devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Copy one page of pdf SDK software service wpf winforms web page dnn BB21-part709

13
Squamous cell carcinoma 
oesophageal  carcinoma  presents  on
endosonography as a circumscribed or
diffuse wall thickening  with a predomi-
nantly  echo-poor  or  echo-inhomoge-
neous  pattern.  As  a  result  of  tumour
penetration  through  the  wall  and  into
surrounding  structures,  the  endosono-
graphic wall layers are destroyed.
C
o
m
p
u
t
e
d
t
o
m
o
g
r
a
p
h
y
(
C
T
)
a
n
d
m
a
g
n
e
t
-
i
c
r
e
s
o
n
a
n
c
e
i
m
a
g
i
n
g
(
M
R
I
)
In  advanced carcinomas, CT and MRI
give information on local and systemic
spread of SCC. Tumour growth is char-
acterized as swelling of the oesophageal
wall,  with  or  without direct  invasion  to
surrounding  organs  {1518}.  Cervical,
abdominal and mediastinal node enlarg-
ement  is  recorded.  Three-dimensional
CT or MRI images may be presented as
virtual  endoscopy,  effectively  demon-
strating T2-T4 lesions, but not T1 lesions.
Macroscopy
The gross appearance varies according
to whether it is detected in an early or an
advanced stage of the disease. Among
early  SCC,  polypoid,  plaque-like,  de-
pressed and occult lesions  have been
described  {161,  2183}.  For  the  macro-
scopic classification of advanced oeso-
phageal SCC, Ming {1236} has proposed
three major patterns:  fungating,  ulcera-
tive, and infiltrating. The fungating pattern
is characterized by a predominantly exo-
phytic growth, whereas in the ulcerative
pattern,  the  tumour growth  is  predomi-
nantly intramural, with a central ulceration
and elevated ulcer edges. The infiltrative
pattern, which is the least common one,
also  shows  a  predominantly  intramural
growth, but causes only a small mucosal
defect.  Similar  types  of  macroscopic
growth patterns have been defined in the
classification of the Japanese Society for
Esophageal Diseases {58}.
Tumour spread and staging
For the staging of SCC, the TNM system
(tumour,  node,  metastasis)  established
by  the  International  Union  Against
Cancer (UICC) is the most widely used
system. Its usefulness in the planning of
treatment and in the prediction of prog-
nosis has been validated {1104, 895, 66,
1, 772}.
S
u
p
e
r
f
i
c
i
a
l
o
e
s
o
p
h
a
g
e
a
l
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
.
When  the  tumour  is  confined  to  the
mucosa  or  the  submucosa,  the  term
superficial  oesophageal  carcinoma  is
used  irrespective  of  the  presence  of
regional  lymph  node  metastases  {58,
161}.  In China  and in Japan,  the  term
early  oesophageal  carcinoma  is  often
used defining a carcinoma that invades
no deeper than the submucosa but has
not metastasised {609}. In several studies
from  Japan,  superficial  carcinomas
accounted for 10-20% of all resected car-
cinomas,  whereas  in Western countries
superficial carcinomas are much less fre-
quently  reported  {543}.  About  5%  of
superficial carcinomas that have invaded
the  lamina  propria display  lymph  node
metastases, whereas in carcinomas that
invade the submucosa the risk of nodal
metastasis  is  about  35%  {1055}.  For
tumours that have infiltrated beyond the
submucosa,  the  term  advanced  oeso-
phageal carcinoma is applied. 
I
n
t
r
a
m
u
r
a
l
m
e
t
a
s
t
a
s
e
s
.
A special feature
of oesophageal SCC is the occurrence of
intramural metastases, which have been
found  in  resected  oesophageal  speci-
mens  in  11-16%  of  cases  {896,  987}.
These metastases are thought to result
from intramural lymphatic spread with the
establishment  of  secondary  intramural
tumour deposits. Intramural metastases
are associated with an advanced stage
of disease and with shorter survival.
S
e
c
o
n
d
p
r
i
m
a
r
y
S
C
C
.
Additionally,  the
occurrence of multiple independent SCC
has been described in between 14 and
31% of cases, the second cancers being
mainly carcinomas
i
n
s
i
t
u
and superficial
SCC {1154, 989, 1507}.
T
r
e
a
t
m
e
n
t
g
r
o
u
p
s
.
Following the clinical
staging, patients are usually divided into
two treatment groups: those with locore-
gional  disease  in  whom  the  tumour  is
potentially  curable  (e.g.  by  surgery,
radiotherapy,  multimodal  therapy),  and
those  with  advanced  disease  (meta-
stases outside the regional area or inva-
sion of the airway) in whom only palliative
treatment  is  indicated  {606}.  Oeso-
phageal SCC limited to the mucosa may
be  treated  by  endoscopic  mucosal
resection  due  to  its  low  risk  of  nodal
metastasis. Endoscopic mucosal resec-
tion  is  also  indicated  for  high-grade
intraepithelial  neoplasia.  Tumours  that
have invaded the submucosa or those in
more  advanced  tumour  stages  have
Fig. 1.06  Primary squamous cell carcinoma (CA) of
oesophagus with an intramural metastasis (M) near
the oesophagogastric junction.
Fig. 1.05  AEndoscopic view of a superficial squa-
mous cell carcinoma presenting as a large nodule
(CA) in a zone of erosion. B After spraying of 2%
iodine solution, the superficial extent of the tumour
becomes visible as unstained light yellow area (CA,
arrows).
A
B
Fig. 1.04 Catheter probe ultrasonograph of a squa-
mous  cell  carcinoma, presenting as  hypoechoic
lesion (arrow).
CA
CA
M
CA
Copy one page of pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
cut pages from pdf reader; extract one page from pdf file
Copy one page of pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pages pdf preview; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
more  than  30%  risk  of  lymph  node
metastasis, and endoscopic therapy is
not indicated {465}. Additionally, clinical
staging is performed in order to deter-
mine the success of treatment, e.g. fol-
lowing radio- and/or chemotherapy.
Tumour spread
The most common sites of metastasis of
oesophageal SCC are the regional lymph
nodes. The risk of lymph node metasta-
sis is about 5% in carcinomas confined
to the mucosa but over 30% in carcino-
mas invading the submucosa and over
80%  in  carcinomas  invading  adjacent
organs or tissues {772}. Lesions of the
upper third of the oesophagus most fre-
quently involve cervical and mediastinal
lymph nodes, whereas those of the mid-
dle third metastasise to the mediastinal,
cervical and upper gastric lymph nodes.
Carcinomas of the lower third preferen-
tially spread to the lower mediastinal and
the  abdominal  lymph  nodes  {28}.  The
most  common  sites  of haematogenous
metastases  are  the  lung  and  the  liver
{1153,  1789}.  Less  frequently  affected
sites are the bones, adrenal glands, and
brain  {1551}.  Recently,  disseminated
tumour cells were identified by means of
immunostaining in the bone marrow  of
about 40% of patients with oesophageal
SCC {1933}. Recurrence of  cancer fol-
lowing  oesophageal  resection  can  be
locoregional or distant, both with approx-
imately equal frequency {1185, 1027}. 
Histopathology 
Oesophageal SCC is defined as the pen-
etration of neoplastic squamous epitheli-
um through the epithelial basement mem-
brane and extension into the lamina pro-
pria  or  deeper  tissue  layers.  Invasion
commonly starts from a carcinoma in situ
with the proliferation of rete-like projec-
tions of neoplastic epithelium that push
into the lamina propria with subsequent
dissociation into small carcinomatous cell
clusters. Along with vertical tumour cell
infiltration,  usually  a  horizontal  growth
undermines the adjacent normal mucosa
at the tumour periphery. The carcinoma
may already invade intramural lymphatic
vessels and veins at an early stage of dis-
ease.  The  frequency  of  lymphatic  and
blood  vessel  invasion  increases  with
increasing  depth  of  invasion  {1662}.
Tumour cells in lymphatic vessels and in
blood vessels may be found progressive-
ly several centimetres beyond the gross
tumour. The carcinoma invades  the mus-
cular  layers,  enters  the  loose  fibrous
adventitia and may extend  beyond the
adventitia,  with  invasion  of  adjacent
organs or tissues, especially the trachea
and bronchi, eventually with the formation
of  oesophagotracheal  or  oesophago-
bronchial fistulae {1789}. 
Oesophageal  SCC  displays  different
microscopic patterns of invasion, which
are categorised as ‘expansive growth’ or
‘infiltrative growth’. The former pattern is
characterized  by  a  broad  and smooth
invasion front with little or no tumour cell
dissociation, whereas the infiltrative pat-
tern shows an irregular invasion front and
a marked tumour cell dissociation. 
The degree of desmoplastic or inflamma-
tory  stromal  reaction,  nuclear  polymor-
phism  and  keratinization  is  extremely
variable.  Additionally,  otherwise  typical
oesophageal SCC may contain small foci
of glandular differentiation, indicated by
the formation of tubular glands or mucin-
producing tumour cells {987}. 
V
e
r
r
u
c
o
u
s
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
(
I
C
D
-
O
8
0
5
1
/
3
)
This rare variant of squamous cell carci-
noma {19} is histologically comparable to
verrucous  carcinomas  arising  at  other
sites  {969}.  On  gross  examination,  its
appearance  is  exophytic,  warty,  cauli-
flower-like or papillary. It can be found in
any part of the oesophagus. Histologi-
cally, it is defined as a malignant papil-
lary tumour composed of well differentia-
ted and keratinized squamous epitheli-
um with minimal cytological atypia, and
pushing rather than  infiltrating margins
{2066}. Oesophageal verrucous carcino-
ma grows slowly and invades locally, with
a very low metastasising potential. 
S
p
i
n
d
l
e
c
e
l
l
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
(
I
C
D
-
O
8
0
9
4
/
3
)
This unusual malignancy is defined as a
squamous cell carcinoma with a variable
sarcomatoid spindle cell component. It is
also known by a variety of other terms,
including carcinosarcoma, pseudosarco-
matous squamous cell carcinoma, poly-
poid carcinoma, and squamous cell car-
cinoma  with  a  spindle  cell  component
{1055}.  Macroscopically,  the  tumour  is
characterized by a polypoid growth pat-
tern. The spindle cells may be capable of
maturation, forming bone, cartilage and
skeletal muscle cells {662}. Alternatively,
they may be more pleomorphic, resem-
bling malignant  fibrous  histiocytoma.  In
the majority of cases a gradual transition
between carcinomatous and sarcomatous
components has been observed on the
light  microscopic  level.  Immunohisto-
chemical  and electron  microscopic stu-
dies indicate that the sarcomatous spin-
dle cells show various degrees of epithe-
lial differentiation. Therefore, the sarcoma-
14
Tumours of the oesophagus
Fig. 1.07 Squamous cell carcinoma with transmural
invasion. M, remaining intact mucosa.
Fig. 1.09 Verrucous carcinoma. A Typical  exo-
phytic papillary growth. BHigh degree of differen-
tiation.
B
Fig. 1.08 Squamous cell carcinoma invading thin-
walled lymphatic vessels.
M
A
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
This C#.NET example describes how to copy an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into another page. // Define input and output documents.
cut pages from pdf preview; delete page from pdf online
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page. This VB.NET example shows how to copy an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into another page.
add and delete pages from pdf; extract page from pdf preview
15
Squamous cell carcinoma 
tous  component  may  be  metaplastic.
However, a recent molecular analysis of a
single case of a spindle cell carcinoma
showed divergent  genetic alterations  in
the carcinomatous and in the sarcoma-
tous tumour component suggesting two
independent malignant cell clones {823}.
B
a
s
a
l
o
i
d
s
q
u
a
m
o
u
s
c
e
l
l
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
(
I
C
D
-
O
8
0
8
3
/
3
)
This  rare  but  distinct  variant  of  oeso-
phageal SCC {1961} appears to be iden-
tical to the basaloid squamous cell carci-
nomas of the upper aerodigestive tract
{109}.  Histologically,  it is composed  of
closely packed cells with hyperchromat-
ic  nuclei  and  scant  basophilic  cyto-
plasm, which show a solid growth pat-
tern, small gland-like spaces and foci of
comedo-type  necrosis.  Basaloid  squa-
mous  cell  carcinomas  are  associated
with  intraepithelial  neoplasia,  invasive
SCC, or islands of squamous differentia-
tion among the basaloid cells {2036}. The
proliferative activity is higher than in typi-
cal SCC. However, basaloid squamous
cell carcinoma is also characterized by a
high rate of apoptosis and its prognosis
does not differ significantly from that of
the ordinary oesophageal SCC {1663}.
Precursor lesions 
Most  studies  on  precursor  lesions  of
oesophageal SCC have been carried out
in high-risk populations, especially in Iran
and Northern China, but there is no evi-
dence that precursor lesions in low-risk
regions  are  substantially  different.  The
development  of  oesophageal  SCC  is
thought to be a multistage process which
progresses from the conversion of nor-
mal  squamous  epithelium  to  that  with
basal  cell  hyperplasia,  intraepithelial
neoplasia (dysplasia  and  carcinoma  in
situ),  and,  finally,  invasive  SCC  {354,
1547, 377}. 
I
n
t
r
a
e
p
i
t
h
e
l
i
a
l
n
e
o
p
l
a
s
i
a
.
This  lesion is
about eight times more common in high
cancer-risk areas than in low-risk areas
{1547}, and is frequently found adjacent
to  invasive  SCC  in  oesophagectomy
specimens  {1154,  988}.  Morphological
features  of  intraepithelial  neoplasia
include both architectural and cytological
abnormalities. The  architectural  abnor-
mality is characterized by a disorganisa-
tion of the epithelium and loss of normal
cell polarity. Cytologically, the cells exhibit
irregular and hyperchromatic nuclei, an
increase in nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio and
increased  mitotic  activity.  Dysplasia  is
usually graded as low or high-grade. In
low-grade  dysplasia,  the  abnormalities
are often confined to the lower half of the
epithelium, whereas in  high-grade dys-
plasia the abnormal cells also occur in
the  upper  half  and  exhibit  a  greater
degree of atypia. In carcinoma 
i
n
s
i
t
u
, the
atypical cells are present throughout the
epithelium without evidence of maturation
at the surface of the epithelium {1154}. In
a two-tier system, severe dysplasia and
carcinoma-in-situ are included under the
rubric of high-grade  intraepithelial neo-
plasia, and may have the same clinical
implications {1055}.
Epidemiological  follow-up  studies  sug-
gest  an  increased  risk  for  the  subse-
quent development of invasive SCC for
patients with basal cell hyperplasia (rela-
tive risk: 2.1), low-grade dysplasia (RR:
2.2),  moderate-grade  dysplasia  (RR:
15.8), high-grade  dysplasia  (RR:  72.6)
and carcinoma in situ (RR: 62.5) {377}.
Fig. 1.10 Spindle cell carcinoma. ATypical polypoid appearance. BTransition between conventional and spindle cells areas. C Malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like
area in a spindle cell carcinoma.
B
C
A
Fig. 1.11  Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. A Ty-
pical  comedo-type  necrosis.  B Small  gland-like
structures.
A
B
Fig. 1.12  Low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia with
an increase in basal cells, loss of polarity in the
deep epithelium and slight cytological atypia.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your PDF document, you can use this VB.NET PDF Library, which supports a variety of PDF
delete pages from pdf preview; cut paste pdf pages
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
extract one page from pdf reader; copy web page to pdf
16
Tumours of the oesophagus
B
a
s
a
l
c
e
l
l
h
y
p
e
r
p
l
a
s
i
a
This lesion is histologically defined as an
otherwise normal  squamous epithelium
with a basal zone thickness greater than
15% of total epithelial thickness, without
elongation  of  lamina  propria  papillae
{377}. In most cases, basal cell hyper-
plasia is an epithelial proliferative lesion
in response to oesophagitis, which is fre-
quently observed in high-risk populations
for oesophageal cancer {1547}.
S
q
u
a
m
o
u
s
c
e
l
l
p
a
p
i
l
l
o
m
a
(
I
C
D
-
O
8
0
5
2
/
0
)
Squamous  cell  papilloma  is  rare  and
usually causes no specific symptoms. It
is a benign tumour composed of hyper-
plastic  squamous  epithelium  covering
finger-like processes with cores derived
from  the  lamina  propria.  The  polypoid
lesions are smooth, sharply demarcated,
and usually 5 mm or less in maximum
diameter {249, 1428}. Rarely, giant papil-
lomas have been reported, with sizes up
to  5  cm  {2037}.  Most  squamous  cell
papillomas  represent  single  isolated
lesions, typically located in the distal to
middle third of the oesophagus, but mul-
tiple lesions occur. 
Histologically, cores of fibrovascular tis-
sue  are  covered  by  mature  stratified
squamous  epithelium.  The  aetiological
role  of  human  papillomavirus  (HPV)
infection has been investigated in seve-
ral studies, but the results were inconclu-
sive {248}. Malignant progression to SCC
is extremely rare.
In  Japan,  oesophageal  squamous  cell
carcinoma is diagnosed mainly based on
nuclear criteria, even in cases judged to
be non-invasive intraepithelial neoplasia
(dysplasia) in the West. This difference in
diagnostic practice may contribute to the
relatively high rate of incidence and good
prognosis  of  superficial  squamous  cell
carcinoma reported in Japan {1682}.
Grading 
Grading of oesophageal SCC is tradition-
ally based on the parameters of mitotic
activity,  anisonucleosis  and  degree  of
differentiation.
W
e
l
l
d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
i
a
t
e
d
tumours have cytolo-
gical and histological features similar to
those of the normal oesophageal squa-
mous  epithelium.  In  well  differentiated
oesophageal SCC there is a high propor-
tion of large, differentiated, keratinocyte-
like squamous cells and a low proportion
of small basal-type cells, which are loca-
ted in the periphery of the cancer cell
nests  {1055}.  The  occurrence  of kera-
tinization has been interpreted as a sign
of  differentiation,  although  the  normal
oesophageal squamous epithelium does
not keratinize. 
P
o
o
r
l
y
d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
i
a
t
e
d
tumours  predomi-
nantly consist of basal-type cells, which
usually exhibit a high mitotic rate.
M
o
d
e
r
a
t
e
l
y
d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
i
a
t
e
d
carcinomas,
between the well and poorly differentia-
ted types, are the most common type,
accounting  for  about  two-thirds  of  all
oesophageal  SCC.  However,  since  no
generally  accepted  criteria  have  been
identified to score the relative contribu-
tion of the different grading parameters,
grading of SCC suffers from a great inter-
observer variation. 
U
n
d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
i
a
t
e
d
carcinomas are defined
by a  lack of  definite  light  microscopic
features of differentiation. However, ultra-
structural or immunohistochemical inves-
tigations may disclose features of squa-
mous differentiation in a subset of light-
microscopically undifferentiated carcino-
mas {1881}.
Fig. 1.14 Squamous  cell papilloma of distal oeso-
phagus. This lesion was negative for human papilloma-
virus by in situ hybridisation.
Fig. 1.13 High grade intraepithelial neoplasia of oesophageal squamous epithelium. Architectural disarray,
loss of polarity and cellular atypia are much greater than shown in Fig. 1.12. Changes in D extend to the
parakeratotic layer of the luminal surface. 
A
B
C
D
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
a pdf page cut; deleting pages from pdf file
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. // Open a document.
cutting pdf pages; extract pdf pages for
17
Squamous cell carcinoma 
Genetic susceptibility 
Familial  predisposition  of  oesophageal
cancer  has  been  only  poorly  studied
except in its association with focal non-
epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma
(NEPPK  or  tylosis)  {1279,  1278,  752}.
This autosomal, dominantly inherited dis-
order of the palmar and plantar surfaces
of  the  skin  segregates  together  with
oesophageal cancer in three pedigrees,
two of which are extensive {456, 1834,
693}. The causative locus has been des-
ignated the tylosis oesophageal cancer
(
T
O
C
)
gene and maps to 17q25 between
the  anonymous  microsatellite  markers
D17S1839  and  D17S785  {1594,  899}.
The genetic defect is thought to be in a
molecule involved in the physical struc-
ture  of  stratified  squamous  epithelia
whereby loss of function of the gene may
alter oesophageal integrity thereby mak-
ing it more susceptible to environmental
mutagens.
Several structural candidate genes such
as  envoplakin 
(
E
V
P
L
)
,
integrin β4
(
I
T
G
B
4
)
and  plakoglobin  have  been
excluded as the TOC gene following inte-
gration of the genetic and physical maps
of this region {1595}. The importance of
this  gene  in  a  larger  population  than
those afflicted with the familial disease is
indicated  by  the  association  of  the
genomic  region  containing  the  TOC
gene  with  sporadic  squamous  cell
oesophageal  carcinomas  {2020,  823},
Barrett adenocarcinoma of the oesopha-
gus {439}, and primary breast cancers
{549} using loss of heterozygosity stud-
ies.
Genetics
Alterations  in  genes  that  encode
regulators of the G1 to S transition of cell
cycle are common in SCC. Mutation in
the
T
P
5
3
gene (17p13) is thought to be
an  early  event,  sometimes  already
detectable  in  intraepithelial  neoplasia.
The  frequency  and  type  of  mutation
varies from one geographic area to the
other, suggesting that some 
T
P
5
3
muta-
tions may occur as the result of exposure
to  region-specific,  exogenous risk  fac-
tors. However, even in SCC from Western
Europe,  the 
T
P
5
3
mutation  spectrum
does not show the same tobacco-associ-
ated  mutations  as  in  lung  cancers
{1266}.  Amplification  of  cyclin  D1
(11q13) occurs in 20-40% of SCC and is
frequently detected in cancers that retain
expression of the Rb protein, in agree-
ment with the notion that these two fac-
tors cooperate within the same signalling
cascade {859}. Inactivation of 
C
D
K
N
2
A
occurs essentially by homozygous dele-
tion or de novo methylation and appears
to be associated with advanced cancer.
Other potentially important genetic alter-
ations include transcriptional inactivation
of the FHIT gene (fragile histidine triad, a
presumptive  tumour  suppressor  on
3p14) by methylation of 5’ CpG islands,
and deletion of the tylosis oesophageal
cancer  gene  on  17q25  {2020,  1264}.
Furthermore,  analysis  of  clones  on
3p21.3, where frequent  LOH  occurs in
oesophageal cancer {1274}, recently led
to identification of a novel gene termed
D
L
C
1
(deleted in lung and oesophageal
cancer-1) {365}. Although the function of
the DLC1 gene remains to be clarified,
RT-PCR experiments indicated that 33%
of primary cancers of lung and oesopha-
gus lacked DLC1 transcripts entirely or
contained increased levels of nonfunc-
tional  DLC1  mRNA.  Recent  evidence
suggests  that  LOH  at  a  new,  putative
tumour suppressor locus on 5p15 may
occur  in  a  majority  of  SCC  {1497}.
Amplification of several proto-oncogenes
has also been reported 
(
H
S
T
-
1
,
H
S
T
-
2
,
E
G
F
R
,
M
Y
C
)
{1266}. How these various
genetic events correlate with phenotypic
Fig. 1.16 Location of  the tylosis oesophageal cancer gene on chromosome 17q.
A
B
C
Fig. 1.15 Squamous cell carcinoma. A Moderately differentiated. B Well differentiated with prominent lymphoid infiltrate. C Well differentiated areas (left) contrast
with immature basal-type cells of a poorly differentiated carcinoma (right).
Location  of the  tylosis
oesophageal 
cancer
gene by haplotype analy-
sis
1cM/ 500 Kb
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
to display it. Thus, PDFPage, derived from REPage, is a programming abstraction for representing one PDF page. Annotating Process.
extract pages from pdf on ipad; extract pages from pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Using RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF page deletion component, developers can easily select one or more PDF pages and delete it/them in both .NET web and Windows
extract one page from pdf preview; extract page from pdf
changes and co operate in the sequence
of events leading to SCC is still specula-
tive.
Prognosis and prognostic factors 
Overall,  the  prognosis  of  oesophageal
SCC is poor and the 5-year survival rates
in  registries  are  around  10%.  Cure  is
foreseen only for superficial cancer. The
survival varies, depending upon tumour
stage at diagnosis, treatment received,
patient’s general health status, morpho-
logical features and molecular features of
the tumour. In the past, studies on prog-
nostic  factors  were largely focused on
patients  who  were treated  by  surgery,
whereas  factors  influencing  survival  of
patients  treated  by  radiotherapy  or  by
multimodal  therapy  have  been  investi-
gated only rarely.
M
o
r
p
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
f
a
c
t
o
r
s
The extent of spread of the oesophageal
SCC  is  the  most  important  factor  for
prognosis, the TNM classification being
the most widely used staging system.
S
t
a
g
i
n
g
.
All  studies  indicate  that  the
depth of invasion and the presence of
nodal  or  distant  metastases  are  inde-
pendent  predictors  of  survival  {1104,
895,  772}.  In  particular,  lymph  node
involvement, regardless of the extent of
the  primary  tumour,  indicates  a  poor
prognosis  {1862,  912,  1873}.  More
recently, the  prognostic significance of
more  sophisticated  methods  for  the
determination  of  tumour  spread  have
been  evaluated,  including  the  ratio  of
involved  to  resected  lymph  nodes
{1603},  immunohistochemically  deter-
mined  lymph  node  micrometastases
{824, 1327} and micrometastases in the
bone marrow  {1933}. However,  current
data are still too limited to draw final con-
clusions on the prognostic value.
D
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
i
a
t
i
o
n
. The prognostic impact of
tumour differentiation is equivocal, possi-
bly due to the poor standardisation of the
grading system and to the high prognos-
tic  power  of  tumour  stage.  Although
some studies have shown a significant
influence  of  tumour  grade  on  survival
{709, 772}, the majority of studies have
not  {443,  1858,  1601,  1660}.  Other
histopathological  features  associated
with a poor prognosis include the pres-
ence of vascular and/or lymphatic inva-
sion {772, 1662} and an infiltrative growth
pattern of the primary tumour {1660}.
L
y
m
p
h
o
c
y
t
i
c
i
n
f
i
l
t
r
a
t
i
o
n
.
Intense lympho-
cytic response to the tumour has been
associated  with  a  better  prognosis
{1660, 443}.
P
r
o
l
i
f
e
r
a
t
i
o
n
.
The cancer cell prolifera-
tion  index,  determined  immunohisto-
chemically by antibodies such as PCNA
or  Ki-  67  /  MIB-1,  have  been  studied
extensively.  However,  the  proliferation
index does not  appear to  be an inde-
pendent prognostic factor {2189, 1005,
1659, 779}.
D
N
A
p
l
o
i
d
y
.
Aneuploidy of cancer cells,
as determined  by flow cytometry  or by
image  analysis,  has  been  identified  in
55% to 95% of oesophageal SCC {935}.
Regarding the prognostic impact, patients
with diploid tumours usually survive longer
than  those  with  aneuploid  tumours.
However, a prognostic impact independ-
ent of tumour stage has been shown only
in two studies {422, 1195}, whereas the
majority of studies have not verified this
0
10  20  30  40  50  60  70
SCC
ADC
G:C>A:T
G:C>A:T (CpG)
G:C>C:G
G:C>T:A
G:C>C:G
Deletions, insertions, complex mutations
G:C>A:T
G:C>A:T (CpG)
G:C>T:A
Deletions, insertions, complex mutations
18
Tumours of the oesophagus
Gene
Location
Tumor abnormality
Function
T
P
5
3
17p13
Point mutation, LOH
G1 arrest, apoptosis,
genetic stability
p
1
6
,
p
1
5
,
9p22
Homozygous loss
CDK inhibitor
A
R
F
/
C
D
K
N
2
Promoter methylation
(cell cycle control)
C
y
c
l
i
n
D
1
11q13
Amplification
Cell cycle control
E
G
F
R
17p13
Amplification, overexpression
Signal transduction
(membrane Tyr kinase)
c
-
m
y
c
8q24.1
Amplification
Transcription factor
R
b
13q14
LOH
Cell cycle control
Absence of expression
T
O
C
17q25
LOH
Tumour suppressor
F
E
Z
1
8p22
Transcription shutdown
Transcription factor
D
L
C
1
3p21.3
Transcription shutdown
Growth inhibition
Table 1.01
Genetic alterations in squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus.
Fig. 1.17 Spectrum of
T
P
5
3
mutations in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the
oesophagus.
19
Squamous cell carcinoma
finding {935}. Therefore, the determination
of DNA ploidy is currently not considered
to improve the prognostic information pro-
vided by the TNM system {1055}.
E
x
t
e
n
t
o
f
r
e
s
e
c
t
i
o
n
.
The  frequency  of
locoregional  recurrence  is  negatively
correlated with the distance of the pri-
mary tumour to  the proximal  resection
margin  and  possibly  to  preoperative
chemotherapy {1890, 1027}.
M
o
l
e
c
u
l
a
r
f
a
c
t
o
r
s
The
T
P
5
3
gene is mutated in 35% to 80%
of  oesophageal  SCC  {1266}.  Whereas
some studies indicated a negative prog-
nostic influence of p53 protein accumula-
tion in cancer cell nuclei {1743, 277}, oth-
ers did not observe any prognostic value
of  either  immunoexpression  or 
T
P
5
3
mutation {2014, 1661, 1008, 779, 319}. 
Other potential prognostic factors include
growth factors and their receptors {927},
oncogenes, including 
c
-
e
r
b
B
-
2
and
i
n
t
-
2
{778}, cell cycle regulators {1748, 1297},
tumour suppressor genes {1886}, redox
defence system components, e.g., metal-
lothionein and heat shock proteins {897},
and  matrix  proteinases  {1303,  1947,
2155}.  Alterations  of  these  factors  in
oesophageal SCC may enhance tumour
cell  proliferation,  invasiveness,  and
metastatic  potential,  and  thus  may  be
associated with survival. However, none
of the factors tested so far has entered
clinical practice.
Fig. 1.19  Immunoreactivity for epidermal growth
factor receptor (EGFR) in oesophageal squamous
cell carcinoma. 
Fig. 1.20 Fluorescence in situ hybridisation demon-
strating cyclin D1 in squamous carcinoma cells.
Fig. 1.18
T
P
5
3
immunoreactivity in squamous cell
carcinoma of the oesophagus.
Multiple LOH
Amplification of CMYC, EGFR, CYCLIND1, HST1...
Overexpression of CYCLIN D1
LOH at 3p21; LOH at 9p31
LOH 3p14 (FHIT); LOH 17q25 (TOC)
TP53 mutations
Normal oesophagus
Oesophagitis
Low-grade
High-grade 
Invasive SCC
intraepithelial neoplasia            intraepithelial neoplasia
Fig. 1.21 Putative sequence of genetic alterations in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus.
20
Tumours of the oesophagus
Definition
 malignant  epithelial  tumour  of  the
oesophagus  with  glandular  differentia-
tion  arising  predominantly  from  Barrett
mucosa in the lower third of the oeso-
phagus.  Infrequently,  adenocarcinoma
originates  from  heterotopic  gastric
mucosa  in  the  upper  oesophagus,  or
from mucosal and submucosal glands.
ICD-O Code
8140/3
Epidemiology
In industrialized countries, the incidence
and  prevalence  of  adenocarcinoma  of
the oesophagus has risen dramatically
{1827}. Population based studies in the
U.S.A. and several European countries
indicate  that  the  incidence  of  oeso-
phageal  adenocarcinoma  has  doubled
between  the  early  1970s  to  the  late
1980s and continues to increase at a rate
of about 5% to 10% per year {152, 153,
370, 405, 1496}. This is paralleled by ris-
ing  rates  of  adenocarcinoma  of  the
gastric cardia and of subcardial gastric
carcinoma.  It  has  been  estimated that
the rate of increase of oesophageal and
oesophagogastric  junction  adenocarci-
noma  in  the  U.S.A.  during  the  past
decade surpassed that of any other type
of  cancer {152}. In the mid  1990s  the
incidence of oesophageal adenocarcino-
ma has been estimated between 1 and 4
per 100,000 per year in the U.S.A. and
several  European  countries  and  thus
approaches  or  exceeds  that  of  squa-
mous cell oesophageal cancer in these
regions. In Asia and Africa, adenocarci-
noma of the oesophagus is an uncom-
mon  finding,  but  increasing  rates  are
also reported from these areas. 
In addition to the rise in incidence, ade-
nocarcinoma of the oesophagus and of
the  oesophagogastric  junction  share
some  epidemiological  characteristics
that clearly distinguish them from squa-
mous cell oesophageal carcinoma and
adenocarcinoma of the  distal stomach.
These include a high preponderance for
the male sex (male:female ratio 7:1), a
higher incidence among whites and an
average age at the time of diagnosis of
around 65 years {1756}.
Aetiology 
B
a
r
r
e
t
t
o
e
s
o
p
h
a
g
u
s
The epidemiological features of adeno-
carcinoma of the distal oesophagus and
oesophagogastric junction match those
of patients with known intestinal metapla-
sia in the distal oesophagus, i.e. Barrett
oesophagus  {1605,  1827},  which  has
been identified as the single most impor-
tant precursor lesion and risk factor for
adenocarcinoma of the distal oesopha-
gus, irrespective of the length of the seg-
ment with intestinal metaplasia.
I
n
t
e
s
t
i
n
a
l
m
e
t
a
p
l
a
s
i
a
of the oesophagus
develops  when  the  normal  squamous
oesophageal epithelium is replaced by
columnar epithelium during the process
of  healing after  repetitive  injury  to  the
oesophageal mucosa, typically associat-
ed  with  gastro-oesophageal  reflux  dis-
ease {1798, 1799}. 
Intestinal metaplasia can be detected in
more than 80% of patients with adenocar-
cinoma of the distal oesophagus. {1756,
1824}. A series of prospective endoscop-
ic  surveillance  studies  in  patients  with
known intestinal metaplasia of the distal
oesophagus has shown an incidence of
oesophageal  adenocarcinoma  in  the
order of 1/100 years of follow up {1799}.
This  translates  into  a  life-time  risk  for
oesophageal  adenocarcinoma  of  about
10% in these patients. The length of the
oesophageal  segment  with  intestinal
metaplasia, and the presence of ulcera-
tions and strictures have been implicated
as further risk factors for the development
of  oesophageal  adenocarcinoma  by
some authors, but this has not been con-
firmed by others {1799, 1797, 1827}.
The biological significance of so-called
ultrashort Barrett oesophagus or intestin-
al metaplasia just beneath a normal Z
line has yet to be fully clarified {1325}.
Whether adenocarcinoma of the gastric
cardia  or  subcardial  gastric  cancer  is
also related to foci of intestinal metapla-
sia at or immediately below the gastric
cardia {715, 1797, 1722} is discussed in
the chapter on adenocarcinoma of the
oesophagogstric  junction.  Despite  the
broad advocation of endoscopic surveil-
lance  in  patients  with  known  Barrett
oesophagus, more than 50% of patients
with  oesophageal adenocarcinoma still
have locally advanced or metastatic dis-
ease at the time of presentation {1826}. 
C
h
r
o
n
i
c
g
a
s
t
r
o
-
o
e
s
o
p
h
a
g
e
a
l
r
e
f
l
u
x
is the
usual underlying cause of the repetitive
mucosal  injury  and  also  provides  an
abnormal environment during the healing
process  that  predisposes  to  intestinal
metaplasia  {1799}.  Data  from  Sweden
have shown an odds ratio of 7.7 for oeso-
phageal  adenocarcinoma  in  persons
with recurrent reflux symptoms, as com-
pared with persons without such symp-
toms {1002, 1001}. 
The  more  frequent,  more  severe,  and
longer-lasting the symptoms of reflux, the
greater  the  risk.  Among  persons  with
long-standing and severe symptoms of
reflux,  the  odds  ratio  for  oesophageal
adenocarcinoma  was  43.5.  Based  on
these data a strong and probably causal
relation  between  gastro-oesophageal
reflux, one of the most common benign
disorders  of  the  digestive  tract,  and
oesophageal adenocarcinoma has been
postulated.
Factors predisposing for the development
of  Barrett oesophagus and subsequent
adenocarcinoma in patients with gastro-
oesophageal  reflux  disease  include  a
markedly increased oesophageal expo-
sure time to refluxed gastric and duode-
nal  contents due to a defective barrier
function of the lower oesophageal sphinc-
ter and ineffective clearance function of
the  tubular  oesophagus  {1823,  1827}.
Experimental  and  clinical  data  indicate
that combined oesophageal exposure to
gastric acid and duodenal contents (bile
acids and pancreatic enzymes) appears
to  be  more  detrimental  than  isolated
exposure  to  gastric  juice  or  duodenal
contents alone {1241, 1825}. Combined
reflux is thought to increase cancer risk
M. Werner
R. Lambert
J.F. Flejou
G. Keller
P. Hainaut
H.J. Stein
H. Höfler
Adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus
21
Adenocarcinoma
by promoting cellular proliferation, and by
exposing the oesophageal epithelium to
potentially genotoxic gastric and intestin-
al contents, e.g. nitrosamines {1825}.
T
o
b
a
c
c
o
Smoking has been identified as another
major risk factor for oesophageal adeno-
carcinoma and may account for as much
as 40% of cases through an early stage
carcinogenic effect {562, 2204}.
O
b
e
s
i
t
y
In a Swedish population-based case con-
trol  study,  obesity was also associated
with an increased  risk for oesophageal
adenocarcinoma. In this study the adjust-
ed odds ratio was 7.6 among persons in
the highest body mass index (BMI) quar-
tile compared with persons in the lowest.
Obese persons (BMI > 30 kg/m
2
) had an
odds ratio of 16.2 as compared with the
leanest persons (persons with a BMI < 22
kg/m
2
) {1002}. The pathogenetic basis of
the association with obesity remains to be
elucidated {310}.
A
l
c
o
h
o
l
In  contrast to squamous cell oesopha-
geal carcinoma, there is no strong rela-
tion  between alcohol consumption  and
adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus.
H
e
l
i
c
o
b
a
c
t
e
r
p
y
l
o
r
i
This infection does not appear to be a
predisposing factor for the development
of intestinal metaplasia and adenocarci-
noma in  the distal oesophagus. Accor-
ding to recent studies, gastric
H
.
p
y
l
o
r
i
infection  may  even  exert  a  protective
effect {309}.
Localization
Adenocarcinoma may occur anywhere in
a segment lined with columnar metaplas-
tic  mucosa  (Barrett  oesophagus)  but
develops  mostly  in  its  proximal  verge.
Adenocarcinoma in a short segment of
Barrett oesophagus is easily mistaken for
adenocarcinoma  of  the  cardia.  Since
adenocarcinoma originating from the dis-
tal oesophagus may infiltrate the gastric
cardia and carcinoma of the gastric car-
dia or subcardial region may grow into
the distal oesophagus these entities are
frequently  difficult  to  discriminate  (see
chapter  on  tumours  of  the  oesopha-
gogastric junction). As an exception, ade-
nocarcinoma occurs also in the middle or
proximal third of the oesophagus, in the
latter usually from a congenital islet of het-
erotopic columnar mucosa (that is pres-
ent in up to 10% of the population).
Barrett oesophagus
S
y
m
p
t
o
m
s
a
n
d
s
i
g
n
s
Barrett oesophagus as the precursor of
most adenocarcinomas is clinically silent
in up to 90% of cases. The symptomatol-
ogy of Barrett oesophagus, when pres-
ent, is that of gastro-oesophageal reflux
{1011}. This is the condition where the
early stages of neoplasia (intraepithelial
and intramucosal neoplasia) should be
sought.
E
n
d
o
s
c
o
p
y
The endoscopic analysis of the squamo-
columnar junction aims at the detection
of  columnar  metaplasia  in  the  distal
oesophagus. At endoscopy, the squamo-
columnar junction (Z-line) is in the thorax,
just above the narrowed passage across
the  diaphragm.  The  anatomical  land-
marks  in  this  area  are  treated  in  the
chapter on tumours of the oesophago-
gastric junction.
If the length of the columnar lining in this
distal oesophageal segment is * 3 cm, it
is termed a long type of Barrett metapla-
sia. When the length is < 3 cm, it is a
short type. Single or multiple finger-like
(1-3 cm) protrusions of columnar mucosa
are classified as short type. In patients
with  short  segment  (<  3  cm)  Barrett
oesophagus the risk for developing ade-
nocarcinoma  is  reported  to  be  lower
compared to  those  with  long  segment
Barrett oesophagus {1720}.
As  Barrett  oesophagus  is restricted  to
cases with histologically confirmed intes-
tinal  metaplasia, adequate tissue  sam-
pling is required.
H
i
s
t
o
p
a
t
h
o
l
o
g
y
Barrett epithelium is characterized by two
different types of cells, i.e. goblet  cells
and columnar cells, and has also been
termed  ‘specialized’,  ‘distinctive’  or
Barrett metaplasia. The goblet cells stain
positively with Alcian blue at low pH (2.5).
The metaplastic epithelium has a flat or
villiform surface, and is identical to gastric
intestinal  metaplasia  of  the  incomplete
type (type II or III). Rarely, foci of complete
intestinal metaplasia (type I) with absorp-
tive cells and Paneth cells may be found.
The mucous glands beneath the surface
epithelium  and  pits  may  also  contain
metaplastic  epithelium.  Recent  studies
suggest  that  the  columnar  metaplasia
originates from multipotential cells located
in intrinsic oesophageal glands {1429}.
Intraepithelial neoplasia 
in Barrett oesophagus
M
a
c
r
o
s
c
o
p
y
Intraepithelial neoplasia generally has no
distinctive gross features, and is detected
by systematic sampling of a flat Barrett
mucosa {634, 1573}. The area involved is
variable,  and  the  presence  of  multiple
dysplastic foci is common {226, 1197}.
In some cases, intraepithelial neoplasia
presents  as  one  or  several  nodular
masses  resembling  sessile  adenomas.
Rare dysplastic lesions have been con-
sidered true adenomas, with an expand-
ing  but localised  growth  resulting in a
well demarcated interface with the sur-
rounding tissue {1459}.
M
i
c
r
o
s
c
o
p
y
Epithelial atypia in Barrett mucosa is usu-
ally  assessed according to the system
Fig. 1.22 Endoscopic ultrasonograph of Barrett T1
adenocarcinoma.  The  hypoechoic  tumour  lies
between the first and second hyperechoic layers
(markers). The continuity of the second layer (sub-
mucosa) is respected.
Table 1.02
Pattern of endoscopic ultrasound in oesophageal
cancer.  There  are  three  hyper-  and  two hypo-
echoic layers; the tumour mass is hypoechoic.
T1
The 2nd hyperechoic layer
(submucosa) is continuous
T2
The 2nd hyperechoic layer
(submucosa) is interrupted
The 3rd hyperechoic layer
(adventitia) is continuous
T3
The 3rd hyperechoic layer
(aventitia) is interrupted
T4
The hypoechoic tumour is
continuous with adjacent structures
22
Tumours of the oesophagus
devised  for  atypia  in  ulcerative colitis,
namely:  negative,  positive or  indefinite
for  intraepithelial  neoplasia.  If  intra-
epithelial neoplasia is present, it should
be classified as low-grade (synonymous
with mild or moderate dysplasia) or high-
grade (synonymous with severe dyspla-
sia and carcinoma 
i
n
s
i
t
u
) {1582, 1685}.
The criteria used to grade intraepithelial
neoplasia comprise cytological and archi-
tectural features {75}.
N
e
g
a
t
i
v
e
f
o
r
i
n
t
r
a
e
p
i
t
h
e
l
i
a
l
n
e
o
p
l
a
s
i
a
Usually,  the  lamina  propria  of  Barrett
mucosa contains a mild accompanying
inflammatory  infiltrate  of  mononuclear
cells.  There  may  be  mild  reactive
changes with enlarged, hyperchromatic
nuclei,  prominence  of  nucleoli,  and
occasional mild stratification in the lower
portion of the glands. However, towards
the  surface  there  is  maturation  of  the
epithelium with few or no abnormalities.
These changes meet the criteria of atypia
negative for intraepithelial neoplasia, and
can usually be separated from low-grade
intraepithelial neoplasia.
A
t
y
p
i
a
i
n
d
e
f
i
n
i
t
e
f
o
r
i
n
t
r
a
e
p
i
t
h
e
l
i
a
l
n
e
o
-
p
l
a
s
i
a
.
One of the major challenges for
the pathologist in Barrett oesophagus is
the differentiation of intraepithelial  neo-
plasia  from  reactive  or  regenerative
epithelial  changes.  This  is  particularly
difficult,  sometimes even  impossible,  if
erosions  or  ulcerations  are  present
{1055}. In areas adjacent to erosions and
ulcerations,  the  metaplastic  epithelium
may display villiform hyperplasia of the
surface foveolae with cytological atypia
and  architectural  disturbances.  These
abnormalities  are  usually  milder  than
those observed in intraepithelial neopla-
sia. There is a normal expansion of the
basal  replication  zone  in  regenerative
epithelium
v
e
r
s
u
s
intraepithelial neopla-
sia, where the proliferation shifts to more
superficial portions of the gland {738}. If
there is doubt as to whether reactive and
regenerative  changes  or  intraepithelial
neoplasia is present in a biopsy, the cat-
egory atypia indefinite for intraepithelial
neoplasia is  appropriate  and  a  repeat
biopsy  after  reflux  control  by  medical
acid suppression or anti-reflux therapy is
indicated.
L
o
w
-
g
r
a
d
e
a
n
d
h
i
g
h
-
g
r
a
d
e
i
n
t
r
a
e
p
i
t
h
e
l
i
a
l
n
e
o
p
l
a
s
i
a
.
Intraepithelial  neoplasia  in
Barrett metaplastic mucosa is defined as
 neoplastic  process  limited  to  the
epithelium  {1582}.  Its  prevalence  in
Barrett  mucosa  is  approximately  10%,
and it develops only in the intestinal type
metaplastic epithelium.
Cytological abnormalities typically extend
to  the  surface  of  the  mucosa.  In  low-
grade  intraepithelial  neoplasia,  there  is
decreased  mucus  secretion,  nuclear
pseudostratification confined to the lower
half  of  the  glandular  epithelium,  occa-
sional  mitosis,  mild pleomorphism, and
minimal architectural changes. 
High-grade  intraepithelial  neoplasia
shows  marked  pleomorphism  and
decrease of  mucus secretion, frequent
mitosis,  nuclear  stratification extending
Fig. 1.24 Barrett oesophagus with low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia on the left and high-grade on the right.
Note the numerous goblet cells showing a clear cytoplasmic mucous vacuole indenting the adjacent nucleus.
Fig. 1.23 Barrett oesophagus. AHaphazardly arranged glands (right) adjacent to hyperplastic squamous epithelium (left).BGoblet cells and columnar cells form vil-
lus-like structures over chronically inflamed stroma. There is no intraepithelial neoplasia.
A
B
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested