devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete pages out of a pdf file control application system azure html web page console 01254627-part76

10 - 1
CHA
P
TER  10
I
NTERPRETATI
ON OF ROCK 
PROPERTI
ES
10.1.   INTRODUCTION
The engineering behavior of most rock masses under loading is determined primarily by the discontinuities,
fractures,  joints,  fissures,  cracks,  and  planes  of  weakness.    The  intact  blocks  of  rock  between  the
discontinuities are usually sufficiently strong, except in the case of weak & porous rocks and those that
weather rapidly.  Thus, two classification systems are needed to adequately characterize these geomaterials:
one for the intact solid rock and another for the rock mass.  The network of fractures divide the rock mass
into discrete and prismatic blocks that affect its response and performance.  With the exception of the
durability testing (discussed in Chapter 8), the results of laboratory testing are of limited direct applicability
to design of structures founded in or on rock masses.
Of the three primary rock types (igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary), sedimentary rocks comprise 75%
of the rocks exposed at the ground surface.  Among the sedimentary rocks, the rocks of the shale family (clay
shale, siltstone, mudstone, and claystone) predominate, representing over 50% of the exposed sedimentary
rocks worldwide (Foster, 1975).  The distribution of rock types within the U.S.A. is reviewed by Witczak
(1972) and Figure 10-1 shows a simplified map of their occurrence (Pough, 1988).
Figure 10-1.   Generalized Distribution of Sedimentary, Igneous, & Metamorphic Rocks in the U.S.A
(From Pough, 1988)
Delete pages out of a pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf document; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
Delete pages out of a pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract page from pdf document; pdf extract pages
10 - 2
An initial step during site reconnaissance and exploration is to categorize the basic type of rock, per Table
10-1. Detailed geological classifications of rock types and petrographic examinations in the laboratory will
be required for major projects involving construction on rocks.  Field mapping by engineering geologists is
necessary for description of the jointing patterns, major discontinuity sets, shear zones, and faults, particularly
in areas involving rock slopes, cliffs, tunnels, and bridge abutments.  A detailed discussion of these aspects
may be found elsewhere (e.g., Goodman, 1989; Pough, 1988).  Major slip planes and joints should be detailed
on maps with appropriate values of dip angle and dip direction (or alternatively, strike).  Large groups of
discontinuities are best represented by statistical summaries on stereonets and polar diagrams.  Important
shear zones and faults can also be depicted on these plots. 
TABLE 10-1.  
PR
I
MARY ROCK TYPES CLASS
I
F
I
ED BY GEOLOG
I
C OR
I
G
I
N
Grains
Aspects
Sedimentary Types
Metamorphic Types
Igneous Types
Clastic
Carbonate
Foliated
Massive
Intrusive
Extrusive
Coarse
Conglomerate
Breccia
Limestone
Conglomerate 
Gneiss
Marble
Pegmatiite
Granite
Volcanic
Breccia
Medium
Sandstone
Siltstone
Limestone
Chalk
Schist
Phyllite
Quartzite
Diorite
Diabase
Tuff
Fine
Shale
Mudstone
Calcareous
Mudstone
Slate
Amphibolite
Rhyolite
Basalt
Obsidian
Alternate classification systems are proposed based on behavioral aspects (Goodman, 1989) or composition
and texture (Wyllie, 1999).  Details on the specific rock minerals and their relative abundance is important
in the petrographic determination of the rock types, yet beyond the scope of discussion here.  In the logging
of field mapping and rock coring operations, the specific formation name and age of the rock is often noted,
being helpful in sorting stratigraphic layering and the determination of the subsurface profile.    Table 10-2
gives the general geologic time scale and associated periods.   Generally, older rocks have lower porosity and
higher strength than younger rocks (Goodman, 1989).  
Rock type can often infer possible problems that can be encountered in construction.  Notable problems occur
in limestone (sinkholes, caves), serpentine (slippage), bentonitic shales (swelling, slope stability), and diabase
(boulders).  Deterioration of shale family of rocks and weakly-cemented friable sandstones is the cause of
many of the maintenance problems  in the national  highway system, particularly with respect to cuts,
embankment construction, and foundations.  For example, deterioration of cut slopes in shales will result in
flatter slopes and/or instability.  Shale used in embankments when compacted will break down and result in
a material less pervious than anticipated for a rock fill.  Maintenance problems for slopes can be mitigated
by making them flatter, installation of horizontal drains, use of gunite & mesh, or in some cases, more
elaborate  structural supports are  required (rock bolts,  retention walls, anchors,  drilled shafts).   When
excavation for a structural foundation is made, the bearing level must be protected against slaking and/or
expansion; this can be accomplished by spraying a protective coating on the freshly exposed rock surface,
such as gunite or shotcrete.  Additional details and considerations are given in Wyllie (1999).
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET
cutting pdf pages; extract pdf pages reader
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF option, The search and delete match rules. -. pageCount, The count of pages that will be deleted a string.
acrobat export pages from pdf; extract pages pdf preview
10 - 3
TABLE 10-2.
GEOLOG
I
C TI
ME SCALE
Era
Period                 Epoch
       Time Boundaries
(Years
Ago)
Holocene - Recent
Quaternary
10,000
Pleistocene
2 million
Pliocene
5 million
Cenozoic
Miocene
26 million
Tertiary
Oligocene
38 million
Eocene
54 million
Paleocene
65 million
Cretaceous
130 million
Mesozoic
Jurassic
185 million
Triassic
230 million
Permian
265 million
Pennsylvanian
Carboniferous
310 million
Mississippian
355 million
Paleozoic
Devonian
413 million
Silurian
425 million
Ordovician
475 million
Cambrian
570 million
Precambrian (oldest rocks)
3.9  billion
Earth Beginning
4.7  billion
The design of rock structures is still frequently done on the basis of an empirical evaluation of rock mass
properties guided by experience, consideration of rock mass structure, index properties and correlations,
and other parameters, such as joint spacing, roughness, degree of weathering, dip & dip direction of slip
planes, infilling, extent of discontinuities, and groundwater conditions (see Figure 10-2).  Many of these
facets  can  be  grouped  together  to  give  an  overall  rating  of  the  predominant  factors  affecting  the
performance of the entire rock mass under loading.  Thus, a rating of the rock mass will be described
using three common methods (RMR = rock mass rating; Q system, and GSI = geologic strength index).  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page from pdf online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
deleting pages from pdf in preview; delete pages from pdf in preview
10 - 4
Figure 10-2.   Factors & Parameters Affecting Geologic Mapping of Rock Mass Features (Wyllie, 1999).
As in the case of the evaluation of soil properties, a number of correlations have been developed for the
interpretation  of  rock  properties.  Notably,  however,  the  rock  property  correlations  reported  in  the
technical literature often have a limited database and should be used with caution.  An attempt should be
made to develop correlations applicable to the specific rock formations in a particular state, as this can be
well worth the expenditure of time and effort in terms of overall safety and economy.
This  chapter  presents  general  discussions  on  the  properties  of  intact  rock  and  jointed  rock  masses,
particularly using rock mass classification schemes and their relevance to the design of rock structures.
The  reader  is strongly encouraged  to  refer  to  the  original references  to  understand  the  basis  of  the
correlations and the classification systems presented in this chapter and for additional information.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages from pdf document; delete pages from pdf file online
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Replace Text in PDF File. VB.NET: Replace Text in Consecutive PDF Pages.
add remove pages from pdf; cut pdf pages
10 - 5
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Specific Gravity o
f Solids
,
 Gs
halite
gypsum
serpentine
quartz
feldspar
chlorite
calcite
dolomite
olivine
barite
pyrite
galena
Values o
f Specific Gravity o
f Rock Minerals
Reference Value
(fresh water)
Common Minerals
Average G
s
= 2.70
Figure 10-3.   Specific Gravity of Solids for Selected Rock Minerals.
10.2   INTACT ROCK PROPERTIES
This section presents information on the indices and properties of natural intact rock. The values are
obtained  from  tests  conducted  in  the  laboratory  on  small  specimens  of  rock  and  therefore  must  be
adjusted to full scale conditions in order to represent the overall rock mass conditions.
10.2.1  Specific Gravity
The specific gravity of solids (G
s
) of different rock types depends upon the minerals present and their
relative percentage of composition.    The values of G
s
for selected minerals are presented in Figure 10-3.
Very common minerals include quartz and feldspar, as well as calcite, chlorite, mica, and the clay mineral
group (illite, kaolinite, smectite).   The bulk value of these together gives an representative average value
of G
s
.
2.7 ± 0.1 for many rock types.  
10.2.2.   Unit Weight
The unit weight of rock is needed in calculating overburden stress profiles in problems involving rock
slopes and tunnel design support systems. Also, because the specific gravity of the basic rock-forming
minerals exhibits a narrow range, the unit weight is an indicator of the degree of induration of the rock
unit and is thus an indirect  indicator of  rock strength.   Strength of  the intact rock  material  tends to
increase proportionally to the increase in unit weight.  Representative dry unit weights for different rock
types are contained in Table 10-3.
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
export one page of pdf preview; delete page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page get a PDF document which is out of order on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files
extract pages from pdf acrobat; acrobat extract pages from pdf
10 - 6
TABLE  10-3
REPRESENTATI
VE RANGE OF DRY UN
IT WE
I
GHTS
Rock Type
Unit Weight Range
(kN/m
3
)
Shale
20 - 25
Sandstone
18 - 26
Limestone
19 - 27
Schist
23 - 28
Gneiss
23 - 29
Granite
25 - 29
Basalt
20 - 30
1.
Dry unit weights are for moderately weathered to unweathered rock..  Note: 9.81 kN/m
3
= 62.4 pcf.
2.
Wide range in unit weights for shale, sandstone, and limestone represents effect of variations in porosity,
cementation, grain size, depth, and age.
3.
Specimens with unit weights falling outside the ranges contained herein may be encountered.
The dry unit weight (
(
dry
) is calculated from the bulk specific gravity of solids and porosity (n) according
to:
(
dry
 
(
water
G
s
(1 - n)                                                                                                (10-1)
Where the unit weight of water is 
(
water
= 9.81 kN/m
3
= 62.43 pcf.  The saturated unit weight (
(
sat
) of
rocks can be expressed:
(
sat
=  
(
water
[G
s
(1 - n) + n]                                                                                          (10-2)
These expressions are consistent with those in Table 7-2 for soil materials where void ratio is used more
commonly.  The interrelationship between porosity and void ratio (e) is simply:   n = e/(1+e).   The
decrease in saturated unit weight with increasing porosity is presented in Figure 10-4 for various rocks
and a selected range of specific gravity values. 
10.2.3.   Ultrasonic Velocities
The compression and shear wave velocities of rock specimens can be measured in the laboratory using
ultrasonics techniques (see Section 8, Figure 8-7).   These wave values can be used as indicators of the
degree of weathering and soundness of the rock, as well as compared with in-situ field measurements that
relate to the extent of fissuring and discontinuities of the larger rock mass.   The summary of data in
Figure 10-5 illustrates the general ranges of compression wave (V
p
) between 3000 and 7000 m/s and
ranges of shear waves (V
s
) between 2000 and 3500 m/s for intact rocks.  
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET NET control allows users to black out image in PDF
extract page from pdf file; deleting pages from pdf in reader
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Ability to extract highlighted text out of PDF document. How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
delete page from pdf reader; add and remove pages from pdf file online
10 - 7
Unit Weights of Rocks
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
Porosity
,
 n
3Saturated Unit Weight, γT (kN/m)
Dolostone
Granite
Gray
w
acke
Limestone
Mudstone
Siltstone
Sandstone
T
u
ff
γ
sat
γ
water
[ G
s
(1-n) + n]
G
s
2.80
2.65
2.50
Figure 10-4.   Saturated Rock Unit Weight in Terms of Porosity and Specific Gravity. 
Seismic Velocities for Intact Rock Materials
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
4500
5000
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
9000
10000
Compression Wave
,
 Vp (m/s)
Shear Wave, Vs
Limestone
Chalk
Marble
Schist
Tuff
Slate
Anhydrite
Grandiorite
Diorite
Gabbro
Granite
Dunite
Basalt
Dolostone
Mudstone
Siltstone
Figure 10-5.  Representative S- and P-wave Velocities for Intact Rock Materials.
10 - 8
q
u
T
0
E
R
ν
Ratio   Ratio
Intact Rock Material
(MPa)  (MPa)  (MPa)      (-)
q
u
/T
0
E
R/
/q
u
Baraboo Quartzite
320.0
11.0
88320
0.11
29.1
276
Bedford Limestone
51.0
1.6
28509
0.29
32.3
559
Berea Sandstone
73.8
1.2
19262
0.38
63.0
261
Cedar City Tonalite
101.5
6.4
19184
0.17
15.9
189
Cherokee Marble
66.9
1.8
55795
0.25
37.4
834
Dworshak Dam Gneiss
162.0
6.9
53622
0.34
23.5
331
Flaming Gorge Shale
35.2
0.2
5526
0.25
167.6
157
Hackensack Siltstone
122.7
3.0
29571
0.22
41.5
241
John Day Basalt
355.0
14.5
83780
0.29
24.5
236
Lockport Dolomite
90.3
3.0
51020
0.34
29.8
565
Micaceous Shale
75.2
2.1
11130
0.29
36.3
148
Navajo Sandstone
214.0
8.1
39162
0.46
26.3
183
Nevada Basalt
148.0
13.1
34928
0.32
11.3
236
Nevada Granite
141.1
11.7
73795
0.22
12.1
523
Nevada Tuff
11.3
1.1
3649.9
0.29
10.0
323
Oneota Dolomite
86.9
4.4
43885
0.34
19.7
505
Palisades Diabase
241.0
11.4
81699
0.28
21.1
339
Pikes Peak Granite
226.0
11.9
70512
0.18
19.0
312
Quartz Mica Schist
55.2
0.5
20700
0.31
100.4
375
Solenhofen Limestone
245.0
4.0
63700
0.29
61.3
260
Taconic Marble
62.0
1.2
47926
0.40
53.0
773
Tavernalle Limestone
97.9
3.9
55803
0.30
25.0
570
Statistical Results:  Mean =
135.5
5.6
44613
0.29
39.1
372.5
S.Dev. =
93.7
4.7
25716
0.08
35.6
193.8
Note:   1 MPa  = 10.45 tsf  =  145.1 psi    
10.2.4   Compressive Strength
The  stress-strain-strength  behavior  of  intact  rock  specimens  can  be  measured  during  a  uniaxial
compression test (unconfined compression), or the more elaborate triaxial test (See details in Figures 8-2
and  8-6).   The  peak stress  of  the 
F
-
,
curve  during  unconfined  loading  is the  uniaxial  compressive
strength (designated q
u
or 
F
u
). The value of q
u
can be estimated from the point load index (I
s
) that is easily
conducted in the field (see Figure 8-1).  Representative values of compressive strengths for a variety of
intact rock specimens are listed in Table 10-4 (Goodman, 1989).   For this database, the compressive
strengths ranged from 11 to 355 MPa (1.6 to 51.5 ksi), with a mean value of q
u
= 135 MPa (19.7 ksi).    A
wide  range  in  compressive  strength  can  exist  for  a  particular  geologic  rock  type,  depending  upon
porosity, cementation, degree of weathering, formation heterogeneity, grain size angularity, and degree of
interlocking of mineral  grains.   The  compressive strength also depends  upon  the orientation  of load
application with respect to microstructure (e.g., foliation in metamorphic rocks and bedding planes in
sedmentary rocks).  
TABLE 10-4.  
REPRESENTATIVE MEASURED PARAMETERS ON INTACT ROCK SPECIMENS
(modified after Goodman, 1989)
10 - 9
Figure 10-6.  Classifications for Unweathered Intact Rock Material Strength
(Kulhawy, Trautmann, and O'Rourke, 1991)
The compressive strength serves as an initial index on the competency of intact rock.  Figure 10-6 shows
a  comparison  of  several  classification  schemes.    This  is  particularly  useful  for  defining  differences
between hard clays to shales, as the boundary in the transition from soil to rock is not precise in these
sedimentary materials. Similarly, it is applicable to residual profiles where the transition from soil to
saprolite and weathered rock and rock may be needed. It can become important in contracts involving
excavatability issues of rock vs. soil, as the former is considerably more expensive than the latter during
site grading, deep excavations, and foundation construction.  
10.2.5   Direct and Indirect Tensile Strength
Rock is relatively weak in tension, and thus, the tensile strength (T
0
) of an intact rock is considerably less
than its compressive value (q
u
). Their interrelation in terms of Mohr strength criterion is shown in Figure
10-7.  The direct tensile strength on rock specimens is not a common laboratory procedure because of the
difficulties involved in proper end preparation (Jaeger and Cook, 1977).  Therefore, it is usual to evaluate
the tensile strength through indirect methods, including the split-tensile test (Brazilian test, per Figure 8-
3), or alternatively, a bending test to obtain the modulus of rupture.  
A list of representative tensile strength values for various rocks is given in Table 10-4 with a measured
range from 0.2 to 14 MPa (30 to 2100 psi) and mean value T
0
= 5.6 MPa (812 psi).   For the data
considered, it can be seen  from  Figure 10-8  that the tensile  strength averages only about 4% of  the
compressive strength for the same rock.  
10 - 10
Figure 10-7.  Interrelationship Between Uniaxial Compression, Triaxial, and         
Tensile Strength of Intact Rock in Mohr-Coulomb Diagram.
Intact Rock Specimens
0
5
10
15
20
25
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
Compressive Strength
,
 qu (MPa)
Tensile Strength, T0
Sedimentary
Metamorphic
Igneous
Trend
+ S.E.
- S.E.
0.01
0.04
0
±
=
u
q
T
Figure 10-8.   Comparison of Tensile vs. Compressive Strengths for Intact Rock Specimens.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested