devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Copy pdf page into word doc SDK Library service wpf .net web page dnn 01254629-part78

10 - 21
ROCK MASS RATING (RMR)
also CSIR System
5
Geomechanics System -  (Bieniawski, 1984, 1989)
RMR =    
Σ
R
Geomechanics Classification for Rock Masses
i = 1
CLASS   DESCRIPTION
RANGE of RMR
I
Very Good Rock
81   to
100
NOTE:  Rock Mass Rating is obtained by summing the five index 
II
Good Rock
61   to 
80
parameters to obtain an overal rating RMR.   Adjustments for dip 
III
Fair Rock
41   to 
60
and orientation of discontinuities being favorable or unfavorable
IV
Poor Rock
21   to 
40
for specific cases of tunnels, slopes, & foundations can also be
V
Very Poor Rock
  to 
20
considered.
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
Unconfined Compressive Strength, q
u
(MPa)
RMR Rating R1
0
5
10
15
20
25
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Rock Quality Designation, RQD
RMR Rating R2
0
5
10
15
20
25
0.01
0.1
1
10
Joint Spacing (meters)
RMR Rating R3
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Joint Separation or Gouge Thickness (mm)
RMR Rating R4
Slightly 
Rough 
Weathered
Slickensided Surface or Gouge-Filled
Soft Gouge-Filled
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
Joint Water Pressure Ratio, u/σ
1
RMR Rating R5
u = joint water pressure
σ
1
= major principal stress
Alternate 2 Definitions
 f
or 
Parameter R5
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
1
10
100
1000
Inflow per 10-m Tunnel Length (Liters/min)
RMR Rating R5
Alternate 1 Definitions
 f
or 
Parameter R5
Dry
Damp
Wet
Dripping
Flowing
Rough/Unweathered
Figure 10-13.  The Geomechanics Classification System for Rock Mass Rating (RMR)
(after Bieniawski, 1984, 1989).
Copy pdf page into word doc - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
convert selected pages of pdf to word online; convert selected pages of pdf to word
Copy pdf page into word doc - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete page from pdf file; extract pdf pages reader
10 - 22
NGI Q-System Rating for Rock Masses
(Barton, Lien, & Lunde, 1974)
Q =  (RQD/J
n
)(J
r
/J
a
)(J
w
/SRF)
Norwegian Classification for Rock Masses
Q - Value
Quality of Rock Mass 
< 0.01
Exceptionally Poor
4.  Discontinuity Condition & Infilling
=    J
a
0.01  to
0.1
Extremely Poor
4.1   Unfilled Cases
0.1  to
1
Very Poor
Healed
0.75
1   to
4
Poor
Stained, no alteration
1
4   to
10
Fair
Silty or Sandy Coating
3
10  to
40
Good
Clay coating
4
40  to
100
Very Good
4.2   Filled Discontinuities
100  to
400
Extremely Good
Sand or crushed rock infill
4
< 400
Exceptionally Good
Stiff clay infilling < 5 mm
6
Soft clay infill < 5 mm thick
8
PARAMETERS FOR THE Q-Rating of Rock Masses
Swelling clay < 5 mm
12
Stiff clay infill > 5 mm thick
10
1.  RQD = Rock Quality Designation = sum of cored pieces
Soft clay infill > 5 mm thick
15
> 100 mm long, divided by total core run length
Swelling clay > 5 mm
20
2.  Number of Sets of Discontinuities (joint sets)
=   J
n
5.  Water Conditions
Massive
0.5
Dry
1
One set
2
Medium Water Inflow
0.66
Two sets
4
Large inflow in unfilled joints
0.5
Three sets
9
Large inflow with filled joints
Four or more sets
15
that wash out
0.33
Crushed rock
20
High transient flow
0.2 to 0.1
High continuous flow
0.1 to 0.05
3.  Roughness of Discontinuities*
=   J
r
Noncontinuous joints
4
6.  Stress Reduction Factor**
  SRF
Rough, wavy
3
Loose rock with clay infill
10
Smooth, wavy
2
Loose rock with open joints
5
Rough, planar
1.5
Shallow rock with clay infill
2.5
Smooth, planar
1
Rock with unfilled joints
1
Slick and planar
0.5
Filled discontinuities
1
**Note:   Additional SRF values given
*Note:  add +1 if mean joint spacing > 3 m
for rocks prone to bursting, squeezing
and swelling by Barton et al. (1974)
Figure 10-14.   The Q-Rating System for Rock Mass Classification
(after Barton, Lien, and Lunde, 1974).
Both the RMR and the Q-ratings can be used to evaluate the stand-up time of unsupported mine & tunnel
walls which is valuable during construction.  The RMR and Q are also used to determine the type and
degree of tunnel support system required for long-term stability, including the use of shotcrete, mesh,
lining, and rock bolt spacing.  Details on these facets are given elsewhere (e.g., Hoek, et al., 1995).  
10.4.3.  Geological Strength Index (GSI)
Whereas the RMR and Q systems were developed originally for mining and tunnelling applications, the
Geological Strength Index (GSI) provides a measure of the rock mass quality for directly assessing the
strength and stiffness of intact and fractured rocks.  A quick assessment of the GSI made be made by use
of the graphical chart given in Figure 10-15, thus facilitating the procedure for field use.
More specifically, the GSI can be calculated from the components of the Q system, as follows: 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load a Word (.doc) document. zoom value and save it into stream. The magnification of the original PDF page size.
cut pages out of pdf online; copy one page of pdf
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET example describes how to copy an image document and paste it into another page. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; PDFDocument doc
cut pages from pdf reader; extract page from pdf online
10 - 23
(10-6)
GSI
RQD
J
J
J
n
r
a
= ⋅
+
9
44
log
In relation to the common Geomechanics Classification System, the GSI is restricted to RMR values in
excess of 25, thus:
4
For RMR > 25:     GSI   =   
G
(R
i
 + 10
(10-7)
i = 1
Figure 10-15.   Chart for Estimating the Geological Strength Index (GSI) (Hoek & Brown, 1997).
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
This VB.NET example shows how to copy an image page of PDF document and paste it into another page. As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim doc
extract pages from pdf file; delete page from pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath) ; value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
cut pdf pages online; cut and paste pdf pages
10 - 24
10.5.   ROCK MASS STRENGTH
The strength of the overall assemblage of rock blocks and fractures can be assessed by large direct shear
tests conducted in the field, backcalculation of rockslides and failured slopes, or alternatively estimated
on the basis of rock mass classification schemes.  For the latter, a detailed approach to evaluating the rock
mass strength is afforded through use of the GSI rating (Hoek, et al. 1995).   In this method, the major
principal  stress  (
F
1
r
 is  related  to  the  minor  principal  stress  (
F
3
r
 at  failure  through  an  empirical
expression that depends upon the following:  
#
The uniaxial compressive strength of the rock material (
F
u
)
#
A material constant (m
i
) for the type of rock
#
Three empirical parameters that reflect the degree of fracturing of the rock mass (m
b,
s, and a). 
The relationship accounts for curvature of the Mohr-Coulomb strength envelope and gives the expression
for  major principal stress in the form:
(10-8)
σ
σ
σ
σσ
1
3
3
'
'
'
=
+
+
u
b
u
a
m
s
The material parameter m
i
depends on the spectific rock type (igneous, metamorphic, or sedimentary) as
determined from the chart given in Figure 10-16.   Values range as low as 4 for mudstone to as high as 33
for gneiss and granite.  
For GSI > 25, the remaining strength parameters for undisturbed rock masses are:
m
b
=  m
i
exp [(GSI-100)/28]
(10-9)
s   =  exp [(GSI-100)/9]
(10-10)
  =  0.5
(10-11)
For GSI < 25, the parameter selection is given by:
s   =   0
(10-12)
a = 0.65 - (GSI/200)
(10-13)
Thus, the evaluation is easily carried out using a spreadsheet with adopted values of effective confining
stresses (
F
3
r
)  taken over the range of anticipated field overburden stresses to calculate corresponding
values of effective major principal stress at failure (
F
1
r
) by equation (10-8).  Then, the paired values of
F
1
r
and 
F
3
r
can be plotted [using either Mohrs Circles or q-p plots] to obtain the equivalent shear strength
parameters, c
r
and 
Nr
  Note that the method can also be applied to evaluate the strength of intact rock
(GSI = 100), as well as fractured rock.  For quick assessments, representative and average values of 
F
3
r
have been used to derive approximate chart solutions for selecting normalized c
r
/
F
u
and friction angle 
Nr
directly from GSI and material constant m
i
, as presented in Figure 10-17. 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. This demo explains how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file .
delete pages out of a pdf; delete pages of pdf preview
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
programming example for converting PDF to Word (.docx) file specified zoom value and save it into stream zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size
deleting pages from pdf in reader; delete pages from pdf in preview
10 - 25
Figure 10-16.   Material Constant m
for GSI Evaluation of Rock Mass Strength
(Hoek, et al., 1995).
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats.
copy page from pdf; delete page from pdf reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF C# demo explains how to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file.
extract pages from pdf acrobat; pdf extract pages
10 - 26
Figure 10-17.   Approximate Chart Solution for Obtaining Normalized Cohesion Intercept (c
r
/
F
u
)
and Friction Angle (
Nr
) from GSI Rating and m
i
Parameter (After Hoek & Brown, 1997).
For the apparent shear strength along specific joints and planes of sliding, the peak friction angle can be
evaluated from the Q-rating parameters (c' = 0):
φ
p
  
.
(J
r
/J
a
)
(10-14)
which gives a range of 7° < φ
p
' < 75° for the full value limits of joint roughness ( J
r
) and alteration (J
a
)
parameters.      
10.6.   ROCK MASS MODULUS
The  equivalent  elastic  modulus  (E
M
)  of  rock masses is  used in deformation analyses  amd numerical
simulations  involving  tunnels,  slopes,  and  foundations  to  estimate  magnitudes  of  movements  and
deflections caused by new loading.   Field methods of measuring the deformability characteristics of rock
masses  include  the  Goodman  jack  and  rock  dilatometer,  as  well  as  backcalculation  from  full-scale
foundation load tests (e.g., Littlechild, et al., 2000).   For routine calculations, E
M
has been empirically
related to intact rock properties (uniaxial strength, 
F
u
, and elastic modulus of the intact rock, E
R
), rock
quality (RQD), and rock mass ratings (RMR, Q, and GSI), such as given by the expressions listed in
Table 10-7.   On critical projects, the actual stiffness of the rock formation can be assessed using full-
scale load tests, made more practical in recent times by the advent of the Osterberg load cell which can
apply very large forces using embedded hydraulic systems.
10 - 27
TABLE 10-8
EMP
I
R
I
CAL METHODS FOR EVALUATI
NG
ELASTI
C MODULUS (EM) OF ROCK MASSES
Expression
Notes/Remarks
Reference
For RQD < 70:   E
M
= E
R
(RQD/350)
For RQD > 70:   E
M
= E
R
[0.2 + (RQD-70)37.5]
Reduction factor on
intact rock modulus
Bieniawski (1978)
E
M
.
E
R
[0.1 + RMR/(1150 - 11.4 RMR}]
Reduction factor
Kulhawy (1978)
E
M
(GPa) =  2 RMR - 100
45 < RMR < 90
Bieniawski (1984)
E
M
(GPa) =  25 Log
10
Q
1 < Q < 400
Hoek et al. (1995)
E
M
(GPa) =  10 
[RMR-100]/40
0 < RMR < 90
Serafim & Pereira
(1983)
E
M
(GPa)  =  (0.01
F
u
) 10 
[GSI-100]/40
Adjustment for rocks
with 
F
< 100 MPa
Hoek (1999)
Notes:   E
= intact rock modulus, E
M
= equivalent rock mass modulus, RQD = rock quality designation,
RMR = rock mass rating, Q = NGI rating of rock mass, GSI = geologic strength index, 
F
= uniaxial
compressive strength.
10.7.  FOUNDATION RESISTANCES
In  many  highway  projects,  foundations  can  bear  on the  rock  surface or be  embedded  into  the rock
formation  to  resist  large  axial  loads.    For  bridge  structures,  shallow  spread  footing  foundations  not
subjected to scour can bear directly on the rock.  In other instances, deep foundations may consist of large
drilled shafts or piers that are constructed into the rock using coring methods.  These may be designed for
axial compression and/or uplift.  In the following sections, methods of estimating the bearing stresses and
side resistance in rocks are provided.
10.7.1   Allowable Foundation Bearing Stress
Detailed calculations can be made concerning the bearing capacity of foundations situated on fractured
rock (e.g., Goodman, 1989).   In addition, the results of the field and laboratory characterization program
of the rock mass may be used to estimate the allowable bearing values directly.  In the most simple
approach, presumptive values are obtained from local practice, Uniform and BOCA building codes, and
AASHTO guidelines.  A summary of allowable bearing stresses from codes has been compiled by Wyllie
(1999) and presented in Figure 10-18.  If the RQD < 90%, the values given in the figure  should be
decreased by variable reduction factors ranging from 0.7 to 0.1.  In this regard, the approach of Peck, et
al. (1974) uses the RQD directly to assess the allowable bearing stress (q
allowable
), provided that the applied
stress does not exceed the uniaxial compressive strength of the intact rock (q
allowable  
F
u
).   The RQD
relationship is  shown in Figure  10-19.    For  more specific calculations  and detailed evaluations,  the
results  of  the  equivalent  Mohr-Coulomb  parameters  from  either  the  GSI  approach  may  be  used  in
traditional bearing capacity equations, as discussed by Wyllie (1999). 
10 - 28
Foundations on Fractured Rock Formations
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Rock Q
uality Designation
,
 RQD
Allowable Bearing Stress qa
Peck, et al. (1974)
Approximation
Note:  Use maximum q
< q
u
where q
u
= compressive strength
of intact rock specimens
/130)
1 (
/16)
(
) 1
(
RQD
RQD
MPa
q
ALLOWABLE
≈ +
NOTE:  1 MPa = 10 tsf
Figure 10-18.  Allowable Bearing Stresses on Unweathered Rock from Codes (Wyllie, 1999).
Figure 10-19.   Allowable Bearing Stress on Fractured Rock from RQD (after Peck, et al. 1974).
10 - 29
Figure 10-20.   Unit Side Resistance Trend with Strength of
Sedimentary Rocks (Kulhawy & Phoon, 1993). 
Figure 10-21.  Shaft Unit Side Resistance with Various Rock Types
(From Ng, et al., 2001).
10.7.2.    Foundation Side Resistances
Deep foundations can be constructed to bear within rock formations.to avert scour problems and resist
both axial compression and uplift loading.   Drilled shaft foundations can be bored through soil layers and
extended deeper by coring into the underlying bedrock.  In many cases, the diameter of the drilled shaft is
reduced when penetrating the rock, thus making a socket.   Figures 10-20 presents a relationship between
the shaft side resistance (f
s
) and one-half the compressive strength (q
u/
2) for sedimentary rocks, while
Figure 10-21 shows a similar diagram between f
and q
for all rock types.  
10 - 30
10-8.   Additional Rock Mass Parameters
As projects  become more complex,  there is need to measure and interprete additional geomechanical
properties of the intact rock and rock mass.   Some recent efforts have included assessments of scour and
erodibility  that  have  been  related  to  rock  mass  indices  (Van  Schalkwyk,  et  al.,  1995).    Similar
methodologies have been developed for excavatability of rocks by machinery in order to minimize use of
blasting (Wyllie, 1999). A simple approach for the latter purpose utilizes the compression wave velocity
(V
P
) of the inplace rock directly, as shown in Figure 10-22.
Figure 10-22.   Rippability of Inplace Rock by Caterpillar Dozer Evaluate by P-Wave Velocity.
(After Franklin and Dusseault, 1989)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested