devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Cut and paste pdf pages application control tool html web page asp.net online Applications%20of%20HVDC%20Technologies%20-%20Summary%20FINAL1-part733

Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 11 
 
Education, Outreach, and Workforce 
An education issue exists for industry, transmission planners, and other stakeholders. There are 
different levels of understanding, as well as misconceptions about new and advanced technologies. 
General lack of understanding, adequate tools, and education about HVDC creates an atmosphere of 
fear, exacerbated by insufficient examples of successful projects. There is a need to increase the 
common understanding of HVDC, to deprogram the industry, to move beyond focusing on AC solutions, 
and to expand thinking about how DC can be integrated and used. Tutorials or webinars tailored to 
different stakeholders, from engineering students to executives, should be developed. Efforts will have 
to be customized for individual stakeholder groups: public utility commissions, engineers, academics, 
and industry executives. 
Sharing of best practices can also help with education and prevent reinventing the wheel on issues 
encountered with HVDC implementation in different states and regions. Additionally, knowledge that 
something has been done before (in a similar environment) will encourage further consideration of that 
technology or process. A website with information about capabilities and possibilities would be helpful. 
HVDC has been studied and deployed for some time so there should be sufficient cases from which to 
draw. Benefits and risks associated with various parameters, such as performance under lightning strikes 
with overhead lines and the use of VSC technology should also be included. To address these issues, 
DOE should facilitate information sharing and leverage resources, research, and lessons learned across 
the government. The Department of Defense has relevant experience with electric ships, and there are 
international lessons‐learned as well. Additionally, DOE provides a degree of neutrality not always 
perceived with a supplier’s website. 
Furthermore, there are various efforts to assess HVDC, such as the DOE‐conducted transmission 
congestion studies, DOE‐funded HVDC studies in Hawaii, a State Department‐funded study in Puerto 
Rico, and exploration of corridor utilization by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) and 
the Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC). These studies and efforts should be 
coordinated and leveraged with an eye toward minimizing redundancy. Assessing and tabulating what 
has been done and what is on‐going would help prevent duplication and add value. There is also a need 
for documentation of realistic and pragmatic case studies. Project information should be presented in a 
structured framework that is accessible to diverse users. Project tracking should be done with an 
overarching view to highlight issues that may come up in other projects.  
Another aspect of education deals with the future workforce; industry needs a young workforce with 
the appropriate training and skills. However, no professors currently teach HVDC; it is not included in 
academic curricula. Universities are currently hiring for smart grid technologies, so HVDC should be 
folded into an expanded scope. Furthermore, students should be engaged before college through earlier 
exposure to power systems engineering and HVDC. A government campaign could also increase interest 
in engineering; HVDC’s environmental benefits could help with marketing. Based on IEEE publications, 
Europe boasts many PhDs and authors in relevant fields, so the potential to grow interest should exist in 
the United States. 
Cut and paste pdf pages - application control tool:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Cut and paste pdf pages - application control tool:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 12 
 
The availability of sufficient funding resources needs to be considered, as it helps drive academic 
research and student training. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) provided $100 
million for education but was not a sustained commitment. A National Science Foundation/industry joint 
fellowship program could be implemented to ramp up the next generation of HVDC experts. A joint 
DOE/vendor fund for universities and education programs would also provide needed financial 
assistance. Another facet is attracting students to these opportunities. Decent salaries incentivize 
students to pursue a career but job placement concerns remain. DOE can leverage national laboratories 
as regional centers to provide experience for students; internships are another mechanism to pursue. 
Opportunities for DOE include the following: 
Leverage GEARED and other efforts from other agencies
6
 
Develop and maintain a website for information on HVDC, including capabilities, best practices, 
and case studies 
Gather information from industry and international sources 
Develop tutorials 
Develop use cases of comparable efforts 
Develop educational tools for academics 
Assess both international and domestic projects 
 
Research, Development, and Standardization 
Despite being considered a mature technology, HVDC still presents several technical challenges. New 
hardware development, controls, and advanced concepts can help address these challenges. Specific 
R&D needs and issues identified are summarized in the table below: 
Technologies 
Issues 
Converters 
Converter losses are high; wide‐bandgap materials and other new 
materials may help to reduce losses 
IGBT devices have limited power ratings; higher power ratings desired 
Power devices have limited availability; they are only accessible through 
large‐device manufacturers and are costly 
VSC technology requires more investigation 
Multi‐terminal configurations are need for DC networks 
DC‐to‐DC conversions are not direct; DC‐to‐DC step‐up transformers could 
improve controllability 
Controls 
New controllers are needed to manage power flows, leveraging the high‐
speeding of the technology to support grid stabilization 
 It must accommodate possible communication failures 
                                                            
6
 http://www.irecusa.org/workforce‐education/grid‐engineering‐for‐renewable‐energy‐deployment‐geared
accessed October 19, 2015 
application control tool:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide cutting. C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. In
www.rasteredge.com
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 13 
 
Coordinating controls with the broader electric power system in current 
and future scenarios 
Off‐shore wind farms with a DC backbone 
Master/slave considerations and hierarchical control 
Concerns with fault management 
Restart times needed for the entire system 
Segmentation of the grid with HVDC; explore the concept of 
graceful degradation 
Breakers 
DC breakers are needed to manage faults in a DC networked system; 
while developments are promising, they may not be available for at least 
10 years 
For an LCC point‐to‐point system, the converter itself is the best breaker 
currently available to deal with overhead line faults; unfortunately, LCC is 
not very suitable for multi‐terminal systems  
For VSC technology, a full‐bridge can suffice and be more economic as a 
breaker but it will depend on the application 
Sensing and 
Diagnostics 
Taking HVDC off‐line (planned or unplanned) will disrupt a large amount 
of power flows, possibly leading to other issues; Early awareness for 
preventative maintenance is necessary to mitigate risks. 
Cables 
Cables are a critical component of HVDC systems; Commensurate 
advances are needed including the application of new materials 
 
Some of basic components and technologies in the table are used in other sectors; advances made in 
these fields and by different entities (e.g., the Department of Defense) could be leveraged to address 
the issues. Another significant challenge is that AC systems and technologies have good interoperability; 
various pieces of hardware from different vendors can be integrated.  This is not the case with DC 
systems where all hardware needs to be from the same manufacturer. Standardization could improve 
interoperability and reduce costs in the near‐term and into the future, especially when considering 
maintenance and turnover. 
Opportunities for DOE include the following: 
Fund R&D for wide‐bandgap semiconductors and other materials 
Support public–private partnerships to help accelerate R&D and ultimately drive down costs 
Support standardization for components 
Help develop control concepts for multi‐terminal applications 
Support HVDC breaker research and an associated pilot 
 
Demonstrations and Test Beds 
Grid operators who are responsible for reliability need to trust in HVDC technology and understand how 
to manage it. However, this requires an extended study of new devices, good study methodologies, and 
ultimately a track record, as it is difficult to put trust in unproven technology. Simulations are helpful but 
application control tool:C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images. Supports to resize images in conversion.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL
www.rasteredge.com
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 14 
 
are not a substitute for live demonstration. HVDC technologies are complex; they are not plug‐and‐play 
and can lead to unexpected control interactions. Understanding these potential system impacts will be 
needed to support their integration. For example, in the event of a component failure, AC technologies 
have an on and off state, whereas DC technologies have many in‐between states.  Demonstration and 
testing of new technologies in combination with control strategies will also be very important. 
Expanded use of HVDC will likely stress operations and the specifics must be understood. The new 
technology must be properly controlled and monitored. Data for models and simulations must also be 
validated and verified. Field tests of the technologies would help overcome concern about deployments 
and improve the accuracy of data. Existence of a test facility for multi‐terminal DC development is 
particularly desirable. It would also be good to ensure that VSC technologies will works in applications 
with off‐shore generation. The number of project cycles for new technologies and concepts is not yet 
sufficient, so government assistance with initial demonstrations is important. 
Partnerships are the most efficient means of investigation to address these challenges. For example, to 
research controllers, industry needs the testing infrastructure and vendors can supply the components 
and systems. Additionally, resources at national laboratories could also be leveraged for demonstration 
projects. One example is the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) at National Renewable Energy 
Laboratory (NREL) which could serve as a test bed to run various scenarios. Preliminary work can be 
done at national laboratories, but it is important to remember that actual field tests will have different 
results. Power marketing administrations should also be leveraged for large‐scale demonstrations or 
deployments. Another capability that is beneficial is a real‐time digital simulator (RTDS), which enables 
testing of hardware in the loop and of various controllers. The RTDS can help develop and verify system 
and control models.  
The true costs of first demonstrations or pilot projects are not known; there are many uncertainties and 
instanced where things can go wrong. Unfortunately, this presents a “Catch‐22” scenario as businesses 
do not want to invest in the demonstrations that are needed to inform business models that spur 
greater investments. The federal government should partner with project developers to help assess the 
means of cost reduction, technology development, and showing how the technology works. Tax 
incentives or loan guarantees may help make demonstrations more accessible. 
DOE‐funded demonstrations should be top‐down projects at the national level; some demonstration 
projects are better led by federal entities than by public utilities. Federal support underscores a project’s 
national significance and can be used strategically to break down barriers. Pilots are usually too small; 
utilities need scaled‐up demonstrations to make an economic impact. Projects that support public policy 
objectives, such as power purchase agreements and contracts, should have state and regional support 
and participation. Island territories can be good candidates for HVDC demonstrations.  
Demonstrations that examine unique value propositions are also important. One example is the 
conversion of AC lines to DC. If the capacity on existing AC lines are limited because of system 
constraints, then conversion to DC lines could be considered. Such a project would be able to 
demonstrate and quantify various benefits such as the time and resources saved (e.g., increasing 
application control tool:VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Delete or remove partial or all hyperlinks from PDF file in VB.NET class. Copy, cut and paste PDF link to another PDF file in VB.NET project.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 15 
 
transmission capacity in limited ROWs where the actual conductors are reused). Because of customer 
resistance to transmission expansion, issues with NIMBY, converting AC to DC can provide significant 
value. Another potential project is installing synchrophasor technology with an HVDC system. Such a 
demonstration would show how HVDC can improve AC system controls. Additional benefits include the 
verification of AC grid models and controls and supporting the development of new models. 
Opportunities for DOE include the following: 
Fund demonstration projects 
Partner with industry to scale up demonstration projects 
Provide HVDC vendors with a test facility for testing various components 
Build or leverage test beds such as at the NREL‐ESIF 
Show conversion of AC to DC and benefits of undergrounding 
Become more strategic with options for demonstrations 
 
Policies, Regulations, and Cost Allocation 
Policies and regulations have a big impact on markets and cost allocation, as well as having the potential 
to level the playing field for new technology. Regulatory authority for transmission and wholesale 
electricity exists for AC systems; the used and useful requirement for regulators can be limiting HVDC 
deployment. Additionally, how the benefits of HVDC fit into existing markets and regulations is not 
clearly understood; policy innovation will be needed to support new technologies. Policies that 
encourage manufacturing in the United States are also important as there is a risk that HVDC will not be 
developed or piloted here, possibly resulting in the loss of domestic technology leadership.  
There is also a need to revisit compliance standards as policies developed in the past tend to be 
accompanied by a good deal of inertia. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) can take a 
proactive role in reexamining laws and regulations to drive institutional changes. Historically, FERC has 
taken a blanket approach to policy making; however, specific situations and associated contingencies 
should be considered such as whether HVDC is handled on an energy basis or a capacity basis. 
Additionally, reliability requirements may change for a future system.  For example, it is important to 
consider what an “N‐1 contingency” would mean for HVDC and what the right metric would be. 
From the deployment experience in Europe, which also faces a challenging institutional and regulatory 
environment, regional coordination and collaboration for planning and implementation has shown 
benefits. Domestically, FERC Order 1000 is meant to support regional planning and is a step in the right 
direction. Regional planning can help support HVDC implementation, but some aspects (e.g., the 
technology’s uniqueness and benefits) may not be considered. One potential scenario is a national long‐
distance HVDC backbone; where the grid is handled liked the federal highway systems with a sense of 
national responsibility. This scenario is unlikely absent a national energy policy which faces many 
externalities. Most likely, regional or interconnection planning will occur but the issue with siting and 
permitting, which are lengthy processes, will remain; interconnection queues can also be dysfunctional. 
application control tool:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application control tool:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 16 
 
Community resistance to new projects (NIMBY) and similar issues may require government intervention, 
such as backstop authority of government. HVDC for accessing offshore wind will present unique siting 
and permitting challenges as well, and should be addressed concurrently. 
Cost allocation is another important barrier, as the prevailing mindset is to implement solutions with the 
lowest cost rather than what is regionally optimal. According to FERC Order 1000, beneficiaries must pay 
development costs for projects but determination of benefits is difficult. With HVDC point‐to‐point 
transfers, determining the primary beneficiaries can be simple, but flyover concerns (i.e., lines crossing 
states that do not benefit) makes things more complex. In places where HVDC does not originate or 
terminate, the administration and calculation of these “side payments” must be incorporated in cost 
allocations. It is difficult to build a project where costs are imposed on others. Documents produced by 
WECC for engaging with stakeholders, which includes HVDC as part of the discussion, may be a resource. 
Public policy considerations, such as economic development and environmental concerns, can add to 
the complexity. Additionally, global benefits are not taken into account; a sharing mechanism could be 
established to cover externalities and broader beneficiaries. 
Financing is a big concern for many new technologies; increased project risks lead to higher cost of 
capital and thus higher electricity prices. Most developers make decisions based on the internal rate of 
return (IRR); a high IRR for a HVDC project translates into implementation. Additionally, societal benefits 
of improved transmission—such as reliability, climate effects, and cleaner energy—are not presently 
factored into financing considerations. These intangibles should be monetized; financing mechanisms 
that are tied to societal benefits could encourage deployment. Additionally, changes to the Federal 
Power Act could also spur deployment.  For example, FERC regulations could ensure a return on 
investment for HVDC; allow 50 percent of costs to be spread to cover regional benefits; or accelerate 
the write off of installed technologies to hasten adoption and implementation of new technologies.  
Another issue is that it is often easier to finance smaller capital expenditures, resulting in a preference 
for the deployment of overhead AC lines to solve problems. The credit of the state should be behind 
projects that support meeting the national interest. A government fund could help pay for incremental 
costs between two technology choices if the more expensive choice (e.g., undergrounding vs. overhead) 
would be the better option to meet public policy objectives. Loan guarantees and production tax credits 
for transmission and distribution infrastructure can also be used to lower risks and facilitate financing. 
Opportunities for DOE include the following: 
Convene a group to establish valuation criteria and cost allocation 
Help establish guidelines and educate regulators 
Work with FERC and provide technical expertise 
Evaluate reliability standards with HVDC 
Explore new markets and financing schemes 
Provide support through loan guarantees 
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 17 
 
Next Steps 
Overall, there was recognition that HVDC technologies have valuable applications but face a range of 
challenges. A group can be formed to continue engagement with the community, identify specific 
technical needs, and determine means to address those needs.  DOE could provide resources to initiate 
these types of groups (e.g., the North American Synchrophasor Initiative); however, they should 
ultimately become vehicles of and for the vendor/user community and are self‐funded.  
The GTT will take the information obtained from this workshop into consideration in the development of 
future DOE plans and activities. Individuals who were not able to participate at the workshop can submit 
comments and additional thoughts to the GTT via GridTechTeam@hq.doe.gov.  
 
 
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 18 
 
Meeting Participants 
First Name 
Last Name 
Affiliation 
Email 
Ram 
Adapa 
EPRI 
radapa@epri.com 
Sam 
Baldwin 
DOE/EERE 
Sam.Baldwin@ee.doe.gov 
Venkat 
Banunarayanan  DOE/EERE 
Venkat.Banunarayanan@hq.doe.gov
Gil 
Bindewald 
DOE/OE 
Gilbert.Bindewald@hq.doe.gov 
Anjan 
Bose 
DOE/Undersecretary 
Anjan.bose@hq.doe.gov 
Erin 
Boyd 
DOE/PI 
Erin.boyd@hq.doe.gov 
Ralph 
Braccio 
Booz Allen Hamilton 
braccio_ralph@bah.com 
Darren 
Buck 
WAPA 
DBuck@WAPA.GOV 
Mary 
Cain 
FERC 
mary.cain@ferc.gov 
Caitlin 
Callaghan 
DOE/OE 
Caitlin.callaghan@hq.doe.gov 
Jay 
Caspary 
SPP 
jcaspary@spp.org 
Kerry 
Cheung 
DOE/OE 
Kerry.cheung@hq.doe.gov 
Rahul 
Chokhawala 
GE 
Chokhawa@ge.com 
Charlton 
Clark 
DOE/EERE 
Charlton.Clark@ee.doe.gov 
Stephen 
Conant 
Anbaric Transmission 
sconant@anbaricpower.com 
Jose 
Conto 
ERCOT 
jconto@ercot.com 
Matt 
Cunningham 
GE 
Matt.Cunningham@ge.com 
Mohamed 
El‐Gasseir 
Atlantic Wind Connection  mme@atlanticwindconnection.com 
Joe 
Eto 
LBNL 
jheto@lbl.gov 
Wayne 
Galli 
Clean Line Energy 
wgalli@cleanlineenergy.com 
Vahan 
Gevorgian 
NREL 
vahan_gevorgian@nrel.gov 
Peter 
Grossman 
Siemens 
peter.kohnstam@siemens.com 
Tim 
Heidel 
DOE/ARPA‐E 
Timothy.Heidel@Hq.Doe.Gov 
Jeffrey T. 
Hein 
Xcel Energy 
Jeffrey.T.Hein@xcelenergy.com 
Nari 
Hingorani 
Consultant 
nghingorani@sbcglobal.net 
Cynthia 
Hsu 
DOE/OE 
Cynthia.Hsu@Hq.Doe.Gov 
Holmes 
Hummel 
DOE/Undersecretary 
Holmes.Hummel@hq.doe.gov 
Sasan 
Jalali 
FERC 
sasan.jalali@ferc.gov 
Ehsan 
Khan 
DOE/FE 
Ehsan.Khan@Hq.Doe.Gov 
Tom 
King 
ORNL 
kingtjjr@ornl.gov 
Neil 
Kirby 
Alstom 
neil.kirby@alstom.com 
Peter 
Kohnstam 
Siemens 
peter.kohnstam@siemens.com 
Rich 
Kowalski 
ISONE 
rkowalski@iso‐ne.com 
Barry 
Lawson 
NRECA 
barry.lawson@nreca.coop 
Per‐Anders 
Lof 
National Grid 
Per‐Anders.Lof@nationalgrid.com 
Lucas 
Lucero 
BLM 
llucero@blm.gov 
Jack 
McCall 
American Superconductor  jmccall@amsc.com 
Paul 
McCurley 
NRECA 
paul.mccurley@nreca.coop  
Ben 
Mehraban 
AEP Transmission 
bmehraban@aep.com 
David 
Meyer 
DOE/OE 
David.Meyer@hq.doe.gov 
Rich 
Meyer 
NRECA 
Richard.meyer@nreca.coop  
Doug 
Middleton 
DOE/FE 
Douglas.middleton@hq.doe.gov 
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 19 
 
First Name 
Last Name 
Affiliation 
Email 
Dave 
Mohre 
NRECA 
dave.mohre@nreca.coop  
Phil 
Overholt 
DOE/OE 
Philip.overholt@hq.doe.gov 
Bill 
Parks 
DOE/OE 
William.Parks@hq.doe.gov 
Mahendra 
Patel 
PJM 
patelm3@pjm.com 
Rich 
Scheer 
Consultant 
scheerllc@verizon.net 
Pam 
Silberstein 
NRECA 
pamela.silberstein@nreca.coop 
Alex 
Slocum 
MIT/OSTP 
slocum@mit.edu 
Holly 
Smith 
NARUC 
hsmith@naruc.org 
Le 
Tang 
ABB 
le.tang@us.abb.com 
Robert J. 
Thomas 
Cornell 
rjt1@cornell.edu 
Brittany 
Westlake 
DOE/OE 
brittany.westlake@hq.doe.gov 
Cynthia 
Wilson 
DOE/PI 
Cynthia.Wilson@hq.doe.gov 
Jon 
Worthington 
DOE/OE 
Jon.Worthington@Hq.Doe.Gov 
Montee 
Wynn 
NRECA 
montee.wynn@nreca.coop  
 
 
 
Applications of HVDC Technologies: Workshop Summary 
Page 20 
 
Acronyms 
Ampere 
AC 
Alternating Current 
CIGRE 
Council on Large Electric Systems 
DC 
Direct Current 
DOE 
U.S. Department of Energy  
EIPC 
Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative  
EISPC 
Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council  
EPRI 
Electric Power Research Institute 
ESIF 
Energy Systems Integration Facility  
FERC 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 
GTT 
Grid Tech Team 
HVAC 
High‐Voltage Alternating Current  
HVDC 
High‐Voltage Direct Current  
IEEE 
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
IGBT 
Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor 
IRR 
Internal Rate of Return 
kV 
Kilovolts 
LCC 
Line‐Commuted Converter  
ms 
Milliseconds 
MW 
Megawatts 
NASPI 
North American Synchrophasor Initiative 
NERC 
North American Electric Reliability Corporation 
NIMBY 
Not in My Backyard 
NREL 
National Renewable Energy Laboratory  
PSLF 
Positive Sequence Load Flow 
PSSE 
Power System Simulator for Engineering 
ROW 
Right‐of‐Way 
RTDS 
Real‐Time Digital Simulator 
STATCOM 
Static Synchronous Compensator 
TVA 
Tennessee Valley Authority 
U.S. 
United States 
VAR 
Volt–Ampere Reactive 
VSC 
Voltage‐Source Converter  
WECC 
Western Electricity Coordinating Council  
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested