devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete blank pages from pdf file application SDK utility azure wpf windows visual studio 01254619-part67

7 - 15
Resistivity
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 288
G 57
Purpose
To determine the corrosion potential of soils.
Procedure
The laboratory test for measuring the resistivity of soils is performed using dried prepared soil
passing the No. 8 screen. The soil is placed in a box approximately 10.2 cm x 15.2 cm x 4.5
cm with electrical terminals attached to the sides of the box such that they remain in contact
with the soil. The terminals in turn are connected to an ohmmeter. A reading of the current
passing through the dry soil is taken as the baseline reference resistance. The soil material is
then removed and 50 ml to 100 ml of distilled water is added and thoroughly mixed, and placed
back in the box. Another reading is taken. The conductivity (conductivity is the reverse of
resistivity) of the soil as read by the ohmmeter increases as water is added. The procedure is
repeated until the conductivity begins dropping. The highest conductivity, or the lowest
resistivity, is used to compute the resistivity of the soil. The method is very sensitive to the
distribution of water in the soils placed in the box. The resistivity may also vary significantly
with the presence of soluble salts in soils.
Commentary
Where construction materials susceptible to corrosion are to be used in subgrades it is necessary
to determine the corrosion potential of soils.  This test is routinely performed for structures
where metallic reinforcements, soil anchors, nails, culverts, pipes, or piles are included.
Organic Content of Soils
AASHTO
ASTM
T 194
D 2974
Purpose
To help classify the soil and identify its engineering characteristics. 
Procedure
Oven-dried (at 110±5
o
C) samples after
determination of moisture content are further gradually
heated to 440
o
C which is maintained until the specimen is completely ashed (no change in
mass occurs after a further period of heating).  The organic content is then calculated from the
weight of the ash generated.
Commentary
Organic materials affect the behavior of soils in varying degrees.  The behavior of soils with
low organic contents (<20% by weight) generally are controlled by the mineral components
of the soil.  When the organic content of soils approaches 20%, the behavior changes to that
of organic, or peaty soils.  The consolidation characteristics, permeability, strength and
stabilization of these soils are largely governed by the properties of organic materials.  Thus
it is important to determine the organic content of soils.  It is not sufficient to simply label a
soil as "organic" without showing the organic content.
Organic soils are those formed throughout the ages at low-lying sediment-starved areas by the
accumulation of dead vegetation  and sediment.  Top soils are very recently formed mixtures
of soil and vegetation that form part of the food chain. Top soils are not suitable for use in
construction and therefore its organic content is not usually determined.
Delete blank pages from pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; extract pages from pdf acrobat
Delete blank pages from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages from pdf online; deleting pages from pdf in preview
7 - 16
7.1.8
Strength Tests
The design and analysis of shallow and deep foundations, excavations, earth retention structures, and fills
and slopes require a thorough understanding of soil strength parameters.  The selection of strength parameters
needed and the corresponding types of tests to be performed vary depending on the type of construction, the
foundation design, the intensity, type and duration of loads to be imposed, and soil materials existing at the
site.
The shear strength should be determined by a combination of both field and laboratory tests.  Lab tests
provide reference strengths under controlled boundaries and loading.  However, limited quality samples are
obtained from the field, particularly for sandy materials.   The interpretation of strength from in-situ tests in
sands and clays is important and discussed in Chapter 9.  
For clays, commonly used laboratory tests include the unconfined compression (UC) and unconsolidated
undrained tests (UU), however, these do not attempt to replicate the ambient stress regime in the ground prior
to loading and therefore can only be considered as index strengths.   Preferably, the consolidated triaxial shear
and direct shear box tests can be used in conjunction with consolidation/oedometer tests in a normalized stress
history approach (Ladd & Foott, 1974; Jamiolkowski, et al. 1985). 
Both undisturbed and remolded or compacted samples are used for strength tests.  Where soils are to be
disturbed and remolded, compacted or stabilized specimens are tested for strength determination at specified
moisture contents and densities. These may be chosen on the basis of design requirements or the in-situ
density and moisture content of soils.  Where obtaining undisturbed samples is not practical (i.e., sandy and
gravelly soils), specimens remolded close to their natural moisture content and density are prepared for
testing.
Total and Effective Stress Analysis
Soils are  controlled  by the effective  stress strength envelope (c
r
and 
Nr
 and  therefore the  proper
determination of these parameters is paramount.  The strength envelope is best determined by either a series
of  (1)  consolidated  undrained  triaxial  shear  tests  with  porewater  pressure  measurements  (
6
C
6
U);  (2)
consolidated drained triaxial tests at slow strain rates (CD); or (3) drained direct shear tests (DDS).   For
long-term analyses, the drained parameters are equal to effective cohesion intercept  c
r
and effective friction
angle 
Nr
from the effective stress Mohr-Coulomb envelope (see Figure 7-5).  The shear strength (
J
max
) is
given by:
J
max
=     c
r
+   
F
N
r
tan 
Nr
(7-5)
Usually,  c
r
.
0 is adopted because lab tests are affected by rate & duration effects and  c
r
is a bond that
weathers with time (e.g., Mesri & Abdel-Ghaffar, 1993).   Effective strength parameters apply to all soil
types, including gravels, sands, silts, and clays.
The stress dependency of soil can be characterized by the stress path method.  A stress path gives a numerical
and graphical representation of the past, present and future state of stress on a representative soil element.
It captures the geologic stress history of the element, the current stresses acting on the element, and the
anticipated future changes in stress on the element.  The stress path method determines what these stresses
are, subjects representative elements of soil to these stress paths, and measures the resulting mechanical
behavior of the soil.  The measurements are used to determine strength, compressibility and permeability for
specific stress paths.  These stress path dependent mechanical properties are then used in analysis and design
to predict the future performance of a constructed facility.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#
extract one page from pdf preview; extract pages from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
cut pages from pdf reader; extract pdf pages for
1
Note: The old archaic term “cohesion” designated “c” has been replaced with undrained shear
strength.
7 - 17
The 
6
C
6
U triaxial test results can be used to develop the “stress path” of the soil under the test conditions by
plotting the effective strength for each load increment from the start to finish of the test.  Using the stress path
method, the test  results can then be analyzed with respect to the approximate field stress and strain conditions
before, during, and after construction (Lambe, 1967 and Lambe and Marr, 1979).
For short-term loading of clays & silts, total stress analysis uses the undrained shear strength (designated s
u
or c
u
)
1
that is a soil behavioral response that reflects the combination of the effective stress frictional envelope
(c
r
and 
Nr
) plus excess porewater pressures that depend on stress history.  From this regard, perhaps the
simple shear is the most appropriate test for stability & bearing capacity analyses, however, the device is not
in widespread use in the U.S.  Other modes of s
u
include triaxial compression & extension, plane strain active
& passive, true triaxial, hollow cylinder, and directional shear, all of which provide different values of s
u
depending upon the boundary conditions, direction of loading, strain rate, and initial stress state.  As this is
a complex issue, the best value is calculated from the normalized value (Jamiolkowski, et al., 1985):
s
u
/
F
vo
r
  0.5 sin
Nr
OCR
0.8
(7-6)
For extensively fissured clays and tills, the macrofabric of discontinuities reduces the overall strength and
(7-6) should be reduced by a factor of 2.  In the case of fissured geomaterials, it is also common that these
exhibit past problems with landsliding and slope instability, therefore the drained strength parameters may
be more appropriately assigned to the residual values (c
r
r
and 
N
r
r
).   Residual strengths can be determined
by ring shear tests or series of repeated drained direct shear box tests (Lupini, et al. 1981).
Figure 7-4.   Definitions of Effective Stress Parameters For Mohr-Coulomb Failure Criterion.
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position. Parameters: pageId, The position of the inserted blank page.
cut pages from pdf preview; delete page from pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
cut pdf pages; convert few pages of pdf to word
7 - 18
Uncon
fined Compression
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Axial Strain, 
ε
a
(%)
Axial Stress, σa
q
u
= 102 kPa  = 2 c
Undrained Shear Strength
cu = su = 51 kN/m2
Unconfined Compressive Strength of Soils
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 208
D 2166
Purpose
To determine the undrained shear strength (c
u
) of clay and silty clay soils.
Procedure
The soil specimens are tested without any confinement or lateral support (
F
3
=0).  Axial load
is rapidly applied to the sample to cause failure.  At failure the total minor principal stress
is zero (
F
3
= 0) and the total major principal stress is 
F
1
(see Figure 7-6).  The maximum
measured force over the sample area is q
u
and referred to as the unconfined compression
strength.  Since the undrained strength is independent of the confining pressure, c
= q
u
/2.
Figure 7-6.   Measured Stress-Strain for Unconfined Compressive Test.
Commentary
The  determination  of  unconfined  compressive  strength  of  undisturbed,  remolded  or
compacted soils is limited to cohesive or naturally or artificially cemented soils.  Application
of this test to non-cohesive soils may result in underestimation of the shear strength.   The
test is inexpensive and requires a relatively short period of time to complete.  However, due
to the absence of lateral pressures and lack of control over pore pressures, it has major
inaccuracies.
The stress-strain curves and failure modes observed during testing provide an index value
of the soil properties in addition to strength.  For example, an  ill-defined failure or yielding
of the sample signifies a relatively soft, fat clay, while a sudden brittle failure indicates that
of a desiccated clay or cemented material.  The stress-strain curves developed from these
tests should be used with caution when determining soil modulus for input to numerical
analyses, such as finite element analysis, which are very sensitive to minor variations of the
modulus.
Soils with inclined fissures, sand & silt lenses and slickensides have a tendency to fail
prematurely along these weaker planes in unconfined compression tests.  It is essential that
such failure modes be reported to the geotechnical engineer, who  may  request further more
sophisticated testing such as triaxial tests to obtain more realistic determination of the in situ
strength.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc = PDFDocument.Create(2); // Save the new created PDF document into file doc.Save
copy one page of pdf; delete pages from pdf reader
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
how to rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page Add and Insert a blank Page to Word File in C#. following C# demo code to insert multiple pages of a
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; cut pages from pdf online
7 - 19
Triaxial Strength
AASHTO
ASTM 
T 296, T 297
D 2850, D 4767
Purpose
To determine strength characteristics of soils including detailed information on the effects of
lateral confinement, porewater pressure, drainage and consolidation.  Triaxial tests provide a
reliable means to determine the friction angle of natural clays & silts, as well as reconstituted
sands.  The stiffness (modulus) at intermediate to large strains can also be evaluated.
Procedure
The triaxial test set-up is shown in Figure 7-7.  Test samples are typically 35 to 75 mm in
diameter and have a height to length ratio between 2 and 2.5.  The sample is encased by a thin
rubber membrane and placed inside a plastic cylindrical chamber that is usually filled with
water or glycerine.  The sample is subjected to a total confining pressure (
F
3
) by compression
of the fluid in the chamber acting on the membrane.  A backpressure (u
o
) is applied directly to
the specimen through a port in the bottom pedestal. Thus, the sample is initially consolidated
with an effective confining stress: 
F
3
r
= (
F
- u
o
).  (Note that air should not be used as a
compression medium).  To cause shear failure in the sample, axial stress is applied through a
vertical loading ram (commonly called deviator stress = 
F
1
F
3
).  Axial stress may be applied
at a constant rate (strain controlled) or by means of a hydraulic press or dead weight increments
or hydraulic pressure (stress controlled) until the sample fails.
The axial load applied by the loading ram corresponding to a given axial deformation is
measured by a proving ring or electronic load cell attached to the ram.  Connections to measure
drainage into or out of the sample, or for porewater pressure are also provided.  Deflections are
monitored by either dial indicators, LVDTs, or DCDTs.
Commentary
In general, there are five types of triaxial tests:
C
Undrained Unconsolidated (UU test)
C
Consolidated Undrained (CU test)
C
Consolidated Drained (CD test)
C
Consolidated Undrained with pore pressure measurement (
6
C
6
U)
C
Cyclic Triaxial Loading Tests (CTX)
In a UU test, the samples are not allowed to drain or consolidate prior to or during the testing.
The results of undrained tests depend on the degree of saturation (S) of the specimens.  Where
S=100%,  the test results will provide  a value of undrained shear strength (s
u
), however, the
test is affected by sample disturbance and rate effect (Ladd, 1991).  This test is not applicable
for granular (S=100%) soils.
The (
6
C
6
U) test with porewater pressure measurements is the most useful as it provides a direct
measure of the undrained shear strength (s
u
), for triaxial compressive mode, as well as the
important effective stress parameters (c
r
and 
Nr
).   The CD tests also provide the parameters
c
r
and 
Nr
  Cyclic triaxial tests are used for projects with repeated and/or cyclic loading,
resilient modulus determinations, and/or liquefaction analysis of soils.  In each of these tests,
the specimen is initially consolidated to the effective vertical overburden stress (
F
vo
r
) prior to
shear.  If additional specimens from the same tube are tested, these may be tested at confining
stress levels of 0.5 (
F
vo
r
) to 1.5 (
F
vo
r
), in order to provide a range of operating values.
The results can be presented in terms of Mohr Circles of stress to obtain the strength parameters
(Figure 7-8).   If more than two or three tests are conducted, the results are more conveniently
plotted on q-p space, where q = ½(
F
1
F
3
) and p
r
=  ½(
F
1
r
F
3
r
), as illustrated in Figure 7-9.
In addition, the entire stress path from start to finish can be followed.
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
to rotate PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page Add and Insert a blank Page to PowerPoint File in C# demo code to insert multiple pages of a
extract pages from pdf reader; cut pages out of pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument.Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into file doc.Save
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages out of a pdf file
7 - 20
(a)                                                                                     (b)
(c)                                                                              (d)
Figure 7-7.  Triaxial Test Apparatuses and Equipment: 
(a)  Specimen Being Consolidated in Triaxial Cell Prior to Shear: (b)  Automated Cyclic Triaxial
Equipment (Geocomp Corp); (c) Mechanical Gear-Driven Load Frame and Triaxial System (Wykeham
Farrance Ltd.); (d) Controlled Triaxial System for Isotropic and/or K
o
-Consolidated Triaxial
Compression and Extension Testing  (CKC System).
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into
delete pages of pdf preview; extract pages pdf
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
delete pages from pdf document; delete pages from pdf file online
7 - 21
SM/ML Residuum
,
 Opelika NGES,
 Alabama
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
Effective Normal Stress, 
σ
N
'   (kPa)
 Shear Stress, τ  (kPa)
Mohr-Coulomb Parameters:
c' = 0;    
φ
' = 34.0°
tan
φ'
=
0.675
σ
3f
'
σ
1f
'
Piedmont Residuum (silty sand) at Opelika Test Site, AL
0
100
200
0
100
200
300
400
Effective p
'
 = (
σ
1
'
+
σ
3
'
)/2  (kPa)
q = (σ13
sin 
φ
'
φ
' = 36
o
c' = 0 
Mohr Coulomb Strength Parameters:    Intercept a' = c' cosφ';   Slope:  tan α = sinφ'
a' = 0
In spite of the above shortcomings, the direct shear test is commonly used as it is simple and
easy to perform. The device uses much less soil than a standard triaxial device, therefore
consolidation times are shorter.  The DS provides reasonably reliable values for the effective
strength parameters, c
r
and 
Nr
, provided that slow rates of testing are utilized (see Figure 7-
11).
Repeated cycles of shearing along the same direction provide an evaluation of the residual
strength parameters (c
r
r
and 
N
r
r
).  The direct shear test is particularly applicable to those
foundation design problems where it is necessary to determine the angle of friction between the
soil and the material of which the foundation is constructed, e.g., the friction between the base
of a concrete footing and underneath soil.  In such cases, the lower box is filled with soil and
the upper box contains the foundation material.
Direct Simple Shear (DSS) Test
The DSS test was developed in an attempt to refine the direct shear test by providing shear
strain  distortion, rather  than  horizontal  displacement.    Earlier  DSS test  devices  used  a
cylindrical specimen confined in rubber membrane reinforced with a series of evenly spaced
rigid rings. Later versions developed by the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI) used
square specimens with hinged end plates that could tilt to maintain fixed specimen length
during shearing.  The NGI version is used by a number of European geotechnical agencies.
Some of the studies performed show that this device provides a means of studying plane strain
(i.e.,  embankment  loads).    Studies  at  MIT,  NGI,  Swedish  Geotechnical  Institute,  and
Politecnico di Torino have concluded that the DSS provides the most representative mode for
Direct Shear Tests on Triassic Clay
,
 Raleigh
,
 NC
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Displacement
,
δ
  (mm)
Shear Stress, τ  (kPa)
σ
n
'
(kPa)=
214.5
135.0
74.7
Direct Shear Tests on Triassic Clay
,
 Raleigh
,
 NC
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
0
50
100
150
200
250
Effective Normal Stress
,
σ
n
'
 (kPa)
Shear Stress, τ  (kPa)
0.488 = tan
φ
'
Strength Parameters:
c' = 0;  
φ
' = 26.0
o
(a)   
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 7-10.  Direct Shear Test Devices: (a) Mechanical Wykeham Farrance Device; (b) Electro-
Mechanical ShearTrac (GeoComp Corp) ; (c) Shear Box Cross-Section; (d) NGI Direct Simple Shear.  
Figure 7-11.  Illustrative Results from DS Tests on Clay Involved in Route 1
Slope Stability Study, Raleigh, NC.
7 - 24
Resonant Column
ASTM 
D 4015
Purpose
To determine the shear modulus (G
max
or G
0
) and damping (D) characteristics of soils at small
strains  for cases where dynamic forces are involved, particularly seismic ground amplification
and machinery foundations.  Recent research has shown the results are also applicable to static
loading at very small strains (< 10
-6
percent); for example (Burland, 1989).
Procedure
Prepared cylindrical specimens are placed in an special triaxial chamber and consolidated to
ambient overburden stresses (Figure 7-12).  Very low amplitude torsional vibrations are
applied to one end of the specimen by use of a special loading cap with electromagnetics.  The
resonant frequency, damping, and strain amplitudes are measured by the use of motion
transducers (Woods, 1994).
Commentary
The resonant column test (RCT) requires a high-caliber laboratory setup with special care in
calibration and maintenance of frequency-domain electronics (e.g., spectrum analyzer).  The
fundamental  measurement  of  shear  wave  velocity  (V
s
) provides the  small-strain  shear
modulus: 
G
max
=  
D
(V
s
)
2
(7-7)
where 
D
T
(
T
/g = total soil mass density and g = 9.8 m/s
2
= gravitational acceleration
constant.  Although field methods such as the crosshole, downhole, surface wave, and
suspension  logging  techniques  provide  direct  in-situ  measurements of  V
s
 the RCT is
advantageous in that it can evaluate the variation (decrease) of G
max
with increasing shear
strain (
(
s), as well as the increase of damping (D) with 
(
s, as illustrated in Figure 7-13.
There are however significant time (soil aging) effects, which can lead to lower values than
obtained in the field.
Generally, the RCT is  considered a nondestructive test and the  material properties are
essentially unchanged during the small-strain torsional loading.  Therefore, it is common that
the same specimen can be subjected to several levels of effective confining stress.  Over three
decades experience with the RCT on soils indicates that G
max
is a function of void ratio (e) and
mean  effective  confining  stress, 
F
o
’  =
a
(
F
vo
r
+2 
F
ho
r
),  as  well  as  cementation,  aging,
saturation, and other factors.  A well-known expression is: 
G
max
= (625/e
1.3
)(
F
ATM
F
o
’)0.5 OCR
5
(7-8)
where 
5
.
(PI
0.72)
/50 and 
F
ATM
= atmospheric pressure (1 bar 
.
100 kPa 
.
1 tsf).
Figure 7-12.   Resonant Column Test (RCT) Equipment for Determining G
max
and D in Soils.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested