and provide the soil parameters needed for design.
Following this subsection are brief discussions of frequently used soil properties and tests. These discussions
assume that the reader will have access to the latest volumes of AASHTO and ASTM standards containing
details of test procedures and will study them in connection with this presentation.  Table  7-3 presents a
summary list of  AASHTO and ASTM tests frequently used for laboratory testing of soils.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested