devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Extract pages from pdf files control software platform web page windows html web browser BB20-part708

World Health Organization Classification of Tumours
International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)
Pathology and Genetics of
Tumours of the Digestive System
Edited by
Stanley R. Hamilton
Lauri A. Aaltonen
IARC
P
r
e
s
s
Lyon, 2000
WHO
OMS
Extract pages from pdf files - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
copy web pages to pdf; deleting pages from pdf document
Extract pages from pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages from pdf file online; delete page from pdf document
Editors
Clinical Editor
Editorial Assistance
Layout
Illustrations
Printed by
Publisher
Stanley R. Hamilton, M.D.
Lauri A. Aaltonen, M.D., Ph.D.
René Lambert, M.D
Wojciech Biernat, M.D.
Norman J. Carr, M.D.
Anna Sankila, M.D.
Sibylle Söring
Felix Krönert
Georges Mollon
Sibylle Söring
Team Rush
69603 Villeurbanne, France
IARC
P
r
e
s
s
International Agency for 
Research on Cancer (IARC)
69372 Lyon, France
World Health Organization Classification of Tumours
Series Editors Paul Kleihues, M.D.
Leslie H. Sobin, M.D.
Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Digestive System
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
extraction from PDF images and image files. textMgr = PDFTextHandler. ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content for text extraction from all PDF
add remove pages from pdf; extract page from pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
extract pages from pdf files; copy pages from pdf to word
This volume was produced in collaboration with the
International Academy of Pathology (IAP)
and
with support from the
Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Bern
The WHO Classification of Tumours of the Digestive System 
presented in this book reflects the views of a 
Working Group that convened for an
Editorial and Consensus Conference in 
Lyon, France, November 6-9, 1999.
Members of the Working Group are indicated 
in the List of Contributors on page 253. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract
delete page from pdf reader; delete blank page from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
deleting pages from pdf online; delete page from pdf file online
IARC Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
Pathology and genetics of tumours of the digestive system / editors, S.R. Hamilton
and L.A. Aaltonen
(World Health Classification of tumours ; 2)
1. Digestive System Neoplasms I. Aaltonen, L.A. II. Hamilton, S.R. 
III. Series
ISBN 92 832 2410 8
(NLM Classification: W1)
Format for bibliographic citations:
Hamilton S.R., Aaltonen L.A. (Eds.): World Health Organization Classification of
Tumours. Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Digestive System. IARC Press:
Lyon 2000
Published by IARC Press, International Agency for Research on Cancer,
150 cours Albert Thomas, F-69372 Lyon, France
© International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2000 reprinted 2006
Publications of the World Health Organization enjoy copyright protection in 
accordance with the provisions of Protocol 2 of the Universal Copyright Convention. 
All rights reserved.
The International Agency for Research on Cancer welcomes 
requests for permission to reproduce or translate its publications, in part or in full. 
Requests for permission to reproduce figures or charts from this publication should be directed to
the respective contributor (see section Source of Charts and Photographs). 
The designations used and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the 
expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the 
World Health Organization concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city, 
or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.
The mention of specific companies or of certain manufacturers' products does not imply 
that they are endorsed or recommended by the World Health Organization in preference to others 
of a similar nature that are not mentioned. Errors and omissions excepted, 
the names of proprietary products are distinguished by initial capital letters.
The authors alone are responsible for the views expressed in this publication.
Enquiries should be addressed to the 
Editorial & Publications Service, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 69372 Lyon, France,
which will provide the latest information on any changes made to the text and plans for new editions. 
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF document in VB.NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file.
delete pages from pdf in preview; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment
extract pages from pdf; extract pdf pages acrobat
Diagnostic terms and definitions
8
1 Tumours of the oesophagus 
9
WHO and TNM classifications
10
Squamous cell carcinoma
11
Adenocarcinoma
20
Endocrine tumours
26
Lymphoma
27
Mesenchymal tumours
28
Secondary tumours and melanoma
30
2 Tumours of the oesophagogastric junction
Adenocarcinoma 
32
3 Tumours of the stomach
37
WHO and TNM classifications
38
Carcinoma
39
Endocrine tumours
53
Lymphoma
57
Mesenchymal tumours
62
Secondary tumours
66
4 Tumours of the small intestine
69
WHO and TNM classifications
70
Carcinoma
71
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome
74
Endocrine tumours
77
B-cell lymphoma
83
T-cell lymphoma
87
Mesenchymal tumours
90
Secondary tumours
91
5 Tumours of the appendix
93
WHO and TNM classifications
94
Adenocarcinoma
95
Endocrine tumours
99
Miscellaneous tumours
102
6 Tumours of the colon and rectum
103
WHO and TNM classifications
104
Carcinoma
105
Familial adenomatous polyposis 
120
Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer
126
Juvenile polyposis
130
Cowden syndrome
132
Hyperplastic polyposis
135
Endocrine tumours
137
B-cell lymphoma
139
Mesenchymal tumours
142
7 Tumours of the anal canal 
145
WHO and TNM classifications
146
Tumours of the anal canal
147
8 Tumours of the liver and 
intrahepatic bile ducts
WHO and TNM classifications
158
Hepatocellular carcinoma
159
Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma
173
Combined hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinoma 181
Bile duct cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma 182
Hepatoblastoma
184
Lymphoma
190
Mesenchymal tumours
191
Secondary tumours 
199
9 Tumours of the gallbladder and
extrahepatic bile ducts
203
WHO and TNM classifications
204
Carcinoma
206
Endocrine tumours
214
Neural and mesenchymal tumours
216
Lymphoma
217
Secondary tumours and melanoma
217
10Tumours of the exocrine pancreas
219
WHO and TNM classifications
220
Ductal adenocarcinoma
221
Serous cystic neoplasms
231
Mucinous cystic neoplasms
234
Intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm
237
Acinar cell carcinoma
241
Pancreatoblastoma
244
Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm
246
Miscellaneous carcinomas
249
Mesenchymal tumours
249
Lymphoma
250
Secondary tumours
250
Contributors
253
Source of charts and photographs
261
References
265
Subject index
307
Contents
157
31
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
can split target PDF document file by specifying a page or pages. If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF
convert few pages of pdf to word; delete pages from pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages.
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete pages from pdf reader
Diagnostic terms and definitions
1
Intraepithelial neoplasia
2
.  A lesion cha-
racterized by morphological changes
that include altered architecture and
abnormalities in cytology and differentia-
tion. It results from clonal alterations in
genes and carries a predisposition for
progression to invasion and metastasis.
High-grade intraepithelial neoplasia.
A mucosal change with cytologic and
architectural features of malignancy but
without evidence of invasion into the stro-
ma. It includes lesions termed severe
dysplasia and carcinoma in situ.
Polyp.  A generic term for any excres-
cence or growth protruding above a
mucous membrane. Polyps can  be
pedunculated or sessile, and are readily
seen by macroscopic examination or
conventional endoscopy. 
Adenoma. A circumscribed benign
lesion composed of tubular and/or villous
structures showing intraepithelial neopla-
sia. The neoplastic epithelial cells are
immature and typically have enlarged,
hyperbasophilic and stratified nuclei.
Tubular adenoma.  An adenoma in
which branching tubules surrounded by
lamina propria comprise at least 80% of
the tumour.
Villous adenoma. An adenoma in which
leaf-like or finger-like processes of lami-
na propria covered by dysplastic epithe-
lium comprise at least 80% of the tumour.
Tubulovillous adenoma. An adenoma
composed of both tubular and villous
structures, each comprising more than
20% of the tumour.
Serrated adenoma. An adenoma com-
posed of saw-toothed glands.
Intraepithelial neoplasia (dysplasia)
associated with chronic inflammatory
diseases.
 neoplastic  glandular
epithelial proliferation occurring in a
patient  with a  chronic  inflammatory
bowel disease, but with macroscopic
and microscopic features that distin-
guish it from an adenoma, e.g. patchy
distribution of dysplasia and poor cir-
cumscription.
Peutz-Jeghers polyp.  A hamartoma-
tous  polyp composed of  branching
bands of smooth muscle covered by nor-
mal-appearing or hyperplastic glandular
mucosa indigenous to the site.
Juvenile polyp.
 hamartomatous
polyp with a spherical head composed
of tubules and cysts, lined by normal
epithelium, embedded in an excess of
lamina propria. In juvenile polyposis, the
polyps are often multilobated with a pap-
illary configuration and a higher ratio of
glands to lamina propria.
Adenocarcinoma. A malignant epithe-
lial tumour with glandular differentiation.
Mucinous adenocarcinoma.  An ade-
nocarcinoma containing extracellular
mucin comprising more than 50% of the
tumour. Note that ‘mucin producing’ is
not synonymous with mucinous in this
context.
Signet-ring cell carcinoma. An adeno-
carcinoma in which the predominant
component (more than 50%) is com-
posed of isolated malignant cells con-
taining intracytoplasmic mucin.
Squamous cell (epidermoid) carcino-
ma.  A malignant epithelial tumour with
squamous cell differentiation.
Adenosquamous carcinoma. A malig-
nant epithelial tumour with significant
components of both glandular and squa-
mous differentiation. 
Small cell carcinoma. A malignant
epithelial tumour similar in morphology,
immunophenotype and behaviour to
small cell carcinoma of the lung.
Medullary carcinoma. A malignant
epithelial tumour in which the cells form
solid  sheets  and  have  abundant
eosinophilic cytoplasm and large, vesic-
ular nuclei with prominent nucleoli. An
intraepithelial infiltrate of lymphocytes is
characteristic.
Undifferentiated carcinoma.  A malig-
nant epithelial tumour with no glandular
structures or other features to indicate
definite differentiation.
Carcinoid. A well differentiated neo-
plasm of the diffuse endocrine system.
______________
1
This list of terms is proposed to be used for the entire digestive system and reflects the view of the Working Group convened in Lyon, 6 – 9 November,
1999. Terminology evolves with scientific progress; the terms listed here reflect current understanding of the process of malignant transformation in the
digestive tract. The Working Group anticipates a further convergence of diagnostic terms throughout the digestive system. 
2
In an attempt to resolve confusion surrounding the terms ‘dysplasia’, ‘carcinoma in situ,’ and ‘atypia’, the Working Group adopted the term ‘intraepithe-
lial neoplasia’ to indicate preinvasive neoplastic change of the epithelium. The diagnosis does not exclude the possibility of coexisting carcinoma.
Intraepithelial neoplasia should 
n
o
t
be used as a generic description of epithelial abnormalities due to reactive or regenerative changes.
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
copy pdf pages to another pdf; cut pages from pdf
CHAPTER 1
Tumours ofthe Oesophagus
Carcinomas of the oesophagus pose a considerable medical
and public health challenge in many parts of the world.
Morphologically and aetiologically, two major types are distin-
guished:
Squamous cell carcinoma
In Western countries, oesophageal carcinomas with squa-
mous cell differentiation typically arise after many years of
tobacco and alcohol abuse. They frequently carry G:C >T:A
mutations of the 
T
P
5
3
gene. Other causes include chronic
mucosal injury through hot beverages and malnutrition, but the
very high incidence rates observed in Iran and some African
and Asian regions remain inexplicable.
Adenocarcinoma
Oesophageal carcinomas with glandular differentiation are
typically located in the distal oesophagus and occur predomi-
nantly in white males of industrialized countries, with a marked
tendency for increasing incidence rates. The most important
aetiological factor is chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux lead-
ing to Barrett type mucosal metaplasia, the most common pre-
cursor lesion of adenocarcinoma. 
10
Tumours of the oesophagus
Epithelial tumours
Squamous cell papilloma
8052/0
1
Intraepithelial neoplasia
2
Squamous
Glandular (adenoma)
Carcinoma
Squamous cell carcinoma
8070/3
Verrucous (squamous) carcinoma
8051/3
Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma
8083/3
Spindle cell (squamous) carcinoma
8074/3
Adenocarcinoma
8140/3
Adenosquamous carcinoma
8560/3
Mucoepidermoid carcinoma
8430/3
Adenoid cystic carcinoma
8200/3
Small cell carcinoma
8041/3
Undifferentiated carcinoma
8020/3
Others
Carcinoid tumour
8240/3
Non-epithelial tumours
Leiomyoma
8890/0
Lipoma
8850/0
Granular cell tumour
9580/0
Gastrointestinal stromal tumour
8936/1
benign
8936/0
uncertain malignant potential
8936/1
malignant
8936/3
Leiomyosarcoma
8890/3
Rhabdomyosarcoma
8900/3
Kaposi sarcoma
9140/3
Malignant melanoma
8720/3
Others
Secondary tumours
WHO histological classification of oesophageal tumours
_____________
1
Morphology code of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O) {542} and the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (http://snomed.org).
Behaviour is coded /0 for benign tumours, /1 for unspecified, borderline or uncertain behaviour, /2 for in situ carcinomas and grade III intraepithelial neoplasia, and /3 for
malignant tumours.
2
Intraepithelial neoplasia does not have a generic code in ICD-O. ICD-O codes are available only for lesions categorized as glandular intraepithelial neoplasia grade III
(8148/2), squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, grade III (8077/2), and squamous cell carcinoma in situ (8070/2).
_____________
1
{1, 66}. This classification applies only to carcinomas.
2
A help desk for specific questions about the TNMclassification is available at http://tnm.uicc.org.
TNMclassification
1
T – Primary Tumour
TX
Primary tumour cannot be assessed
T0
No evidence of primary tumour
Tis
Carcinoma in situ
T1
Tumour invades lamina propria or submucosa
T2
Tumour invades muscularis propria
T3
Tumour invades adventitia
T4
Tumour invades adjacent structures
N – Regional Lymph Nodes
NX
Regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed
N0
No regional lymph node metastasis
N1
Regional lymph node metastasis
M – Distant Metastasis
MX
Distant metastasis cannot be assessed
M0
No distant metastasis
M1
Distant metastasis
For tumours of lower thoracic oesophagus
M1a
Metastasis in coeliac lymph nodes
M1b
Other distant metastasis
For tumours of upper thoracic oesophagus
M1a
Metastasis in cervical lymph nodes
M1b
Other distant metastasis
For tumours of mid-thoracic oesophagus
M1a
Not applicable
M1b
Non-regional lymph node
or other distant metastasis
Stage Grouping
Stage 0
Tis
N0
M0
Stage I
T1
N0
M0
Stage IIA
T2
N0
M0
T3
N0
M0
Stage IIB
T1
N1
M0
T2
N1
M0
Stage III
T3
N1
M0
T4
Any N
M0
Stage IVA
Any T
Any N
M1a
Stage IVB
Any T
Any N
M1b
TNM classification of oesophageal tumours
11
Squamous cell carcinoma 
Definition
Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the
oesophagus is a malignant epithelial
tumour with squamous cell differentia-
tion, microscopically characterised by
keratinocyte-like cells with intercellular
bridges and/or keratinization.
ICD-O Code
8070/3
Epidemiology
Squamous cell carcinoma of the oeso-
phagus shows great geographical diver-
sity in incidence, mortality and sex ratio.
In Western countries, the age-standar-
dized annual incidence in most areas
does not exceed 5 per 100,000 popula-
tion in males and 1 in females. There are,
however, several well-defined high-risk
areas, e.g. Normandy and Calvados in
North-West France, and Northern Italy,
where incidence may be as high as 30
per 100,000 population in males and 2 in
females {1020, 1331}. This type of can-
cer is much more frequent in Eastern
countries and in many developing coun-
tries. Regions with very high incidence
rates have been identified in Iran, Central
China, South Africa and Southern Brazil.
In the city of Zhengzhou, capital of
Henan province in China, the mortality
rate exceeds 100 per 100,000 population
in males and 50 in females {1116, 2191}.
In both high-risk and low-risk regions,
this cancer is exceedingly rare before
the age of 30 and the median age is
around 65 in both males and females.
Recent changes in the distribution pat-
tern in France indicate that the rate of
SCC has increased steadily in low-risk
areas,  particularly  among  females,
whereas there may be a slight decrease
in high-risk areas. In the United States, a
search in hospitalisation records of mili-
tary veterans indicates that SCC is 2-3
times more frequent among blacks than
among  Asians,  Whites  or  Native
Americans {453}.
Aetiology
T
o
b
a
c
c
o
a
n
d
a
l
c
o
h
o
l
.
In Western coun-
tries, nearly 90% of the risk of SCC can
be attributed to tobacco and alcohol.
Each of these factors influences the risk
of oesophageal cancer in a different way.
With regard to the consumption of tobac-
co, a moderate intake during a long peri-
od carries a higher risk than a high intake
during a shorter period, whereas the
reverse is true for alcohol. Both factors
combined show a multiplicative effect,
even at low alcohol intake. In high-risk
areas of North-West France and Northern
Italy, local drinking customs may partially
explain the excess incidence of SCC
{523, 1020}. In Japanese alcoholics, a
polymorphism  in
A
L
D
H
2
,
the  gene
encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase 2,
has been shown to be significantly asso-
ciated with several cancers of the upper
digestive tract, including squamous cell
cancer. This observation suggests a role
for acetaldehyde, one of the main car-
cinogenic metabolites of alcohol in the
development of oesophageal carcinoma
{2177}.
N
u
t
r
i
t
i
o
n
.
Risk factors other than tobac-
co and alcohol play significant roles in
other regions of the world. In high-risk
areas of China, a deficiency in certain
trace elements and the consumption of
pickled or mouldy foods (which are
potential sources of nitrosamines) have
been suggested.
H
o
t
b
e
v
e
r
a
g
e
s
.
Worldwide, one of the
most common risk factors appears to be
the consumption of burning-hot bevera-
ges (such as Mate tea in South America)
which cause thermal injury leading to
chronic oesophagitis and then to precan-
cerous lesions {1116, 2191, 387}.
H
P
V
.
Conflicting reports have proposed
a role for infectious agents, including
human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.
Although  HPV  DNA  isconsistently
detected in 20 to 40% of SCC in high-risk
areas of China, it is generally absent in
the cancers arising in Western countries
{954, 679}.
Squamous cell carcinoma 
of the oesophagus
H.E. Gabbert
Y. Nakamura
T. Shimoda
J.K. Field
P. Hainaut
H. Inoue
Fig. 1.02Squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus. Age-standardized incidence
rates per 100,000 and proportions (%) due to alcohol and tobacco (dark-blue).
Fig. 1.01 Worldwide annual incidence (per 100,000) of oesophageal cancer in
males. Numbers on the map indicate regional average values.
5.2
7.8
19.3
11.9
51.6
4.6
11.0
< 2.2
< 3.8
< 5.8
< 9.5
< 51.7
China, Henan
Iran, North East
South Africa
India, Bombay
Urugay
China, Hong Kong
Italy, North East
USA, New York
France, Calvados
1%
70%
50%
50%
20%
90%
90%
70%
90%
0
50
100
150
200
12
Tumours of the oesophagus
Associations between achalasia, Plum-
mer-Vinson syndrome, coeliac disease
and tylosis (focal nonepidermolytic pal-
moplantar  keratoderma)  with  oeso-
phageal cancer have also been de-
scribed.
Localization
Oesophageal SCC is located predomi-
nantly in the middle and the lower third of
the oesophagus, only 10-15% being situ-
ated in the upper third {1055}. 
Clinical features
S
y
m
p
t
o
m
s
a
n
d
s
i
g
n
s
The most common symptoms of ad-
vanced oesophageal cancer are dys-
phagia, weight loss, retrosternal or epi-
gastric pain, and regurgitation caused
by narrowing of the oesophageal lumen
by tumour growth {606}. Superficial SCC
usually has no specific symptoms but
sometimes causes a tingling sensation,
and is, therefore, often detected inciden-
tally  during  upper  gastrointestinal
endoscopy {464, 1874}.
E
n
d
o
s
c
o
p
y
a
n
d
v
i
t
a
l
s
t
a
i
n
i
n
g
Superficial oesophageal cancer is com-
monly observed as a slight elevation or
shallow  depression  on  the  mucosal
surface, which is a minor morphological
change compared to that of advanced
cancer. Macroscopically, three types can
be distinguished: flat, polypoid and ulcer-
ated. Chromoendoscopy utilizing toluidine
blue or Lugol iodine spray may be of value
{465, 481}. Toluidine blue, a metachromat-
ic stain from the thiazine group, has a par-
ticular affinity for RNA and DNA, and
stains areas that are richer in nuclei than
the normal mucosa. Lugol solution reacts
specifically with glycogen in the normal
squamous epithelium, whereas precan-
cerous and cancerous lesions, but also
inflamed areas and gastric heterotopia,
are not stained. However, the superficial
extension of carcinomas confined to the
mucosa can not be clearly recognized by
simple endoscopy.
E
n
d
o
s
c
o
p
i
c
u
l
t
r
a
s
o
n
o
g
r
a
p
h
y
Endoscopic ultrasonography is used to
evaluate both depth of tumour infiltration
and  para-oesophageal  lymph  node
involvement  in early  and  advanced
stages of the disease {1509, 1935}. For
the evaluation of the depth of infiltration,
high frequency endoscopic ultrasono-
graphy may be used {1302}. In general,
Fig. 1.03Macroscopic images of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oesophagus. . AFlat superficial type.
BLugol iodine staining of the specimen illustrated in A. CPolypoid SCC. DLongitudinal sections of carcino-
ma illustrated in C. EDeeply invasive polypoid SCC. FLongitudinal sections of carcinoma illustrated in E.
A
C
B
F
D
E
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested