devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Deleting pages from pdf document software control cloud windows azure wpf class 01254628-part77

10 - 11
10.2.6  Elastic Modulus of Intact Rock
The Young's modulus (E
R
) of intact rock is measured during uniaxial compression or triaxial compression
loading (See Figure 8-6).    The  equivalent elastic modulus is  the  slope of the 
F
-
,
curve and can be
assessed as either a tangent value (E = 
)
F
/
)
,
) or a secant value (E = 
F
/
,
) from the initial loading.  Also,
it may be evaluated  from an unload-reload cycle implemented  off of the  initial loading ramp.  Most
common in engineering practice, the tangent value taken at 50% of ultimate strength is reported as the
characteristic elastic modulus (E
R50
).   
Intact rock specimens can exhibit a wide range of elastic modulus, as evidenced by Table 10-4.  For these
data, the measured values vary from 3.6 to 88.3 GPa (530 to 12815 ksi), with a mean value of E
R
= 44.6
GPa (6500 ksi).  Notably, these moduli are comparable to normal and high-strength concretes that are
manufacturered for construction.  For many sedimentary and foliated metamorphic rocks, the modulus of
elasticity is generally greater parallel to the bedding or foliation planes than perpendicular to them, due to
closure of parallel weakness planes.
An intact rock classification system based on strength and modulus ratio (E/
F
u
) is given in Table 10-5.
For  each  of  the  basic  rock  types  (igneous,  sedmentary,  and  metamorphic),  Figure  10-9  shows  the
corresponding groupings of elastic modulus (E
t
) vs. uniaxial compressive strength (
F
u
).   The modulus
here is the tangent modulus at 50% of ultimate strength. The broad range of strengths and moduli shown
in the three figures is informative.  The above system considers intact rock specimens only and does not
consider the natural fractures (discontinuities) in the rock mass.  
TABLE 10-5
ENG
I
NEER
I
NG CLASS
I
F
I
CATI
ON OF 
I
NTACT ROCK
(Deere and Miller, 1966; Stagg and Zienkiewicz, 1968)
I. On basis of strength, 
F
u
Class
Description
Uniaxial compressive strength
(MPa)
A
Very high strength
Over 220
B
High strength
110-220
C
Medium strength
55-110
D
Low strength
28-55
E
Very low strength
Less than 28
II. On basis of modulus ratio, E
t
/
F
u
Class
Description
Modulus ratio 
b
H
High modulus ratio
Over 500
M
Average (medium) ratio
200-500
L
Low modulus ratio
Less than 200
a
Rocks are classified by strength and modulus ratio such as AM, BL, BH, CM, etc..  
b
Modulus ratio = E
t
/
F
a(ult)
where E
t
is tangent modulus at 50% ultimate strength and 
F
a(ult)
is the uniaxial compressive strength.
Deleting pages from pdf document - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete page from pdf acrobat; copy pages from pdf to word
Deleting pages from pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract one page from pdf reader; copy one page of pdf to another pdf
10 - 12
Figure 10-9a.   Elastic Modulus-Compressive Strength Groupings for Intact Igneous
Rock Materials (Deere & Miller, 1966). 
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
cut and paste pdf pages; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET Class. Free PDF edit control and component for deleting PDF pages in Visual Basic .NET framework
deleting pages from pdf document; acrobat remove pages from pdf
10 - 13
Figure 10-9b.   Elastic Modulus-Compressive Strength Groupings for Intact Sedimentary
Rock Materials (Deere & Miller, 1966). 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. Sorting Pages. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages.
deleting pages from pdf in preview; export pages from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page
crop all pages of pdf; delete pages of pdf
10 - 14
Figure 10-9c.   Elastic Modulus-Compressive Strength Groupings for Intact Metamorphic
Rock Materials (Deere & Miller, 1966). 
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting Word Pages. Overview.
cut paste pdf pages; export one page of pdf preview
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET. Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PowerPoint Pages. Overview.
extract pages pdf; extract pages pdf preview
10 - 15
Figure 10-10.  Small-Strain Elastic Modulus (E
max
)  versus Compressive Strength (q
u
) for
All Types of Civil Engineering Materials.  (Tatsuoka & Shibuya, 1992).
For  lab  testing  on  intact rock  specimens,  the nondestructive elastic modulus at  very  small  strains  is
obtained from ultrasonics measurements and this value is higher than moduli measured at intermediate to
high strains, such as E
t50
.   Figure 10-3d shows a global database of E
max
from small-strain measurements
(ultrasonics, bender elements, resonant column) versus the compressive strength (q
max
= q
u
) for a wide
range of civil engineering materials ranging from soils to rocks, as well as concrete and steel (Tatsuoka &
Shibuya, 1992). 
10.3   Operational Shear Strength
The shear strength of rock usually controls in the geotechnical evaluation of slopes, tunnels, excavations,
and foundations.  As such, the shear strength (
τ
) of inplace rock often needs to be defined at three distinct
levels:  (a) intact rock, (b) along a rock joint or discontinuity plane, and (c) representative of an entire
fractured rock mass.  Figure 10-11 illustrates these cases for the illustrative example involving a road
highway cut in rock.   In all cases, the shear strength is most commonly determined in terms of the Mohr-
Coulomb criterion (Figure 10-7):
τ  =   c'  +   σ' tan φ'
(10-3)
where τ  = operational shear strength, σ' = effective normal stress on the plane of shearing, c' = effective
cohesion  intercept,  and  φ'  =  effective  friction  angle.    The  appropriate  values  of  the  Mohr-Coulomb
parameters c' and φ' will depend greatly upon the specific cases considered and levels of failure applicable
per Figure 10-11.
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
check following TIFF page deleting methods and ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete pages from pdf reader
VB.NET TIFF: An Easy VB.NET Solution to Delete or Remove TIFF File
empowers users to insert blank pages into TIFF I have tried the function of deleting page from powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert selected pages of pdf to word online; cut pages out of pdf online
10 - 16
Road
Cut Slope
Cut Slope
Road
Sloping Joints
Sloping Joints
Extensive Cracks
Massive Rock                     
Favorable Joint Set              Unfavorable Joint Set         Highly Fractured
Mass
Wedge
Assumed Slip Plane
Figure  10-11.   Illustrative  Cases  for Defining Rock Shear Strength for  Cut, including:   (a)  intact  rock
strength, (b) intact strength across joints, (c) shear strength along joint planes, and (d)  jointed rock mass.
For the intact rock, series of triaxial compressive strength tests can be performed at increasing confining
stresses to define the Mohr-Coulomb envelope and corresponding c' and φ' parameters.  See Section 7.1.8
for further details on this approach.  Alternatively, empirical methods based on the type of rock material
and its measured uniaxial compressive strength (q
u
= σ
u
) are available for evaluating the shear strength
parameters of intact rock (e.g., Hoek, et al. 1995), as discussed later in Section 10.4.   This approach is
versatile as it can be reduced to account for the degree of fracturing and weathering, thus also used to
represent and estimate the shear strength of rock masses.
Laboratory direct shear testing can be used to determine the shear strength of a discontinuity and/or the
infilling material found within the joints.  The split box is orientated with the axis along the preferred
plane of interest (Figure 8-4).   The shear strength of the discontinuity surface has either a representative
peak or residual value of the frictional component of shear strength.   Peak shear strengths will apply
during highway cuts and excavations in rocks where no movement has occurred before.  Residual shear
strengths will be appropriate in restoration and remedial work involving rockslides and slipped wedges or
blocks of rock. Relatively small movements can reduce shear strength from peak to residual values.  The
peak  values  can  be  conceived  as  the  composite  of  the  residual  shear  strength  and  a  geometrical
component that depends on roughness and related to asperities and roughness on the joint plane.   Table
10-6 lists values of peak friction angle of various rock surface types, rock minerals (that may coat the
joints), and infilling materials (such as clays and sands).  If the joints are open enough, the infilling of
clay/soil may dominate the shear strength behavior of the situation.  
Movement  reduces  (or  removes) the  effect  of  the  asperities,  resulting  in reduced  shear strength.    If
sufficent  movement occurs,  the  residual  strength  of  the  material  is reached.    Table  10-7  presents  a
selection of reported values of residual frictional angle (φ
r
', assuming c
r
' = 0)  for various types of rock
surfaces and minerals found in rock joints and discontinuities.  These values can give an approximate
guide in selecting interface and joint strengths.
Additional guidelines for the selection of Mohr-Coulomb parameters are given by Hoek, et al. (1995) and
Wyllie (1999). 
C#: How to Delete Cached Files from Your Web Viewer
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Visual C#.NET Developers the Ways of Deleting Cache Files.
export pages from pdf online; delete pages from pdf in reader
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Provide C# Demo Code for Deleting and Removing Image and remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
cut pages from pdf; add and remove pages from pdf file online
10 - 17
TABLE  10-6 
FR
I
CTI
ON ANGLES FOR ROCK JO
I
NTS,
 M
I
NERALS,
 AND F
I
LL
I
NGS
(after compilations by Franklin & Dusseault, 1989, and Jaeger & Cook, 1977)
Condition/Case
Friction Angle  
N
' (deg)
(c'  =  0)
Thick joint fillings:
Smectite and montmorillonitic clays
Kaolinite
Illite
Chlorite
Quartzitic sand
Feldspathic sand
Minerals:
Talc
Serpentine
Biotite (mica)
Muscovite (mica)
Calcite
Feldspar
Quartz
Rock joints:
Crystalline limestone
Porous limestone
Chalk
Sandstone
Quartzite
Clay Shale
Bentonitic Shale
Granite
Dolerite
Schist
Marble
Gabbro
Gneiss
5 - 10
12 - 15
16 - 22
20 - 30
33 - 40
28 - 35
9
16
7
13
8
24
33
42 - 49
32 - 48
30 - 41
24 - 35
23 - 44
22 - 37
9 - 27
31 - 33
33 - 43
32 - 40
31 - 37
33
31 - 35
10 - 18
TABLE  10-7
RES
I
DUAL FR
I
CTI
ON ANGLES
(compilations after Barton, 1973, and Hoek & Bray, 1977)
Rock Type
Residual Friction Angle 
N
r
(degrees), assuming c' = 0
Amphibolite
32
Basalt
31-38
Conglomerate
35
Chalk
30
Dolomite
27-31
Gneiss (schistose)
23-29
Granite (fine grain)
29-35
Limestone
33-40
Porphyry
31
Sandstone
25-35
Shale
27
Siltstone
27-31
Slate
25-30
Note:  Lower value is generally given by tests on wet rock surfaces.
10.4    ROCK  MASS CLASSIFICATION
While the mineral composition, age, and porosity determine the properties of the intact rock, the network
of fractures, cracks, and joints govern the rock mass behavior in terms of available strength, stiffness,
permeability, and performance.  The pattern of discontinuities of the rock mass will be evident in the
cored sections obtained during the site exploration studies, as well as in  the  exposed faces and rock
outcrops in the topographic terrain.  A selection of exposed rock types is presented in Figure 10-12 to
illustrate the variations that occur in scenery due to the inherent fracture and joint patterns.   
Measures of quantifying the degree, extent, and nature of the discontinuities is paramount in assessing the
quality and condition of the rock mass.  The rock quality designation (RQD, described in Figure 3-20) is
a first-order assessment of the amount of natural jointing and fissuring in rock masses.  The RQD has
been used to approximately quantify the rock mass behavior, yet was developed four decades ago (Deere
& Deere, 1989).  Since then, more elaborate and quantitative methods of assessing the overall rock mass
condition have been developed including the Geomechanics RMR-System (Bieniawski, 1989), based on
mining  experiences  in  South  Africa,  and  the  NGI-Q  system  (Barton,  1988),  based  on  tunneling
experiences in Norway.  A closely related system to the RMR is the Geological Strength Index (GSI) that
will is useful in assessing the strength of rock masses.   These and other rock mass classifications systems
are  described  in  detail  elsewhere  and  summarized  in  ASTM  D  5878  (Classification  of  Rock  Mass
Systems).   The influential factors that comprise the rock mass ratings will be briefly discussed here and
presented in the context for the interpretation of rock mass properties need for design and analysis of
slopes, tunnels, and foundations in rock formations.  
10 - 19
Figure 10-12 (a).   Limestone at I-75, TN           Figure 10-12 (b).  Sandstone in Grand Canyon. AZ
Figure 10-12 (c).   Basalt Beach, Kauai, HI         
Figure 10-12 (d).  Mica Schist near Hope, BC 
Figure 10-12 (e).  Gneiss at Sondestrom, Greenland. Figure 10-12(f). Exposed Granite, Rio, Brazil
Figure 10-12.   Selection of Exposed Rock Masses from Different Geologic Origins.
10 - 20
10.4.1  Rock Mass Rating System (RMR)
The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) rock classification system uses five basic parameters for classification and
properties evaluation.   A sixth parameter helps further assess issues of stability to specific problems.
Originally intended for tunneling & mining applications, it has been extended for the design of cut slopes
and foundations. The six parameters used to determine the RMR value are:
Uniaxial compressive strength (q
u
or σ
u
)*.
Rock Quality Designation (RQD)
Spacing of discontinuities
Condition of discontinuities
Groundwater conditions
Orientation of discontinuities
*Note:  Value may be estimated from point load index (I
s
).
The  basic components  of the RMR system  is  contained  in Figure 10-13.   The rating  is  obtained  by
summing the values assigned for the first five components.  Later, an overall rating can be made by a
final adjustment by  consideration  of  the  sixth  component  depending  upon the  intended  project  type
(tunnel, slope, or foundation), however, this is less utilized in most routine applications.  Thus, the RMR
is determined as:
5
RMR =  
G
(R
i
)
(10-4)
i = 1
The RMR rating assigns a value of between 0 (very poor) to 100 (most excellent)  for the rock mass.  The
RMR system has been modified over the years with additional details and variants given elsewhere (e.g.,
Bieniawski, 1989; Hoek, et al., 1995; Wyllie, 1999).  Depending upon the dip and dip direction (or strike)
of the natural discontinuities with respect to the proposed layout and orientation of the construction, then
an  additional  factor  may  be  added  to  adjust  the  RMR,  ranging  from  favorable  (R
6
 0)  to  very
unfavorable (-12 for tunnels, -25 for foundations, and -60 for slopes).   
10.4.2.   NGI - Q Rating
The  Q Rating  was  developed for assessing rock masses  for tunneling applications  by the  Norwegian
Geotechnical Institute (Barton, et al. 1974) and relies on six parameters for evaluation:
• Rock Quality Designation (RQD)
• J
n
is the number of discontinuity sets in the rock mass (joint sets).
• J
r
represents the roughness of the interface within the discontinuities, fractures, and joints.
• J
describes the condition, alterations, and infilling material with the joints and cracks.
• J
provides an assessment on the inplace water conditions.
• SRF is a stress reduction factor related to the initial stress state and compactness.
The individual parameters are assigned values per the criteria given in Figure 10-14 and then a complete
Q rating is obtained as follows:
(10-5)
Q
RQD
J
J
J
J
SRF
n
r
a
w
=
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested