devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Copy pages from pdf to word Library SDK class asp.net .net html ajax 01254621-part70

7 - 35
The senior laboratory technician, the geologist and/or the geotechnical engineer need to study the drilling logs,
understand the geology of the site, and visually examine the samples before selecting the test specimens.
Samples should be selected on the basis of their color, physical appearance, and structural features.
Specimens should be selected to represent all types of materials present at the site, not just the worst or the
best.  Samples with discontinuities and intrusions may cause premature failures in the laboratory.  They,
however, would not cause such  failures in  situ.  Such failures should be noted  but not selected  as
representative of the deposit of the formation.
There is no single set of rules that can be applied to all specimen selection. In selecting the proper specimens,
the geotechnical engineer, the geologist, and senior laboratory technician must apply their knowledge and
experience with the geologic setting, materials, and project requirements.
7.2.4
Equipment Calibration
All laboratory equipment should be periodically checked to verify that they meet the tolerances as established
by the AASHTO and ASTM test procedures. Sieves, ovens, compaction molds, triaxial and permeability cells
should be periodically examined to assure that they meet the opening size, temperature and volumetric
tolerances. Compression or tension testing equipment, including proving rings and transducers should be
checked quarterly and calibrated  at least once a year using U.S. Bureau of Standards certified equipment.
Scales, particularly electronic or reflecting mirror types, should be checked at least once every day to assure
that they are leveled and in proper adjustment.  Electronic equipment and software should also be checked
periodically (i.e. quarterly) to assure that all is well.
7.2.5
Pitfalls
Sampling and testing of soils are the most important and fundamental steps in the design and construction
of all types of structures. Omissions or errors introduced in these steps, if gone undetected, will be carried
through the process of design and construction resulting often in costly or possibly unsafe facilities.  Table
7-4 lists topics that should be considered for proper handling of samples, preparation, and laboratory test
procedures.  Table 7-4 should in no way be construed as being a complete list of possible important items
in the handling or testing of soil specimens; there are many more. These are just some of the more common
ones.
Copy pages from pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
copy page from pdf; delete page from pdf acrobat
Copy pages from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pages from pdf files; delete pages from pdf
7 - 36
TABLE 7-4.
COMMON SENSE GU
I
DEL
I
NES FOR LABORATORY TESTI
NG OF SO
I
LS
1.
Protect samples to prevent moisture loss and structural disturbance.
2.
Carefully handle samples during extrusion of samples; samples must be extruded properly and
supported upon their exit from the tube.
3.
Avoid long term storage of soil samples in Shelby tubes.
4.
Properly number and identify samples.
5.
Store samples in properly controlled environments.
6.
Visually examine and identify soil samples after removal of smear from the sample surface.
7.
Use pocket penetrometer or miniature vane only for an indication of strength.
8.
Carefully select “representative” specimens for testing.
9.
Have a sufficient number of samples to select from.
10
Always   consult the field logs for proper selection of specimens.
11. Recognize disturbances caused by sampling, the presence of cuttings, drilling mud or other foreign
matter and avoid during selection of specimens.
12. Do not depend solely on the visual identification of soils for classification. 
13. Always perform organic content tests when classifying soils as peat or organic. Visual classifications
of organic soils may be very misleading.
14. Do not dry soils in overheated or underheated ovens.
15. Discard old worn-out equipment; old screens for example, particularly fine (<No. 40) mesh ones
need to be inspected and replaced often, worn compaction mold or compaction hammers (an error
in the volume of a compaction mold is amplified 30x when translated to unit volume) should be
checked and replaced if needed. 
16. Performance of Atterberg Limits requires carefully adjusted drop height of the Liquid Limit machine
and proper rolling of Plastic Limit specimens.
17. Do not use of tap water for tests where distilled water is specified.
18. Properly cure stabilization test specimens.
19. Never assume that all samples are saturated as received.
20. Saturation must be performed using properly staged back pressures.
21. Use properly fitted o-rings, membranes etc. in triaxial or permeability tests.
22. Evenly trim the ends and sides of undisturbed samples.
23. Be careful to identify slickensides and natural fissures. Report slickensides and natural fissures.
24. Also do not mistakenly identify failures due to slickensides as shear failures.
25. Do not use unconfined compression test results (stress-strain curves) to determine elastic moduli.
26. Incremental loading of consolidation tests should only be performed after the completion of each
primary stage.
27. Use proper loading rate for strength tests.
28. Do not guesstimate e-log p curves from accelerated, incomplete consolidation tests.
29. Avoid "Reconstructing" soil specimens, disturbed by sampling or handling, for undisturbed testing.
30. Correctly label laboratory test specimens.
31. Do not take shortcuts: using non-standard equipment or non-standard test procedures.
32. Periodically calibrate all testing equipment and maintain calibration records.
33. Always test a sufficient number of samples to obtain representative results in variable material.
C# Word - Extract or Copy Pages from Word File in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB
delete pages from pdf reader; extract page from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET code. All PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a short time in VB.NET class application. In addition, texts
export one page of pdf preview; crop all pages of pdf
7 - 37
7.3 
SELECTION AND ASSIGNMENT OF TESTS
Certain considerations regarding laboratory testing, such as when, how much, and what type, can only be
decided by an experienced geotechnical engineer.   The following minimal criteria should be considered
while determining the scope of the laboratory testing program:
C
Project type (bridge, embankment, rehabilitation, buildings, etc.)
C
Size of the project
C
Loads to be imposed on the foundation soils
C
Types of loads  (i.e., static, dynamic, etc.)
C
Critical tolerances for the project (e.g., settlement limitations)
C
Vertical and horizontal variations in the soil profile as determined from boring logs and visual
identification of soil types in the laboratory
C
Known or suspected peculiarities of soils at the project location (i.e., swelling soils, collapsible soils,
organics, etc.)
C
Presence of visually observed intrusions, slickensides, fissures, concretions, etc.
The selection of tests should be considered preliminary until the geotechnical engineer is satisfied that the test
results are sufficient to develop reliable soil profiles and provide the soil parameters needed for design.
Laboratory visual identification of all soil samples extracted from the borings should be performed.  The soil
groups with similar engineering properties should be classified using the Unified Soil Classification System
(ASTM D2487) [preferred for geotechnical practice] or the AASHTO system (M145) with classification tests
performed on selected samples as requested by the engineer.  Moisture content analysis should be performed
on all cohesive samples and, if possible, on all samples. The geotechnical engineer should then determine the
appropriate tests required to obtain the design parameters or validate design parameters obtained from field
tests for each soil layer. A summary of information needs and testing considerations for a range of
applications is provided in Table 7-5 (from GEC 5).  Additional guidance on the selection of soil and rock
properties is contained in the FHWA “Soil and Foundations Workshop” reference manual.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
deleting pages from pdf in preview; combine pages of pdf documents into one
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
delete pages of pdf reader; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
7 - 38
Table 7-5.  Summary of information needs and testing considerations for a range of highway applications.
               (from FHWA Geotechnical Engineering Circular 5 – Soil and Rock Properties, 2002)
Geotechnical
Issues
Engineering
Evaluations
Required Information
for Analyses
Field Testing
Laboratory Testing
Shallow
Foundations
!bearing capacity
!settlement (magnitude &
rate)
!shrink/swell of foundation
soils (natural soils or
embankment fill)
!chemical compatibility of soil
and concrete
!frost heave
!scour (for water crossings)
!extreme loading
!subsurface profile (soil, groundwater, rock)
!shear strength parameters
!compressibility parameters (including
consolidation, shrink/swell potential, and
elastic modulus)
!frost depth
!stress history (present and past vertical
effective stresses)
!chemical composition of soil
!depth of seasonal moisture change
!unit weights
!geologic mapping including orientation and
characteristics of rock discontinuities
!vane shear test
!SPT (granular soils)
!CPT
!dilatometer
!rock coring (RQD)
!nuclear density
!plate load testing
!geophysical testing
!1-D oedometer tests
!direct shear tests
!triaxial tests
!grain size distribution
!Atterberg Limits
!pH, resistivity tests
!moisture content
!unit weight
!organic content
!collapse/swell potential
tests
!rock uniaxial
compression test and
intact rock modulus
!point load strength test
Driven Pile
Foundations
!pile end-bearing
!pile skin friction
!settlement
!down-drag on pile
!lateral earth pressures
!chemical compatibility of soil
and pile
!driveability
!presence of boulders/ very
hard layers
!scour (for water crossings)
!vibration/heave damage to
nearby structures
!extreme loading
!subsurface profile (soil, ground water, rock)
!shear strength parameters
!horizontal earth pressure coefficients
!interface friction parameters (soil and pile)
!compressibility parameters
!chemical composition of soil/rock
!unit weights
!presence of shrink/swell soils (limits skin
friction)
!geologic mapping including orientation and
characteristics of rock discontinuities
!SPT (granular soils)
!pile load test
!CPT
!vane shear test
!dilatometer
!piezometers
!rock coring (RQD)
!geophysical testing
!triaxial tests
!interface friction tests
!grain size distribution
!1-D oedometer tests
!pH, resistivity tests
!Atterberg Limits
!organic content
!moisture content
!unit weight
!collapse/swell potential
tests
!slake durability
!rock uniaxial
compression test and
intact rock modulus
!point load strength test
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
extract page from pdf acrobat; cut and paste pdf pages
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
extract one page from pdf file; extract pdf pages
7 - 39
Table 7-5.  Summary of information needs and testing considerations for a range of highway applications (continued).
Geotechnical
Issues
Engineering
Evaluations
Required Information for Analyses
Field Testing
Laboratory Testing
Drilled Shaft
Foundations
!shaft end bearing
!shaft skin friction
!constructability
!down-drag on shaft
!quality of rock socket
!lateral earth pressures
!settlement (magnitude &
rate)
!groundwater seepage/
dewatering
!presence of boulders/ very
hard layers
!scour (for water crossings)
!extreme loading
!subsurface profile (soil, ground water, rock)
!shear strength parameters
!interface shear strength friction parameters
(soil and shaft)
!compressibility parameters
!horizontal earth pressure coefficients
!chemical composition of soil/rock
!unit weights
!permeability of water-bearing soils
!presence of artesian conditions
!presence of shrink/swell soils (limits skin
friction)
!geologic mapping including orientation and
characteristics of rock discontinuities
!degradation of soft rock in presence of water
and/or air (e.g., rock sockets in shales)
!technique shaft
!shaft load test
!vane shear test
!CPT
!SPT (granular soils)
!dilatometer
!piezometers
!rock coring (RQD)
!geophysical testing
!1-D oedometer
!triaxial tests
!grain size distribution
!interface friction tests
!pH, resistivity tests
!permeability tests
!Atterberg Limits
!moisture content
!unit weight
!organic content
!collapse/swell potential
tests
!rock uniaxial compression
test and intact rock
modulus
!point load strength test
!slake durability
Embankments
and
Embankment
Foundations
!settlement (magnitude &
rate)
!bearing capacity
!slope stability
!lateral pressure
!internal stability
!borrow source evaluation
(available quantity and
quality of borrow soil)
!required reinforcement
!subsurface profile (soil, ground water, rock)
!compressibility parameters
!shear strength parameters
!unit weights
!time-rate consolidation parameters
!horizontal earth pressure coefficients 
!interface friction parameters 
!pullout resistance
!geologic mapping including orientation and
characteristics of rock discontinuities
!shrink/swell/degradation of soil and rock fill
!nuclear density
!plate load test
!test fill
!CPT
!SPT (granular soils)
!dilatometer
!vane shear
!rock coring (RQD)
!geophysical testing
!1-D Oedometer
!triaxial tests
!direct shear tests
!grain size distribution
!Atterberg Limits
!organic content
!moisture-density
relationship
!hydraulic conductivity
!geosynthetic/soil testing
!shrink/swell
!slake durability
!unit weight
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Able to get word count in PDF pages.
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
delete pages from pdf preview; cut pdf pages online
7 - 40
Table 7-5.  Summary of information needs and testing considerations for a range of highway applications (continued).
Geotechnical
Issues
Engineering
Evaluations
Required Information for Analyses
Field Testing
Laboratory Testing
Excavations
and Cut Slopes
!slope stability
!bottom heave
!liquefaction
!dewatering
!lateral pressure
!soil softening/progressive
failure
!pore pressures
!subsurface profile (soil, ground water, rock)
!shrink/swell properties
!unit weights
!hydraulic conductivity
!time-rate consolidation parameters
!shear strength of soil and rock (including
discontinuities)
!geologic mapping including orientation and
characteristics of rock discontinuities
!test cut to evaluate stand-up
time
!piezometers
!CPT
!SPT (granular soils)
!vane shear
!dilatometer
!rock coring (RQD)
!in situ rock direct shear test
!geophysical testing
!hydraulic conductivity 
!grain size distribution
!Atterberg Limits
!triaxial tests
!direct shear tests
!moisture content
!slake durability
!rock uniaxial compression
test & intact rock modulus
!point load strength test
Fill Walls/
Reinforced
Soil
Slopes
!internal stability
!external stability
!settlement
!horizontal deformation 
!lateral earth pressures 
!bearing capacity 
!chemical compatibility with
soil and wall materials 
!pore pressures behind wall 
!borrow source evaluation
(available quantity and
quality of borrow soil)
!subsurface profile (soil, ground water, rock)
!horizontal earth pressure coefficients
!interface shear strengths 
!foundation soil/wall fill shear strengths 
!compressibility parameters (including
consolidation, shrink/swell potential, and
elastic modulus)
!chemical composition of fill/ foundation soils 
!hydraulic conductivity of soils  behind wall 
!time-rate consolidation parameters 
!geologic mapping including orientation and
characteristics of rock discontinuities 
!SPT (granular soils)
!CPT
!dilatometer
!vane shear
!piezometers
!test fill 
!nuclear density 
!pullout test (MSEW/RSS)
!rock coring (RQD)
!geophysical testing
!1-D Oedometer
!triaxial tests
!direct shear tests
!grain size distribution
!Atterberg Limits
!pH, resistivity tests 
!moisture content 
!organic content 
!moisture-density
relationships
!hydraulic conductivity 
Cut Walls
!internal stability
!external stability
!excavation stability 
!dewatering
!chemical compatibility of
wall/soil
!lateral earth pressure
!down-drag on wall
!pore pressures behind wall
!obstructions in retained soil
!subsurface profile (soil, ground water, rock)
!shear strength of soil
!horizontal earth pressure coefficients
!interface shear strength (soil and
reinforcement)
!hydraulic conductivity of soil
!geologic mapping including orientation and
characteristics of rock discontinuities
!test cut to evaluate stand-up
time
!well pumping tests
!piezometers
!SPT (granular soils)
!CPT
!vane shear
!dilatometer
!pullout tests (anchors, nails)
!geophysical testing
!triaxial tests
!direct shear
!grain size distribution
!Atterberg Limits
!pH, resistivity tests
!organic content
!hydraulic conductivity
!moisture content
!unit weight
8 - 1
CHA
P
TER 8
.
0
LABORATORY TESTI
NG FOR ROCKS
8.1
INTRODUCTION
Laboratory rock testing is performed to determine the strength and elastic properties of intact specimens and
the potential for degradation and disintegration of the rock material.  The derived parameters are used in
part for the design of rock fills, cut slopes, shallow and deep foundations, tunnels, and the assessment of
shore protection materials (rip-rap).  Deformation and strength properties of intact specimens aid in
evaluating the larger-scale rock mass that is significantly controlled by joints, fissures, and discontinuity
features (spacing, roughness, orientation, infilling), water pressures, and ambient geostatic stress state.
8.2
LABORATORY TESTS
Common laboratory tests for intact rocks include measurements of strength (point load index, compressive
strength, Brazilian test, direct shear), stiffness (ultrasonics, elastic modulus), and durability (slaking,
abrasion).  Table 8-1 gives a summary list of laboratory rock tests and procedures by ASTM.  Brief sections
discuss the common tests (denoted with an asterisk*) useful for a standard highway project involving
construction in rock.
8.2.1
Strength Tests
The laboratory determination of intact rock strength is accomplished by the following tests: point load
index, unconfined compression, triaxial compression, Brazilian test, and direct shear.  The uniaxial (or
unconfined) compression test provides the general reference value, having a respective analogy with
standard tests on concrete cylinders. The uniaxial compressive strength (q
u
F
u
) is obtained by compressing
a trimmed cylindrical specimen in the longitudinal direction and taking the maximum measured force
divided by the cross-sectional area.  The point load index serves as a surrogate for the UCS and is a simpler
test in that irregular pieces of rock core can be used.  A direct tensile test requires special end preparation
that is difficult for most commercial labs, therefore tensile strength is more often evaluated by compression
loading of cylindrical specimens across their diameter (known as the Brazilian test).  Direct shear tests are
used to investigate frictional characteristics along rock discontinuity features.
Figure 8-1:  (a) Intact Rock Specimens for Laboratory Testing;  (b) Compressive Strength Testing.
8 - 2
TABLE  8-1.
STANDARDS & 
PROCEDURES FOR LABORATORY TESTI
NG OF 
I
NTACT ROCK
Test
Category
Name of Test
Test Designation
AASHTO
ASTM
Point Load
Strength
Method for determining point load index (I
s
)
-
D 5731*
Compressive
Strength
Compressive strength (q
u
F
u
) of core in unconfined
compression (uniaxial compression test)
-
D 2938*
Triaxial compressive strength without pore pressure
T 226
D 2664
Creep
Tests
Creep-cylindrical hard rock core in uniaxial compression 
-
D 4341 
Creep-cylindrical soft rock core in uniaxial compression
-
D 4405
Creep-cylindrical hard rock core, in triaxial compression 
-
D 4406
Tensile
Strength
Direct tensile strength of intact rock core specimens
-
D 3936
Splitting tensile strength of intact core (Brazilian test)
-
D 3967*
Direct Shear Laboratory direct shear strength tests - rock specimens,
under constant normal stress
-
D 5607*
Permeability
Permeability of rocks by flowing air
-
D 4525
Durability
Slake durability of shales and similar weak rocks
-
D 4644*
Rock slab testing for riprap soundness, using
sodium/magnesium sulfate 
-
D 5240*
Rock-durability for erosion control under freezing/thawing
-
D 5312*
Rock-durability for erosion control under wetting/drying 
-
D 5313
Deformation
and Stiffness
Elastic moduli of intact rock core in uniaxial compression 
-
D 3148*
Elastic moduli of intact rock core in triaxial compression 
-
D 5407
Pulse velocities and ultrasonic elastic constants in rock
-
D 2845*
Specimen
Preparation
Rock core specimen preparation
-
D 4543
Rock slab preparation for durability testing
-
D 5121
Note:  *Routine rock test procedure described in this manual
8 - 3
Point Load Index (Strength)
ASTM
D 5731
Purpose
To determine strength classification of rock materials through an index test.
Procedure
Rock specimens in the form of core (diametral and axial), cut blocks or irregular lumps
are broken by application of concentrated load through a pair of spherically truncated,
conical platens.  The distance between specimen-platen contact points is recorded.  The
load is steadily increased, and the failure load is recorded.
There is little sample preparation.  However, specimens should conform to the size and
shape requirements as specified by ASTM.  In general, for the diametral test, core
specimens with a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.0 are adequate while for the axial test
core specimens with length-to-diameter ratio of 0.3 to 1.0 are suitable.  Specimens for
the  block and the irregular lump  test should have a length of 50±35 mm and  a
depth/width ratio between 0.3 and 1.0 (preferably close to 1.0). The test specimens are
typically tested at their natural water content.
Size corrections are applied to obtain the point load strength index, 
I
s(50)
, of a rock
specimen.  A strength anisotropy index, I
a(50)
, is determined when  
I
s(50)
values are
measured perpendicular and parallel to planes of weakness.
Commentary
The test can be performed in the field with portable equipment or in the laboratory
(Figure 8-1).  The point load index is used to evaluate the uniaxial compressive
strength (
F
u
).  On the average, 
F
u
.
25 
I
s(50)
 However, the coefficient term can vary
from 15 to 50 depending upon the specific rock formation, especially for anisotropic
rocks.  The test should not be used for weak rocks where 
F
u
< 25 MPa.
Figure 8-1:  Point Load Test Apparatus.  (Adopted from Roctest)
8 - 4
σ
u
=
Uniaxial Compression Test
AASHTO
ASTM 
-
D 2938
Purpose
To determine the uniaxial compressive strength of rock (q
u
F
u
F
C
).
Procedure
In  this  test,  cylindrical  rock  specimens  are  tested  in  compression  without  lateral
confinement.  The test procedure is similar to the unconfined compression test for soils
and concrete.  The test specimen should be a rock cylinder of length-to-width ratio (H/D)
in the range of 2 to 2.5 with flat, smooth, and parallel ends cut perpendicular to the
cylinder axis.  Originally, specimen diameters of NX size were used (D = 2
c
in. = 44
mm), yet now the standard size is NQ core (D = 1
f
in. = 47.6 mm).
(a)
(b)
Figure 8-2: Uniaxial Compression Test on Rock with (a) Definitions of stress
conditions and strains, (b) Derived stress-strain curve with peak
stress corresponding to the uniaxial compressive strength (q
u
F
u
)
Commentary
The uniaxial compression test is most direct means of determining rock strength. The
results are influenced by the moisture content of the specimens, and thus should be
noted. The rate of loading and the condition of the two ends of the rock will also affect
the final results. Ends should be planar and parallel per ASTM D 4543. The rate of
loading should be constant as per the ASTM test procedure. Inclined fissures, intrusions,
and other anomalies will often cause premature failures on those planes. These should
be noted so that, where appropriate, other tests such as triaxial or direct shear tests can
be required.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested