devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Extract pages from pdf online tool control application system azure web page windows console Calculus14-part744

6.4 Linear r Approximations
141
Newton’smethodisoneexampleoftheusefulnessofthetangentlineasanapproximation
toacurve. Hereweexploreanothersuchapplication.
Recallthatthetangentlinetof(x)atapointx=aisgivenbyL(x)=f0(a)(x a)+
f(a).Thetangentlineinthiscontextisalsocalledthelinearapproximationtofata.
IffisdierentiableatathenLisagoodapproximationoffsolongasxis\nottoo
far" froma. . Putanotherway,iff f isdierentiableatathenundera microscope f will
lookverymuchlikeastraightline. Figure6.4.1showsatangentlinetoy=x
2
atthree
dierentmagnications.
If we e want to o approximate e f(b), , because e computing g it exactly is dicult, we e can
approximatethevalueusinga linearapproximation,providedthat wecancomputethe
tangentlineatsomeaclosetob.
Figure 6.4.1
Thelinearapproximationtoy=x
2
.
EXAMPLE 6.4.1
Let f (x) =
p
x+ 4. Then f
0
(x) = 1=(2
p
x+ 4). The linear ap-
proximation to f at x = 5 is L(x) = 1=(2
p
5+ 4)(x   5) +
p
5+ 4 = (x   5)=6 + 3. As
an immediate application we can approximate square roots of numbers near 9 by hand.
To estimate
p
10, we substitute 6 into the linear approximation instead of into f(x), so
p
6+ 4  (6   5)=6 + 3 = 19=6  3:1
6. This rounds to 3:17 while the square root of 10 is
actually 3:16 to two decimal places, so this estimate is only accurate to one decimal place.
This is not too surprising, as 10 is really not very close to 9; on the other hand, for many
calculations, 3:2 would be accurate enough.
With modern calculators and computing software it may not appear necessary to use
linear approximations. But in fact they are quite useful. In cases requiring an explicit
numerical approximation, they allow us to get a quick rough estimate which can be used
as a \reality check" on a more complex calculation. In some complex calculations involving
Extract pages from pdf online tool - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete pages out of a pdf file; copy pdf page into word doc
Extract pages from pdf online tool - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; extract one page from pdf file
142
Chapter 6 Applications of the Derivative
functions, the linear approximation makes an otherwise intractable calculation possible,
without serious loss of accuracy.
EXAMPLE 6.4.2
Consider the trigonometric function sin x. Its linear approximation
at x = 0 is simply L(x) = x. When x is small this is quite a good approximation and is
used frequently by engineers and scientists to simplify some calculations.
DEFINITION 6.4.3
Let y = f(x) be a dierentiable function. We dene a new
independent variable dx, and a new dependent variable dy = f
0
(x) dx. Notice that dy is a
function both of x (since f0(x) is a function of x) and of dx. We say that dx and dy are
dierentials.
Let x = x   a and y = f (x)   f (a). If x is near a then x is small. If we set
dx = x then
dy = f
0
(a) dx 
y
x
x = y:
Thus, dy can be used to approximate y, the actual change in the function f between a
and x. This is exactly the approximation given by the tangent line:
dy = f
0
(a)(x   a) = f
0
(a)(x   a) + f (a)   f (a) = L(x)   f(a):
While L(x) approximates f (x), dy approximates how f (x) has changed from f (a). Fig-
ure6.4.2 illustrates the relationships.
a
x
..
..
...
...
..
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
...
...
.....
...
...
.....
...
...
.....
...
....
.....
...
....
.....
...
....
.....
....
....
.....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
....
.....
.....
....
......
....
.....
.....
.....
......
....
....
......
....
.....
.....
......
....
......
....
......
.....
......
....
.....
......
.....
......
.....
......
.....
......
.....
.......
......
.....
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
.......
.......
.....
.......
......
.......
.....
.......
.......
......
...
.
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
...
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
dx = x
    !
"
j
y
j
#
"
j
j
dy
j
j
#
Figure 6.4.2
Dierentials.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. PDF file is loaded as sample file for viewing
delete pages from pdf file online; extract pages pdf preview
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste view PDF document in single page or continue pages. PDF file is loaded as sample file for viewing on
export pages from pdf preview; extract one page from pdf reader
6.5 The Mean Value Theorem
143
Exercises 6.4.
1. Let f(x) = x
4
.If a = 1 and dx = x = 1=2, what are y and dy? )
2. Let f(x) =
p
x. If a = 1 and dx = x = 1=10, what are y and dy? )
3. Let f(x) = sin(2x). If a =  and dx = x = =100, what are y and dy? )
4. Use dierentials to estimate the amount of paint needed to apply a coat of paint 0.02 cm
thick to a sphere with diameter 40 meters. (Recall that the volume of a sphere of radius r is
V = (4=3)r
3
.Notice that you are given that dr = 0:02.) )
5. Show in detail that the linear approximation of sin x at x = 0 is L(x) = x and the linear
approximation of cos x at x = 0 is L(x) = 1.
Here are two interesting questions involving derivatives:
1. Suppose two dierent functions have the same derivative; what can you say about
the relationship between the two functions?
2. Suppose you drive a car from toll booth on a toll road to another toll booth at
an average speed of 70 miles per hour. What can be concluded about your actual
speed during the trip? In particular, did you exceed the 65 mile per hour speed
limit?
While these sound very dierent, it turns out that the two problems are very closely
related. We know that \speed" is really the derivative by a dierent name; let’s start by
translating the second question into something that may be easier to visualize. Suppose
that the function f(t) gives the position of your car on the toll road at time t. Your change
in position between one toll booth and the next is given by f (t
1
 f (t
0
), assuming that
at time t
0
you were at the rst booth and at time t
1
you arrived at the second booth.
Your average speed for the trip is (f (t
1
 f (t
0
))=(t
1
t
0
). If we think about the graph
of f(t), the average speed is the slope of the line that connects the two points (t
0
;f (t
0
))
and (t
1
;f (t
1
)). Your speed at any particular time t between t
0
and t
1
is f
0
(t), the slope
of the curve. Now question (2) becomes a question about slope. In particular, if the slope
between endpoints is 70, what can be said of the slopes at points between the endpoints?
As a general rule, when faced with a new problem it is often a good idea to examine
one or more simplied versions of the problem, in the hope that this will lead to an
understanding of the original problem. In this case, the problem in its \slope" form is
somewhat easier to simplify than the original, but equivalent, problem.
Here is a special instance of the problem. Suppose that f(t
0
) = f (t
1
). Then the
two endpoints have the same height and the slope of the line connecting the endpoints
is zero. What can we say about the slope between the endpoints? It shouldn’t take
much experimentation before you are convinced of the truth of this statement: Somewhere
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer is an advanced PDF tool, which is
extract pdf pages reader; add or remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
extract one page from pdf; delete pages of pdf online
144
Chapter 6 Applications of the Derivative
between t
0
and t
1
the slope is exactly zero, that is, somewhere between t
0
and t
1
the slope
is equal to the slope of the line between the endpoints. This suggests that perhaps the same
is true even if the endpoints are at dierent heights, and again a bit of experimentation will
probably convince you that this is so. But we can do better than \experimentation"|we
can prove that this is so.
We start with the simplied version:
THEOREM 6.5.1
Rolle’s Theorem
Suppose that f (x) has a derivative on the
interval (a; b), is continuous on the interval [a; b], and f (a) = f(b). Then at some value
c2 (a; b), f
0
(c) = 0.
Proof. We know that f (x) has a maximum and minimum value on [a; b] (because it
is continuous), and we also know that the maximum and minimum must occur at an
endpoint, at a point at which the derivative is zero, or at a point where the derivative is
undened. Since the derivative is never undened, that possibility is removed.
If the maximum or minimum occurs at a point c, other than an endpoint, where
f
0
(c) = 0, then we have found the point we seek. Otherwise, the maximum and minimum
both occur at an endpoint, and since the endpoints have the same height, the maximum
and minimum are the same. This means that f(x) = f (a) = f(b) at every x 2 [a; b], so
the function is a horizontal line, and it has derivative zero everywhere in (a; b). Then we
may choose any c at all to get f0(c) = 0.
Perhaps remarkably, this special case is all we need to prove the more general one as
well.
THEOREM 6.5.2
Mean Value Theorem
Suppose that f (x) has a derivative on
the interval (a; b) and is continuous on the interval [a; b]. Then at some value c 2 (a; b),
f
0
(c) =
f(b)   f(a)
 a
.
Proof. Let m =
f(b)   f (a)
 a
,and consider a new function g(x) = f (x) m(x a) f (a).
We know that g(x) has a derivative everywhere, since g
0
(x) = f
0
(x)  m. We can compute
g(a) = f (a)   m(a   a)   f (a) = 0 and
g(b) = f (b)   m(b   a)   f(a) = f(b)  
f(b)   f(a)
 a
(b   a)   f(a)
=f(b)   (f (b)   f (a))   f (a) = 0:
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to
extract page from pdf file; extract pages from pdf acrobat
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
convert PDF to text, VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to
convert selected pages of pdf to word; extract pdf pages for
6.5 The Mean Value Theorem
145
So the height of g(x) is the same at both endpoints. This means, by Rolle’s Theorem, that
at some c, g
0
(c) = 0. But we know that g
0
(c) = f
0
(c)   m, so
0= f
0
(c)   m = f
0
(c)  
f(b)   f(a)
 a
;
which turns into
f
0
(c) =
f(b)   f (a)
 a
;
exactly what we want.
Returning to the original formulation of question (2), we see that if f(t) gives the
position of your car at time t, then the Mean Value Theorem says that at some time c,
f
0
(c) = 70, that is, at some time you must have been traveling at exactly your average
speed for the trip, and that indeed you exceeded the speed limit.
Now let’s return to question (1). Suppose, for example, that two functions are known to
have derivative equal to 5 everywhere, f
0
(x) = g
0
(x) = 5. It is easy to nd such functions:
5x, 5x + 47, 5x   132, etc. Are there other, more complicated, examples? No|the only
functions that work are the \obvious" ones, namely, 5x plus some constant. How can we
see that this is true?
Although \5" is a very simple derivative, let’s look at an even simpler one. Suppose
that f0(x) = g0(x) = 0. Again we can nd examples: f (x) = 0, f (x) = 47, f(x) =  511
all have f
0
(x) = 0. Are there non-constant functions f with derivative 0? No, and here’s
why: Suppose that f (x) is not a constant function. This means that there are two points
on the function with dierent heights, say f (a) 6= f (b). The Mean Value Theorem tells
us that at some point c, f
0
(c) = (f(b)   f(a))=(b   a) 6= 0. So any non-constant function
does not have a derivative that is zero everywhere; this is the same as saying that the only
functions with zero derivative are the constant functions.
Let’s go back to the slightly less easy example: suppose that f
0
(x) = g
0
(x) = 5. Then
(f (x)   g(x))
0
=f
0
(x)   g
0
(x) = 5   5 = 0. So using what we discovered in the previous
paragraph, we know that f(x)  g(x) = k, for some constant k. So any two functions with
derivative 5 must dier by a constant; since 5x is known to work, the only other examples
must look like 5x + k.
Now we can extend this to more complicated functions, without any extra work.
Suppose that f0(x) = g0(x). Then as before (f (x)   g(x))0 = f0(x)   g0(x) = 0, so
f(x)  g(x) = k. Again this means that if we nd just a single function g(x) with a certain
derivative, then every other function with the same derivative must be of the form g(x)+k.
EXAMPLE 6.5.3
Describe all functions that have derivative 5x   3. It’s easy to nd
one: g(x) = (5=2)x
2
3x has g
0
(x) = 5x   3. The only other functions with the same
derivative are therefore of the form f (x) = (5=2)x
2
3x + k.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Best online HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer library as well as an advanced PDF annotating software for Visual Studio .NET. An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is
copy pages from pdf to word; extract page from pdf preview
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Best online HTML5 PDF Viewer PDF Viewer library as well as an advanced PDF annotating software for Visual Studio .NET. An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is
deleting pages from pdf file; acrobat export pages from pdf
146
Chapter 6 Applications of the Derivative
Alternately, though not obviously, you might have rst noticed that g(x) = (5=2)x
2
3x + 47 has g
0
(x) = 5x   3. Then every other function with the same derivative must
have the form f (x) = (5=2)x
2
3x + 47 + k. This looks dierent, but it really isn’t.
The functions of the form f(x) = (5=2)x
2
3x + k are exactly the same as the ones of
the form f(x) = (5=2)x
2
3x + 47 + k. For example, (5=2)x
2
3x + 10 is the same as
(5=2)x
2
3x +47 + ( 37), and the rst is of the rst form while the second has the second
form.
This is worth calling a theorem:
THEOREM 6.5.4
If f
0
(x) = g
0
(x) for every x 2 (a; b), then for some constant k,
f(x) = g(x) + k on the interval (a; b).
EXAMPLE 6.5.5
Describe all functions with derivative sin x + e
x
.One such function
is   cos x + e
x
,so all such functions have the form   cos x + e
x
+k.
Exercises 6.5.
1. Let f(x) = x
2
.Find a value c 2 ( 1;2) so that f
0
(c) equals the slope between the endpoints
of f(x) on [ 1; 2]. )
2. Verify that f(x) = x=(x + 2) satises the hypotheses of the Mean Value Theorem on the
interval [1; 4] and then nd all of the values, c, that satisfy the conclusion of the theorem.
)
3. Verify that f(x) = 3x=(x + 7) satises the hypotheses of the Mean Value Theorem on the
interval [ 2;6] and then nd all of the values, c, that satisfy the conclusion of the theorem.
4. Let f(x) = tan x. Show that f() = f(2) = 0 but there is no number c 2 (; 2) such that
f
0
(c) = 0. Why does this not contradict Rolle’s theorem?
5. Let f(x) = (x   3)
2
. Show that there is no value c 2 (1;4) such that f
0
(c) = (f(4)  
f(1))=(4   1). Why is this not a contradiction of the Mean Value Theorem?
6. Describe all functions with derivative x
2
+47x   5.)
7. Describe all functions with derivative
1
1+ x2
)
8. Describe all functions with derivative x
3
1
x
)
9. Describe all functions with derivative sin(2x). )
10. Show that the equation 6x
4
7x + 1 = 0 does not have more than two distinct real roots.
11. Let f be dierentiable on R. Suppose that f
0
(x) 6= 0 for every x. Prove that f has at most
one real root.
12. Prove that for all real x and y j cos x   cos yj  jx   yj. State and prove an analogous result
involving sine.
13. Show that
p
1+ x  1 + (x=2) if  1 < x < 1.
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET An advanced PDF loading and creation tool, which supports to
export pages from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
7
Integration
Up to now we have been concerned with extracting information about how a function
changes from the function itself. Given knowledge about an object’s position, for example,
we want to know the object’s speed. Given information about the height of a curve we
want to know its slope. We now consider problems that are, whether obviously or not, the
reverse of such problems.
EXAMPLE 7.1.1 An object moves in a straight line so that its speed at time t is given
by v(t) = 3t in, say, cm/sec. If the object is at position 10 on the straight line when t = 0,
where is the object at any time t?
There are two reasonable ways to approach this problem. If s(t) is the position of the
object at time t, we know that s
0
(t) = v(t). Because of our knowledge of derivatives, we
know therefore that s(t) = 3t
2
=2 +k, and because s(0) = 10 we easily discover that k = 10,
so s(t) = 3t
2
=2 + 10. For example, at t = 1 the object is at position 3=2 + 10 = 11:5. This
is certainly the easiest way to deal with this problem. Not all similar problems are so easy,
as we will see; the second approach to the problem is more dicult but also more general.
We start by considering how we might approximate a solution. We know that at t = 0
the object is at position 10. How might we approximate its position at, say, t = 1? We
know that the speed of the object at time t = 0 is 0; if its speed were constant then in the
rst second the object would not move and its position would still be 10 when t = 1. In
fact, the object will not be too far from 10 at t = 1, but certainly we can do better. Let’s
look at the times 0:1, 0:2, 0:3, : : : , 1:0, and try approximating the location of the object
147
148
Chapter 7 Integration
at each, by supposing that during each tenth of a second the object is going at a constant
speed. Since the object initially has speed 0, we again suppose it maintains this speed, but
only for a tenth of second; during that time the object would not move. During the tenth
of a second from t = 0:1 to t = 0:2, we suppose that the object is traveling at 0:3 cm/sec,
namely, its actual speed at t = 0:1. In this case the object would travel (0:3)(0:1) = 0:03
centimeters: 0:3 cm/sec times 0:1 seconds. Similarly, between t = 0:2 and t = 0:3 the
object would travel (0:6)(0:1) = 0:06 centimeters. Continuing, we get as an approximation
that the object travels
(0:0)(0:1) + (0:3)(0:1) + (0:6)(0:1) +    + (2:7)(0:1) = 1:35
centimeters, ending up at position 11.35. This is a better approximation than 10, certainly,
but is still just an approximation. (We know in fact that the object ends up at position
11:5, because we’ve already done the problem using the rst approach.) Presumably,
we will get a better approximation if we divide the time into one hundred intervals of a
hundredth of a second each, and repeat the process:
(0:0)(0:01) + (0:03)(0:01) + (0:06)(0:01) +    + (2:97)(0:01) = 1:485:
We thus approximate the position as 11:485. Since we know the exact answer, we can see
that this is much closer, but if we did not already know the answer, we wouldn’t really
know how close.
We can keep this up, but we’ll never really know the exact answer if we simply compute
more and more examples. Let’s instead look at a \typical" approximation. Suppose we
divide the time into n equal intervals, and imagine that on each of these the object travels
at a constant speed. Over the rst time interval we approximate the distance traveled
as (0:0)(1=n) = 0, as before. During the second time interval, from t = 1=n to t = 2=n,
the object travels approximately 3(1=n)(1=n) = 3=n
2
centimeters. During time interval
number i, the object travels approximately (3(i   1)=n)(1=n) = 3(i   1)=n
2
centimeters,
that is, its speed at time (i   1)=n, 3(i   1)=n, times the length of time interval number i,
1=n. Adding these up as before, we approximate the distance traveled as
(0)
1
n
+3
1
n2
+3(2)
1
n2
+3(3)
1
n2
+   + 3(n   1)
1
n2
centimeters. What can we say about this? At rst it looks rather less useful than the
concrete calculations we’ve already done. But in fact a bit of algebra reveals it to be much
7.1 Two examples
149
more useful. We can factor out a 3 and 1=n
2
to get
3
n2
(0 + 1 + 2 + 3 +    + (n   1));
that is, 3=n
2
times the sum of the rst n   1 positive integers. Now we make use of a fact
you may have run across before:
1+ 2 + 3 +    + k =
k(k + 1)
2
:
In our case we’re interested in k = n   1, so
1+ 2 + 3 +    + (n   1) =
(n   1)(n)
2
=
n
2
n
2
:
This simplies the approximate distance traveled to
3
n2
n
2
n
2
=
3
2
n
2
n
n2
=
3
2
n
2
n2
n
n2
=
3
2
1
n
:
Now this is quite easy to understand: as n gets larger and larger this approximation gets
closer and closer to (3=2)(1   0) = 3=2, so that 3=2 is the exact distance traveled during
one second, and the nal position is 11:5.
So for t = 1, at least, this rather cumbersome approach gives the same answer as
the rst approach. But really there’s nothing special about t = 1; let’s just call it t
instead. In this case the approximate distance traveled during time interval number i is
3(i   1)(t=n)(t=n) = 3(i   1)t
2
=n
2
,that is, speed 3(i   1)(t=n) times time t=n, and the
total distance traveled is approximately
(0)
t
n
+3(1)
t
2
n2
+3(2)
t
2
n2
+3(3)
t
2
n2
+   + 3(n   1)
t
2
n2
:
As before we can simplify this to
3t2
n2
(0 + 1 + 2 +    + (n   1)) =
3t2
n2
n2   n
2
=
3
2
t
2
1
n
:
In the limit, as n gets larger, this gets closer and closer to (3=2)t
2
and the approximated
position of the object gets closer and closer to (3=2)t
2
+10, so the actual position is
(3=2)t
2
+10, exactly the answer given by the rst approach to the problem.
EXAMPLE 7.1.2 Find the area under the curve y = 3x between x = 0 and any positive
value x. There is here no obvious analogue to the rst approach in the previous example,
150
Chapter 7 Integration
but the second approach works ne. (Because the function y = 3x is so simple, there
is another approach that works here, but it is even more limited in potential application
than is approach number one.) How might we approximate the desired area? We know
how to compute areas of rectangles, so we approximate the area by rectangles. Jumping
straight to the general case, suppose we divide the interval between 0 and x into n equal
subintervals, and use a rectangle above each subinterval to approximate the area under
the curve. There are many ways we might do this, but let’s use the height of the curve
at the left endpoint of the subinterval as the height of the rectangle, as in gure 7.1.1.
The height of rectangle number i is then 3(i   1)(x=n), the width is x=n, and the area is
3(i   1)(x
2
=n
2
). The total area of the rectangles is
(0)
x
n
+3(1)
x
2
n2
+3(2)
x
2
n2
+3(3)
x
2
n2
+   + 3(n   1)
x
2
n2
:
By factoring out 3x
2
=n
2
this simplies to
3x
2
n2
(0 + 1 + 2 +    + (n   1)) =
3x
2
n2
n
2
n
2
=
3
2
x
2
1
n
:
As n gets larger this gets closer and closer to 3x
2
=2, which must therefore be the true area
under the curve.
:::
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
Figure 7.1.1
Approximating the area under y = 3x with rectangles. Drag the slider to
change the number of rectangles.
What you will have noticed, of course, is that while the problem in the second example
appears to be much dierent than the problem in the rst example, and while the easy
approach to problem one does not appear to apply to problem two, the \approximation"
approach works in both, and moreover the calculations are identical. As we will see, there
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested