9.1 Area a betweencurves
191
0
5
10
0
1
2
3
..
...
....
...
....
...
...
....
...
....
....
...
....
....
...
....
....
....
...
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
....
.....
....
....
.....
.....
....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
......
......
......
......
.......
......
.......
.......
........
........
........
.........
..........
...........
.............
..............
...................
.....................................
...................
.....................................
...................
..............
.............
..........
..........
.........
.........
........
.......
........
.......
......
.......
......
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
..
...
....
...
...
...
....
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
.......
.......
...........
.................................
............
........
......
.......
.....
.....
.....
....
.....
....
....
....
...
....
....
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
Figure 9.1.2
Approximating area between curves with rectangles.
EXAMPLE 9.1.2
Find the area below f (x) =  x
2
+4x + 1 and above g(x) =  x
3
+
7x
2
10x + 3 over the interval 1  x  2; these are the same curves as before but lowered
by 2. In gure9.1.3 we show the two curves together. Note that the lower curve now dips
below the x-axis. This makes it somewhat tricky to view the desired area as a big area
minus a smaller area, but it is just as easy as before to think of approximating the area
by rectangles. The height of a typical rectangle will still be f(x
i
 g(x
i
), even if g(x
i
)is
negative. Thus the area is
Z
2
1
x
2
+4x + 1   ( x
3
+7x
2
10x + 3) dx =
Z
2
1
x
3
8x
2
+14x   2 dx:
This is of course the same integral as before, because the region between the curves is
identical to the former region|it has just been moved down by 2.
x
y
0
1
2
3
0
5
10
Figure 9.1.3
Area between curves.
EXAMPLE 9.1.3 Find the area between f(x) =  x
2
+4x and g(x) = x
2
6x + 5 over
the interval 0  x  1; the curves are shown in gure9.1.4. Generally we should interpret
Extract pages pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf file; delete page from pdf document
Extract pages pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
convert few pages of pdf to word; extract one page from pdf
192
Chapter 9 Applications of Integration
\area" in the usual sense, as a necessarily positive quantity. Since the two curves cross,
we need to compute two areas and add them. First we nd the intersection point of the
curves:
x
2
+4x = x
2
6x + 5
0= 2x
2
10x + 5
x=
10 
p
100   40
4
=
5
p
15
2
:
The intersection point we want is x = a = (5  
p
15)=2. Then the total area is
Z
a
0
x
2
6x + 5   ( x
2
+4x) dx +
Z
1
a
x
2
+4x   (x
2
6x + 5) dx
=
Z
a
0
2x
2
10x + 5 dx +
Z
1
a
2x
2
+10x   5 dx
=
2x
3
3
5x
2
+5x
a
0
2x
3
3
+5x
2
5x
1
a
52
3
+5
p
15;
after a bit of simplication.
x
y
0
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
Figure 9.1.4
Area between curves that cross.
EXAMPLE 9.1.4
Find the area between f(x) =  x
2
+4x and g(x) = x
2
6x + 5;
the curves are shown in gure9.1.5. Here we are not given a specic interval, so it must
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
add remove pages from pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
extract page from pdf; copy pdf page into word doc
9.1 Area between curves
193
be the case that there is a \natural" region involved. Since the curves are both parabolas,
the only reasonable interpretation is the region between the two intersection points, which
we found in the previous example:
5
p
15
2
:
If we let a = (5  
p
15)=2 and b = (5 +
p
15)=2, the total area is
Z
b
a
x
2
+4x   (x
2
6x + 5) dx =
Z
b
a
2x
2
+10x   5 dx
2x
3
3
+5x
2
5x
b
a
=5
p
15:
after a bit of simplication.
5
0
5
1
2
3
4
5
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
....
....
...
....
....
.....
....
....
.....
.....
......
......
.......
.......
.........
..............
......................................
.............
.........
........
......
.......
.....
.....
.....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
...
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
...
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.......
......
........
..........
..............
..................................
..............
.........
........
.......
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
....
.....
....
....
...
....
....
...
....
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
Figure 9.1.5
Area bounded by two curves.
Exercises 9.1.
Find the area bounded by the curves.
1. y = x
4
x
2
and y = x
2
(the part to the right of the y-axis))
2. x = y
3
and x = y
2
)
3. x = 1   y
2
and y =  x   1)
4. x = 3y   y
2
and x + y = 3)
5. y = cos(x=2) and y = 1   x
2
(in the rst quadrant))
6. y = sin(x=3) and y = x (in the rst quadrant))
7. y =
p
xand y = x
2
)
8. y =
p
xand y =
p
x+ 1, 0  x  4)
9. x = 0 and x = 25   y
2
)
10. y = sin x cos x and y = sin x, 0  x  )
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
delete page from pdf online; cut pages out of pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
reader extract pages from pdf; extract pages from pdf files
194
Chapter 9 Applications of Integration
11. y = x
3=2
and y = x
2=3
)
12. y = x
2
2x and y = x   2)
The following three exercises expand on the geometric interpretation of the hyperbolic functions.
Refer to section4.11 and particularly to gure4.11.2 and exercise6 in section4.11.
13. Compute
Z
p
x2   1 dx using the substitution u = arccosh x, or x = cosh u; use exercise6
in section 4.11.
14. Fix t > 0. Sketch the region R in the right half plane bounded by the curves y = xtanh t,
y=  xtanh t, and x
2
y
2
=1. Note well: t is xed, the plane is the x-y plane.
15. Prove that the area of R is t.
We next recall a general principle that will later be applied to distance-velocity-acceleration
problems, among other things. If F (u) is an anti-derivative of f(u), then
Z
b
a
f(u) du =
F(b)   F (a). Suppose that we want to let the upper limit of integration vary, i.e., we
replace b by some variable x. We think of a as a xed starting value x
0
. In this new
notation the last equation (after adding F (a) to both sides) becomes:
F(x) = F (x
0
)+
Z
x
x
0
f(u) du:
(Here u is the variable of integration, called a \dummy variable," since it is not the variable
in the function F (x). In general, it is not a good idea to use the same letter as a variable
of integration and as a limit of integration. That is,
Z
x
x
0
f(x)dx is bad notation, and can
lead to errors and confusion.)
An important application of this principle occurs when we are interested in the position
of an object at time t (say, on the x-axis) and we know its position at time t
0
. Let s(t)
denote the position of the object at time t (its distance from a reference point, such as
the origin on the x-axis). Then the net change in position between t
0
and t is s(t)   s(t
0
).
Since s(t) is an anti-derivative of the velocity function v(t), we can write
s(t) = s(t
0
)+
Z
t
t
0
v(u)du:
Similarly, since the velocity is an anti-derivative of the acceleration function a(t), we have
v(t) = v(t
0
)+
Z
t
t
0
a(u)du:
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
cut pdf pages; delete pages of pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
deleting pages from pdf file; extract one page from pdf file
9.2 Distance, Velocity, Acceleration
195
EXAMPLE 9.2.1
Suppose an object is acted upon by a constant force F . Find v(t)
and s(t). By Newton’s law F = ma, so the acceleration is F=m, where m is the mass of
the object. Then we rst have
v(t) = v(t
0
)+
Z
t
t
0
F
m
du = v
0
+
F
m
u
t
t
0
=v
0
+
F
m
(t   t
0
);
using the usual convention v
0
=v(t
0
). Then
s(t) = s(t
0
)+
Z
t
t
0
v
0
+
F
m
(u   t
0
)
du = s
0
+(v
0
u+
F
2m
(u   t
0
)
2
)
t
t
0
=s
0
+v
0
(t   t
0
)+
F
2m
(t   t
0
)
2
:
For instance, when F =m =  g is the constant of gravitational acceleration, then this is
the falling body formula (if we neglect air resistance) familiar from elementary physics:
s
0
+v
0
(t   t
0
g
2
(t   t
0
)
2
;
or in the common case that t
0
=0,
s
0
+v
0
g
2
t
2
:
Recall that the integral of the velocity function gives the net distance traveled. If you
want to know the total distance traveled, you must nd out where the velocity function
crosses the t-axis, integrate separately over the time intervals when v(t) is positive and
when v(t) is negative, and add up the absolute values of the dierent integrals. For
example, if an object is thrown straight upward at 19.6 m/sec, its velocity function is
v(t) =  9:8t + 19:6, using g = 9:8 m/sec for the force of gravity. This is a straight line
which is positive for t < 2 and negative for t > 2. The net distance traveled in the rst 4
seconds is thus
Z
4
0
( 9:8t + 19:6)dt = 0;
while the total distance traveled in the rst 4 seconds is
Z
2
0
( 9:8t + 19:6)dt +
Z
4
2
( 9:8t + 19:6)dt
=19:6 + j   19:6j = 39:2
meters, 19:6 meters up and 19:6 meters down.
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
extract page from pdf acrobat; extract page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
copy web pages to pdf; acrobat export pages from pdf
196
Chapter 9 Applications of Integration
EXAMPLE 9.2.2
The acceleration of an object is given by a(t) = cos(t), and its
velocity at time t = 0 is 1=(2). Find both the net and the total distance traveled in the
rst 1.5 seconds.
We compute
v(t) = v(0) +
Z
t
0
cos(u)du =
1
2
+
1
sin(u)
t
0
=
1
1
2
+sin(t)
:
The net distance traveled is then
s(3=2)   s(0) =
Z
3=2
0
1
1
2
+sin(t)
dt
=
1
t
2
1
cos(t)

3=2
0
=
3
4
+
1
2
0:340 meters.
To nd the total distance traveled, we need to know when (0:5 + sin(t)) is positive and
when it is negative. This function is 0 when sin(t) is  0:5, i.e., when t = 7=6, 11=6,
etc. The value t = 7=6, i.e., t = 7=6, is the only value in the range 0  t  1:5. Since
v(t) > 0 for t < 7=6 and v(t) < 0 for t > 7=6, the total distance traveled is
Z
7=6
0
1
1
2
+sin(t)
dt +
Z
3=2
7=6
1
1
2
+sin(t)
dt
=
1
7
12
+
1
cos(7=6) +
1
+
1
3
4
7
12
+
1
cos(7=6)
=
1
7
12
+
1
p
3
2
+
1
!
+
1
3
4
7
12
+
1
p
3
2
:
0:409 meters.
Exercises 9.2.
For each velocity function nd both the net distance and the total distance traveled during the
indicated time interval (graph v(t) to determine when it’s positive and when it’s negative):
1. v = cos(t), 0  t  2:5)
2. v =  9:8t + 49, 0  t  10)
3. v = 3(t   3)(t   1), 0  t  5)
4. v = sin(t=3)   t, 0  t  1)
5. An object is shot upwards from ground level with an initial velocity of 2 meters per second;
it is subject only to the force of gravity (no air resistance). Find its maximum altitude and
the time at which it hits the ground. )
6. An object is shot upwards from ground level with an initial velocity of 3 meters per second;
it is subject only to the force of gravity (no air resistance). Find its maximum altitude and
the time at which it hits the ground. )
9.3 Volume
197
7. An object is shot upwards from ground level with an initial velocity of 100 meters per second;
it is subject only to the force of gravity (no air resistance). Find its maximum altitude and
the time at which it hits the ground. )
8. An object moves along a straight line with acceleration given by a(t) =   cos(t), and s(0) = 1
and v(0) = 0. Find the maximum distance the object travels from zero, and nd its maximum
speed. Describe the motion of the object. )
9. An object moves along a straight line with acceleration given by a(t) = sin(t). Assume that
when t = 0, s(t) = v(t) = 0. Find s(t), v(t), and the maximum speed of the object. Describe
the motion of the object. )
10. An object moves along a straight line with acceleration given by a(t) = 1 + sin(t). Assume
that when t = 0, s(t) = v(t) = 0. Find s(t) and v(t). )
11. An object moves along a straight line with acceleration given by a(t) = 1   sin(t). Assume
that when t = 0, s(t) = v(t) = 0. Find s(t) and v(t). )
We have seen how to compute certain areas by using integration; some volumes may also
be computed by evaluating an integral. Generally, the volumes that we can compute this
way have cross-sections that are easy to describe.
x
i
y
i
!
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
.
.
.
Figure 9.3.1
Volume of a pyramid approximated by rectangular prisms. (AP)
EXAMPLE 9.3.1
Find the volume of a pyramid with a square base that is 20 meters
tall and 20 meters on a side at the base. As with most of our applications of integration, we
begin by asking how we might approximate the volume. Since we can easily compute the
volume of a rectangular prism (that is, a \box"), we will use some boxes to approximate
198
Chapter 9 Applications of Integration
the volume of the pyramid, as shown in gure9.3.1: on the left is a cross-sectional view, on
the right is a 3D view of part of the pyramid with some of the boxes used to approximate
the volume.
Each box has volume of the form (2x
i
)(2x
i
)y. Unfortunately, there are two variables
here; fortunately, we can write x in terms of y: x = 10   y=2 or x
i
=10   y
i
=2. Then the
total volume is approximately
n 1
i=0
4(10   y
i
=2)
2
y
and in the limit we get the volume as the value of an integral:
Z
20
0
4(10   y=2)
2
dy =
Z
20
0
(20   y)
2
dy =  
(20   y)
3
3
20
0
0
3
3
20
3
3
=
8000
3
:
As you may know, the volume of a pyramid is (1=3)(height)(area of base) = (1=3)(20)(400),
which agrees with our answer.
EXAMPLE 9.3.2
The base of a solid is the region between f (x) = x
2
1 and g(x) =
x
2
+1, and its cross-sections perpendicular to the x-axis are equilateral triangles, as
indicated in gure9.3.2. The solid has been truncated to show a triangular cross-section
above x = 1=2. Find the volume of the solid.
1
1
1
1
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
......
.....
.....
.........
............................
.........
.....
.....
......
...
....
...
...
....
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
....
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
....
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
....
...
...
....
...
....
.....
......
.....
.........
..........................
.........
.....
......
.....
....
...
....
...
...
....
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
....
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
....
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
Figure 9.3.2
Solid with equilateral triangles as cross-sections. (AP)
Across-section at a value x
i
on the x-axis is a triangle with base 2(1   x
2
i
)and height
p
3(1   x
2
i
), so the area of the cross-section is
1
2
(base)(height) = (1   x
2
i
)
p
3(1   x
2
i
);
9.3 Volume
199
and the volume of a thin \slab" is then
(1   x
2
i
)
p
3(1   x
2
i
)x:
Thus the total volume is
Z
1
1
p
3(1   x
2
)
2
dx =
16
15
p
3:
One easy way to get \nice" cross-sections is by rotating a plane gure around a line.
For example, in gure9.3.3 we see a plane region under a curve and between two vertical
lines; then the result of rotating this around the x-axis, and a typical circular cross-section.
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
...
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
...
..
.
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
...
...
...
.....................
...
....
....
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
..
....
..
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
....
...
....
...
.....
.................
.....
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
Figure 9.3.3
Asolid of rotation. (AP)
Of course a real \slice" of this gure will not have straight sides, but we can approxi-
mate the volume of the slice by a cylinder or disk with circular top and bottom and straight
sides; the volume of this disk will have the form r
2
x. As long as we can write r in terms
of x we can compute the volume by an integral.
EXAMPLE 9.3.3
Find the volume of a right circular cone with base radius 10 and
height 20. (A right circular cone is one with a circular base and with the tip of the cone
directly over the center of the base.) We can view this cone as produced by the rotation
of the line y = x=2 rotated about the x-axis, as indicated in gure9.3.4.
At a particular point on the x-axis, say x
i
, the radius of the resulting cone is the
y-coordinate of the corresponding point on the line, namely y
i
=x
i
=2. Thus the total
volume is approximately
nX 1
i=0
(x
i
=2)
2
dx
and the exact volume is
Z
20
0
x2
4
dx =
4
203
3
=
2000
3
:
200
Chapter 9 Applications of Integration
0
20
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
...
....
..
Figure 9.3.4
Aregion that generates a cone; approximating the volume by circular disks.
(AP)
Note that we can instead do the calculation with a generic height and radius:
Z
h
0
r
2
h2
x
2
dx =
r
2
h2
h
3
3
=
r
2
h
3
;
giving us the usual formula for the volume of a cone.
EXAMPLE 9.3.4
Find the volume of the object generated when the area between
y= x
2
and y = x is rotated around the x-axis. This solid has a \hole" in the middle; we
can compute the volume by subtracting the volume of the hole from the volume enclosed
by the outer surface of the solid. In gure9.3.5 we show the region that is rotated, the
resulting solid with the front half cut away, the cone that forms the outer surface, the
horn-shaped hole, and a cross-section perpendicular to the x-axis.
We have already computed the volume of a cone; in this case it is =3. At a particular
value of x, say x
i
,the cross-section of the horn is a circle with radius x
2
i
,so the volume of
the horn is
Z
1
0
(x
2
)
2
dx =
Z
1
0
x
4
dx = 
1
5
;
so the desired volume is =3   =5 = 2=15.
As with the area between curves, there is an alternate approach that computes the
desired volume \all at once" by approximating the volume of the actual solid. We can
approximate the volume of a slice of the solid with a washer-shaped volume, as indicated
in gure9.3.5.
The volume of such a washer is the area of the face times the thickness. The thickness,
as usual, is x, while the area of the face is the area of the outer circle minus the area of
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested