devexpress asp.net pdf viewer : Delete page from pdf Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax Calculus7-part767

4
TranscendentalFunctions
Sofarwehaveusedonlyalgebraicfunctionsasexampleswhenndingderivatives,thatis,
functionsthatcanbebuiltupbytheusualalgebraicoperationsofaddition,subtraction,
multiplication,division,andraisingtoconstantpowers.Bothintheoryandpracticethere
are otherfunctions, , calledtranscendental,that t areveryuseful. . Most t importantamong
these are the trigonometric functions, , the e inverse trigonometric functions, , exponential
functions,andlogarithms.
Whenyourstencounteredthetrigonometricfunctionsitwasprobablyinthecontextof
\triangletrigonometry,"dening,forexample,thesineofanangleasthe\sideopposite
overthehypotenuse." Whilethiswillstillbeusefulinaninformalway,weneedtousea
moreexpansivedenitionofthetrigonometricfunctions. Firstanimportantnote: : while
degreemeasureofanglesissometimesconvenientbecauseitissofamiliar,itturnsoutto
beill-suitedtomathematicalcalculation,so(almost)everythingwedowillbeintermsof
radianmeasureofangles.
71
Delete page from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
cut pages from pdf online; deleting pages from pdf in reader
Delete page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy pdf pages to another pdf; delete pages of pdf preview
72
Chapter 4 4 Transcendental l Functions
Todenetheradianmeasurementsystem,weconsidertheunitcircleinthexy-plane:
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
......
.......
........
...........
........................................
...........
........
.......
.....
......
....
.....
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
....
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
.....
....
.....
......
......
........
.........
....................
..........
...................
.........
........
......
......
.....
.....
....
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
.
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
x
(cos x; sin x)
y
A
B
(1; 0)
An angle, x, at the center of the circle is associated with an arc of the circle which is said
to subtend the angle. In the gure, this arc is the portion of the circle from point (1; 0)
to point A. The length of this arc is the radian measure of the angle x; the fact that the
radian measure is an actual geometric length is largely responsible for the usefulness of
radian measure. The circumference of the unit circle is 2r = 2(1) = 2, so the radian
measure of the full circular angle (that is, of the 360 degree angle) is 2.
While an angle with a particular measure can appear anywhere around the circle, we
need a xed, conventional location so that we can use the coordinate system to dene
properties of the angle. The standard convention is to place the starting radius for the
angle on the positive x-axis, and to measure positive angles counterclockwise around the
circle. In the gure, x is the standard location of the angle =6, that is, the length of the
arc from (1; 0) to A is =6. The angle y in the picture is  =6, because the distance from
(1; 0) to B along the circle is also =6, but in a clockwise direction.
Now the fundamental trigonometric denitions are: the cosine of x and the sine of x
are the rst and second coordinates of the point A, as indicated in the gure. The angle x
shown can be viewed as an angle of a right triangle, meaning the usual triangle denitions
of the sine and cosine also make sense. Since the hypotenuse of the triangle is 1, the \side
opposite over hypotenuse" denition of the sine is the second coordinate of point A over
1, which is just the second coordinate; in other words, both methods give the same value
for the sine.
The simple triangle denitions work only for angles that can \t" in a right triangle,
namely, angles between 0 and =2. The coordinate denitions, on the other hand, apply
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. This page is aimed to help you learn how to delete page from your PDF document in VB.NET application.
extract page from pdf document; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
extract pdf pages online; extract one page from pdf acrobat
4.1 Trigonometric Functions
73
to any angles, as indicated in this gure:
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
......
.......
........
...........
........................................
...........
........
.......
.....
......
....
.....
....
....
....
...
....
...
....
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
.....
....
.....
......
......
........
.........
....................
.........
....................
.........
........
......
......
.....
.....
....
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
.
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
......
.......
.........
.............
.............................
..............
........
.......
......
......
.....
....
.....
....
....
...
....
...
...
....
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
x
A
(cos x; sin x)
The angle x is subtended by the heavy arc in the gure, that is, x = 7=6. Both
coordinates of point A in this gure are negative, so the sine and cosine of 7=6 are both
negative.
The remaining trigonometric functions can be most easily dened in terms of the sine
and cosine, as usual:
tan x =
sin x
cos x
cot x =
cos x
sin x
sec x =
1
cos x
csc x =
1
sin x
and they can also be dened as the corresponding ratios of coordinates.
Although the trigonometric functions are dened in terms of the unit circle, the unit
circle diagram is not what we normally consider the graph of a trigonometric function.
(The unit circle is the graph of, well, the circle.) We can easily get a qualitatively correct
idea of the graphs of the trigonometric functions from the unit circle diagram. Consider
the sine function, y = sin x. As x increases from 0 in the unit circle diagram, the second
coordinate of the point A goes from 0 to a maximum of 1, then back to 0, then to a
minimum of  1, then back to 0, and then it obviously repeats itself. So the graph of
y= sin x must look something like this:
1
1
=2
3=2
2
=2
3=2
2
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
.....
.....
...........
........
..........
......
.....
...
....
...
....
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
....
.....
........
...................
.......
.....
.....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
.....
.....
...........
........
..........
......
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
....
.....
.......
....................
.......
.....
.....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
extract pages pdf; deleting pages from pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
convert selected pages of pdf to word; extract one page from pdf file
74
Chapter 4 Transcendental Functions
Similarly, as angle x increases from 0 in the unit circle diagram, the rst coordinate of
the point A goes from 1 to 0 then to  1, back to 0 and back to 1, so the graph of y = cos x
must look something like this:
1
1
=2
3=2
2
=2
3=2
2
.........
........
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
....
......
........
..............
........
......
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
.....
.....
........
.................
........
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
....
...
....
....
....
......
........
..............
........
......
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
....
...
...
....
.....
.....
........
........
Exercises 4.1.
Some useful trigonometric identities are in appendixB.
1. Find all values of  such that sin() =  1; give your answer in radians. )
2. Find all values of  such that cos(2) = 1=2; give your answer in radians.)
3. Use an angle sum identity to compute cos(=12).)
4. Use an angle sum identity to compute tan(5=12).)
5. Verify the identity cos
2
(t)=(1   sin(t)) = 1 + sin(t).
6. Verify the identity 2 csc(2) = sec() csc().
7. Verify the identity sin(3)   sin() = 2 cos(2) sin().
8. Sketch y = 2 sin(x).
9. Sketch y = sin(3x).
10. Sketch y = sin( x).
11. Find all of the solutions of 2 sin(t)   1   sin
2
(t) = 0 in the interval [0; 2].)
sin x
What about the derivative of the sine function? The rules for derivatives that we have are
no help, since sin x is not an algebraic function. We need to return to the denition of the
derivative, set up a limit, and try to compute it. Here’s the denition:
d
dx
sin x = lim
x!0
sin(x + x)   sin x
x
:
Using some trigonometric identities, we can make a little progress on the quotient:
sin(x + x)   sin x
x
=
sin x cos x + sin x cos x   sin x
x
=sin x
cos x   1
x
+cos x
sin x
x
:
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
convert selected pages of pdf to word online; extract pages from pdf file online
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
extract pages from pdf on ipad; copy pdf page to powerpoint
4.3 A hard limit
75
This isolates the dicult bits in the two limits
lim
x!0
cos x   1
x
and
lim
x!0
sin x
x
:
Here we get a little lucky: it turns out that once we know the second limit the rst is quite
easy. The second is quite tricky, however. Indeed, it is the hardest limit we will actually
compute, and we devote a section to it.
We want to compute this limit:
lim
x!0
sin x
x
:
Equivalently, to make the notation a bit simpler, we can compute
lim
x!0
sin x
x
:
In the original context we need to keep x and x separate, but here it doesn’t hurt to
rename x to something more convenient.
To do this we need to be quite clever, and to employ some indirect reasoning. The
indirect reasoning is embodied in a theorem, frequently called the squeeze theorem.
THEOREM 4.3.1
Squeeze Theorem
Suppose that g(x)  f (x)  h(x) for all x
close to a but not equal to a. If lim
x!a
g(x) = L = lim
x!a
h(x), then lim
x!a
f(x) = L.
This theorem can be proved using the ocial denition of limit. We won’t prove it
here, but point out that it is easy to understand and believe graphically. The condition
says that f (x) is trapped between g(x) below and h(x) above, and that at x = a, both g
and h approach the same value. This means the situation looks something like gure4.3.1.
The wiggly curve is x
2
sin(=x), the upper and lower curves are x
2
and  x
2
. Since the
sine function is always between  1 and 1,  x
2
x
2
sin(=x)  x
2
,and it is easy to see
that lim
x!0
x
2
=0 = lim
x!0
x
2
. It is not so easy to see directly, that is algebraically,
that lim
x!0
x
2
sin(=x) = 0, because the =x prevents us from simply plugging in x = 0.
The squeeze theorem makes this \hard limit" as easy as the trivial limits involving x
2
.
To do the hard limit that we want, lim
x!0
(sin x)=x, we will nd two simpler functions
gand h so that g(x)  (sin x)=x  h(x), and so that lim
x!0
g(x) = lim
x!0
h(x). Not too
surprisingly, this will require some trigonometry and geometry. Referring to gure4.3.2,
xis the measure of the angle in radians. Since the circle has radius 1, the coordinates of
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete pages from pdf; extract pdf pages
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete page from pdf online; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
76
Chapter 4 Transcendental Functions
.
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
....
...........
....
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
...
...
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
.....
....
..
..
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
..
...
......
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
..
..
.....
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
...
......
..
..
.
.
..
..
..
..
.....
.
......................................
..........
..
...
...
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
...
....
...
..
.
..
.
.
.
.....
...
...
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
.
...
..
....
..
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
..
...
.......
...
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.......
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
...
..
...
......
...
.....
...
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
....
...
....
....
....
.....
....
.....
.....
......
......
.......
.......
.........
...........
...................
........................
...................
...........
.........
.......
.......
......
.....
......
....
.....
....
.....
....
....
...
....
...
....
...
...
...
....
...
..
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
...
....
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
......
......
.......
........
.........
.............
....................................................
.............
.........
........
.......
......
......
.....
.....
.....
....
....
....
....
....
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
....
..
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
Figure 4.3.1
The squeeze theorem.
point A are (cos x; sin x), and the area of the small triangle is (cos x sin x)=2. This triangle
is completely contained within the circular wedge-shaped region bordered by two lines and
the circle from (1; 0) to point A. Comparing the areas of the triangle and the wedge we
see (cos x sin x)=2  x=2, since the area of a circular region with angle  and radius r is
r
2
=2. With a little algebra this turns into (sin x)=x  1= cos x, giving us the h we seek.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
....
...
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
....
....
....
.....
.....
.....
......
......
.......
........
..........
.................
...............
0
1
1
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
x
A
B
..
.
..
..
.
..
..
.
Figure 4.3.2
Visualizing sin x=x.
To nd g, we note that the circular wedge is completely contained inside the larger
triangle. The height of the triangle, from (1; 0) to point B, is tan x, so comparing areas we
get x=2  (tan x)=2 = sin x=(2 cos x). With a little algebra this becomes cos x  (sin x)=x.
So now we have
cos x 
sin x
x
1
cos x
:
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
pdf extract pages; acrobat extract pages from pdf
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete page from pdf reader; add and delete pages from pdf
4.3 A hard limit
77
Finally, the two limits lim
x!0
cos x and lim
x!0
1= cos x are easy, because cos(0) = 1. By
the squeeze theorem, lim
x!0
(sin x)=x = 1 as well.
Before we can complete the calculation of the derivative of the sine, we need one other
limit:
lim
x!0
cos x   1
x
:
This limit is just as hard as sin x=x, but closely related to it, so that we don’t have to a
similar calculation; instead we can do a bit of tricky algebra.
cos x   1
x
=
cos x   1
x
cos x + 1
cos x + 1
=
cos2 x   1
x(cos x + 1)
=
sin
2
x
x(cos x + 1)
sin x
x
sin x
cos x + 1
:
To compute the desired limit it is sucient to compute the limits of the two nal fractions,
as x goes to 0. The rst of these is the hard limit we’ve just done, namely 1. The second
turns out to be simple, because the denominator presents no problem:
lim
x!0
sin x
cos x + 1
=
sin 0
cos 0 + 1
=
0
2
=0:
Thus,
lim
x!0
cos x   1
x
=0:
Exercises 4.3.
1. Compute lim
x!0
sin(5x)
x
)
2. Compute lim
x!0
sin(7x)
sin(2x)
)
3. Compute lim
x!0
cot(4x)
csc(3x)
)
4. Compute lim
x!0
tan x
x
)
5. Compute lim
x!=4
sin x   cos x
cos(2x)
)
6. For all x  0, 4x   9  f (x)  x
2
4x + 7. Find lim
x!4
f(x). )
7. For all x, 2x  g(x)  x
4
x
2
+2. Find lim
x!1
g(x). )
8. Use the Squeeze Theorem to show that lim
x!0
x
4
cos(2=x) = 0.
78
Chapter 4 Transcendental Functions
sin x
Now we can complete the calculation of the derivative of the sine:
d
dx
sin x = lim
x!0
sin(x + x)   sin x
x
= lim
x!0
sin x
cos x   1
x
+cos x
sin x
x
=sin x  0 + cos x  1 = cos x:
The derivative of a function measures the slope or steepness of the function; if we
examine the graphs of the sine and cosine side by side, it should be that the latter appears
to accurately describe the slope of the former, and indeed this is true:
1
1
=2
3=2
2
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
.....
.....
..........
.........
..........
......
.....
....
...
....
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
....
.....
........
...................
.......
.....
.....
...
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
sin x
1
1
=2
3=2
2
.....
..........
......
....
....
....
...
....
...
..
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
...
...
...
...
....
....
....
.....
.......
....................
.......
.....
....
....
....
...
...
...
...
...
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
..
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
..
...
...
....
...
....
....
....
......
..........
....
cos x
Notice that where the cosine is zero the sine does appear to have a horizontal tangent
line, and that the sine appears to be steepest where the cosine takes on its extreme values
of 1 and  1.
Of course, now that we know the derivative of the sine, we can compute derivatives of
more complicated functions involving the sine.
EXAMPLE 4.4.1
Compute the derivative of sin(x
2
).
d
dx
sin(x
2
)= cos(x
2
) 2x = 2x cos(x
2
):
EXAMPLE 4.4.2
Compute the derivative of sin
2
(x
3
5x).
d
dx
sin
2
(x
3
5x) =
d
dx
(sin(x
3
5x))
2
=2(sin(x
3
5x))
1
cos(x
3
5x)(3x
2
5)
=2(3x
2
5) cos(x
3
5x) sin(x
3
5x):
4.5 Derivatives of the Trigonometric Functions
79
Exercises 4.4.
Find the derivatives of the following functions.
1. sin
2
(
p
x))
2.
p
xsin x)
3.
1
sin x
)
4.
x
2
+x
sin x
)
5.
p
 sin2 x )
All of the other trigonometric functions can be expressed in terms of the sine, and so their
derivatives can easily be calculated using the rules we already have. For the cosine we
need to use two identities,
cos x = sin(x +
2
);
sin x =   cos(x +
2
):
Now:
d
dx
cos x =
d
dx
sin(x +
2
)= cos(x +
2
) 1 =   sin x
d
dx
tan x =
d
dx
sin x
cos x
=
cos2 x + sin
2
x
cos2 x
=
1
cos2 x
=sec
2
x
d
dx
sec x =
d
dx
(cos x)
1
= 1(cos x)
2
 sin x) =
sin x
cos2 x
=sec x tan x
The derivatives of the cotangent and cosecant are similar and left as exercises.
Exercises 4.5.
Find the derivatives of the following functions.
1. sin x cos x)
2. sin(cos x))
3.
p
xtan x )
4. tan x=(1 + sin x))
5. cot x)
6. csc x)
7. x
3
sin(23x
2
))
8. sin
2
x+ cos
2
x)
9. sin(cos(6x)))
10. Compute
d
d
sec 
1+ sec 
.)
11. Compute
d
dt
t
5
cos(6t). )
12. Compute
d
dt
t
3
sin(3t)
cos(2t)
)
13. Find all points on the graph of f (x) = sin
2
(x) at which the tangent line is horizontal. )
80
Chapter 4 Transcendental Functions
14. Find all points on the graph of f (x) = 2 sin(x) sin
2
(x) at which the tangent line is horizontal.
)
15. Find an equation for the tangent line to sin
2
(x) at x = =3. )
16. Find an equation for the tangent line to sec
2
xat x = =3. )
17. Find an equation for the tangent line to cos
2
 sin
2
(4x) at x = =6.)
18. Find the points on the curve y = x + 2 cos x that have a horizontal tangent line.)
19. Let C be a circle of radius r. Let A be an arc on C subtending a central angle . Let B be
the chord of C whose endpoints are the endpoints of A. (Hence, B also subtends .) Let
sbe the length of A and let d be the length of B. Sketch a diagram of the situation and
compute lim
!0
+
s=d.
An exponential function has the form a
x
,where a is a constant; examples are 2
x
,10
x
,e
x
.
The logarithmic functions are the inverses of the exponential functions, that is, functions
that \undo" the exponential functions, just as, for example, the cube root function \un-
does" the cube function:
3
p
23 = 2. Note that the original function also undoes the inverse
function: (
3
p
8)
3
=8.
Let f (x) = 2
x
. The inverse of this function is called the logarithm base 2, denoted
log
2
(x) or (especially in computer science circles) lg(x). What does this really mean? The
logarithm must undo the action of the exponential function, so for example it must be that
lg(2
3
)= 3|starting with 3, the exponential function produces 2
3
=8, and the logarithm
of 8 must get us back to 3. A little thought shows that it is not a coincidence that lg(2
3
)
simply gives the exponent|the exponent is the original value that we must get back to.
In other words, the logarithm is the exponent. Remember this catchphrase, and what it
means, and you won’t go wrong. (You do have to remember what it means. Like any
good mnemonic, \the logarithm is the exponent" leaves out a lot of detail, like \Which
exponent?" and \Exponent of what?")
EXAMPLE 4.6.1 What is the value of log
10
(1000)? The \10" tells us the appropriate
number to use for the base of the exponential function. The logarithm is the exponent,
so the question is, what exponent E makes 10
E
=1000? If we can nd such an E, then
log
10
(1000) = log
10
(10
E
)= E; nding the appropriate exponent is the same as nding the
logarithm. In this case, of course, it is easy: E = 3 so log
10
(1000) = 3.
Let’s review some laws of exponents and logarithms; let a be a positive number. Since
a
5
=a a  a a  a and a
3
=a a  a, it’s clear that a
5
a
3
=a a  a a  a a  a a = a
8
=a
5+3
,
and in general that a
m
a
n
=a
m+n
.Since \the logarithm is the exponent," it’s no surprise
that this translates directly into a fact about the logarithm function. Here are three facts
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested