devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Copy page from pdf control application platform web page azure .net web browser Chapter%203%20Data%20Converter%20Architectures%20F10-part800

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.99 
Figure 3.116: Incremental and Absolute Optical Encoders 
The absolute optical encoder (right-hand diagram in Figure 3.116) overcomes these 
disadvantages but is more expensive. An absolute optical encoder's disc is divided up into 
N sectors (N = 5 for example shown), and each sector is further divided radially along its 
length into opaque and transparent sections, forming a unique N-bit digital word with a 
maximum count of 2
N
– 1. The digital word formed radially by each sector increments in 
value from one sector to the next, usually employing Gray code. Binary coding could be 
used, but can produce large errors if a single bit is incorrectly interpreted by the sensors. 
Gray code overcomes this defect: the maximum error produced by an error in any single 
bit of the Gray code is only 1 LSB after the Gray code is converted into binary code. A 
set of N light sensors responds to the N-bit digital word which corresponds to the disc's 
absolute angular position. Industrial optical encoders achieve up to 16-bit resolution, with 
absolute accuracies that approach the resolution (20 arc seconds). Both absolute and 
incremental optical encoders, however, may suffer damage in harsh industrial 
environments.  
Resolver-to-Digital Converters (RDCs) and Synchros 
Machine-tool and robotics manufacturers have increasingly turned to resolvers and 
synchros to provide accurate angular and rotational information. These devices excel in 
demanding factory applications requiring small size, long-term reliability, absolute 
position measurement, high accuracy, and low-noise operation.  
A diagram of a typical synchro and resolver is shown in Figure 3.117. Both sycnchros 
and resolvers employ single-winding rotors that revolve inside fixed stators. In the case 
of a simple synchro, the stator has three windings oriented 120º apart and electrically 
LIGHT
SOURCES
SENSORS
CONDITIONING
ELECTRONICS
SHAFT
DISC
LIGHT
SOURCES
SENSORS
CONDITIONING
ELECTRONICS
DISC
5 BITS
SHAFT
INCREMENTAL
ABSOLUTE
5 BITS
θ
θ
Copy page from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
deleting pages from pdf file; cut pages from pdf preview
Copy page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pdf pages; extract one page from pdf reader
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.100 
connected in a Y-connection. Resolvers differ from synchros in that their stators have 
only two windings oriented at 90º.  
Figure 3.117: Synchros and Resolvers 
Because synchros have three stator coils in a 120º orientation, they are more difficult than 
resolvers to manufacture and are therefore more costly. Today, synchros find decreasing 
use, except in certain military and avionic retrofit applications.  
Modern resolvers, in contrast, are available in a brushless form that employ a transformer 
to couple the rotor signals from the stator to the rotor. The primary winding of this 
transformer resides on the stator, and the secondary on the rotor. Other resolvers use 
more traditional brushes or slip rings to couple the signal into the rotor winding. 
Brushless resolvers are more rugged than synchros because there are no brushes to break 
or dislodge, and the life of a brushless resolver is limited only by its bearings. Most 
resolvers are specified to work over 2-V to 40-V rms and at frequencies from 400 Hz to 
10 kHz. Angular accuracies range from 5 arc-minutes to 0.5 arc-minutes. (There are 60 
arc-minutes in one degree, and 60 arc-seconds in one arc-minute. Hence, one arc-minute 
is equal to 0.0167 degrees). 
In operation, synchros and resolvers resemble rotating transformers. The rotor winding is 
excited by an ac reference voltage, at frequencies up to a few kHz. The magnitude of the 
voltage induced in any stator winding is proportional to the sine of the angle, θ, between 
the rotor coil axis and the stator coil axis. In the case of a synchro, the voltage induced 
across any pair of stator terminals will be the vector sum of the voltages across the two 
connected coils.  
R1
R2
S1
S2
S3
R1
R2
S1
S2
S3
S4
S1 TO S3 = V sin 
ω
t sin θ
S3 TO S2 = V sin 
ω
t sin (θ + 120°)
S2 TO S1 = V sin 
ω
t sin (θ + 240°)
S1 TO S3 = V sin 
ω
t sin θ
S4 TO S2 = V sin 
ω
t sin (θ + 90°)
= V sin 
ω
t cos θ
ROTOR
ROTOR
STATOR
STATOR
ROTOR
STATOR
SYNCHRO
RESOLVER
V sin 
ω
t
V sin 
ω
t
θ
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
in Page. VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page. This VB.NET example shows how to copy an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into another page.
extract page from pdf document; convert selected pages of pdf to word
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
This C#.NET example describes how to copy an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into another page. // Define input and output documents.
deleting pages from pdf in reader; extract page from pdf acrobat
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.101 
For example, if the rotor of a synchro is excited with a reference voltage, Vsinωt, across 
its terminals R1 and R2, then the stator's terminal will see voltages in the form: 
S1 to S3 = V sinωt sinθ     
Eq. 3.2 
S3 to S2 = V sinωt sin (θ + 120º) 
Eq. 3.3 
S2 to S1 = V sinωt sin (θ + 240º),     
Eq. 3.4 
where θ is the shaft angle. 
In the case of a resolver, with a rotor ac reference voltage of Vsinωt, the stator's terminal 
voltages will be: 
S1 to S3 = V sinωt sin θ  
Eq. 3.5 
S4 to S2 = V sinωt sin(θ + 90º) = V sinωt cosθ.   Eq. 3.6 
It should be noted that the 3-wire synchro output can be easily converted into the 
resolver-equivalent format using a Scott-T transformer. Therefore, the following signal 
processing example describes only the resolver configuration.  
A typical resolver-to-digital converter (RDC) is shown functionally in Figure 3.118. The 
two outputs of the resolver are applied to cosine and sine multipliers. These multipliers 
incorporate sine and cosine lookup tables and function as multiplying digital-to-analog 
converters. Begin by assuming that the current state of the up/down counter is a digital 
number representing a trial angle, ϕ. The converter seeks to adjust the digital angle, ϕ, 
continuously to become equal to, and to track θ, the analog angle being measured. The 
resolver's stator output voltages are written as: 
V
1
= V sinωt sinθ    
Eq. 3.7 
V
2
= V sinωt cosθ    
Eq. 3.8 
where θ is the angle of the resolver's rotor. The digital angle ϕ is applied to the cosine 
multiplier, and its cosine is multiplied by V
1
to produce the term: 
V sinωt sinθ cosϕ.    
Eq. 3.9 
The digital angle ϕ is also applied to the sine multiplier and multiplied by V
2
to product 
the term: 
V sinωt cosθ sinϕ.    
Eq. 3.10 
These two signals are subtracted from each other by the error amplifier to yield an ac 
error signal of the form: 
V sinωt [sinθ cosϕ – cosθ sinϕ]. 
Eq. 3.11 
Using a simple trigonometric identity, this reduces to: 
V sinωt [sin (θ –ϕ)].   
Eq. 3.12 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET. C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C#
cutting pdf pages; extract one page from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET Project. A Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library, able to perform image extraction from multiple page adobe PDF file in VB.NET.
delete page from pdf acrobat; extract pages from pdf files
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.102 
The detector synchronously demodulates this ac error signal, using the resolver's rotor 
voltage as a reference. This results in a dc error signal proportional to  
sin(θ–ϕ).  
The dc error signal feeds an integrator, the output of which drives a voltage-controlled-
oscillator (VCO). The VCO, in turn, causes the up/down counter to count in the proper 
direction to cause: 
Sin (θ – ϕ) → 0.   
Eq. 3.13 
When this is achieved, 
θ – ϕ → 0,   
Eq. 3.14 
and therefore 
ϕ = θ    
Eq. 3.15 
to  within one count. Hence, the counter's digital output, ϕ, represents the angle θ. The 
latches enable this data to be transferred externally without interrupting the loop's 
tracking.  
Figure 3.118: Resolver-to-Digital Converter (RDC) 
COSINE
MULTIPLIER
SINE
MULTIPLIER
DETECTOR
INTEGRATOR
UP / DOWN
COUNTER
VCO
V sin 
ω
t sin θ
V sin 
ω
t cos θ
V sin 
ω
t sin θ cos 
ϕ
V sin 
ω
t cos θ sin 
ϕ
_
+
V sin 
ω
t [sin (θ –
ϕ 
)]
ERROR
V sin 
ω
t
ROTOR REFERENCE
STATOR
INPUTS
LATCHES
K sin (θ –
ϕ 
)
ϕ
ϕ
= DIGITAL ANGLE
ϕ
VELOCITY
WHEN ERROR = 0,
ϕ
= θ ± 1 LSB
ϕ
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Please follow the sections below to learn more. DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class. How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; pdf extract pages
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.103 
This circuit is equivalent to a so-called type-2 servo loop, because it has, in effect, two 
integrators. One is the counter, which accumulates pulses; the other is the integrator at the 
output of the detector. In a type-2 servo loop with a constant rotational velocity input, the 
output digital word continuously follows, or tracks the input, without needing externally 
derived convert commands, and with no steady state phase lag between the digital output 
word and actual shaft angle. An error signal appears only during periods of acceleration 
or deceleration.  
As an added bonus, the tracking RDC provides an analog dc output voltage directly 
proportional to the shaft's rotational velocity. This is a useful feature if velocity is to be 
measured or used as a stabilization term in a servo system, and it makes additional 
tachometers unnecessary.  
Since the operation of an RDC depends only on the ratio between input signal 
amplitudes, attenuation in the lines connecting them to resolvers doesn't substantially 
affect performance. For similar reasons, these converters are not greatly susceptible to 
waveform distortion. In fact, they can operate with as much as 10% harmonic distortion 
on the input signals; some applications actually use square-wave references with little 
additional error.  
Tracking ADCs are therefore ideally suited to RDCs. While other ADC architectures, 
such as successive approximation, could be used, the tracking converter is the most 
accurate and efficient for this application.  
Because the tracking converter doubly integrates its error signal, the device offers a high 
degree of noise immunity (12-dB-per-octave rolloff). The net area under any given noise 
spike produces an error. However, typical inductively coupled noise spikes have equal 
positive and negative going waveforms. When integrated, this results in a zero net error 
signal. The resulting noise immunity, combined with the converter's insensitivity to 
voltage drops, lets the user locate the converter at a considerable distance from the 
resolver. Noise rejection is further enhanced by the detector's rejection of any signal not 
at the reference frequency, such as wideband noise.  
The AD2S90 is one of a number of integrated RDCs offered by Analog Devices. The 
general architecture is similar to that of Figure 3.118. Further details on synchro and 
resolver-to-digital converters can be found in References 69 and 70.  
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
extract pages from pdf document; extract one page from pdf online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
You can use specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of PDF file; you can also copy and paste pages from a PDF document into another PDF file.
delete pages from pdf online; delete page from pdf document
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.104 
REFERENCES: 
3.2 ADC ARCHITECTURES 
1.  Reza Moghimi, "Amplifiers as Comparators," Ask the Applications Engineer 31, Analog Dialogue, 
Vol. 37-04, Analog Devices, April 2003, http://www.analog.com. 
2.  James N. Giles, "High Speed Transistor Difference Amplifier," U.S. Patent 3,843,934, filed January 
31 1973, issued October 22, 1974. (describes one of the first high-speed ECL comparators, the 
AM685). 
3.  Christopher W. Mangelsdorf, A 400-MHz Input Flash Converter with Error CorrectionIEEE 
Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 25, No. 1, February 1990, pp. 184-191. (a discussion of the 
AD770, an 8-bit 200 MSPS flash ADC. The paper describes the comparator metastable state problem 
and how to optimize the ADC design to minimize its effects). 
4.  Charles E. Woodward, A Monolithic Voltage-Comparator Array for A/D Converters, IEEE Journal of 
Solid State Circuits, Vol. SC-10, No. 6, December 1975, pp. 392-399 . (an early paper on a 3-bit flash 
converter optimized to minimize metastable state errors). 
5.  Paul M. Rainey, "Facimile Telegraph System," U.S. Patent 1,608,527, filed July 20, 1921, issued 
November 30, 1926. (although A. H. Reeves is generally credited with the invention of PCM, this 
patent discloses an electro-mechanical PCM system complete with A/D and D/A converters. The 5-bit 
electro-mechanical ADC described is probably the first documented flash converter. The patent was 
largely ignored and forgotten until many years after the various Reeves' patents were issued in 1939-
1942). 
6.  R. W. Sears, "Electron Beam Deflection Tube for Pulse Code Modulation," Bell System Technical 
Journal, Vol. 27, pp. 44-57, Jan. 1948. (describes an electon-beam deflection tube 7-bit, 100-kSPS 
flash converter for early experimental PCM work). 
7.  Frank Gray, "Pulse Code Communication," U.S. Patent 2,632,058, filed November 13, 1947, issued 
March 17, 1953. (detailed patent on the Gray code and its application to electron beam coders). 
8.  J. O. Edson and H. H. Henning, "Broadband Codecs for an Experimental 224Mb/s PCM Terminal," 
Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 44, pp. 1887-1940, Nov. 1965. (summarizes experiments on 
ADCs based on the electron tube coder as well as a bit-per-stage Gray code 9-bit solid state ADC. The 
electron beam coder was 9-bits at 12 MSPS, and represented the fastest of its type at the time). 
9.  R. Staffin and R. D. Lohman, "Signal Amplitude Quantizer," U.S. Patent 2,869,079, filed December 
19, 1956, issued January 13, 1959. (describes flash and subranging conversion using tubes and 
transistors). 
10.  Goto, et. al., "Esaki Diode High-Speed Logical Circuits," IRE Transactions on Electronic 
Computers, Vol. EC-9, March 1960, pp. 25-29. (describes how to use tunnel diodes as logic 
elements). 
11.  T. Kiyomo, K. Ikeda, and H. Ichiki, "Analog-to-Digital Converter Using an Esaki Diode Stack," IRE 
Transactions on Electronic Computers, Vol. EC-11, December 1962, pp. 791-792. (description of a 
low resolution 3-bit flash ADC using a stack of tunnel diodes). 
12.  H. R. Schindler, "Using the Latest Semiconductor Circuits in a UHF Digital Converter," Electronics
August 1963, pp. 37-40. (describes a 6-bit 50-MSPS subranging ADC using three 2-bit tunnel diode 
flash converters).  
13.  J. B. Earnshaw, "Design for a Tunnel Diode-Transistor Store with Nondestructive Read-out of 
Information," IEEE Transactions on Electronic Computers, EC-13, 1964 , pp. 710-722. (use of 
tunnel diodes as memory elements). 
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.105 
14.  Willard K. Bucklen, "A Monolithic Video A/D Converter," Digital VideoVol. 2, Society of Motion 
Picture and Television Engineers, March 1979, pp. 34-42. (describes the revolutionary TDC1007J 8-
bit 20MSPS video flash converter. Originally introduced at the February 3, 1979 SMPTE Winter 
Conference in San Francisco, Bucklen accepted an Emmy award for this product in 1988 and was 
responsible for the initial marketing and applications support for the device).  
15.  J. Peterson, "A Monolithic video A/D Converter," IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. SC-14, 
No. 6, December 1979, pp. 932-937. (another detailed description of the TRW TDC1007J 8-bit, 20-
MSPS flash converter).  
16.  Yukio Akazawa et. al., A 400MSPS 8 Bit Flash A/D Converter1987 ISSCC Digest of Technical 
Papers, pp. 98-99. (describes a monolithic flash converter using Gray decoding). 
17.  A. Matsuzawa et al., An 8b 600MHz Flash A/D Converter with Multi-stage Duplex-gray Coding, 
Symposium VLSI Circuits, Digest of Technical Papers, May 1991, pp. 113-114. (describes a 
monolithic flash converter using Gray decoding).  
18.  Chuck Lane, A 10-bit 60MSPS Flash ADC, Proceedings of the 1989 Bipolar Circuits and 
Technology Meeting, IEEE Catalog No. 89CH2771-4, September 1989, pp. 44-47. (describes an 
interpolating method for reducing the number of preamps required in a flash converter). 
19.  W. W. Rouse Ball and H. S. M. Coxeter, Mathematical Recreations and Essays, Thirteenth Edition, 
Dover Publications, 1987, pp. 50, 51. (describes a mathematical puzzle for measuring unknown 
weights using the minimum number of weighing operations. The solution proposed in the 1500's is the 
same basic successive approximation algorithm used today). 
20.  Alec Harley Reeves, "Electric Signaling System," U.S. Patent 2,272,070, filed November 22, 1939, 
issued February 3, 1942. Also French Patent 852,183 issued 1938, and British Patent 538,860 issued 
1939. (the ground-breaking patent on PCM. Interestingly enough, the ADC and DAC proposed by 
Reeves are counting types, and not successive approximation).  
21.  John C. Schelleng, "Code Modulation Communication System," U.S. Patent 2,453,461, filed June 19, 
1946, issued November 9, 1948. (an interesting description of a rather cumbersome successive 
approximation ADC based on vacuum tube technology. This converter was not very practical, but did 
illustrate the concept. Also in the patent is a description of a corresponding binary DAC). 
22.  W. M. Goodall, "Telephony by Pulse Code Modulation," Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 26, pp. 
395-409, July 1947. (describes an experimental PCM system using a 5-bit, 8KSPS successive 
approximation ADC based on the subtraction of binary weighted charges from a capacitor to 
implement the internal subtraction/DAC function. It required 5 internal reference voltages). 
23.  Harold R. Kaiser, et al, "High-Speed Electronic Analogue-to-Digital Converter System," U.S. Patent 
2,784,396, filed April 2, 1953, issued March 5, 1957. (one of the first SAR ADCs to use an actual 
binary-weighted DAC internally). 
24.  B. D. Smith, "Coding by Feedback Methods," Proceedings of the I. R. E., Vol. 41, August 1953, pp. 
1053-1058. (Smith uses an internal DAC and also points out that a non-linear transfer function can be 
achieved by using a DAC with non-uniform bit weights, a technique which is widely used in today's 
voiceband ADCs with built-in companding).  
25.  L.A. Meacham and E. Peterson, "An Experimental Multichannel Pulse Code Modulation System of 
Toll Quality," Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 27, No. 1, January 1948, pp. 1-43. (describes 
non-linear diode-based compressors and expanders for generating a non-linear ADC/DAC transfer 
function). 
26.  Bernard M. Gordon and Robert P. Talambiras, "Signal Conversion Apparatus," U.S. Patent 3,108,266, 
filed July 22, 1955, issued October 22, 1963. (classic patent describing Gordon's 11-bit, 20kSPS 
vacuum tube successive approximation ADC done at Epsco. The internal DAC represents the first 
known use of equal currents switched into an R/2R ladder network.) 
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.106 
27.  Bernard M. Gordon and Evan T. Colton, "Signal Conversion Apparatus," U.S. Patent 2,997,704, filed 
February 24, 1958, issued August 22, 1961. (classic patent describes the logic to perform the 
successive approximation algorithm in a SAR ADC). 
28.  J. R. Gray and S. C. Kitsopoulos, "A Precision Sample-and-Hold Circuit with Subnanosecond 
Switching," IEEE Transactions on Circuit Theory, CT11, September 1964, pp. 389-396. (one of the 
first papers on the detailed analysis of a sample-and-hold circuit). 
29.  T. C. Verster, "A Method to Increase the Accuracy of Fast Serial-Parallel Analog-to-Digital 
Converters," IEEE Transactions on Electronic Computers, EC-13, 1964, pp. 471-473. (one of the 
first references to the use of error correction in a subranging ADC).  
30.  G. G. Gorbatenko, High-Performance Parallel-Serial Analog to Digital Converter with Error 
Correction, IEEE National Convention Record, New York, March 1966. (another early reference to 
the use of error correction in a subranging ADC). 
31.  D. J. Kinniment, D. Aspinall, and D.B.G. Edwards, "High-Speed Analogue-Digital Converter," IEE 
Proceedings, Vol. 113, pp. 2061-2069, Dec. 1966. (a 7-bit 9MSPS three-stage pipelined error 
corrected converter is described based on recircuilating through a 3-bit stage three times. Tunnel 
(Esaki) diodes are used for the individual comparators. The article also shows a proposed faster 
pipelined 7-bit architecture using three individual 3-bit stages with error correction. The article also 
describes a fast bootstrapped diode-bridge sample-and-hold circuit). 
32.  O. A. Horna, "A 150Mbps A/D and D/A Conversion System," Comsat Technical Review, Vol. 2, No. 
1, pp. 52-57, 1972. (a detailed description and analysis of a subranging ADC with error correction).  
33.  J. L. Fraschilla, R. D. Caveney, and R. M. Harrison, "High Speed Analog-to-Digital Converter," U.S. 
Patent 3,597,761, filed Nov. 14, 1969, issued Aug. 13, 1971. (Describes an 8-bit, 5-MSPS subranging 
ADC with switched references to second comparator bank). 
34.  Stephen H. Lewis, Scott Fetterman, George F. Gross, Jr., R. Ramachandran, and T. R. Viswanathan, 
"A 10-b 20-Msample/s Analog-Digital Converter, IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 27, No. 
3, March 1992, pp. 351-358. (a detailed description and analysis of an error corrected subranging 
ADC using 1.5-bit pipelined stages). 
35.  Roy Gosser and Frank Murden, "A 12-bit 50MSPS Two-Stage A/D Converter," 1995 ISSCC Digest 
of Technical Papers, p. 278. (a description of the AD9042 error corrected subranging ADC using 
MagAMP stages for the internal ADCs). 
36.  B. D. Smith, "An Unusual Electronic Analog-Digital Conversion Method," IRE Transactions on 
Instrumentation, June 1956, pp. 155-160. (possibly the first published description of the binary-coded 
and Gray-coded bit-per-stage ADC architectures. Smith mentions similar work partially covered in R. 
P. Sallen's 1949 thesis at M.I.T.). 
37.  N. E. Chasek, "Pulse Code Modulation Encoder," U.S. Patent 3,035,258, filed November 14, 1960, 
issued May 15, 1962. (an early patent showing a diode-based circuit for realizing the Gray code 
folding transfer function). 
38.  F. D. Waldhauer, "Analog-to-Digital Converter," U.S. Patent 3,187,325, filed July 2, 1962, issued 
June 1, 1965. (a classic patent using op amps with diode switches in the feedback loops to implement 
the Gray code folding transfer function).  
39.  J. O. Edson and H. H. Henning, "Broadband Codecs for an Experimental 224Mb/s PCM Terminal," 
Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 44, pp. 1887-1940, Nov. 1965. (a further description of a 9-bit 
ADC based on Waldhauer's folding stage).  
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.107 
40.  Udo Fiedler and Dieter Seitzer, "A High-Speed 8 Bit A/D Converter Based on a Gray-Code Multiple 
Folding Circuit," IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. SC-14, No. 3, June 1979, pp. 547-551. 
(an early monolithic folding ADC). 
41.  Rudy J. van de Plassche and Rob E. J. van de Grift, "A High-Speed 7 Bit A/D Converter," IEEE 
Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. SC-14, No. 6, December 1979, pp. 938-943. (a monolithic 
folding ADC). 
42.  Rob. E. J. van de Grift and Rudy J. van de Plassche, "A Monolithic 8-bit Video A/D Converter, IEEE 
Journal of Solid State Circuits, Vol. SC-19, No. 3, June 1984, pp. 374-378. (a monolithic folding 
ADC).  
43.  Rob. E. J. van de Grift, Ivo W. J. M. Rutten and Martien van der Veen, "An 8-bit Video ADC 
Incorporating Folding and Interpolation Techniques," IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, Vol. SC-
22, No. 6,  December 1987, pp. 944-953. (another monolithic folding ADC). 
44.  Rudy van de Plassche, Integrated Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog Converters, Kluwer 
Academic Publishers, 1994, pp. 148-187. (a good textbook on ADCs and DACs with a section on 
folding ADCs indicated by the referenced page numbers).  
45.  Carl Moreland, "An 8-bit 150 MSPS Serial ADC," 1995 ISSCC Digest of Technical Papers, Vol. 38, 
p. 272. (a description of an 8-bit ADC with 5 folding stages followed by a 3-bit flash converter).  
46.  Carl Moreland, An Analog-to-Digital Converter Using Serial-Ripple Architecture, Masters' Thesis, 
Florida State University College of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, 1995. 
(Moreland's early work on folding ADCs).  
47.  Frank Murden, "Analog to Digital Converter Using Complementary Differential Emitter Pairs," U.S. 
Patent 5,550,492, filed December 1, 1994, issued August 27, 1996. (a description of an ADC based on 
the MagAMP folding stage  
48.  Carl W. Moreland, "Analog to Digital Converter Having a Magnitude Amplifier with an Improved 
Differential Input Amplifier," U.S. Patent 5,554,943, filed December 1, 1994, issued September 10, 
1996. (a description of an 8-bit ADC with 5 folding stages followed by a 3-bit flash converter). 
49.  Frank Murden and Carl W. Moreland, "N-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter with N-1 Magnitude 
Amplifiers and N Comparators," U.S. Patent 5,684,419, filed December 1, 1994, issued November 4, 
1997. (another patent on the MagAMP folding architecture applied to an ADC). 
50.  Carl Moreland, Frank Murden, Michael Elliott, Joe Young, Mike Hensley, and Russell Stop, "A 14-bit 
100-Msample/s Subranging ADC, IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, Vol. 35, No. 12, December 
2000, pp. 1791-1798. (describes the architecture used in the 14-bit AD6645 ADC).  
51.  Frank Murden and Michael R. Elliott, "Linearizing Structures and Methods for Adjustable-Gain 
Folding Amplifiers," U.S. Patent 6,172,636B1, filed July 13, 1999, issued January 9, 2001. (describes 
methods for trimming the folding amplifiers in an ADC).  
52.  Bernard M. Oliver and Claude E. Shannon, "Communication System Employing Pulse Code 
Modulation," U.S. Patent 2,801,281, filed February 21, 1946, issued July 30, 1957. (charge run-down 
ADC and Shannon-Rack DAC)
53.  Arthur H. Dickinson, "Device to Manifest an Unknown Voltage as a Numerical Quantity," U.S. Patent 
2,872,670, filed May 26, 1951, issued February 3, 1959. (ramp run-up ADC). 
54.  K. Howard Barney, "Binary Quantizer," U.S. Patent 2,715,678, filed May 26, 1950, issued August 16, 
1955. (tracking ADC). 
55.  Bernard M. Gordon and Robert P. Talambiras, "Information Translating Apparatus and Method," U.S. 
Patent 2,989,741, filed July 22, 1955, issued June 20, 1961 . (tracking ADC). 
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.108 
56.  John L. Lindesmith, "Voltage-to-Digital Measuring Circuit," U.S. Patent 2,835,868, filed September 
16, 1952, issued May 20, 1958. (voltage-to-frequency ADC).  
57.  Paul Klonowski, "Analog-to-Digital Conversion Using Voltage-to-Frequency Converters," 
Application Note AN-276, Analog Devices, Inc. (a good application note on VFCs).  
58.  James M. Bryant, "Voltage-to-Frequency Converters," Application Note AN-361, Analog Devices, 
Inc. (a good overview of VFCs).  
59.  Walt Jung, "Operation and Applications of the AD654 IC V-F Converter," Application Note AN-278
Analog Devices, Inc. 
60.  Steve Martin, "Using the AD650 Voltage-to-Frequency Converter as a Frequency-to-Voltage 
Converter," Application Note AN-279, Analog Devices, Inc. (a description of a frequency-to-voltage 
converter using the popular AD650 VFC).  
61.  Robin N. Anderson and Howard A. Dorey, "Digital Voltmeters," U.S. Patent 3,267,458, filed August 
20, 1962, issued August 16, 1966. (charge balance dual slope voltmeter ADC). 
62.  Richard Olshausen, "Analog-to-Digital Converter," U.S. Patent 3,281,827, filed June 27, 1963, issued 
October 25, 1966. (charge balance dual slope ADC). 
63.  Roswell W. Gilbert, "Analog-to-Digital Converter," U.S. Patent 3,051,939, filed May 8, 1957, issued 
August 28, 1962. (dual-slope ADC). 
64.  Stephan K. Ammann, "Integrating Analog-to-Digital Converter," U.S. Patent 3,316,547, filed July 15, 
1964, issued April 25, 1967. (dual-slope ADC). 
65.  Ivar Wold, "Integrating Analog-to-Digital Converter Having Digitally-Derived Offset Error 
Compensation and Bipolar Operation without Zero Discontinuity," U.S. Patent 3,872,466, filed July 
19, 1973, issued March 18, 1975. (quad-slope ADC). 
66.  Hans Bent Aasnaes, "Triple Integrating Ramp Analog-to-Digital Converter," U.S. Patent 3,577,140
filed June 27, 1967, issued May 4, 1971. (triple-slope ADC)
67.  Frederick Bondzeit, Lewis J. Neelands, "Multiple Slope Analog-to-Digital Converter," U.S. Patent 
3,564,538, filed January 29, 1968, issued February 16, 1971. (triple-slope ADC).  
68.  Desmond Wheable, "Triple-Slope Analog-to-Digital Converters," U.S. Patent 3,678,506, filed 
October 2, 1968, issued July 18, 1972. (triple-slope ADC). 
69.  Dan Sheingold, Analog-Digital Conversion Handbook, Prentice-Hall, 1986, ISBN-0-13-032848-0, 
pp. 441-471. (this chapter contains an excellent tutorial on optical, synchro, and resolver-to-digital 
conversion). 
70.  Dennis Fu, "Circuit Applications of the AD2S90 Resolver-to-Digital Converter," Application Note 
AN-230, Analog Devices. (applications of the AD2S90 RTD).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested