devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Acrobat extract pages from pdf control SDK system web page wpf azure console Calculus15-part745

7.2 TheFundamentalTheoremofCalculus
151
aremany,manyproblemsthatappearmuchdierentonthesurfacebutthatturnoutto
bethesameastheseproblems,inthesensethatwhenwetrytoapproximatesolutionswe
endupwithmathematicsthatlookslikethetwoexamples,thoughofcoursethefunction
involvedwillnotalwaysbesosimple.
Evenbetter,wenowseethatwhilethesecondproblemdidnotappeartobeamenable
toapproachone,itcaninfactbesolvedinthesameway.Thereasoningisthis: weknow
that problemone canbe solvedeasilybyndinga functionwhose derivative is3t. . We
alsoknowthatmathematicallythetwoproblemsarethesame,becausebothcanbesolved
bytaking alimit ofasum,andthesumsareidentical. . Therefore,we e don’t reallyneed
tocomputethelimitofeithersumbecauseweknowthatwewillgetthesameanswerby
computingafunctionwiththederivative3tor,whichisthesamething,3x.
It’struethattherstproblemhadtheaddedcomplicationofthe\10",andwecertainly
needtobeabletodealwithsuchminorvariations,butthatturnsouttobequitesimple.
Thelessonthenisthis: wheneverwecansolveaproblembytakingthelimitofasumof
acertain form,wecan instead ofcomputing the(oftennasty)limitndanewfunction
withacertainderivative.
Exercises 7.1.
1. Suppose an objectmoves in astraight line so that itsspeed attime t is given by v(t) = 2t+2,
and that at t = 1 the object is at position 5. Find the position of the object at t = 2. )
2. Suppose an objectmovesin astraight line sothat its speed at time t is given by v(t) =t
2
+2,
and that at t = 0 the object is at position 5. Find the position of the object at t = 2. )
3. By a method similar to that in example7.1.2, nd the area under y = 2x between x= 0and
any positive value for x. )
4. By a method similar to that in example7.1.2, nd the area under y = 4x between x= 0and
any positive value for x. )
5. By a method similar to that in example7.1.2, nd the area under y = 4x between x= 2and
any positive value for x bigger than 2. )
6. By a method similar to that in example7.1.2, nd the area under y = 4x between any two
positive values for x, say a <b.)
7. Let f(x) = x
2
+3x+ 2. Approximate the area under the curve between x = 0 and x = 2
using 4 rectangles and also using 8 rectangles. )
8. Let f(x) = x
2
2x+ 3. Approximate the area under the curve between x = 1 and x = 3
using 4 rectangles. )
Let’s recast the rst example from the previous section. Suppose that the speed of the
object is 3t at time t. How far does the object travel between time t = a and time t = b?
We are no longer assuming that we know where the object is at time t = 0 or at any other
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract one page from pdf preview; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
cut paste pdf pages; delete page from pdf reader
152
Chapter 7 Integration
time. Itis certainlytruethat it is somewhere, solet’s suppose that att =0 the positionis k.
Then just as in the example,we knowthat the position of the object at any time is 3t
2
=2+k.
This means that at time t = a the position is 3a
2
=2+k and at time t = b the position is
3b
2
=2 +k. Therefore the change in position is 3b
2
=2 +k  (3a
2
=2+ k) = 3b
2
=2  3a
2
=2.
Notice that the k drops out; this means that it doesn’t matter that we don’t know k, it
doesn’t even matter if we use the wrong k, we get the correct answer. In other words, to
nd the change in position between time a and time b we can use any antiderivative of the
speed function 3t|it need not be the one antiderivative that actually gives the location of
the object.
What about the second approach to this problem, in the new form? We now want to
approximate the change in position between time a and time b. We take the interval of
time between a and b, divide it into n subintervals, and approximate the distance traveled
during each. The starting time of subinterval number i is now a+(i 1)(b a)=n, which
we abbreviate as t
i 1
,so that t
0
=a, t
1
=a + (b   a)=n, and so on. The speed of the
object is f(t) = 3t, and each subinterval is (b  a)=n = t seconds long. The distance
traveled during subinterval number i is approximately f(t
i 1
)t, and the total change in
distance is approximately
f(t
0
)t +f(t
1
)t++f(t
n 1
)t:
The exact change in position is the limit of this sum as n goes to innity. We abbreviate
this sum using sigma notation:
nX 1
i=0
f(t
i
)t =f(t
0
)t+f(t
1
)t++f(t
n 1
)t:
The notation on the left side of the equal sign uses a large capital sigma, a Greek letter,
and the left side is an abbreviation for the right side. The answer we seek is
lim
n!1
nX 1
i=0
f(t
i
)t:
Since this must be the same as the answer we have already obtained, we know that
lim
n!1
nX 1
i=0
f(t
i
)t =
3b
2
2
3a
2
2
:
The signicance of 3t
2
=2, into which we substitute t = b and t = a, is of course that it is
afunction whose derivative is f(t). As we have discussed, by the time we know that we
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
delete page from pdf preview; deleting pages from pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
deleting pages from pdf online; copy page from pdf
7.2 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
153
want to compute
lim
n!1
n 1
i=0
f(t
i
)t;
it no longer matters what f(t) stands for|it could be a speed, or the height of a curve,
or something else entirely. We know that the limit can be computed by nding any
function with derivative f(t), substituting a and b, and subtracting. We summarize this
in a theorem. First, we introduce some new notation and terms.
We write
Z
b
a
f(t)dt = lim
n!1
nX 1
i=0
f(t
i
)t
if the limit exists. That is, the left hand side means, or is an abbreviation for, the right
hand side. The symbol
R
is called an integral sign, and the whole expression is read
as \the integral of f(t) from a to b." What we have learned is that this integral can be
computed by nding a function, say F(t), with the property that F
0
(t) = f(t), and then
computing F(b)  F(a). The function F(t) is called an antiderivative of f(t). Now the
theorem:
THEOREM 7.2.1
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
Suppose that f(x) is
continuous on the interval [a;b]. If F(x) is any antiderivative of f(x), then
Z
b
a
f(x)dx =F(b)  F(a):
Let’s rewrite this slightly:
Z
x
a
f(t)dt = F(x) F(a):
We’ve replaced the variable x by tand b byx. These are just dierent names for quantities,
so the substitution doesn’t change the meaning. It does make it easier to think of the two
sides of the equation as functions. The expression
Z
x
a
f(t)dt
is a function: plug in a value for x, get out some other value. The expression F(x)  F(a)
is of course also a function, and it has a nice property:
d
dx
(F(x)  F(a)) =F
0
(x) = f(x);
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf in preview
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
copy pdf page to powerpoint; delete page from pdf acrobat
154
Chapter 7 Integration
since F(a) is a constant and has derivative zero. In other words, by shifting our point of
view slightly, we see that the odd looking function
G(x) =
Z
x
a
f(t)dt
has a derivative, and that in fact G
0
(x) = f(x). This is really just a restatement of the
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and indeed is often called the Fundamental Theorem
of Calculus. To avoid confusion, some people call the two versions of the theorem \The
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, part I" and \The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus,
part II", although unfortunately there is no universal agreement as to which is part I and
which part II. Since it really is the same theorem, dierently stated, some people simply
call them both \The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus."
THEOREM 7.2.2
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
Suppose that f(x) is
continuous on the interval [a;b] and let
G(x) =
Z
x
a
f(t)dt:
Then G
0
(x) = f(x).
We have not really proved the Fundamental Theorem. In a nutshell, we gave the
following argument to justify it: Suppose we want to know the value of
Z
b
a
f(t)dt = lim
n!1
nX 1
i=0
f(t
i
)t:
We can interpret the right hand side as the distance traveled by an object whose speed
is given by f(t). We know another way to compute the answer to such a problem: nd
the position of the object by nding an antiderivative of f(t), then substitute t = a and
t= b and subtract to nd the distance traveled. This must be the answer to the original
problem as well, even if f(t) does not represent a speed.
What’s wrong with this? In some sense, nothing. As a practical matter it is a very
convincing argument, because our understanding of the relationship between speed and
distance seems to be quite solid. From the point of view of mathematics, however, it
is unsatisfactory to justify a purely mathematical relationship by appealing to our un-
derstanding of the physical universe, which could, however unlikely it is in this case, be
wrong.
Acomplete proof is a bit too involved to include here, but we will indicate how it goes.
First, if we can prove the second version of the Fundamental Theorem, theorem7.2.2, then
we can prove the rst version from that:
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages of pdf reader; extract one page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete pages from pdf preview; delete page from pdf document
7.2 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
155
Proof of Theorem7.2.1.
We know from theorem7.2.2 that
G(x) =
Z
x
a
f(t)dt
is an antiderivative of f(x), and therefore any antiderivative F(x) of f(x) is of the form
F(x) =G(x) +k. Then
F(b)  F(a) = G(b) +k  (G(a)+k) =G(b)  G(a)
=
Z
b
a
f(t)dt 
Z
a
a
f(t)dt:
It is not hard to see that
Z
a
a
f(t)dt = 0, so this means that
F(b)  F(a) =
Z
b
a
f(t)dt;
which is exactly what theorem7.2.1 says.
So the real job is to prove theorem7.2.2. We will sketch the proof, using some facts
that we do not prove. First, the following identity is true of integrals:
Z
b
a
f(t)dt =
Z
c
a
f(t)dt+
Z
b
c
f(t)dt:
This can be proved directly from the denition of the integral, that is, using the limits
of sums. It is quite easy to see that it must be true by thinking of either of the two
applications of integrals that we have seen. It turns out that the identity is true no matter
what c is, but it is easiest to think about the meaning when a c b.
First, if f(t) represents a speed, then we know that the three integrals represent the
distance traveled between time a and time b; the distance traveled between time a and
time c; and the distance traveled between time c and time b. Clearly the sum of the latter
two is equal to the rst of these.
Second, if f(t) represents the height of a curve, the three integrals represent the area
under the curve between a and b; the area under the curve between a and c; and the area
under the curve between c and b. Again it is clear from the geometry that the rst is equal
to the sum of the second and third.
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
extract pdf pages; delete page from pdf file
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
add and delete pages from pdf; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
156
Chapter 7 Integration
Proof sketch for Theorem 7.2.2.
We want to compute G
0
(x), so we start with the
denition of the derivative in terms of a limit:
G
0
(x) = lim
x!0
G(x +x)  G(x)
x
= lim
x!0
1
x
Z
x+x
a
f(t)dt 
Z
x
a
f(t)dt
!
= lim
x!0
1
x
Z
x
a
f(t)dt +
Z
x+x
x
f(t)dt  
Z
x
a
f(t)dt
!
= lim
x!0
1
x
Z
x+x
x
f(t)dt:
Now we need to know something about
Z
x+x
x
f(t)dt
when x is small; in fact, it is very close to xf(x), but we will not prove this. Once
again, it is easy to believe this is true by thinking of our two applications: The integral
Z
x+x
x
f(t)dt
can be interpreted as the distance traveled by an object over a very short interval of time.
Over a suciently short period of time, the speed of the object will not change very much,
so the distance traveled willbe approximately the length of time multiplied by the speed at
the beginning of the interval, namely, xf(x). Alternately,the integralmay be interpreted
as the area under the curve between x and x + x. When x is very small, this will be
very close to the area of the rectangle with base x and height f(x); again this is xf(x).
If we accept this, we may proceed:
lim
x!0
1
x
Z
x+x
x
f(t)dt = lim
x!0
xf(x)
x
=f(x);
which is what we wanted to show.
It is still true that we are depending on an interpretation of the integral to justify the
argument, but we have isolated this part of the argument into two facts that are not too
hard to prove. Once the last reference to interpretation has been removed from the proofs
of these facts, we will have a real proof of the Fundamental Theorem.
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any Convert all pages or certain pages chosen by users; download & perpetual update. Start Image DICOM PDF Converting.
crop all pages of pdf; deleting pages from pdf in preview
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support conversion of Bitmap - PDF files in both single & batch mode; Convert all pages or certain
extract pages from pdf document; delete pages from pdf
7.2 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
157
Now we know that to solve certain kinds of problems, those that lead to a sum of a
certain form, we \merely" nd an antiderivative and substitute two values and subtract.
Unfortunately,nding antiderivatives can be quitedicult. While thereare a smallnumber
of rules that allow us to compute the derivative of any common function, there are no such
rules for antiderivatives. There are some techniques that frequently prove useful, but we
will never be able to reduce the problem to a completely mechanical process.
Because of the close relationship between an integraland an antiderivative,the integral
sign is also used to mean \antiderivative". You can tell which is intended by whether the
limits of integration are included:
Z
2
1
x
2
dx
is an ordinary integral, also called a denite integral, because it has a denite value,
namely
Z
2
1
x
2
dx =
2
3
3
1
3
3
=
7
3
:
We use
Z
x
2
dx
to denote the antiderivative of x
2
,also called an indenite integral. So this is evaluated
as
Z
x
2
dx =
x3
3
+C:
It is customary to include the constant C to indicate that there are really an innite
number of antiderivatives. We do not need this C to compute denite integrals, but in
other circumstances we will need to remember that the C is there, so it is best to get
into the habit of writing the C. When we compute a denite integral, we rst nd an
antiderivative and then substitute. It is convenient to rst display the antiderivative and
then do the substitution; we need a notation indicating that the substitution is yet to be
done. A typical solution would look like this:
Z
2
1
x
2
dx =
x
3
3
2
1
=
2
3
3
1
3
3
=
7
3
:
Theverticalline withsubscript and superscript isusedto indicate theoperation\substitute
and subtract" that is needed to nish the evaluation.
158
Chapter 7 Integration
Exercises 7.2.
Find the antiderivatives of the functions:
1. 8
p
x)
2. 3t
2
+1)
3. 4=
p
x)
4. 2=z
2
)
5. 7s
1
)
6. (5x+1)
2
)
7. (x 6)
2
)
8. x
3=2
)
9.
2
x
p
x
)
10. j2t 4j)
Compute the values of the integrals:
11.
Z
4
1
t
2
+3tdt)
12.
Z
0
sintdt)
13.
Z
10
1
1
x
dx)
14.
Z
5
0
e
x
dx)
15.
Z
3
0
x
3
dx)
16.
Z
2
1
x
5
dx)
17. Find the derivative of G(x) =
Z
x
1
t
2
3tdt)
18. Find the derivative of G(x) =
Z
x
2
1
t
2
3tdt)
19. Find the derivative of G(x) =
Z
x
1
e
t
2
dt)
20. Find the derivative of G(x) =
Z
x
2
1
e
t
2
dt)
21. Find the derivative of G(x) =
Z
x
1
tan(t
2
)dt)
22. Find the derivative of G(x) =
Z
x
2
1
tan(t
2
)dt)
Suppose an object moves so that its speed, or more properly velocity, is given by v(t) =
t
2
+5t, as shown in gure 7.3.1. Let’s examine the motion of this object carefully.
We know that the velocity is the derivative of position, so position is given by s(t) =
t
3
=3 + 5t
2
=2 + C. Let’s suppose that at time t = 0 the object is at position 0, so
s(t) =  t
3
=3+5t
2
=2; this function is also pictured in gure7.3.1.
Between t = 0 and t = 5 the velocity is positive, so the object moves away from the
starting point, until it is a bit past position 20. Then the velocity becomes negative and
the object moves back toward its starting point. The position of the object at t = 5 is
7.3 Some Properties of Integrals
159
6
4
2
0
2
4
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
.....
.....
.......
...........................
.......
.....
.....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
.
0
5
10
15
20
1
2
3
4
5
6
..........
.......
......
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
.....
......
............
....
............
.....
.....
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
Figure 7.3.1
The velocity of an object and its position.
exactly s(5) = 125=6, and at t = 6 it is s(6) = 18. The total distance traveled by the
object is therefore 125=6 +(125=6 18) = 71=3  23:7.
As we have seen, we can also compute distance traveled with an integral; let’s try it.
Z
6
0
v(t)dt =
Z
6
0
t
2
+5tdt =
t
3
3
+
5
2
t
2
6
0
=18:
What went wrong? Well, nothing really, except that it’s not really true after all that \we
can also compute distance traveled with anintegral". Instead, as you might guess from this
example, the integral actually computes the net distance traveled, that is, the dierence
between the starting and ending point.
As we have already seen,
Z
6
0
v(t)dt =
Z
5
0
v(t)dt+
Z
6
5
v(t)dt:
Computing the two integrals on the right (do it!) gives 125=6 and  17=6, and the sum of
these is indeed 18. But what does that negative sign mean? It means precisely what you
might think: it means that the object moves backwards. To get the total distance traveled
we can add 125=6+17=6 =71=3, the same answer we got before.
Remember that we can also interpret an integral as measuring an area, but now we
see that this too is a little more complicated that we have suspected. The area under the
curve v(t) from 0 to 5 is given by
Z
5
0
v(t)dt =
125
6
;
and the \area" from 5 to 6 is
Z
6
5
v(t)dt =  
17
6
:
160
Chapter 7 Integration
In other words, the area between the x-axis and the curve, but under the x-axis, \counts
as negative area". So the integral
Z
6
0
v(t)dt = 18
measures \net area", the area above the axis minus the (positive) area below the axis.
If we recall that the integral is the limit of a certain kind of sum, this behavior is not
surprising. Recall the sort of sum involved:
n 1
i=0
v(t
i
)t:
In each term v(t)t the t is positive, but if v(t
i
)is negative then the term is negative. If
over an entire interval, like 5 to 6, the function is always negative, then the entire sum is
negative. In terms of area, v(t)t is then a negative height times a positive width, giving
anegative rectangle \area".
So now we see that when evaluating
Z
6
5
v(t)dt =  
17
6
by nding an antiderivative, substituting, and subtracting, we get a surprising answer, but
one that turns out to make sense.
Let’s now try something a bit dierent:
Z
5
6
v(t)dt =
t
3
3
+
5
2
t
2
5
6
=
5
3
3
+
5
2
5
2
6
3
3
5
2
6
2
=
17
6
:
Here we simply interchanged the limits 5 and 6, so of course when we substitute and
subtract we’re subtracting in the opposite order and we end up multiplying the answer
by  1. This too makes sense in terms of the underlying sum, though it takes a bit more
thought. Recall that in the sum
n 1
i=0
v(t
i
)t;
the t is the \length" of each little subinterval, but more precisely we could say that
t = t
i+1
t
i
,the dierence between two endpoints of a subinterval. We have until now
assumed that we were working left to right, but could as well number the subintervals from
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested