devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete page from pdf online SDK application service wpf windows html dnn 01254618-part66

7 - 5
TABLE 7-3.
AASHTO AND ASTM STANDARDS FOR FREQUENTLY-USED
LABORATORY TESTI
NG OF SO
I
LS
Test
Category
Name of Test
Test Designation
AASHTO
ASTM
Visual
Identification
Practice for Description and Identification of Soils (Visual-
Manual Procedure)
-
D 2488
Practice for Description of Frozen Soils (Visual-Manual
Procedure)
-
D 4083
Index
Properties
Test Method for Determination of Water (Moisture) Content
of Soil by Direct Heating Method
T 265
D 4959
Test Method for Specific Gravity of Soils
T 100
D 854
Method for Particle-Size Analysis of Soils
T 88
D 422
Test Method for Amount of Material in Soils Finer than the
No. 200 (75-
:
m) Sieve
D 1140
Test Method for Liquid Limit, Plastic Limit, and Plasticity
Index of Soils
T 89
T 90
D 4318
Test Method for Laboratory Compaction Characteristics of
Soil Using Standard Effort (600 kN-m/m
3
)
T 99
D 698
Test Method for Laboratory Compaction Characteristics of
Soil Using Modified Effort (2,700 kN-m/m
3
)
T 180
D 1557
Corrosivity
Test Method for pH of Peat Materials
-
D 2976
Test Method for pH of Soils
-
D 4972
Test Method for pH of Soil for Use in Corrosion Testing
T 289
G 51
Test Method  for Sulfate Content
T 290
D 4230
Test Method For Resistivity  
T 288
D 1125
G 57
Test Method for Chloride Content                
T 291
D 512
Test Methods for Moisture, Ash, and Organic Matter of Peat
and Other Organic Soils
T 194
D 2974
Test  Method  for  Classification  of  Soils  for  Engineering
Purposes
M 145
D 2487
D 3282
Delete page from pdf online - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf files; deleting pages from pdf online
Delete page from pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
cut pages from pdf reader; a pdf page cut
7 - 6
TABLE 7-3 (Continued)
AASHTO AND ASTM STANDARDS FOR FREQUENTLY USED
LABORATORY TESTI
NG OF SO
I
LS
Test
Category
Name of Test
Test Designation
AASHTO
ASTM
Strength
Properties
Unconfined Compressive Strength of Cohesive Soil
T 208
D 2166
Unconsolidated, Undrained Compressive Strength of Clay and
Silt Soils in Triaxial Compression
T 296
D 2850
Consolidated-Undrained Triaxial Compression Test on Cohesive
Soils
T 297
D 4767
Direct Shear Test of Soils For Consolidated Drained Conditions
T 236
D 3080
Modulus and Damping of Soils by the Resonant-Column Method
(Small-Strain Properties)
-
D 4015
Test Method for  Laboratory Miniature  Vane Shear Test for
Saturated Fine-Grained Clayey Soil
-
D 4648
Test Method for Bearing Ratio of Soils in Place
-
D 4429
Test Method for CBR (California Bearing Ratio) of Laboratory-
Compacted Soils
-
D 1883
Test method For Resilient Modulus of Soils
T 294
-
Method  for  Resistance  R-Value  and  Expansion  Pressure  of
Compacted Soils 
T 190
D 2844
Permeability
Test Method for Permeability of Granular Soils (Constant Head)
T 215
D 2434
Test Method for Measurement of Hydraulic Conductivity of
Saturated Porous Materials Using a Flexible Wall Permeameter
-
D 5084
Compression
Properties
Method for One-Dimensional Consolidation Properties of Soils
(Oedometer Test)
T 216
D 2435
Test Methods for One-Dimensional Swell or Settlement Potential
of Cohesive Soils
T 258
D 4546
Test Method for Measurement of Collapse Potential of Soils
-
D 5333
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your PDF document, you can use
pdf extract pages; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Advanced component and library able to delete PDF page in both Visual C# .NET WinForms and ASP.NET WebForms project. Free online C# class source code for
convert selected pages of pdf to word online; cut pages from pdf online
7 - 7
7.1.6
Visual Identification of Soils
Guidelines for visual identification of soils can be used in field as well as laboratory investigations.
Visual Identification of Soils
AASHTO
ASTM 
-
D 2488, D 4083
Purpose
1. Verify the field description of soil color and soil type.
2. Select  representative specimens for various tests.
3. Select specimens for special tests (i.e., slickensided soils for triaxial testing) to determine
the effects of the soil macro structure on the overall properties.
4. Locate and identify changes, intrusions, and disturbances  within a sample.
5. Verify or revise the soil description to be included in the boring logs or in soil profile
presentations.
Procedure
The visual-manual examination should be done expeditiously to ascertain the percent fines,
relative percentages of gravel, sand, silt, & clay, as well as constituents & composition.
Commentary
Prior to assigning laboratory tests, all soil samples submitted to a laboratory should be subjected
to visual examination and identification. It is advisable for the geotechnical engineer to be
present during the opening of samples for visual inspection. He should remain in contact with
the laboratory, as he can offer valuable assistance in assessing soil properties. 
Disturbed Samples
As discussed earlier, disturbed samples are normally bulk samples of various sizes.  Visual
examinations of these samples are limited to the color, contents (i.e., gravel, concretions, sand,
etc.) and consistency, as determined by handling a small, representative piece of the sample.
The color of the soil should be determined by examining the samples in a jar or sealed can,
where the moisture content is preserved near or at its natural condition.  If more than one
sample is obtained from the same deposit, the uniformity of the sample or lack of it is
determined at this stage.  This determination is used to decide on the proper mixing and
quartering of disturbed samples to obtain representative specimens.
Undisturbed Samples
Undisturbed samples should be opened for examination one sample at a time.  Prior to opening,
the sample number, depth and other identifying marks placed on the sample tube or wrapping
should be checked against field logs.  Samples should be laid on their side on a clean table top.
If samples are soft, they should be supported in a sample cradle of appropriate size; they should
not be examined on a flat table top.
Samples should  be  examined in a humid  room where possible, or  in rooms where the
temperature is neither excessively warm nor cold.  Once the samples are unwrapped, the
technician, engineer or geologist examining the sample identifies its color, soil type, variations
and discontinuities identifiable from surface features such as silt and sand seams, trace of
organics, fissures, shells, mica, other minerals, and important features.
The apparent relative strength, as determined by a hand-held penetrometer, is often noted
during this process.  Samples should be handled very gently to avoid disturbing the material.
The examination should be done quickly before changes in the natural moisture content occur.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
extract pages from pdf file; extract page from pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
convert selected pages of pdf to word; delete pages of pdf
7 - 8
7.1.7
Index Properties
Index properties are used to characterize soils and determine their basic properties such as moisture
content, specific gravity, particle size distribution, consistency and moisture-density relationships.
Moisture Content
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 265
D 4959
Purpose
To determine the amount of water present in a quantity of soil in terms of its dry weight and to
provide general correlations with strength, settlement, workability and other properties.
Procedure
Oven-dry the soil at a temperature of 110±5
o
C to a constant weight (evaporate free water); this
is usually achieved in 12 to 18 hours.
Commentary
Determination of the moisture content of soils is the most commonly used laboratory procedure.
The moisture content of soils, when combined with data obtained from other tests, produces
significant information about the characteristics of the soil.  For example, when the in situ
moisture content of a sample retrieved from below the phreatic surface approaches its liquid
limit, it is an indication that the soil in its natural state is susceptible to larger consolidation
settlement.
Serious errors may be introduced if the soil contains other components, such as petroleum
products or easily ignitable solids.  When the soils contain fibrous organic matter, absorbed
water may be present in the organic fibers as well as in the soil voids.  The test procedure does
not differentiate between pore water and absorbed water  in organic fibers  (although the
procedure does suggest evaluating organic soils at a lower temperature of 60
o
C to reduce
decomposition of highly organic soils).  Thus the moisture content measured will be the total
moisture lost rather than free moisture lost (from void spaces).  As discussed later, this may
introduce serious errors in the determination of Atterberg limits.
Specific Gravity
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 100
D 854
Purpose
To determine the specific gravity of the soil grains.
Procedure
The specific gravity is determined as the ratio of the weight of a given volume of soil solids at
a given temperature to the weight of an equal volume of distilled water at that temperature,
both weights being taken in air.
Commentary
Some qualifying words like true, absolute, apparent, bulk or mass, etc. are sometimes added
to "specific gravity".  These qualifying words modify the sense of specific gravity as to whether
it refers to soil grains or to soil mass.  The soil grains have permeable and impermeable voids
inside them.  If all the internal voids of soil grains are excluded for determining the true
volume of grains, the specific gravity obtained is called absolute or true specific gravity.
Complete de-airing of the soil-water mix during the test is imperative while determining the
true or absolute value of specific gravity.
A value of specific gravity is necessary to compute the void ratio of a soil, it is used in the
hydrometer analysis, and it is useful to predict the unit weight of a soil (see Table 7-2).
Occasionally, the specific gravity may be useful in soil mineral classifications; e.g., iron
minerals have a larger value of specific gravity than silica.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+. PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
extract page from pdf reader; copy web page to pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages from pdf in preview; a pdf page cut
7 - 9
Unit Weight
The measurement of unit weight for undisturbed soil samples in the laboratory is simply determined by
weighing a portion of a soil sample and dividing by its volume.  This is convenient with thin-walled tube
(Shelby) samples, as well as piston, Sherbrooke, Laval, and NGI samplers, as well.  The water content should
be obtained at the same time to allow conversion from total to dry unit weights, as needed.  
Where undisturbed samples are not available, the unit weight is evaluated from weight-volume relations
between the water content and/or void ratio, as well as the assumed or measured degree of saturation  (see
Table 7-2).   Additional methods using in-situ test data are discussed in Chapter 9.
Figure 7-1.    Laboratory Sieves for Mechanical Analysis for Grain Size Distributions.  
Shown (right to left) are Sieve Nos. 3/8-in. (9.5-mm), No. 10 (2.0-mm), No. 40 (250-
:
m) 
and No. 200 (750-
:
m) and example soil particle sizes including (right to left): 
medium gravel, fine gravel, medium-coarse sand, silt, and dry clay (kaolin).  
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
acrobat export pages from pdf; extract one page from pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages of pdf preview; cut paste pdf pages
7 - 10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
0.0001
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
Grain Size (mm)
Percent Passing (by weight)
Silica Sand
Piedmont Silt
Plastic Kaolin
CLAY SIZE  
SILT SIZE   
GRAVEL  
0.075 mm  
Fine-Grained Soils  
Coarse-Grained Soils  
Sieve Analysis
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 88
D 422, D 1140
Purpose
To determine the percentage of various grain sizes.  The grain size distribution is used to
determine the textural classification of soils (i.e., gravel, sand, silty clay, etc.) which in turn
is useful in evaluating the engineering characteristics such as permeability, strength, swelling
potential, and susceptibility to frost action. 
Procedure
Wash a prepared representative sample through a series of sieves (screens).   Figure 7-1
shows a selection of sieves and soil particle sizes.  The amount retained on each sieve is
collected dried and weighed to determine the percentage of material passing that sieve size.
Figure 7-2 shows several grain size distributions obtained from sieving and hydrometer
methods including natural clays, silts, and various sands.
Figure 7-2: Representative Grain Size Curves for Several Soil Types.
Commentary
Obtaining a representative specimen is an important aspect of this test. When samples are
dried for testing or “washing,” it may be necessary to break up the soil clods.  Care should
be made  to avoid crushing of soft carbonate or sand  particles. If the soil contains a
substantial amount of fibrous organic materials, these may tend to plug the sieve openings
during washing.  The material settling over the sieve during washing should be constantly
stirred to avoid plugging.
Openings of fine (< No. 200) mesh or fabric are easily distorted as a result of normal handling
and use.  They should be replaced often.  A simple way to determine whether sieves should
be replaced is the periodic examination of the stretch of the sieve fabric on its frame.  The
fabric should remain taut; if it sags, it has been distorted and should be replaced. A common
cause of serious errors is the use of “dirty” sieves.  Some soil particles, because of their shape,
size or adhesion characteristics, have a tendency to be lodged in the sieve openings.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Allow users to draw freehand shapes on PDF page. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
copy pdf page to clipboard; extract pages from pdf online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Allow users to draw freehand shapes on PDF page. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
extract page from pdf preview; delete pages of pdf online
7 - 11
Hydrometer Analysis
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 88
D 1140
Purpose
To determine distribution (percentage) of particle sizes smaller than No. 200 sieve (< 0.075
mm) and identify the silt, clay, and colloids percentages in the soil.
Procedure
Soil passing the No. 200 sieve is mixed with a dispersant and distilled water and placed in a
special graduated cylinder in a state of liquid suspension. The specific gravity of the mixture
is periodically measured using a calibrated hydrometer to determine the rate of settlement of
soil particles.  The relative size and percentage of fine particles are determined based on Stoke’s
law for settlement of idealized spherical particles.
Commentary
The principal value of the hydrometer analysis is in obtaining the clay fraction (percent finer
than 0.002 mm).  This is because the soil behavior for a cohesive soil depends principally on
the type and percent of clay minerals, the geologic history of the deposit, and its water content
rather than on the distribution of particle sizes.
Replicable results can be obtained when soils are largely composed of common mineral
ingredients. Results can be distorted and erroneous when the composition of the soil is not taken
into account to make corrections for the specific gravity of the specimen.  Particle size of  highly
organic soils cannot be determined by the use of this method.
Atterberg Limits
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 89, T 90
D 4318
Purpose
To describe the consistency and plasticity of fine-grained soils with varying degrees of
moisture.
Procedure
For the portion of the soil passing the No. 40 sieve, the moisture content is varied to identify
three stages of soil behavior in terms of consistency. These stages are known as the liquid
limit (LL), plastic limit (PL) and shrinkage limit (SL) of soils. 
The liquid limit (LL) is defined as the water content at which 25 blows of the liquid
limit machine (Figure 7-3a) closes a standard groove cut in the soil pat for a distance
of 12.7 cm.  An alternate procedure in Europe and Canada uses a fall cone device to
obtain better repeatability (Figure 7-3b).
The plastic limit (PL) is as the water content at which a thread of soil, when rolled
down to a diameter of 3 mm, will crumble.
The shrinkage limit (SL) is defined as that water content below which no further soil
volume change occurs with further drying.
Commentary
The Atterberg limits provide general indices of moisture content relative to the consistency
and behavior of soils.  The LL defines a liquid/semi-solid change, while the PL is a solids
boundary.  The difference is termed the plasticity index (PI = LL - PL).  The liquidity index
is LI = (w-PL)/PI is an indicator of stress history;  LI 
.
1 for normally consolidated (NC)
soils and LI 
.
0 for over-consolidated (OC) soils.  By and large, these are approximate and
empirical  values.    They were originally developed for    agronomic  purposes.   Their
widespread use by engineers has resulted in the development of a large number of rough
empirical relationships for characterizing soils.
Considering the abstract and manual nature of the test procedure, Atterberg limits should
only be performed by experienced technicians.  Lack of experience, and lack of care will
introduce serious errors in the test results.
7 - 12
Compaction Curve
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
0
5
10
15
20
25
Water Content, w  (%)
3Dry Unit Weight, γd
ZAV = zero air void curve
(G
s
= 2.70)
S = 
100%
80%
70%
Measured
γ
at varying 
moisture 
contents
Optimum
Moisture
Content, w
opt
Max. Dry 
Unit Weight
Figure 7-3.   Liquid Limit Test by (a) Manual Casagrande Cup Device; (b) Electric Fall Cone. 
Figure 7-4.    A Representative Moisture-Density Relationship from a Standard Compaction Test.
7 - 13
Moisture-Density (Compaction) Relationship
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 99 (Standard Proctor), T 180 (Modified Proctor)
D 698 (Standard Proctor), D 1557 (Modified Proctor)
Purpose
To determine the maximum dry density attainable under a specified nominal compaction
energy for a given soil and the (optimum) moisture content corresponding to this density.
Procedure
Compaction tests are performed using disturbed, prepared soils with or without additives.
Normally, soil passing the No. 4 sieve is mixed with water to form samples at various moisture
contents ranging from the dry state to wet state.  These samples are compacted in layers in a
mold by a hammer in accordance with a specified nominal compaction energy.  Dry density is
determined based on the moisture content and the unit weight of compacted soil.  A curve of
dry density versus moisture content is plotted in Figure 7-4 and the maximum ordinate on this
curve is referred to as the maximum dry density (
(
dmax
).  The water content at which this dry
density occurs is termed as the optimum moisture content (OMC).
Commentary
In  the  construction  of  highway  embankments,  earth  dams,  retaining  walls,  structure
foundations and many other facilities, loose soils must be compacted to increase their densities.
Compaction increases the strength and stiffness characteristics of soils.  Compaction also
decreases  the amount of undesirable settlement of structures and increases the stability of
slopes and embankments.
The density of soils is measured as the unit dry weight, 
(
d
, (weight of dry soil divided by the
bulk volume of the soil).  It is a measure of the amount of solid materials present in a unit
volume.  The higher the amount of solid materials, the stronger and more stable the soil will
be.  To provide a “relative” measure of compaction, the concept of relative compaction is used.
Relative compaction is the ratio (expressed as a percentage) of the density of compacted or
natural in-situ soils to the maximum density obtainable in a compaction test.  Often it is
necessary to specify the achieving of a certain level of relative compaction (e.g. 95%) in the
construction or preparation of foundations, embankments,  pavement sub-bases and bases, and
for deep-seated deposits such as loose sands.  The design and selection of a placement method
to improve the strength, dynamic resistance and consolidation characteristics of deposits
depend heavily on relative compaction measurements.
During the compaction of several specimens, the total unit weight of each compacted specimen
is measured at each water content and the two soil identities used to obtain the needed
parameters:
(1)  G
s
w =  S e ,and 
(2) 
(
t
=G
s
(
w
(1+w)/(1+e).   
The dry unit weight is obtained as:
(
d
(
t/
(1+w).   
It is also convenient to plot the zero air voids (ZAV) curve on the moisture-density graph,
corresponding to 100 percent saturation (see Figure 7-4).   The measured compaction curve
response should not fall on or above this ZAV line.  The maximum dry unit weight (“density”)
found as the peak value often corresponds to saturation levels of between 70 to 85 percent.
Where a variety of soils are to be used for construction, a moisture-density relationship for each
major type of soil present at the site should be established.
Moisture-Density (Compaction) Relationship
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 99 (Standard Proctor), T 180 (Modified Proctor)
D 698 (Standard Proctor), D 1557 (Modified Proctor)
7 - 14
When additives such as Portland cement, lime, or fly ash are used to determine the maximum
density of mixed compacted soils in the laboratory, care should be taken to duplicate the
expected delay period between mixing and compaction in the field.  It should be kept in mind
that these chemical additives start reacting as soon as they are added to the wet soil. They cause
substantial changes in soil properties, including densities achievable by compaction.  If in the
field the period between mixing and compaction is expected to be three hours, for example,
then in the laboratory the compaction of the soil should also be delayed three hours after
mixing the stabilizing additives.
Relative density (D
R
) (ASTM D 4253) is often a useful parameter in assessing the engineering
characteristics of granular soils and is defined as:
D
R
= 100 (e
max
- e)/(e
max
- e
min
                                                                 (7-
4)
that can also be expressed in terms of dry unit weights.  A greater discussion of D
R
is given
later in Chapter 9.
Classification of Soils
AASHTO
ASTM 
M 145
D 2487, D 3282
Purpose
To provide in a very concise manner information on the type and fundamental characteristics
of soils, their utility as construction or foundation materials, their constituents, etc.
Procedure
See Section  4.6
Commentary
See Section  4.6
Corrosivity of Soils
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 288, T 289, T 290, T 291
G 51, D 512, D 1125, D 2976. D 4230 , D 4972
Purpose
To determine the aggressiveness and corrosivity of soils, pH, sulfate and chloride content of
soils.
Procedure
Usually the pH of a soil material is determined electrometically by a pH meter which is a
potentiometer equipped with a glass-calomel electrode system calibrated with buffers of known
pH.  Measurements are commonly performed on a suspension of soil, water and/or alkaline
(usually calcium chloride)  solutions.
Commentary
Because of their environment or composition soils may have varying degrees of acidity or
alkalinity, as measured by the pH test.  Measurements of pH are particularly important for
determining corrosion potential where metal piles, culverts, anchors, metal strips, or pipes are
to be used.  pH is also an important parameter for evaluating the durability of geosynthetics.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested