devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete page from pdf file software SDK cloud windows wpf web page class Appraisal0-part741

Sample
Batch PDF Merger
Delete page from pdf file - software SDK cloud:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete page from pdf file - software SDK cloud:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Last revision: April 30, 2014 
Appraisal_v8 
software SDK cloud:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a single page from a PDF document.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file. Parameters:
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
www.rasteredge.com
CONTENTS 
Introduction
Conservation Area Appraisal
Location and setting 
Why is it special? 
Historic development 
Character analysis 
Strengths Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats 
Management Policies
Roofs 
Facing Materials 
Windows 
Doors, Porches and Canopies 
The Curtilage 
Decoration 
Appendices
Appendix 1 -  
Secretary of State’s Letter and the Notice of the Article 4 Direction dated 
29 July 1992 
Appendix 2 - Proposed new Article 4 Direction 
Appendix 3 - Article 4(2) Direction of the Oakmount Triangle Conservation Area 
(provided 
for information in this draft)  
Appendix 4 -  Summary of  the relevant national and local planning policies. 
software SDK cloud:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
www.rasteredge.com
Introduction
A Conservation Area  is ‘an area of special architectural or historic interest, the 
character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enh
ance’. Southampton 
City Council designated the Ethelburt Avenue (Bassett Green Estate) as a Conservation 
Area in September 1988. This recognised that ‘the special quality of this early 
(sic) 
example of the Garden City Movement is derived from its residential character, 
architectural quality and its generous layout in terms of the ratio between open space 
and buildings.’ 
Planning applications for development in the Conservation Area are decided with regard 
to the need to preserve and to enhance it. In 1992 an Article 4 Direction removed some 
of the general permitted development rights and the following year Design Guidance for 
the Ethelburt Avenue (Bassett Green Estate) Conservation Area. was published. All 
properties within the boundary are covered by the Article 4 with the exception of the infill 
development in Field Close and flats on the corner of Bassett Green Road and 
Stoneham Lane (shown in blue on the above plan). Southampton City Council as Local 
Planning Authority retains control over development affecting flats as they do not have 
the permitted development rights granted to development within the curtilage of a 
dwelling house.   
This Appraisal, Management Plan and a revised Article 4 Direction are is are needed to 
address changes that have taken place within the Conservation Area and the 
surrounding area since its designation, to  reflect changes in the legislation, and to 
clarify the Article 4 Direction for residents and planners alike. Appendix 4 summarises 
the relevant national and local planning policies. 
The aim of this document is therefore two-fold: 
To identify the unique characteristics of the area in support of local planning 
policies to preserve and enhance the special character and appearance of the 
area. 
To provide residents, Council officers and Members, appeal inspectors and 
others with authoritative guidelines on the types of development and other 
changes that will preserve or enhance the area. 
The document is in three parts: 
The Appraisal  assesses what makes the area special, analyses its character 
and identifies issues and opportunities. 
The Management Plan  contains guidance on specific features identified in the 
Appraisal as significant elements in the character of the Conservation Area
Appendices, including the revised Article 4 Direction which will be subject to 
software SDK cloud:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
www.rasteredge.com
simultaneous consultation with the main part of the document. 
The text in grey boxes has been provided by the Residents’ Association. These 
boxes give guidance to assist householders manage their own properties and 
deal with matters beyond the scope of planning control. They deal with matters 
such as the restrictive covenants and preserving the mixture of open 
boundaries and privet hedges which are such an important feature of the 
estate. 
software SDK cloud:C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
www.rasteredge.com
software SDK cloud:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
www.rasteredge.com
The Appraisal
LOCATION AND BOUNDARIES 
The Ethelburt Avenue (Bassett Green Estate) Conservation Area, located in the north-
east of the city is enclosed within the red area shown above. It comprises Ethelburt 
Avenue, parts of Stoneham Lane, Leaside Way and Bassett Green Road and Field 
Close. 
Boundary Changes  
Proposals to extend the boundary to include Summerfield Gardens (the area within the 
red boundary on the above map) would not be supported due to the amount of 
inappropriate changes that have taken place (uPVC windows, guttering etc).  It is 
considered that existing SCC policies (such as the Residential Design Guide) are 
sufficient to protect the area from inappropriate development. 
At the corner of Stoneham Lane and High Road is Market Buildings comprising flats and 
shops built in 1931 and designed by Herbert Collins. This is shown as the green area on 
the map above, beyond the southeast corner of the existing Conservation Area. The 
proposed area includes the area of trees and the Herbert Collins Memorial Gardens. 
The building still very largely retains its original form and would be suitable for adding to 
the Conservation Area. 
WHY IS IT SPECIAL? 
Built in the second quarter of the 20th century, this housing estate contains an oasis of 
order and calm amidst the outer northern suburbs of Southampton. It was designed by 
the architect and planner Herbert Collins (see picture below), following the finest 
Garden City traditions. The houses are mainly two-storeyed with low-pitched roofs, built 
in pairs and short terraces grouped around greens and along grass-bordered roads. 
They vary in style from vernacular, through Georgian cottage to 'Moderne' but have a 
coherent architectural vocabulary with carefully proportioned small-paned windows and 
distinctive front doors and surrounds. The layout and landscaping are generous and the 
design, materials and construction of the individual houses are all of the highest quality. 
They were sold on long leases with restrictive covenants controlling their future 
maintenance and alteration: as a result many houses retain much of their distinctive 
original character. 
Note that there are restrictive covenants on the properties in Summerfield 
Gardens concerning alterations, including covenants to prevent enclosure of 
the front gardens and alteration of the colour of the paintwork from cream, 
except for the front doors. 
Herbert Collins 1885-1975 
HISTORIC BACKGROUND 
The land on which the Conservation Areas stands was part of North Stoneham Manor 
which was purchased by Sir Thomas Fleming in 1599. He was one of the judges that 
tried Guy Fawkes and became Lord Chief Justice. In the eighteenth century, the male 
line died out and inheritance passed through a female. Her great grandson Thomas 
Willis adopted the surname Willis Fleming. The Willis family were descended from the 
seventeenth century Oxford physician Dr Thomas Willis . The Willis family were 
descended from the celebrated seventeenth century Oxford physician Dr Thomas Willis.  
Late in the nineteenth century the area was still remote from the urban spread of 
Southampton. It comprised tenant farms, landed gentry living in great houses, North 
Stoneham House, South Stoneham House and The Grange (located on the open land 
by the Wide Lane, Mansbridge Road roundabout) and small rural settlements.  
By 1908, urban development has spread from Southampton along Portswood Road and 
reached to the end of High Road at the railway arch (the last section of houses were 
demolished when the road was made a dual carriageway). A network of roads off 
Portswood Road for the Hampton Park Estate has been layed out, but as yet little house 
building had taken place. Willis and Phillimore roads have been created and developed. 
House building continued rapidly, especially after the First World War. 
Late in the nineteenth century the area was still remote from the urban spread of 
Southampton. It comprised tenant farms, landed gentry living in great houses, North 
Stoneham House, South Stoneham House and The Grange (located on the open land 
by the Wide Lane, Mansbridge Road roundabout) and small rural settlements.  
By 1908, urban development has spread from Southampton along Portswood Road and 
reached to the end of High Road at the railway arch (the last section of houses were 
demolished when the road was made a dual carriageway). A network of roads off 
Portswood Road for the Hampton Park Estate has been layed out, but as yet little house 
building had taken place. Willis and Phillimore roads have been created and developed. 
House building continued rapidly, especially after the First World War. 
In 1920, the County Borough of Southampton was enlarged. The northern boundary 
had previously run along Burgess Street from Hill Lane to just after  University Road 
and then ran just south of and parallel to Broadlands Road. The new northern boundary 
ran in the countryside along the line it has today. Under provisions of the Housing Act 
1919 for housing of the working classes, Southampton Borough Council compulsorily 
purchased land on the north side of Burgess Road from John Willis Fleming. This 
become “The Flower Estate”. So development was contemporary with the Collin
houses in the Conservation Area.  
By 1933, the area was about as developed as it is today. An exception were all the land 
to the north of Bassett Green Road. On the north side Ethelburt Avenue only the first 
square had been built and on the south side of Bassett Green Road, Field Close and 
Conservation Area houses west of Field Close had also not been built. Some of the 
houses in High Road had become shops to serve the growing population. The tramlines 
reached Swaythling along Portswood Road in 1922 and in 1930 this was extended 
along Burgess Road to link with the line at Bassett Crossroads. 
DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONSERVATION AREA 
In 1925, William J Collins, Herbert's father bought from John Willis Fleming most of the 
land that had comprised the South Camp of the Swaythling Remount Depot.  
In 1925, William J Collins, Herbert's father bought from John Willis Fleming most of the 
land that had comprised the South Camp of the Swaythling Remount Depot. 
Before the First World War, the part of the land purchased to the south of Bassett Green 
Road was allotments and prior to that was mostly arable land forming part of Burgess 
Street Farm. The tithe map for the parish of North Stoneham about 1845, shows that 
there had also been a small wood on the west side, adjacent to Bassett Green Road. 
The Burgess Street Farm house was opposite what is now Langhorne Road. The land 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested