devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete pages from pdf in preview software Library project winforms .net html UWP Calculus24-part755

10.1 Polar r Coordinates
241
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
=4
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
.
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
.
..
...
..
..
..
.
.
..
..
..
..
...
.
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
.
..
..
...
..
..
.
...
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
.
...
......
..
Figure 10.1.3
The point ( 2;=4) = (2;5=4) = (2; 3=4) in polar coordinates.
x= ( 2) cos(=4) =  
p
2 1:4142 and y = ( 2)sin(=4) =  
p
2. This makes it very
easy to convert equations from rectangular to polar coordinates.
EXAMPLE 10.1.3
Find the equation of the line y = 3x + 2 in polar coordinates. We
merely substitute: r sin = 3r cos  + 2, or r =
2
sin   3cos
.
EXAMPLE 10.1.4
Find the equation of the circle (x   1=2)
2
+y
2
= 1=4 in polar
coordinates. Again substituting: (r cos    1=2)
2
+r
2
sin
2
= 1=4. A bit of algebra turns
this into r = cos(t). You should try plotting a few (r;) values to convince yourself that
this makes sense.
EXAMPLE 10.1.5 Graph the polar equation r = . Here the distance from the origin
exactly matches the angle, so a bit of thought makes it clear that when   0 we get the
spiral of Archimedes in gure10.1.4. When  < 0, r is also negative, and so the full graph
is the right hand picture in the gure.
(2;2)
(;)
(=2;=2)
(1;1)
.........
....
..
...
.
...
.
...
.
..
.
...
.
..
..
..
.
...
.
...
.
.
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
....
....
.........
...................
.......
......
....
....
...
.....
..
...
..
...
..
..
....
..
..
..
..
...
.
..
..
..
...
.
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
...
.
.
..
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
..
.
.
...
.
..
..
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
...
..
.
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
..
.
..
...
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
....
...
..
...
....
...
...
....
...
.....
....
.....
.....
......
.......
..........
........................................
.........
........
......
.....
......
....
....
....
....
....
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
..
...
....
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
...
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
( 2; 2)
( ; )
( =2; =2)
( 1; 1)
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
...
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
...
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
...
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
...
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
....
...
..
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
....
....
....
....
....
......
.....
......
........
.........
........................................
..........
.......
......
.....
.....
....
.....
...
....
...
...
....
...
..
...
....
..
..
...
..
..
...
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
...
..
.
..
..
..
.
...
..
.
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
..
..
.
...
.
.
..
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
..
.
.
...
..
.
..
.
..
.
...
..
.
..
..
.
...
..
.
..
.
...
..
..
..
.
...
..
..
..
..
....
..
..
...
..
...
..
.....
...
....
....
......
.......
...................
.........
....
....
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
.
.
...
.
...
.
..
..
..
.
...
.
..
.
...
.
...
.
...
..
....
..................
....
..
...
.
...
.
...
.
..
.
...
.
..
..
..
.
...
.
...
.
.
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
....
....
.........
...................
.......
......
....
....
...
.....
..
...
..
...
..
..
....
..
..
..
..
...
.
..
..
..
...
.
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
...
.
.
..
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
..
.
.
...
.
..
..
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
...
..
.
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
..
.
..
...
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
....
...
..
...
....
...
...
....
...
.....
....
.....
.....
......
.......
..........
........................................
.........
........
......
.....
......
....
....
....
....
....
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
..
...
....
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
...
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
.
..
..
.
.
..
..
.
.
..
..
.
.
...
..
..
..
..
Figure 10.1.4
The spiral of Archimedes and the full graph of r = .
Converting polar equations to rectangular equations can be somewhat trickier, and
graphing polar equations directly is also not always easy.
Delete pages from pdf in preview - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf; copy web pages to pdf
Delete pages from pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pages from pdf online; delete page from pdf file online
242
Chapter 10 Polar Coordinates, Parametric Equations
EXAMPLE 10.1.6
Graph r = 2 sin . Because the sine is periodic, we know that we
will get the entire curve for values of  in [0;2). As  runs from 0 to =2, r increases
from 0 to 2. Then as  continues to , r decreases again to 0. When  runs from  to
2, r is negative, and it is not hard to see that the rst part of the curve is simply traced
out again, so in fact we get the whole curve for values of  in [0;). Thus, the curve looks
something like gure10.1.5. Now, this suggests that the curve could possibly be a circle,
and if it is, it would have to be the circle x
2
+(y   1)
2
=1. Having made this guess, we
can easily check it. First we substitute for x and y to get (r cos )
2
+(r sin    1)
2
=1;
expanding and simplifying does indeed turn this into r = 2 sin .
1
1
0
1
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
....
....
....
.....
......
..........
.....................
.........
......
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
.....
.....
.......
.................................
.......
.....
.....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
Figure 10.1.5
Graph of r = 2sin .
Exercises 10.1.
1. Plot these polar coordinate points on one graph: (2; =3), ( 3;=2), ( 2;  =4), (1=2; ),
(1;4=3), (0; 3=2).
Find an equation in polar coordinates that has the same graph as the given equation in
rectangular coordinates.
2. y = 3x)
3. y =  4)
4. xy
2
=1)
5. x
2
+y
2
=5)
6. y = x
3
)
7. y = sin x)
8. y = 5x + 2)
9. x = 2)
10. y = x
2
+1)
11. y = 3x
2
2x)
12. y = x
2
+y
2
)
Sketch the curve.
13. r = cos
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
delete pages from pdf preview; delete pages from pdf in preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
extract pages from pdf without acrobat; deleting pages from pdf online
10.2 Slopes in polar coordinates
243
14. r = sin( + =4)
15. r =  sec
16. r = =2,   0
17. r = 1+ 
1
=
2
18. r = cot csc
19. r =
1
sin  +cos 
20. r
2
= 2sec csc
Find an equation in rectangular coordinates that has the same graph as the given equation
in polar coordinates.
21. r = sin(3))
22. r = sin
2
)
23. r = sec csc)
24. r = tan  )
When we describe a curve using polar coordinates, it is still a curve in the x-y plane. We
would like to be able to compute slopes and areas for these curves using polar coordinates.
We have seen that x = r cos  and y = r sin describe the relationship between polar
and rectangular coordinates. If in turn we are interested in a curve given by r = f(),
then we can write x = f() cos  and y = f() sin , describing x and y in terms of  alone.
The rst of these equations describes  implicitly in terms of x, so using the chain rule we
may compute
dy
dx
=
dy
d
d
dx
:
Since d=dx = 1=(dx=d), we can instead compute
dy
dx
=
dy=d
dx=d
=
f() cos  + f
0
() sin
f() sin  + f0() cos 
:
EXAMPLE 10.2.1
Find the points at which the curve given by r = 1 + cos  has a
vertical or horizontal tangent line. Since this function has period 2, we may restrict our
attention to the interval [0;2) or ( ;], as convenience dictates. First, we compute the
slope:
dy
dx
=
(1 + cos ) cos   sin sin 
(1 + cos ) sin    sin cos 
=
cos  + cos
2
  sin
2
sin    2 sin cos
:
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Delete unimportant contents:
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Erase PDF images. • Erase PDF pages. Miscellaneous. • Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview. • View PDF outlines. Related Resources.
extract page from pdf online; delete page from pdf
244
Chapter 10 Polar Coordinates, Parametric Equations
This fraction is zero when the numerator is zero (and the denominator is not zero). The
numerator is 2 cos
2
+ cos    1 so by the quadratic formula
cos  =
1 
p
1+ 4 2
4
= 1 or
1
2
:
This means  is  or =3. However, when  = , the denominator is also 0, so we cannot
conclude that the tangent line is horizontal.
Setting the denominator to zero we get
   2 sin cos  = 0
sin(1 + 2cos ) = 0;
so either sin = 0 or cos  =  1=2. The rst is true when  is 0 or , the second when 
is 2=3 or 4=3. However, as above, when  = , the numerator is also 0, so we cannot
conclude that the tangent line is vertical. Figure10.2.1 shows points corresponding to 
equal to 0, =3, 2=3 and 4=3 on the graph of the function. Note that when  =  the
curve hits the origin and does not have a tangent line.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
....
...
....
....
.....
.....
........
.........................
........
......
....
....
....
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
...
......
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
...
..
....
...
....
....
.....
......
..........
...............
..........
......
......
....
....
...
....
...
...
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
Figure 10.2.1
Points of vertical and horizontal tangency for r = 1 + cos.
We know that the second derivative f
00
(x) is useful in describing functions, namely,
in describing concavity. We can compute f
00
(x) in terms of polar coordinates as well. We
already know how to write dy=dx = y
0
in terms of , then
d
dx
dy
dx
=
dy
0
dx
=
dy
0
d
d
dx
=
dy
0
=d
dx=d
:
EXAMPLE 10.2.2
We nd the second derivative for the cardioid r = 1 + cos :
d
d
cos  + cos
2
  sin
2
sin   2sin cos 
1
dx=d
= =
3(1 + cos )
(sin  + 2 sin cos )2
1
(sin + 2sin cos )
=
3(1 + cos )
(sin + 2sin cos )3
:
The ellipsis here represents rather a substantial amount of algebra. We know from above
that the cardioid has horizontal tangents at =3; substituting these values into the second
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
copy pdf page to powerpoint; copy page from pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
extract page from pdf reader; copy pages from pdf to word
10.3 Areas in polar coordinates
245
derivative we get y
00
(=3) =  
p
3=2 and y
00
( =3) =
p
3=2, indicating concave down and
concave up respectively. This agrees with the graph of the function.
Exercises 10.2.
Compute y
0
=dy=dx and y
00
=d
2
y=dx
2
.
1. r = )
2. r = 1+ sin  )
3. r = cos )
4. r = sin )
5. r = sec)
6. r = sin(2))
Sketch the curves over the interval [0;2] unless otherwise stated.
7. r = sin  +cos 
8. r = 2+ 2sin
9. r =
3
2
+sin
10. r = 2+ cos
11. r =
1
2
+cos
12. r = cos(=2);0    4
13. r = sin(=3); 0    6
14. r = sin
2
15. r = 1+ cos
2
(2)
16. r = sin
2
(3)
17. r = tan
18. r = sec(=2); 0    4
19. r = 1+ sec
20. r =
1
 cos
21. r =
1
1+ sin
22. r = cot(2)
23. r = =; 0    1
24. r = 1+ =;0    1
25. r =
p
=;0    1
We can use the equation of a curve in polar coordinates to compute some areas bounded
by such curves. The basic approach is the same as with any application of integration: nd
an approximation that approaches the true value. For areas in rectangular coordinates, we
approximated the region using rectangles; in polar coordinates, we use sectors of circles,
as depicted in gure10.3.1. Recall that the area of a sector of a circle is r
2
=2, where
is the angle subtended by the sector. If the curve is given by r = f(), and the angle
subtended by a small sector is , the area is ()(f())
2
=2. Thus we approximate the
total area as
n 1
i=0
1
2
f(
i
)
2
:
In the limit this becomes
Z
b
a
1
2
f()
2
d:
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
a pdf page cut; delete pages out of a pdf
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
deleting pages from pdf; extract pages from pdf file
246
Chapter 10 Polar Coordinates, Parametric Equations
EXAMPLE 10.3.1
We nd the area inside the cardioid r = 1 + cos .
Z
2
0
1
2
(1+cos )
2
d =
1
2
Z
2
0
1+2cos +cos
2
d =
1
2
( + 2sin  +
2
+
sin2
4
)
2
0
=
3
2
:
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
..
....
...
...
...
....
....
....
....
....
......
.....
.......
.........
.........................................
........
.......
.....
.....
.....
....
...
....
...
...
.
.
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
......
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
.
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
.
.
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
.
..
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
.......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
......
...
Figure 10.3.1
Approximating area by sectors of circles.
EXAMPLE 10.3.2 We nd the area between the circles r = 2 and r = 4 sin, as shown
in gure10.3.2. The two curves intersect where 2 = 4sin , or sin  = 1=2, so  = =6 or
5=6. The area we want is then
1
2
Z
5=6
=6
16 sin
2
  4 d =
4
3
+ 2
p
3:
Figure 10.3.2
An area between curves.
This example makes the process appear more straightforward than it is. Because
points have many dierent representations in polar coordinates, it is not always so easy to
identify points of intersection.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
copy pdf page into word doc; copy web page to pdf
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from PowerPoint in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
extract page from pdf acrobat; delete page from pdf preview
10.3 Areas in polar coordinates
247
EXAMPLE 10.3.3
We nd the shaded area in the rst graph of gure10.3.3 as the
dierence of the other two shaded areas. The cardioid is r = 1 + sin  and the circle is
r= 3 sin . We attempt to nd points of intersection:
1+ sin = 3 sin
1= 2 sin
1=2 = sin:
This has solutions  = =6 and 5=6; =6 corresponds to the intersection in the rst quad-
rant that we need. Note that no solution of this equation corresponds to the intersection
point at the origin, but fortunately that one is obvious. The cardioid goes through the
origin when  =  =2; the circle goes through the origin at multiples of , starting with
0.
Now the larger region has area
1
2
Z
=6
=2
(1 + sin )
2
d =
2
9
16
p
3
and the smaller has area
1
2
Z
=6
0
(3 sin)
2
d =
3
8
9
16
p
3
so the area we seek is =8.
Figure 10.3.3
An area between curves.
248
Chapter 10 Polar Coordinates, Parametric Equations
Exercises 10.3.
Find the area enclosed by the curve.
1. r =
p
sin )
2. r = 2 + cos )
3. r = sec ;=6    =3)
4. r = cos;0    =3)
5. r = 2a cos; a > 0)
6. r = 4 + 3sin )
7. Find the area inside the loop formed by r = tan(=2). )
8. Find the area inside one loop of r = cos(3).)
9. Find the area inside one loop of r = sin
2
. )
10. Find the area inside the small loop of r = (1=2) +cos . )
11. Find the area inside r = (1=2) +cos, including the area inside the small loop. )
12. Find the area inside one loop of r
2
=cos(2). )
13. Find the area enclosed by r = tan and r =
csc
p
2
)
14. Find the area inside r = 2cos  and outside r = 1.)
15. Find the area inside r = 2sin  and above the line r = (3=2)csc. )
16. Find the area inside r = , 0    2. )
17. Find the area inside r =
p
, 0    2.)
18. Find the area inside both r =
p
3cos and r = sin . )
19. Find the area inside both r = 1   cos and r = cos. )
20. The center of a circle of radius 1 is on the circumference of a circle of radius 2. Find the area
of the region inside both circles. )
21. Find the shaded area in gure10.3.4. The curve is r = , 0    3.)
Figure 10.3.4
An area bounded by the spiral of Archimedes.
10.4 Parametric Equations
249
When we computed the derivative dy=dx using polar coordinates, we used the expressions
x = f() cos  and y = f() sin . These two equations completely specify the curve,
though the form r = f() is simpler. The expanded form has the virtue that it can easily
be generalized to describe a wider range of curves than can be specied in rectangular or
polar coordinates.
Suppose f(t) and g(t) are functions. Then the equations x = f(t) and y = g(t)
describe a curve in the plane. In the case of the polar coordinates equations, the variable
tis replaced by  which has a natural geometric interpretation. But t in general is simply
an arbitrary variable, often called in this case a parameter, and this method of specifying
acurve is known as parametric equations. One important interpretation of t is time.
In this interpretation, the equations x = f(t) and y = g(t) give the position of an object
at time t.
EXAMPLE 10.4.1
Describe the path of an object that moves so that its position at
time t is given by x = cos t, y = cos
2
t. We see immediately that y = x
2
,so the path lies
on this parabola. The path is not the entire parabola, however, since x = cos t is always
between  1 and 1. It is now easy to see that the object oscillates back and forth on the
parabola between the endpoints (1;1) and ( 1; 1), and is at point (1;1) at time t = 0.
It is sometimes quite easy to describe a complicated path in parametric equations
when rectangular and polar coordinate expressions are dicult or impossible to devise.
EXAMPLE 10.4.2
Awheel of radius 1 rolls along a straight line, say the x-axis. A
point on the rim of the wheel will trace out a curve, called a cycloid. Assume the point
starts at the origin; nd parametric equations for the curve.
Figure10.4.1 illustrates the generation of the curve (click on the AP link to see an
animation). The wheel is shown at its starting point, and again after it has rolled through
about 490 degrees. We take as our parameter t the angle through which the wheel has
turned, measured as shown clockwise from the line connecting the center of the wheel
to the ground. Because the radius is 1, the center of the wheel has coordinates (t;1).
We seek to write the coordinates of the point on the rim as (t + x;1 + y), where
x and y are as shown in gure 10.4.2. These values are nearly the sine and cosine
of the angle t, from the unit circle denition of sine and cosine. However, some care is
required because we are measuring t from a nonstandard starting line and in a clockwise
direction, as opposed to the usual counterclockwise direction. A bit of thought reveals
that x =  sint and y =  cos t. Thus the parametric equations for the cycloid are
x= t   sint, y = 1   cos t.
250
Chapter 10 Polar Coordinates, Parametric Equations
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
.....
.....
......
......
........
..........
.......................................
..........
........
.......
.....
.....
.....
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
.
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
.......
........
..........
.......................................
..........
........
......
......
.....
.....
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
.
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
.......
.......
...........
.......................................
..........
........
......
......
.....
.....
....
....
...
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
.
.
...
....
...
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
...
....
......
....
..
...
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
..
...
....
.........
....
...
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
t
.
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
.
.....
........
....
....
...
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
...
...
...
....
.....
....................
.....
....
...
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
...
...
...
.....
.......
.....
.....
........
....
....
...
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
...
...
...
....
.....
....................
.....
....
...
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
...
...
...
.....
.......
.....
Figure 10.4.1
Acycloid. (AP)
x
y
.
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
....
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..............
........
......
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
.....
.....
.......
...............................
........
.....
.....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
.....
....
......
.........
............
Figure 10.4.2
The wheel.
Exercises 10.4.
1. What curve is described by x = t
2
, y = t
4
? If t is interpreted as time, describe how the
object moves on the curve.
2. What curve is described by x = 3cost, y = 3sint? If t is interpreted as time, describe how
the object moves on the curve.
3. What curve is described by x = 3cost, y = 2sint? If t is interpreted as time, describe how
the object moves on the curve.
4. What curve is described by x = 3sint, y = 3cost? If t is interpreted as time, describe how
the object moves on the curve.
5. Sketch the curve described by x = t
3
t, y = t
2
.If t is interpreted as time, describe how the
object moves on the curve.
6. A wheel of radius 1 rolls along a straight line, say the x-axis. A point P is located halfway
between the center of the wheel and the rim; assume P starts at the point (0; 1=2). As the
wheel rolls, P traces a curve; nd parametric equations for the curve. )
7. A wheel of radius 1 rolls around the outside of a circle of radius 3. A point P on the rim of
the wheel traces out a curve called a hypercycloid, as indicated in gure10.4.3. Assuming
P starts at the point (3; 0), nd parametric equations for the curve. )
8. A wheel of radius 1 rolls around the inside of a circle of radius 3. A point P on the rim of
the wheel traces out a curve called a hypocycloid, as indicated in gure10.4.3. Assuming
P starts at the point (3; 0), nd parametric equations for the curve. )
9. An involute of a circle is formed as follows: Imagine that a long (that is, innite) string is
wound tightly around a circle, and that you grasp the end of the string and begin to unwind
it, keeping the string taut. The end of the string traces out the involute. Find parametric
equations for this curve, using a circle of radius 1, and assuming that the string unwinds
counter-clockwise and the end of the string is initially at (1; 0). Figure10.4.4 shows part of
the curve; the dotted lines represent the string at a few dierent times. )
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested