devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete pages of pdf reader control software platform web page windows asp.net web browser 01254626-part75

9 - 33
d = 35.7 mm
CONE TIP STRESS
SLEEVE FRICTION
PORE PRESSURE
SHEAR WAVE VELOCITY
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
10
20
30
40
q
(MPa)
Depth (m)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
100
200
300
f
s
(kPa)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
1000
2000
3000
u
2
(kPa)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
100
200
300
400
V
s
(m/sec)
q
t
f
s
u
2
V
s
Figure 9-37.  Results  of  Seismic  Piezocone  Tests  (SCPTu)  in  Layered  Soil  Profile, Wolf River,
Memphis, TN.
The small-strain shear modulus of quartzitic sands may be estimated from the cone tip stress and effective
overburden stress, as indicated by Figure 9-35.   Similarly, a relationship for obtaining G
from DMT in
quartz sands is presented in Figure 9-36.
Figure 9-38.  Ratio of G
/q
c
with Normalized CPT Resistance for Uncemented Sands (Baldi, et al.
1989).
Delete pages of pdf reader - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete pages from pdf document; delete page from pdf reader
Delete pages of pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
add or remove pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf reader
9 - 34
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
deleting pages from pdf in preview; delete pages from pdf in reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
export pages from pdf acrobat; copy pdf pages to another pdf
0.1
1
10
100
1
10
100
1000
Shear Modulus
,
 Go (MPa)
Constrained Modulus, D' (MPa)
Bothkennar
Brent Cross
Drammen
Fucino
Hutchinson
Madingley
Montalto
Onsoy
Pentre
P
isa
St Alban
Ska Edeby
D
'
 = Go/1
D
'
 = Go/2
Figure 9-41.  Trend Between G
0
and DMT modulus E
D
in Clay Soils (Tanaka & Tanaka, 1998).  
Figure 9-42.   Modulus (D’) vs. Shear Modulus (G
0
) in Clays.    Dataset from Burns & Mayne (1998).
In each case, the value of initial shear modulus (G
0
) is either  directly measured or approximately assessed,
and then reduced to the appropriate level of strain or stress by consideration of the relative factor of safety
(FS).   An alternative would be to directly relate the constrained modulus to the fundamental G
0
, such as
shown in Figure 9-39 for a wide variety of clays.   In these data, all G
0
values were obtained from field
measurements using either downhole methods (DHT or SCPTu) or crosshole tests (CHT), or in one case,
spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW).  
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
export pages from pdf preview; cut pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
crop all pages of pdf; delete page from pdf file
9 - 36
9.6.   FLOW PROPERTIES
Soils exhibit flow properties that control hydraulic conductivity (k), rates of consolidation, construction
behavior, and drainage characteristics in the ground.  Field measurements for soil permeability have been
discussed previously in Chapter 6 and include pumping tests with measured drawdown, slug tests, and packer
methods. Laboratory methods are presented in Chapter 7 and include falling head and constant head types in
permeameters.  An indirect assessment of permeability can be made from consolidation test data.  Typical
permeability values for a range of different soil types are provided in Table 9-1.  Results of pressure
dissipation readings from piezocone and flat dilatometer and holding tests during pressuremeter testing can
be used to determine permeability and the coefficient of consolidation (Jamiolkowski, et al. 1985).  Herein,
only the piezocone approach will be discussed. 
The permeability (k) can be determined from the dissipation test data, either by use of the direct correlative
relationship presented earlier (Figure 6-7), or alternatively by the evaluation of the coefficient of consolidation
c
h
.  Assuming radial flow, the horizontal permeability (k
h
) is obtained from:
(9-30)
k
c
D
h
h
w
=
γ
'
where D
r
= constrained modulus obtained from oedometer tests.
9.6.1.   Monotonic Dissipation
In fine-grained soils, excess porewater pressures (
)
u) are generated during penetration of any probe (pile,
cone, blade).   For example, in Figure 9-34, large u
2
readings are observed in the clay layer from 11 to 19 m
depth.  If penetration is halted, the 
)
u will decay eventually to zero (thus the porewater transducer will read
the hydrostatic value, u
0
).   The rate of decay depends on the coefficient of (horizontal) consolidation (c
h
) and
permeability (k
h
) of the medium.  An example of piezocone dissipation for both type 1 and 2 filter elements
is given in Figure 6-6.  These are termed monotonic porewater decays because the readings always decrease
with time and generally are associated with soft to firm clays and silts.  For these cases, the strain path method
(Teh & Houlsby, 1991) may be used to determine c
h
from the expression:
(9-31)
c
T a
I
t
h
R
=
*
2
50
where T* = modified time factor from consolidation theory, a = probe radius, I
R
= G/s
u
= rigidity index of the
soil, and t = measured time on the dissipation record (usually taken at 50% equalization). 
Several solutions have been presented for the modified time factor T* based on different theories, including
cavity expansion, strain path, and dislocation points (Burns & Mayne, 1998).  For monotonic dissipation
response, the strain path solutions (Teh & Houlsby, 1991) are presented in Figure 9-40(a) and (b) for both
midface and shoulder type elements, respectively.
The determination of t
50
from shoulder porewater decays is illustrated by example in Figure 6-6.  For the
particular case of 50% consolidation, the respective time factors are T* = 0.118 for the type 1 (midface
element) and T* = 0.245 for the type 2 (shoulder element).    
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf acrobat; convert few pages of pdf to word
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
copy pdf page into word doc; delete page from pdf document
9 - 37
TABLE 9-1.
REPRESENTATI
VE 
PERMEAB
I
L
ITY VALUES FOR SO
I
LS
(Modified after Carter and Bentley, 1991)
10
-11
10
-10
10
-9
10
-8
10
-7
10
-6
10
-5
10
-4
10
-3
10
-2
10
-1
1
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
k =
meters/sec      (m/s)
Hydraulic
Conductivity     10
-9
10
-8
10
-7
10
-6
10
-5
10
-4
10
-3
10
-2
10
-1
1
10         100
or
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Coefficient
centimeters/sec    (cm/s)
of Permeability
Permeability:    Practically
Impermeable
Very low
Low
Medium
High
Drainage
conditions:
Practically
Impermeable
Poor
Fair
Good
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Typical soil                        GC Î GM Î                    SM
SW Î                GW  Î
Groups*:
CH      SC          SM-SC
SP Î
GP Î
MH
ML-CL
______________________________________________________________________________
Soil types: Homogeneous
clays below
the zone of
Silts, fine sands, silty sands,
glacial till, stratified clays
Clean sands, sand
and gravel mixtures
Clean
gravels
weathering
Fissured and weathered clays and clays
modified by the effects of vegetation
*Note:  The arrow adjacent to group classes indicates that permeability values can be greater than the typical value
shown.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
cut pages from pdf reader; delete pages out of a pdf file
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
cut pages from pdf file; copy pages from pdf to word
9 - 38
Strain 
Path Solution f
or Type 1 CP
T
u Dissipation
(after Teh and Houlsby
,
 1991)
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1.0
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
Modified Time Factor
,
 T*
Normalized Excess Pore Pressures
Strain 
Path
Approx
.
 Curve
U = 50%
T*50(u1) = 0
.
118
u
1
Strain 
Path Solution f
or Type 2 CP
T
u Dissipation
(after Teh and Houlsby
,
 1991)
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1.0
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
Modified Time Factor
,
 T*
Normalized Excess Pore Pressures
Strain 
Path
Approx
.
 Curve
U = 50%
T*50(u2) = 0
.
245
u
2
Figure 9-43a.   Modified Time Factors for u
1
Monotonic Porewater Dissipations
Figure 9-43b.   Modified Time Factors for u
2
Monotonic Porewater Dissipations
9 - 39
Keaveny & Mitchell (1986):
CK
0
UC Triaxial Data
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
1
10
Overconsolidation Ratio
,
 OCR
Rigidity Index, IR50u
2   
P
I
 = 10
   20
   30
   40
   50
 > 50
Keaveny & Mitchell (1986): 
CK
0
UC Triaxial Data
Figure 9-44. Estimation of Rigidity Index from OCR and Plasticity Index (Keaveny & Mitchell,
1986).  
For clays,  the rigidity index (I
R
 is the ratio of shear  modulus (G) to  shear  strength (s
u
) and may be
obtained  from  a  number  of  different  means  including:  (a)  measured  triaxial  stress-strain  curve,  (b)
measured pressuremeter tests, and (c) empirical correlation.  One correlation based on anisotropically-
consolidated triaxial compression test data expresses I
R
in terms of OCR and plasticity index (PI), as
shown in Figure 9-41.
For spreadsheet use, t
he empirical trend may be approximated by:
(9-30)
(
)
I
PI
OCR
R
+
+
exp
ln
.
.
137
23
1
1
1
26
32
08
Additional approaches to estimating the value of I
R
are reviewed elsewhere (Mayne, 2001).  
To facilitate the interpretation of c
h
corresponding to t
50
readings using the standard penetrometer, Figure
9-42 presents a graphical plot for various I
R
values.
9 - 40
Strain Path Solution
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
1000
0.1
1
10
100
1000
Measured Time t50 (minutes)
2Coef. of Consolidation, ch
500
200
100
50
20
u
2
Rigidity Index, I
R
d = 3.57 cm   (10 cm
2
)
For 15-cm
2
cones, multiply
these by 1.5
Figure 9-45.   Coefficient of Consolidation for 50% Dissipation from Shoulder Readings
9.6.2.  Dilatory Dissipations
In many overconsolidated and fissured materials, a dissipation test may first show an increase in 
)
u with
time, reaching a peak value, and subsequent decrease in 
)
u with time (e.g., Lunne, et al. 1997).  This type
of response is termed dilatory dissipation, referring to both the delay in time and cause of the phenomenon
(dilation).   The dilatory  response  has been observed  during  type 2 piezocone  tests as  well as during
installation of driven piles in fine-grained soils. The definition of 50% completion is not clear and thus the
previous approach is not applicable.
A rigorous mathematics derivation has been presented elsewhere that provides a cavity expansion-critical
state solution to both monotonic and dilatory porewater decay with time (Burns & Mayne, 1998).  For
practical use, an approximate closed-form expression is presented here.  In lieu of merely matching one
point on the dissipation curve (i.e, t
50
), the entire curve is matched to provide the best overall value of c
h
.
The  excess  porewater  pressures 
)
u
t
at  any  time  t  can  be  compared  with  the  initial  values  during
penetration (
)
u
i
).   
9 - 41
Monotonic & Dilatory Dissipations
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.6
0.0001
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
Time Factor
:
  T = ch 
t
/a2
Normalized Porewater
Pressures, ∆u/∆ui
OCR=1
OCR=2
OCR=3
OCR=5
OCR=10
OCR=20
OCR=100
φ
250
I
R
50
Λ
0.80
The measured initial excess porewater pressure (
)
u
i
= u
2
-u
o
) is given by:
)
u
i
=   (
)
u
oct
)
i
  (
)
u
shear
)
i
(9-31)
where (
)
u
oct
)
i
=  
F
vo
r
(2M/3)(OCR/2)
7
ln(I
R
) = the octahedral component during penetration;
and  (
)
u
shear
)
i
=  
F
vo
r
[1 - (OCR/2)
7
] is the shear-induced component during penetration.
The porewater pressures at any
time (t) are obtained in terms of the modified time factor T* from:
)
u
t
=   (
)
u
oct
)
i
[1 + 50 T
r
]
-1
  (
)
u
shear
)
i
[1 + 5000 T
r
]
-1
(9-32)
where a different modified time factor is defined by: T
r
= (c
h
t)/(a
2
I
R
0.75
).    On a spreadsheet, a column of
assumed (logarithmic) values of T
r
are used to generate the corresponding time (t) for a given rigidity
index (I
R
) and probe radius (a).   Then, trial & error can be used to obtain the best fit c
h
for the measured
dissipation data.   Series of dissipation curves can be developed for a given set of soil properties.  One
example set of curves is presented in Figure 9-43 for various OCRs and the following parameters: 
7
=
0.8, I
R
= 50, and 
Nr
= 25
°
, in order to obtain the more conventional time factor, T = = (c
h
t)/a
2
.
Figure 9-46  Representative Solutions for Type 2 Dilatory Dissipation Curves at Various OCRs 
(after Burns & Mayne, 1998).
9 - 42
9.7   NONTEXTBOOK MATERIALS
The aforementioned relationships have been developed for “common” geomaterials, including clays and
silts of low to medium sensitivity and uncemented quartz sands.  The geotechnical engineer should always
be on the lookout for unusual soils and complex natural materials, as Mother Earth has bestowed a vast
and varied assortment of soil particles under many different geologies and origins.  In many parts of the
world, notoriety is associated with highly organic soils such as peats, bogs, muskegs, and organic clays &
silts.  In some settings, sensitive soils and quick clays may be found. These soils should be approached
with great caution and concern over there short- and long-term behavior with respect to strength, stiffness,
and creep characteristics.  
In certain locations, cemented sands of calcareous origin or corraline deposits (carbonate sands) are found
and these exhibit significantly different behavior to loading than the more ubiquitous quartz sands.  Other
nontextbook soil types include diatomaceous earth, dispersive clays, collapsible soils, loess, volcanic ash,
and special structured geomaterials.  When in doubt, additional testing and outside consultants should be
brought in to assist in the evaluation of the subsurface conditions and interpretation of soil properties.
Although these may seem like extra expenses from an initial viewpoint, in the unfortunate scenario of a
poorly-designed facility, the overall immense costs associated with the remediation, repair, failure, and/or
ensuing litigation will far outweigh the small investigative costs up-front.
Finally, man-made geomaterials have emerged in the past century, bringing many new and interesting
challenges  to  geotechnique.   These  include  vast  amounts  of  tailings  derived  from  mining operations
related  to  extraction  of  copper,  gold,  uranium,  phosphates,  smectities,  and  bauxite.      These  tailings
disposals  include  earthen  dams  that  empound  slimes  that  are  unconsolidated,  thus  requiring  periodic
checks on stability of slopes under static and dynamic loading.  Other man-made geomaterials include
modified ground from site improvement works such as vibroflotation, dynamic compaction, and grouting.
Artificial "soils" include the very large deposits of waste (or "urban fill") and construction of immense
landfills across the U.S.   These, in particular, offer new demands for site characterization technologies
because of the unusual and widely-diverse nature of these landfilled substances.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested