devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete pages out of a pdf file application Library tool html asp.net .net online BB210-part710

CHAPTER 6
Tumours of the Colon and Rectum
Colorectal  carcinomas  vary  considerably  throughout  the
world, being one of the leading cancer sites in the developed
countries. Both environmental (diet) and genetic factors play
key roles in its aetiology. Genetic susceptibility ranges from
well-defined inherited syndromes, e.g. familial adenomatous
polyposis,  to  ill-defined  familial  aggregations.  Molecular
genetic mechanisms are diverse, and recent data suggest two
main pathways: a mutational pathway, which involves inacti-
vation  of  tumour  suppressor  genes  such  as  APC;  and
microsatellite instability which occurs in hereditary nonpolypo-
sis colon cancer (HNPCC) and a proportion of sporadic carci-
nomas.
The main precursor lesion is the adenoma, which is readily
detected  and treated  by endoscopic  techniques.  Non-neo-
plastic polyps are not considered precancerous unless they
occur in polyposis syndromes. Inflammatory bowel diseases,
such as chronic ulcerative colitis, bear resemblance to Barrett
oesophagus as a precursor lesion with a potential for control
by  endoscopic  surveillance.  Cure  is  strongly  related  to
anatomic extent, which makes accurate staging very impor-
tant.
Lymphomas, endocrine tumours, and mesenchymal tumours
are quite uncommon at this site. 
Delete pages out of a pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf document; delete page from pdf preview
Delete pages out of a pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy page from pdf; reader extract pages from pdf
Epithelial tumours
Adenoma
8140/0
Tubular
8211/0
Villous
8261/0
Tubulovillous
8263/0
Serrated
8213/0
Intraepithelial neoplasia
2
(dysplasia)
associated with chronic inflammatory diseases
Low-grade glandular intraepithelial neoplasia
High-grade glandular intraepithelial neoplasia
Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
8140/3
Mucinous adenocarcinoma
8480/3
Signet-ring cell carcinoma
8490/3
Small cell carcinoma
8041/3
Squamous cell carcinoma
8070/3
Adenosquamous carcinoma
8560/3
Medullary carcinoma
8510/3
Undifferentiated carcinoma
8020/3
Carcinoid (well differentiated endocrine neoplasm)
8240/3
EC-cell, serotonin-producing neoplasm
8241/3
L-cell, glucagon-like peptide and PP/PYY producing tumour
Others
Mixed carcinoid-adenocarcinoma
8244/3
Others
Non-epithelial tumours
Lipoma
8850/0
Leiomyoma
8890/0
Gastrointestinal stromal tumour
8936/1
Leiomyosarcoma
8890/3
Angiosarcoma
9120/3
Kaposi sarcoma
9140/3
Malignant melanoma 
8720/3
Others
Malignant lymphomas
Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT Type
9699/3
Mantle cell lymphoma 
9673/3
Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
9680/3
Burkitt lymphoma
9687/3
Burkitt-like /atypical Burkitt-lymphoma
9687/3
Others
Secondary tumours
Polyps
Hyperplastic (metaplastic)
Peutz-Jeghers
Juvenile
WHO histological classification of tumours of the colon and rectum
1
104
Tumours of the colon and rectum
_________
1
This classification is modified from the previous WHO histological classification of tumours {845} taking into account changes in our understanding of these lesions. In the case of
endocrine neoplasms, it is based on the recent WHO classification {1784} but has been simplified to be of more practical utility in morphological classification.
2
Morphology code of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O) {542} and the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (http://snomed.org). Behaviour is coded
/0 for benign tumours, /3 for malignant tumours, /2 for in situ carcinomas and grade III intraepithelial neoplasia, and /1 for unspecified, borderline or uncertain behaviour. Intraepithelial
neoplasia does not have a generic code in ICD-O. ICD-O codes are available only for lesions categorized as glandular intraepithelial neoplasia grade III (8148/2), and adenocarcino-
ma in situ (8140/2).
TNMclassification
1, 2
T – Primary Tumour
TX
Primary tumour cannot be assessed
T0
No evidence of primary tumour
Tis
Carcinoma in situ: intraepithelial or invasion of lamina propria
3
T1
Tumour invades submucosa
T2
Tumour invades muscularis propria
T3
Tumour invades through muscularis propria into subserosa 
or into non-peritonealized pericolic or perirectal tissues
T4
Tumour directly invades other organs or structures
4
and/or perforates visceral peritoneum
N – Regional Lymph Nodes
NX
Regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed
N0
No regional lymph node metastasis
N1
Metastasis in 1 to 3 regional lymph nodes
N2
Metastasis in 4 or more regional lymph nodes
M – Distant Metastasis
MX
Distant metastasis cannot be assessed
M0
No distant metastasis
M1
Distant metastasis
Stage Grouping
Stage 0
Tis
N0
M0
Stage I
T1
N0
M0
T2
N0
M0
Stage II T3
N0
M0
T4
N0
M0
Stage III Any T
N1
M0
Any T
N2
M0
Stage IV Any T
Any N
M1
TNM classification of tumours of the colon and rectum
_________
1
{1, 66}.This classification applies only to carcinomas.
2A help desk for specific questions about the TNM classification is available at http://tnm.uicc.org.
3
This includes cancer cells confined within the glandular basement membrane (intraepithelial) or lamina propria (intramucosal) with no extension through muscularis mucosae into
submucosa.
4
Direct invasion in T4 includes invasion of other segments of the colorectum by way of the serosa, e.g. invasion of sigmoid colon by a carcinoma of the cecum.
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET
cut pdf pages online; extract pages from pdf reader
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF option, The search and delete match rules. -. pageCount, The count of pages that will be deleted a string.
copy pdf page into word doc; cut pages from pdf online
105
Definition
A malignant epithelial tumour of the colon
or rectum. Only tumours that have pene-
trated through muscularis mucosae  into
submucosa are considered malignant at
this  site.  The  presence  of  scattered
Paneth  cells,  neuroendocrine  cells  or
small foci of squamous cell differentiation
is compatible with the diagnosis of adeno-
carcinoma.
ICD-O codes
Adenocarcinoma
8140/3
Mucinous adenocarcinoma
8480/3
Signet-ring cell carcinoma
8490/3
Small cell carcinoma
8041/3
Squamous cell carcinoma
8070/3
Adenosquamous carcinoma
8560/3
Medullary carcinoma
8510/3
Undifferentiated carcinoma
8020/3
Epidemiology
An estimated 875,000 cases of colorec-
tal cancer occurred worldwide in 1996,
representing about 8.5% of all new can-
cers {1531}. The age-standardized inci-
dence (cases/100,000 population) varies
greatly around the world, with up to 20-
fold differences between the high rates in
developed  countries  of  Europe,  North
and  South  America,  Australia/New
Zealand, and Asia  and the still  lower
rates in some recently developed coun-
tries (Malaysia, Korea) and in developing
countries of Africa, Asia and Polynesia.
Significant  differences also  exist  within
continents, e.g. with higher incidences in
western  and  northern  Europe  than  in
central  and  southern  Europe  {336}.
Among  immigrants  and  their  descen-
dants,  incidence  rates  rapidly  reach
those of the adopted country, indicating
that environmental factors are important.
According to the U.S. SEER database,
the incidence rate for adenocarcinoma of
the colon is 33.7/100,000 and increased
by  18%  during  the  period  from  1973
through 1987 while the incidence of rec-
tal adenocarcinoma (12.8/100,000) and
mucinous adenocarcinoma in the colon
and rectum (0.3  and  0.8, respectively)
remained  relatively  constant  {1928}.
During the last decade of the 20th centu-
ry,  incidence  and  mortality  have
decreased {566}. By contrast, the inci-
dence in Japan, Korea and Singapore is
rising rapidly {737}, probably due to the
acquisition  of  a  Western  lifestyle.
Incidence  increases  with  age  {2121}:
carcinomas are rare before the age of 40
years except in individuals with genetic
predisposition  or  predisposing  condi-
tions such as chronic inflammatory bowel
disease.
Incidence  rates  in  the  1973-87  SEER
data for colonic and rectal adenocarci-
noma for males were higher than those
for females; whites had higher rates than
blacks  for  rectal  adenocarcinoma,  but
blacks had higher rates for colonic ade-
nocarcinoma {1928}. During 1975-94, a
decrease in incidence in whites was evi-
dent,  while  the  incidence  of  proximal
colon cancers  in blacks still  increased
{1958}.
Aetiology
D
i
e
t
a
n
d
l
i
f
e
s
t
y
l
e
A  high incidence of colorectal carcino-
mas is consistently observed in popula-
tions with a Western type diet, i.e. highly
caloric food rich in animal fat combined
S.R. Hamilton
C.A. Rubio
B. Vogelstein
L.H. Sobin
S. Kudo
F. Fogt
E. Riboli
S.J. Winawer
S. Nakamura
D.E. Goldgar
P. Hainaut
J.R. Jass
Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
Adenocarcinoma
Fig. 6.01 Worldwide annual incidence (per 100,000) of colon and rectum cancer
in males. Numbers on the map indicate regional average values.
From: Globocan, IARC Press, Lyon.
Fig. 6.03 Double contrast barium enema showing
adenocarcinoma of colon. Between the proximal
(top) and distal (bottom) segment of the colon the
lumen is narrowed with an irregular surface, due to
tumour infiltration.
Fig. 6.02Male incidence (blue) and mortality (orange) of colorectal cancer in
some selected countries.
From: Globocan, IARC Press, Lyon.
Hungary
Australia
Japan
France
United States
Spain
Finland
Brazil
South America
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Incidence
Mortality
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from pdf acrobat; export pages from pdf online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages out of a pdf
106
Tumours of the colon and rectum
with a sedentary lifestyle. Epidemiologi-
cal studies have indicate that meat con-
sumption,  smoking  and  alcohol  con-
sumption are risk factors. Inverse associ-
ations  include  vegetable  consumption,
prolonged  use  of  non-steroidal  anti-
inflammatory  drugs,  oestrogen replace-
ment therapy, and physical activity {1531,
2121}. Fibre may have a protective role,
but this has been questioned recently.
The  molecular  pathways  underlying
these  epidemiological  associations  are
poorly understood, but production of het-
erocyclic amines during cooking of meat,
stimulation of higher levels of fecal bile
acids and production of reactive oxygen
species have been implicated as possi-
ble mechanisms {416, 1439}.
Vegetable  anticarcinogens  such  as
folate,  antioxidants  and  inducers  of
detoxifying enzymes, binding of luminal
carcinogens,  fibre fermentation  to  pro-
duce protective volatile fatty acids, and
reduced  contact  time  with  colorectal
epithelium  due  to  faster  transit  may
explain some of the inverse associations.
C
h
r
o
n
i
c
i
n
f
l
a
m
m
a
t
i
o
n
Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are
significant  aetiological  factors  in  the
development of colorectal adenocarcino-
mas {1582}. The risk increases after 8-10
years  and  is  highest  in  patients  with
early-onset and  widespread manifesta-
tion (pancolitis).
U
l
c
e
r
a
t
i
v
e
c
o
l
i
t
i
s
.
This chronic disorder
of  unknown  aetiology  affects  children
and adults, with a peak incidence in the
early third decade. It is considered a pre-
malignant  disorder,  with  duration  and
extent of  disease being the major  risk
factors. Population-based studies show
a 4.4-fold increase in mortality from col-
orectal  carcinoma  {1504,  448,  1835,
1214}. In clinical studies, the increase in
incidence is usually higher, up to 20-fold
{647, 990}. Involvement of greater than
one half of the colon is associated with a
risk  to  develop  carcinoma  of  approxi-
mately 15%, whereas left sided disease
may bear a malignancy risk of 5% {1727,
1045}. Ulcerative proctitis is not associat-
ed with an increased carcinoma risk.
C
r
o
h
n
d
i
s
e
a
s
e
.
Development of carcino-
ma is seen both in the small intestine and
the large intestine. The risk of colorectal
malignancy appears to be 3 fold above
normal  {581}.  Long  duration and  early
onset of disease are risk factors for car-
cinoma.
M
o
d
i
f
y
i
n
g
f
a
c
t
o
r
s
.
Non-steroidal  anti-
inflammatory drugs and some  naturally
occurring  compounds  block  the  bio-
chemical abnormalities in prostaglandin
homeostasis  in  colorectal  neoplasms.
Some of these agents cause a dramatic
involution of adenomas but their role in
the chemoprevention of adenocarcinoma
is  less  clear.  Polymorphisms  in  key
enzymes can alter other metabolic path-
ways that modify protective or injurious
compounds, e.g. methylenetetrahydrofo-
late reductase, N-acetyltransferases, glu-
tathione-S-transferases,  aldehyde dehy-
drogenase and cytochrome P-450 {1766,
686, 1300}. These polymorphisms may
explain individual susceptibility or predis-
position among populations with similar
exposures {1555}.
I
r
r
a
d
i
a
t
i
o
n
.
A  rare but well recognized aetiological
factor  in  colorectal  neoplasia  is  thera-
peutic pelvic irradiation {1974}.
Localization
Most colorectal carcinomas are located
in  the  sigmoid  colon  and  rectum,  but
there is evidence of changing distribu-
tion in recent years, with an increasing
proportion of more proximal carcinomas
B
A
A
B
Fig. 6.04 A Depressed lesion highlighted with indigo-carmine dye spray corresponding to high-grade
intraepithelial neoplasia. B Flat, elevated adenoma with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia after indigo-
carmine dye spray.
Fig. 6.05 Endoscopic features of(A)polypoid,(B)flat, slightly elevated and(C)flat adenoma.
C
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
extract page from pdf acrobat; extract one page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Replace Text in PDF File. VB.NET: Replace Text in Consecutive PDF Pages.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; cut pages out of pdf
107
Adenocarcinoma
{1928}.  Molecular  pathology  has  also
shown site differences: tumours with high
levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H)
or
r
a
s
proto-oncogene  mutations  are
more frequently located in the caecum,
ascending colon and transverse colon.
{842, 1563, 1897}.
Clinical features
S
i
g
n
s
a
n
d
s
y
m
p
t
o
m
s
Some patients are asymptomatic, espe-
cially when their neoplasm is identified
by screening or surveillance. Haemato-
chezia and anaemia are common pre-
senting  features  due to  bleeding  from
the  tumour.  Many  patients  experience
change in bowel habit; in the right colon,
the  fluid  faeces  can  pass  exophytic
masses,  whereas  in the  left colon  the
solid faeces are  more  often halted by
annular tumours so that constipation is
more common. There may be associated
abdominal  distension.  Rectosigmoid
lesions  can  produce  tenesmus.  Other
symptoms include fever, malaise, weight
loss, and abdominal pain. Some patients
present  with  the  complications  of
obstruction or perforation. 
I
m
a
g
i
n
g
Modern imaging techniques permit non-
invasive detection and clinical staging.
Conventional barium enema detects large
tumours,  while  air-contrast radiography
improves  the  visualization  of  less ad-
vanced lesions. Cross-sectional imaging
by CT, MRI imaging and transrectal ultra-
sonography permit some assessment of
the depth of local tumour invasion and the
presence of regional and distant metas-
tases  {2202}. Scintigraphy  and positron
emission tomography are also used.
E
n
d
o
s
c
o
p
y
The development of endoscopy has had
a major impact on diagnosis and treat-
ment. Colonoscopy allows observation of
the mucosal surface of the entire large
bowel  with biopsy of identified lesions.
Chromoendoscopy  employing  dyes  to
improve  visualization  of  non-protruding
lesions  and  magnification,  have  been
developed.  The  flat  neoplastic  lesions
B
A
D
C
Fig. 6.06 AEndoscopic view of two small flat adenomas highlighted with indigo-carmine to show the abnor-
mal tubular pit pattern. BMagnifying video endoscopy of a tubulovillous adenoma highlighted with indigo-
carmine to show cribriform pattern. CHistological section of a flat elevated tubular adenoma showing low-
grade intraepithelial neoplasia. D Stereomicroscopic view with indigo-carmine dye spray of a depressed
adenoma with high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia containing very small round pits.
B
A
Fig. 6.07  ASmall adenocarcinoma invading muscularis propria, arising in a depressed adenoma. BEarly adenocarcinoma invading submucosa, arising in a flat ade-
noma.
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
export pages from pdf acrobat; extract page from pdf file
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page get a PDF document which is out of order on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files
delete pages of pdf; delete page from pdf document
108
Tumours of the colon and rectum
have been designated by Japanese gas-
troenterologists  as  ‘type  II’,  with  three
subtypes: IIa, ‘en plateau’ elevated; IIb,
completely  flat;  and  IIc,  ‘en  plateau’
depressed. The depressed lesions have,
despite a smaller diameter, a poor prog-
nosis with prompt penetration in the sub-
mucosa. The pit pattern of the surface at
magnification 100 allows a reliable pre-
diction  of  histology.  Therapeutic  endo-
scopy, including snare polypectomy and
endoscopic mucosectomy, can be used
to  remove  colorectal neoplasms, espe-
cially  adenomas,  and  carcinomas  with
minimal submucosal invasion. Protruded
neoplasms  can usually be resected by
snare  polypectomy.  Superficial  lesions
(flat and depressed) and some protruded
lesions may be removed by endoscopic
mucosal resection {2121, 2122, 1164}.
Macroscopy
The macroscopic features are influenced
by  the  phase  in  the  natural  history  of
tumours  at  the  time  of  discovery.
Carcinomas may be exophytic/fungating
with predominantly  intraluminal  growth,
endophytic/ulcerative with predominantly
intramural growth, diffusely infiltrative/lini-
tis  plastica  with  subtle  endophytic
growth, and annular with circumferential
involvement  of  the  colorectal  wall  and
constriction of the lumen. Overlap among
these  types  is  common.  Pedunculated
exophytic lesions have a mural attach-
ment  narrower  than  the  head  of  the
tumour, with the stalk consisting of unin-
volved  mucosa  and submucosa,  while
sessile  exophytic  tumours  have  broad
attachment to the wall. 
Carcinomas of the proximal colon tend to
grow as exophytic masses while those in
the transverse and descending colon are
more often endophytic and annular. On
cut section, most colorectal carcinomas
have a relatively homogeneous appear-
ance although areas of necrosis can be
seen. Adenocarcinomas of the mucinous
(colloid)  type  often  have  areas  with
grossly visible mucus. Carcinomas with
high  levels  of  microsatellite  instability
(MSI-H) are  usually circumscribed and
about 20% are mucinous {842}. 
Tumour spread and staging 
Following  transmural  extension through
the muscularis propria into pericolic or
perirectal  soft  tissue,  the  tumour  may
involve contiguous structures. The con-
sequences of  direct  extension  depend
on the anatomic site. An advanced rectal
carcinoma may extend into pelvic struc-
tures  such  as  the  vagina  and  urinary
bladder, but cannot gain direct access to
the peritoneal cavity when it is located
distal to the peritoneal reflection. 
By contrast, colonic tumours can extend
directly to the serosal surface. Perforation
can  be  associated  with  transcoelomic
spread to the peritoneal cavity (peritoneal
carcinomatosis). Involvement of the peri-
toneal surface should only be diagnosed
if the peritoneum is ulcerated or if tumour
cells  have  clearly  penetrated  the
mesothelium.  Since  the  peritoneal  sur-
face  infiltrated  by  tumour  cells  may
become adherent to adjacent structures,
direct  extension  into  adjoining  organs
can also occur in colonic carcinomas that
have invaded the peritoneal portion of the
wall  {62}.  Implantation  due  to  surgical
manipulation  occurs  only  occasionally,
but has been reported after laparoscop-
ic colectomy for cancer {1106}.
Spread via lymphatic  or  blood  vessels
can occur early in the natural history and
lead  to  systemic  disease.  Despite  the
presence of lymphatics in the colorectal
mucosa, lymphogenic spread does not
occur unless the muscularis mucosae is
breached and the submucosa is invad-
ed, This biological behaviour stands in
sharp  contrast  to  carcinomas  of  the
stomach where metastasis occurs occa-
Fig. 6.11 Crohn-like lymphoid reaction associated
with a colonic adenocarcinoma.
Fig. 6.10  Well differentiated adenocarcinoma aris-
ing in Crohn disease, invading wall beneath intra-
epithelial neoplasia.
B
C
Fig. 6.08 Advanced colorectal carcinomas. ASmall depressed invasive carcinoma (arrow) with a nearby protruding adenoma, BAdvanced colorectal carcinoma,
depressed type. CCross section of adenocarcinoma with extension into the submucosa (pT1).
A
Fig. 6.09 Small ulcerating adenocarcinoma of colon
producing a depressed lesion.
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET NET control allows users to black out image in PDF
export pages from pdf acrobat; add remove pages from pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
reader extract pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat
109
Adenocarcinoma
sionally from purely intramucosal carci-
nomas. Invasion of portal vein tributaries
in the colon and vena cava tributaries in
the rectum can lead to haematogenous
dissemination.
S
t
a
g
i
n
g
The classification proposed by C. Dukes
in 1929-35 for rectal cancer serves as
the template for many staging systems
currently in use. This family of classifica-
tions takes into account two histopatho-
logical  features:  depth  of  penetration
into  the  wall  and  the  presence  or
absence of metastasis in regional lymph
nodes.  The  TNM  classification  {66}  is
replacing the Dukes classification.
Histopathology
The defining feature of colorectal adeno-
carcinoma is invasion through the muscu-
laris  mucosae  into  the  submucosa.
Lesions with the morphological charac-
teristics of adenocarcinoma that are con-
fined to the epithelium or invade the lam-
ina  propria  alone  and  lack  invasion
through the muscularis mucosae into the
submucosa  have  virtually  no  risk  of
metastasis. Therefore, 
h
i
g
h
-
g
r
a
d
e
i
n
t
r
a
-
e
p
i
t
h
e
l
i
a
l
n
e
o
p
l
a
s
i
a
is a more appropriate
term than 
a
d
e
n
o
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
i
n
-
s
i
t
u
,
a
n
d
i
n
t
r
a
m
u
c
o
s
a
l
n
e
o
p
l
a
s
i
a
is more appro-
priate than 
i
n
t
r
a
m
u
c
o
s
a
l
a
d
e
n
o
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
-
m
a
’. Use of these proposed terms helps
to avoid overtreatment. 
Most  colorectal  adenocarcinomas  are
gland-forming, with variability in the size
and configuration of the glandular struc-
tures. In well and moderately differentiat-
ed adenocarcinomas, the epithelial cells
are usually large and tall, and the gland
lumina often contain cellular debris.
M
u
c
i
n
o
u
s
a
d
e
n
o
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
This designation is used if > 50% of the
lesion is composed of mucin. This vari-
ant is characterized by pools of extracel-
lular  mucin  that  contain  malignant
epithelium as acinar structures, strips of
cells or single cells. Many high-frequen-
cy micro-satellite instability (MSI-H) car-
cinomas  are  of  this  histopathological
type.
S
i
g
n
e
t
-
r
i
n
g
c
e
l
l
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
This  variant  of  adenocarcinoma  is
defined  by  the  presence  of >  50%  of
tumour cells with prominent intracytoplas-
mic mucin {1672}. 
The typical signet-ring cell has a large
mucin  vacuole  that  fills  the  cytoplasm
and  displaces  the  nucleus.  Signet-ring
cells  can  occur in the  mucin  pools  of
mucinous  adenocarcinoma or  in  a  dif-
fusely  infiltrative  process  with  minimal
extracellular mucin. Some MSI-H carcino-
mas are of this type.
A
d
e
n
o
s
q
u
a
m
o
u
s
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
These unusual tumours show features of
both squamous  carcinoma and adeno-
carcinoma, either as separate areas with-
in the tumour or admixed. For a lesion to
be classified as adenosquamous, there
should  be  more  than  just  occasional
small  foci  of  squamous  differentiation.
Pure 
s
q
u
a
m
o
u
s
c
e
l
l
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
is  very
rare in the large bowel. 
Fig. 6.14 Villous adenoma of rectum and invasive
adenocarcinoma.  Two  of  four  lymph  nodes  in
perirectal tissue have metastasis.
Fig. 6.13  A Tubulovillous adenoma showing invasive adenocarcinoma within the core of the polyp. 
BAdenocarcinoma arising in a villous adenoma.
B
A
D
A
Fig. 6.12  AWell differentiated adenocarcinoma. BModerately diffferentiated adenocarcinoma. CPoorly dif-
ferentiated adenocarcinoma; this lesion was MSI-H and shows numerous intraepithelial lymphocytes. 
DUndifferentiated carcinoma.
C
B
110
Tumours of the colon and rectum
M
e
d
u
l
l
a
r
y
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
This  rare  variant  is  characterized  by
sheets of malignant cells with vesicular
nuclei, prominent nucleoli and abundant
pink cytoplasm exhibiting prominent infil-
tration  by  intraepithelial  lymphocytes
{856}.  It  is  invariably  associated  with
MSI-H and has a favourable prognosis
when compared to other poorly differen-
tiated  and  undifferentiated  colorectal
carcinomas. 
U
n
d
i
f
f
e
r
e
n
t
i
a
t
e
d
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
These rare tumours lack morphological
evidence of differentiation beyond that of
an epithelial tumour and  have variable
histological features {1946}. Despite their
undifferentiated  appearances,  these
tumours are genetically distinct and typi-
cally associated with MSI-H. 
Other variants
Carcinomas that include  a spindle cell
component are best termed 
s
p
i
n
d
l
e
c
e
l
l
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
m
a
or  sarcomatoid  carcinoma.
The  spindle  cells  are,  at  least  focally,
immunoreactive for cytokeratin. The term
c
a
r
c
i
n
o
s
a
r
c
o
m
a
applies  to  malignant
tumours containing both carcinomatous
and  heterologous  mesenchymal  ele-
ments. Other rare histopathological vari-
ants  of  colorectal  carcinoma  include
pleomorphic (giant cell), choriocarcino-
ma, pigmented, clear cell, stem cell, and
Paneth cell-rich (crypt cell  carcinoma).
Mixtures of histopathological types can
be seen.
C
a
r
c
i
n
o
s
a
r
c
o
m
a
Carcinomas  that include  a  spindle cell
component are best termed sarcomatoid
carcinoma or spindle cell carcinoma. The
spindle cells are, at least focally, immuno-
reactive for cytokeratin. The term carci-
nosarcoma applies to malignant tumours
containing both carcinomatous and het-
erologous mesenchymal elements. 
Grading
Adenocarcinomas are graded predomi-
nantly on the basis of the extent of glan-
dular appearances, and should be divid-
ed into well, moderately and poorly dif-
ferentiated,  or  into  low-grade  (encom-
passing well and moderately differentiat-
ed  adenocarcinomas)  and  high-grade
(including  poorly  differentiated  adeno-
carcinomas and undifferentiated carcino-
mas).  Poorly  differentiated  adenocarci-
nomas should show at least some gland
formation or mucus production; tubules
are typically irregularly folded and dis-
torted. 
When a carcinoma has heterogeneity in
differentiation, grading should be based
on  the  least  differentiated  component,
not including the  leading front  of inva-
sion. Small foci of apparent poor differ-
entiation are common at the advancing
edge of tumours, but this feature is insuf-
ficient to classify the tumour as poorly dif-
ferentiated {1543}. 
The percentage  of the tumour  showing
formation of gland-like structures can be
used to define the grade. Well differentiat-
ed  (grade  1)  lesions  exhibit  glandular
structures in > 95% of the tumour; moder-
ately differentiated (grade 2) adenocarci-
Fig. 6.16 Metastatic adenocarcinoma in regional
lymph node.
Fig. 6.19 Adenocarcinoma with venous invasion.
B
A
D
C
Fig. 6.17 Mucinous adenocarcinoma. ACut surface with glassy appearance. BMucinous adenocarcinoma
beneath high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in ulcerative colitis. CWell-differentiated tumour with large
mucin lakes. DMultilocular mucin deposits with well-differentiated adenocarcinoma.
Fig 6.18  Signet-ring cell carcinoma  invading a
nerve.
Fig. 6.15 Adenocarcinoma within lymphatic vessel.
111
Adenocarcinoma
noma has 50-95% glands; poorly differen-
tiated  (grade  3)  adenocarcinoma  has 
5-50%;  and  undifferentiated  (grade  4)
carcinoma has < 5%. Mucinous adeno-
carcinoma and signet-ring cell carcinoma
by convention are considered poorly dif-
ferentiated (grade 3). Medullary carcino-
ma with MSI-H appears undifferentiated.
Additional studies of the biological behav-
iour  of  MSI-H  cancers  are  needed  to
relate  the  morphological  grade  and
molecular subtypes of mucinous, signet-
ring cell and medullary carcinoma to out-
come since MSI-H carcinomas have an
improved  stage-specific  survival  {788,
924, 1098}.
Precursor lesions 
During the past decade the natural histo-
ry  of  colorectal  carcinomas  has  been
extensively studied in correlation with the
underlying accumulation of genetic alter-
ations.
A
b
e
r
r
a
n
t
c
r
y
p
t
f
o
c
i
(
A
C
F
)
The earliest morphological precursor of
epithelial neoplasia is the aberrant crypt
focus (ACF). Microscopic examination of
mucosal  sheets  dissected  from  the
bowel wall and stained with methylene
blue,  or  mucosal  examination  with  a
magnifying endoscope, reveal ACFs to
have  crypts  of  enlarged  calibre  and
thickened epithelium with reduced mucin
content.  Microscopy  shows  two  main
types:
A
C
F
s
w
i
t
h
f
e
a
t
u
r
e
s
o
f
h
y
p
e
r
p
l
a
s
t
i
c
p
o
l
y
p
s
and a high frequency of 
r
a
s
proto-
oncogene  mutations,  and 
d
y
s
p
l
a
s
t
i
c
A
C
F
s
(
m
i
c
r
o
-
a
d
e
n
o
m
a
s
)
associated with
 mutation  of  the 
A
P
C
gene  {1375}.
Progression from ACF through adenoma
to carcinoma characterizes carcinogene-
sis in the large intestine {1326}. 
A
d
e
n
o
m
a
s
These precursor lesions are defined by
the presence of intraepithelial neoplasia,
histologically characterized by hypercel-
lularity  with  enlarged,  hyperchromatic
nuclei, varying degrees of nuclear strati-
fication, and loss of polarity. Nuclei may
be  spindle-shaped,  or  enlarged  and
ovoid.  Inactivation  of  the  APC/beta-
catenin pathway commonly initiates the
process  and  results  in  extension  of
epithelial  proliferation  in  dysplastic
epithelium from the base of the crypts,
where it normally occurs, toward or onto
the luminal surface {851, 1528}. Polyps
appear  to  grow  as  a consequence  of
accelerated crypt fission resulting from
A
P
C
gene mutation {564}. Intraepithelial
neoplasia  can  be  low-grade  or  high-
grade, depending on the degree of glan-
dular  or  villous  complexity,  extent  of
nuclear  stratification,  and  severity  of
abnormal  nuclear  morphology.  Paneth
cells,  neuroendocrine  cells  and  squa-
mous cell aggregates may be seen in
adenomas and may become a dominant
constituent of the epithelium. 
M
a
c
r
o
s
c
o
p
y
 Colorectal adenomas can
be classified into three groups:
e
l
e
v
a
t
e
d
,
f
l
a
t
,
and
d
e
p
r
e
s
s
e
d
{973}. Elevated ade-
nomas range from pedunculated polyps
with  a  long  stalk  of  non-neoplastic
mucosa to those that are sessile. Flat or
non-protruding  adenomas  and  de-
pressed  adenomas  are  recognized
macroscopically by mucosal reddening,
subtle changes in texture, or highlighting
by dye techniques. The term adenoma is
applied even though the lesions are not
polypoid because intraepithelial neopla-
B
C
A
Fig. 6.20  ASignet-ring cell carcinoma arising in an adenoma; intramucosal signet-ring cells adjacent to adenomatous glands. B Signet-ring cells infiltrating mus-
cularis propria. CLymph node metastasis of a signet-ring cell carcinoma.
Fig. 6.21 Sporadic proximal colonic carcinomas. Comparison of pathology of MSI-H
(red) and microsatellite stable MSS (blue) carcinomas.
Fig. 6.22 Frequency of adenocarcinoma in adenomas relative to size and archi-
tecture.
MSI-H
MSS
* p<0.05;  ** p<0.01
112
Tumours of the colon and rectum
sia (dysplasia) is the hallmark of these
lesions. Depressed adenomas are usual-
ly  smaller  than  flat  or  protruding  ones
and tend to give rise to adenocarcinoma
while still relatively small (mean diameter,
11 mm)  due to  a  greater  tendency  to
progress {1628}. These adenomas have
a lower frequency of 
r
a
s
mutation than
polypoid adenomas {974}. 
H
i
s
t
o
p
a
t
h
o
l
o
g
y
.
T
u
b
u
l
a
r
a
d
e
n
o
m
a
s
are
usually protruding, spherical and pedun-
culated,  or  non-protruding  (flat).  Micro-
scopically,  dysplastic  glandular  struc-
tures occupy at least 80% of the luminal
surface. 
V
i
l
l
o
u
s
a
d
e
n
o
m
a
s
are typically
sessile  with  a  hairy-appearing  surface.
Microscopically, leaf-like projections lined
by dysplastic glandular epithelium com-
prise more than 80% of the luminal sur-
face. Distinction of villous structures from
elongated  separated  tubules  is  some-
times problematical.  Villous architecture
is defined arbitrarily by the length of the
glands exceeding twice the thickness of
normal colorectal mucosa. 
T
u
b
u
l
o
v
i
l
l
o
u
s
a
d
e
n
o
m
a
s
have a mixture of tubular and
villous  structures  with  a  ratio  between
80%/20% and 20%/80%. Serrated adeno-
mas are characterized by the saw-tooth
configuration of a hyperplastic (metaplas-
tic) polyp on low power microscopy, but
the epithelium lining the upper portion of
the crypts and luminal surface is dysplas-
tic. Serrated adenomas can also have a
tubular or villous component, but low-lev-
els of microsatellite instability (MSI-L) and
altered mucin are characteristic of these
serrated lesions {840}. By contrast, 
m
i
x
e
d
h
y
p
e
r
p
l
a
s
t
i
c
p
o
l
y
p
/
a
d
e
n
o
m
a
contains
separate identifiable areas of each histo-
pathological  type  {1092}.  Occasionally,
some  villous  adenomas  show  in  the
slopes of the villi  closely  packed small
glands;  those  adenomas  have  been
referred to as 
v
i
l
l
o
-
m
i
c
r
o
g
l
a
n
d
u
l
a
r
a
d
e
n
o
-
m
a
s
{972}.
Although  tiny flat or depressed adeno-
carcinomas are well-described, it is diffi-
cult to determine if 
d
e
n
o
v
o
adenocarci-
nomas without a benign histopathologi-
cal  precursor  lesion  ever  occur  in  the
large bowel, because adenocarcinoma
can overgrow the precursor lesion. The
prolonged time interval usually required
for progression of intraepithelial to inva-
sive  neoplasia  offers  opportunities  for
prevention or interruption of the process
to reduce mortality due to colorectal car-
cinoma.
Intraepithelial neoplasia can also occur
in the absence of an adenoma, in a pre-
existing lesion of another type (such as a
hamartomatous polyp in juvenile polypo-
sis  syndrome  and  Peutz-Jeghers  syn-
drome), and in chronic inflammatory dis-
eases.
H
y
p
e
r
p
l
a
s
t
i
c
(
m
e
t
a
p
l
a
s
t
i
c
)
p
o
l
y
p
s
The definition is a mucosal excrescence
characterized  by  elongated,  serrated
crypts lined by proliferative epithelium in
the  bases  with  infolded  epithelial  tufts
and enlarged goblet cells in the upper
crypts  and  on  the  luminal  surface,
imparting  a  saw-tooth  outline.  In  the
appendix, diffuse hyperplasia may occur
as a sessile mucosal proliferation.
The epithelial nuclei in the serrated region
are small, regular, round and located at
Fig. 6.23 Clear cell carcinoma of colon. 
B
A
Fig. 6.26 A, BCrypt adenoma in a patient with FAP.
B
A
Fig. 6.25  A Sessile  villous adenoma. B Section
through a villous adenoma.
Fig. 6.24 Tubulovillous  adenoma.  Pedunculated
with long stalk of non-neoplastic mucosa.
Fig.6.27
Tubular adenoma of colon.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested