devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Extract pdf pages reader Library application component .net windows asp.net mvc Calculus2-part750

1.3 Functions
21
isalsotruethatifxisanynumbernot1thereisnoywhichcorrespondstox,butthatis
notaproblem|onlymultipleyvaluesisaproblem.
Inadditiontolines,anotherfamiliarexampleofafunctionistheparabolay=f(x)=
x
2
. Wecandrawthegraphofthisfunctionbytakingvariousvaluesofx(say,atregular
intervals) and plotting the points(x;f(x)) = = (x;x
2
). Then n connect the pointswith a
smoothcurve.(Seegure1.3.1.)
The twoexamplesy=f(x) =2x+1 and y=f(x) =x
2
arebothfunctionswhich
canbeevaluated atanyvalue ofxfromnegativeinnityto positive innity. . Formany
functions, however, it t only y makes sense to o take x x in some interval or outside e of f some
\forbidden"region.Theintervalofx-valuesatwhichwe’reallowedtoevaluatethefunction
iscalledthedomainofthefunction.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
....
....
...
.....
.....
.....
.......
...........
.......................
...........
.......
......
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
y= f (x) = x
2
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
...
....
....
....
.....
....
.....
.....
......
.....
.......
......
.......
....
y= f (x) =
p
x
...........
...........
.........
.......
.......
......
.....
....
.....
...
....
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
...
..
...
...
....
....
....
.....
.....
......
.......
.......
..........
...........
........
y= f(x) = 1=x
Figure 1.3.1
Some graphs.
For example, the square-root function y = f (x) =
p
xis the rule which says, given an
x-value, take the nonnegative number whose square is x. This rule only makes sense if x
is positive or zero. We say that the domain of this function is x  0, or more formally
fx 2 R j x  0g. Alternately, we can use interval notation, and write that the domain is
[0; 1). (In interval notation, square brackets mean that the endpoint is included, and a
parenthesis means that the endpoint is not included.) The fact that the domain of y =
p
x
is [0; 1) means that in the graph of this function ((see gure1.3.1) we have points (x; y)
only above x-values on the right side of the x-axis.
Another example of a function whose domain is not the entire x-axis is: y = f (x) =
1=x, the reciprocal function. We cannot substitute x = 0 in this formula. The function
makes sense, however, for any nonzero x, so we take the domain to be: fx 2 R j x 6= 0g.
The graph of this function does not have any point (x; y) with x = 0. As x gets close to
0from either side, the graph goes o toward innity. We call the vertical line x = 0 an
asymptote.
To summarize, two reasons why certain x-values are excluded from the domain of a
function are that (i) we cannot divide by zero, and (ii) we cannot take the square root
Extract pdf pages reader - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pdf pages for; add and delete pages from pdf
Extract pdf pages reader - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy pdf pages to another pdf; extract pages from pdf file online
22
Chapter 1 Analytic Geometry
of a negative number. We will encounter some other ways in which functions might be
undened later.
Another reason why the domain of a function might be restricted is that in a given
situation the x-values outside of some range might have no practical meaning. For example,
if y is the area of a square of side x, then we can write y = f (x) = x
2
. In a purely
mathematical context the domain of the function y = x
2
is all of R. But in the story-
problem context of nding areas of squares, we restrict the domain to positive values of x,
because a square with negative or zero side makes no sense.
In a problem in pure mathematics, we usually take the domain to be all values of x
at which the formulas can be evaluated. But in a story problem there might be further
restrictions on the domain because only certain values of x are of interest or make practical
sense.
In a story problem, often letters dierent from x and y are used. For example, the
volume V of a sphere is a function of the radius r, given by the formula V = f(r) =
4
=
3
r
3
.
Also, letters dierent from f may be used. For example, if y is the velocity of something
at time t, we may write y = v(t) with the letter v (instead of f ) standing for the velocity
function (and t playing the role of x).
The letter playing the role of x is called the independent variable, and the letter
playing the role of y is called the dependent variable (because its value \depends on"
the value of the independent variable). In story problems, when one has to translate from
English into mathematics, a crucial step is to determine what letters stand for variables.
If only words and no letters are given, then we have to decide which letters to use. Some
letters are traditional. For example, almost always, t stands for time.
EXAMPLE 1.3.1 An open-top box is made from an ab rectangular piece of cardboard
by cutting out a square of side x from each of the four corners, and then folding the sides
up and sealing them with duct tape. Find a formula for the volume V of the box as a
function of x, and nd the domain of this function.
The box we get will have height x and rectangular base of dimensions a 2x by b  2x.
Thus,
V = f (x) = x(a   2x)(b   2x):
Here a and b are constants, and V is the variable that depends on x, i.e., V is playing the
role of y.
This formula makes mathematical sense for any x, but in the story problem the domain
is much less. In the rst place, x must be positive. In the second place, it must be less
than half the length of either of the sides of the cardboard. Thus, the domain is
fx 2 R j 0 < x <
1
2
(minimum of a and b)g:
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
deleting pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf preview
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; deleting pages from pdf in reader
1.3 Functions
23
In interval notation we write: the domain is the interval (0; min(a; b)=2). (You might think
about whether we could allow 0 or min(a; b)=2 to be in the domain. They make a certain
physical sense, though we normally would not call the result a box. If we were to allow
these values, what would the corresponding volumes be? Does that make sense?)
EXAMPLE 1.3.2
Circle of radius r centered at the origin
The equation for
this circle is usually given in the form x
2
+y
2
=r
2
. To write the equation in the form
y = f (x) we solve for y, obtaining y = 
p
r2   x2. But this is not a function, because
when we substitute a value in ( r; r) for x there are two corresponding values of y. To get
afunction, we must choose one of the two signs in front of the square root. If we choose
the positive sign, for example, we get the upper semicircle y = f(x) =
p
r2   x2 (see
gure1.3.2). The domain of this function is the interval [ r; r], i.e., x must be between  r
and r (including the endpoints). If x is outside of that interval, then r
2
x
2
is negative,
and we cannot take the square root. In terms of the graph, this just means that there are
no points on the curve whose x-coordinate is greater than r or less than  r.
r
r
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
......
.....
.......
......
.........
..........
.................
........................
..................
..........
........
.......
......
......
.....
.....
....
.....
....
....
....
...
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
Figure 1.3.2
Upper semicircle y =
p
r2   x2
EXAMPLE 1.3.3
Find the domain of
y= f(x) =
1
p
4x   x2
:
To answer this question, we must rule out the x-values that make 4x  x2 negative (because
we cannot take the square root of a negative number) and also the x-values that make
4x   x
2
zero (because if 4x   x
2
=0, then when we take the square root we get 0, and
we cannot divide by 0). In other words, the domain consists of all x for which 4x   x2 is
strictly positive. We give two dierent methods to nd out when 4x   x
2
>0.
First method. Factor 4x   x
2
as x(4   x). The product of two numbers is positive
when either both are positive or both are negative, i.e., if either x > 0 and 4   x > 0,
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
cut pages from pdf online; delete pages from pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
extract one page from pdf preview; extract pdf pages
24
Chapter 1 Analytic Geometry
or else x < 0 and 4   x < 0. The latter alternative is impossible, since if x is negative,
then 4   x is greater than 4, and so cannot be negative. As for the rst alternative, the
condition 4   x > 0 can be rewritten (adding x to both sides) as 4 > x, so we need: x > 0
and 4 > x (this is sometimes combined in the form 4 > x > 0, or, equivalently, 0 < x < 4).
In interval notation, this says that the domain is the interval (0; 4).
Second method. Write 4x   x
2
as  (x
2
4x), and then complete the square,
obtaining  
(x   2)
2
4
=4   (x   2)
2
. For this to be positive we need (x   2)
2
<4,
which means that x  2 must be less than 2 and greater than  2:  2 < x  2 < 2. Adding
2to everything gives 0 < x < 4. Both of these methods are equally correct; you may use
either in a problem of this type.
Afunction does not always have to be given by a single formula, as we have already
seen (in the income tax problem, for example). Suppose that y = v(t) is the velocity
function for a car which starts out from rest (zero velocity) at time t = 0; then increases
its speed steadily to 20 m/sec, taking 10 seconds to do this; then travels at constant speed
20 m/sec for 15 seconds; and nally applies the brakes to decrease speed steadily to 0,
taking 5 seconds to do this. The formula for y = v(t) is dierent in each of the three time
intervals: rst y = 2x, then y = 20, then y =  4x + 120. The graph of this function is
shown in gure1.3.3.
10
25
30
0
10
20
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
t
v
Figure 1.3.3
Avelocity function.
Not all functions are given by formulas at all. A function can be given by an ex-
perimentally determined table of values, or by a description other than a formula. For
example, the population y of the U.S. is a function of the time t: we can write y = f(t).
This is a perfectly good function|we could graph it (up to the present) if we had data for
various t|but we can’t nd an algebraic formula for it.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
cut pages from pdf file; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
copy web page to pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat
1.4 Shifts and Dilations
25
Exercises 1.3.
Find the domain of each of the following functions:
1. y = f(x) =
p
2x   3)
2. y = f(x) = 1=(x + 1))
3. y = f(x) = 1=(x
2
1))
4. y = f(x) =
p
1=x)
5. y = f(x) =
3
p
x)
6. y = f(x) =
4
p
x)
7. y = f(x) =
p
r2   (x   h)2 , where r is a positive constant. )
8. y = f(x) =
p
 (1=x))
9. y = f(x) = 1=
p
 (3x))
10. y = f(x) =
p
x+ 1=(x   1))
11. y = f(x) = 1=(
p
 1))
12. Find the domain of h(x) =
(x
2
9)=(x   3) x 6= 3
6
if x = 3.
)
13. Suppose f (x) = 3x   9 and g(x) =
p
x. What is the domain of the composition (g  f )(x)?
(Recall that composition is dened as (g  f )(x) = g(f (x)).) What is the domain of
(f  g)(x)?)
14. A farmer wants to build a fence along a river. He has 500 feet of fencing and wants to enclose
arectangular pen on three sides (with the river providing the fourth side). If x is the length
of the side perpendicular to the river, determine the area of the pen as a function of x. What
is the domain of this function? )
15. A can in the shape of a cylinder is to be made with a total of 100 square centimeters of
material in the side, top, and bottom; the manufacturer wants the can to hold the maximum
possible volume. Write the volume as a function of the radius r of the can; nd the domain
of the function. )
16. A can in the shape of a cylinder is to be made to hold a volume of one liter (1000 cubic
centimeters). The manufacturer wants to use the least possible material for the can. Write
the surface area of the can (total of the top, bottom, and side) as a function of the radius r
of the can; nd the domain of the function.)
Many functions in applications are built up from simple functions by inserting constants
in various places. It is important to understand the eect such constants have on the
appearance of the graph.
Horizontal shifts. If we replace x by x  C everywhere it occurs in the formula for f (x),
then the graph shifts over C to the right. (If C is negative, then this means that the graph
shifts over jCj to the left.) For example, the graph of y = (x 2)2 is the x2-parabola shifted
over to have its vertex at the point 2 on the x-axis. The graph of y = (x + 1)
2
is the same
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
delete pages from pdf; extract pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages of pdf online; copy pdf page to powerpoint
26
Chapter 1 Analytic Geometry
parabola shifted over to the left so as to have its vertex at  1 on the x-axis. Note well:
when replacing x by x   C we must pay attention to meaning, not merely appearance.
Starting with y = x
2
and literally replacing x by x   2 gives y = x   2
2
.This is y = x   4,
aline with slope 1, not a shifted parabola.
Vertical shifts. If we replace y by y   D, then the graph moves up D units. (If D is
negative, then this means that the graph moves down jDj units.) If the formula is written
in the form y = f(x) and if y is replaced by y  D to get y  D = f (x), we can equivalently
move D to the other side of the equation and write y = f(x) + D. Thus, this principle
can be stated: to get the graph of y = f(x) + D, take the graph of y = f (x) and move it
D units up. For example, the function y = x
2
4x = (x   2)
2
4 can be obtained from
y= (x   2)
2
(see the last paragraph) by moving the graph 4 units down. The result is the
x
2
-parabola shifted 2 units to the right and 4 units down so as to have its vertex at the
point (2;  4).
Warning. Do not confuse f (x) +D and f(x +D). For example, if f(x) is the function x
2
,
then f(x) + 2 is the function x
2
+2, while f (x + 2) is the function (x + 2)
2
=x
2
+4x + 4.
EXAMPLE 1.4.1 Circles
An important example of the above two principles starts
with the circle x
2
+y
2
=r
2
. This is the circle of radius r centered at the origin. (As we
saw, this is not a single function y = f (x), but rather two functions y = 
p
r2   x2 put
together; in any case, the two shifting principles apply to equations like this one that are
not in the form y = f (x).) If we replace x by x   C and replace y by y   D|getting the
equation (x   C)
2
+(y   D)
2
=r
2
|the eect on the circle is to move it C to the right
and D up, thereby obtaining the circle of radius r centered at the point (C; D). This tells
us how to write the equation of any circle, not necessarily centered at the origin.
We will later want to use two more principles concerning the eects of constants on
the appearance of the graph of a function.
Horizontal dilation. If x is replaced by x=A in a formula and A > 1, then the eect on
the graph is to expand it by a factor of A in the x-direction (away from the y-axis). If A
is between 0 and 1 then the eect on the graph is to contract by a factor of 1=A (towards
the y-axis). We use the word \dilate" to mean expand or contract.
For example, replacing x by x=0:5 = x=(1=2) = 2x has the eect of contracting toward
the y-axis by a factor of 2. If A is negative, we dilate by a factor of jAj and then  ip
about the y-axis. Thus, replacing x by  x has the eect of taking the mirror image of the
graph with respect to the y-axis. For example, the function y =
p
x, which has domain
fx 2 R j x  0g, is obtained by taking the graph of
p
xand  ipping it around the y-axis
into the second quadrant.
1.4 Shifts and Dilations
27
Vertical dilation. If y is replaced by y=B in a formula and B > 0, then the eect on
the graph is to dilate it by a factor of B in the vertical direction. As before, this is an
expansion or contraction depending on whether B is larger or smaller than one. Note that
if we have a function y = f(x), replacing y by y=B is equivalent to multiplying the function
on the right by B: y = Bf(x). The eect on the graph is to expand the picture away from
the x-axis by a factor of B if B > 1, to contract it toward the x-axis by a factor of 1=B if
0< B < 1, and to dilate by jBj and then  ip about the x-axis if B is negative.
EXAMPLE 1.4.2 Ellipses
Abasic example of the two expansion principles is given
by an ellipse of semimajor axis a and semiminor axis b. We get such an ellipse by
starting with the unit circle|the circle of radius 1 centered at the origin, the equation
of which is x
2
+y
2
=1|and dilating by a factor of a horizontally and by a factor of b
vertically. To get the equation of the resulting ellipse, which crosses the x-axis at a and
crosses the y-axis at b, we replace x by x=a and y by y=b in the equation for the unit
circle. This gives
x
a
2
+
y
b
2
=1
or
x
2
a2
+
y
2
b2
=1:
Finally, if we want to analyze a function that involves both shifts and dilations, it
is usually simplest to work with the dilations rst, and then the shifts. For instance, if
we want to dilate a function by a factor of A in the x-direction and then shift C to the
right, we do this by replacing x rst by x=A and then by (x   C) in the formula. As an
example, suppose that, after dilating our unit circle by a in the x-direction and by b in the
y-direction to get the ellipse in the last paragraph, we then wanted to shift it a distance
hto the right and a distance k upward, so as to be centered at the point (h; k). The new
ellipse would have equation
 h
a
2
+
 k
b
2
=1:
Note well that this is dierent than rst doing shifts by h and k and then dilations by a
and b:
x
a
h
2
+
y
b
k
2
=1:
See gure1.4.1.
28
Chapter 1 Analytic Geometry
1
2
3
1
1
2
3
4
2
1
.
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
.....
.......
...........
...........
...........
.......
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
.....
.....
........
..........................
.......
......
....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
.
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
.....
.......
...........
...........
...........
.......
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
.....
.....
........
..........................
.......
......
....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
Figure 1.4.1
Ellipses:
x 1
2
2
+
y 1
3
2
=1 on the left,
x
2
1
2
+
y
3
1
2
=1 on the
right.
Exercises 1.4.
Starting with the graph of y =
p
x, the graph of y = 1=x, and the graph of y =
p
 x2 (the
upper unit semicircle), sketch the graph of each of the following functions:
1. f (x) =
p
 2
2. f (x) =  1   1=(x + 2)
3. f (x) = 4 +
p
x+ 2
4. y = f (x) = x=(1   x)
5. y = f (x) =  
p
x
6. f (x) = 2 +
p
 (x   1)2
7. f (x) =  4 +
p
(x   2)
8. f (x) = 2
p
 (x=3)2
9. f (x) = 1=(x + 1)
10. f (x) = 4 + 2
p
 (x   5)2=9
11. f (x) = 1 + 1=(x   1)
12. f (x) =
p
100   25(x   1)2 + 2
The graph of f(x) is shown below. Sketch the graphs of the following functions.
13. y = f (x   1)
1
2
3
1
0
1
2
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
...
...
....
...
...
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
...
..
..
...
...
...........
...
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
...
...
....
...
...
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
.
14. y = 1 + f(x + 2)
15. y = 1 + 2f (x)
16. y = 2f (3x)
17. y = 2f (3(x   2)) + 1
18. y = (1=2)f(3x   3)
19. y = f (1 + x=3) + 2
2
Instantaneous Rate of Change:
The Derivative
Suppose that y is a function of x, say y = f (x). It is often necessary to know how sensitive
the value of y is to small changes in x.
EXAMPLE 2.1.1
Take, for example, y = f (x) =
p
625   x2 (the upper semicircle of
radius 25 centered at the origin). When x = 7, we nd that y =
p
625   49 = 24. Suppose
we want to know how much y changes when x increases a little, say to 7.1 or 7.01.
In the case of a straight line y = mx +b, the slope m = y=x measures the change in
yper unit change in x. This can be interpreted as a measure of \sensitivity"; for example,
if y = 100x + 5, a small change in x corresponds to a change one hundred times as large
in y, so y is quite sensitive to changes in x.
Let us look at the same ratio y=x for our function y = f (x) =
p
625   x2 when x
changes from 7 to 7:1. Here x = 7:1   7 = 0:1 is the change in x, and
y = f (x + x)   f(x) = f(7:1)   f(7)
=
p
625   7:12  
p
625   72  23:9706   24 =  0:0294:
Thus, y=x   0:0294=0:1 =  0:294. This means that y changes by less than one
third the change in x, so apparently y is not very sensitive to changes in x at x = 7.
We say \apparently" here because we don’t really know what happens between 7 and 7:1.
Perhaps y changes dramatically as x runs through the values from 7 to 7:1, but at 7:1 y
just happens to be close to its value at 7. This is not in fact the case for this particular
function, but we don’t yet know why.
29
30
Chapter 2 Instantaneous Rate of Change: The Derivative
One way to interpret the above calculation is by reference to a line. We have computed
the slope of the line through (7; 24) and (7:1; 23:9706), called a chord of the circle. In
general, if we draw the chord from the point (7; 24) to a nearby point on the semicircle
(7 + x; f(7 + x)), the slope of this chord is the so-called dierence quotient
slope of chord =
f(7 + x)   f(7)
x
=
p
625   (7 + x)2   24
x
:
For example, if x changes only from 7 to 7.01, then the dierence quotient (slope of the
chord) is approximately equal to (23:997081   24)=0:01 =  0:2919. This is slightly less
steep than the chord from (7; 24) to (7:1; 23:9706).
As the second value 7 + x moves in towards 7, the chord joining (7; f (7)) to (7 +
x; f (7 + x)) shifts slightly. As indicated in gure2.1.1, as x gets smaller and smaller,
the chord joining (7; 24) to (7 + x; f (7 + x)) gets closer and closer to the tangent line
to the circle at the point (7; 24). (Recall that the tangent line is the line that just grazes
the circle at that point, i.e., it doesn’t meet the circle at any second point.) Thus, as x
gets smaller and smaller, the slope y=x of the chord gets closer and closer to the slope
of the tangent line. This is actually quite dicult to see when x is small, because of the
scale of the graph. The values of x used for the gure are 1, 5, 10 and 15, not really very
small values. The tangent line is the one that is uppermost at the right hand endpoint.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.......
......
........
..........
...........
..................
.................
5
10
15
20
25
5
10
15
20
25
..
.....
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
......
.....
......
.....
......
...
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.....
......
.....
.....
.....
.
...
....
....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
.
Figure 2.1.1
Chords approximating the tangent line. (AP)
So far we have found the slopes of two chords that should be close to the slope of
the tangent line, but what is the slope of the tangent line exactly? Since the tangent line
touches the circle at just one point, we will never be able to calculate its slope directly,
using two \known" points on the line. What we need is a way to capture what happens
to the slopes of the chords as they get \closer and closer" to the tangent line.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested