devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Extract page from pdf document SDK application service wpf windows winforms dnn Chapter%203%20Data%20Converter%20Architectures%20F11-part801

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.109 
SECTION 3.3: SIGMA-DELTA CONVERTERS 
Walt Kester, James Bryant 
Historical Perspective 
The sigma-delta (Σ-∆) ADC architecture had its origins in the early development phases 
of pulse code modulation (PCM) systems—specifically, those related to transmission 
techniques called delta modulation and differential PCM.  (An excellent discussion of 
both the history and concepts of the sigma-delta ADC can be found by Max Hauser in 
Reference 1). Delta modulation was first invented, like classical PCM, at the ITT 
Laboratories in France by the director of the laboratories, E. M. Deloraine, S. Van 
Mierlo, and B. Derjavitch in 1946 (References 2, 3). The principle was rediscovered, 
several years later, at the Phillips Laboratories in Holland, whose engineers published the 
first extensive studies both of the single-bit and multi-bit concepts in 1952 and 1953 
(References 4, 5). In 1950, C. C. Cutler of Bell Telephone Labs in the U.S. filed a 
seminal patent on differential PCM which covered the same essential concepts 
(Reference 6).  
The driving force behind delta modulation and differential PCM was to achieve higher 
transmission efficiency by transmitting the changes (delta) in value between consecutive 
samples rather than the actual samples themselves.  
In delta modulation, the analog signal is quantized by a one-bit ADC (a comparator) as 
shown in Figure 3.119A. The comparator output is converted back to an analog signal 
with a 1-bit DAC, and subtracted from the input after passing through an integrator. The 
shape of the analog signal is transmitted as follows: a "1" indicates that a positive 
excursion has occurred since the last sample, and a "0" indicates that a negative excursion 
has occurred since the last sample.  
If the analog signal remains at a fixed dc level for a period of time, a pattern alternating 
of "0s" and "1s" is obtained. It should be noted that differential PCM (see Figure 3.119B) 
uses exactly the same concept except a multibit ADC is used rather than a comparator to 
derived the transmitted information.  
Since there is no limit to the number of pulses of the same sign that may occur, delta 
modulation systems are capable of tracking signals of any amplitude. In theory, there is 
no peak clipping. However, the theoretical limitation of delta modulation is that the 
analog signal must not change too rapidly. The problem of slope clipping is shown in 
Figure 3.120. Here, although each sampling instant indicates a positive excursion, the 
analog signal is rising too quickly, and the quantizer is unable to keep pace.  
Extract page from pdf document - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf reader; export pages from pdf online
Extract page from pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete pages of pdf; delete blank pages from pdf file
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.110 
Figure 3.119: Delta Modulation and Differential PCM 
Figure 3.120: Quantization Using Delta Modulation 
Slope clipping can be reduced by increasing the quantum step size or increasing the 
sampling rate. Differential PCM uses a multibit quantizer to effectively increase the 
quantum step sizes at the increase of complexity. Tests have shown that in order to obtain 
the same quality as classical PCM, delta modulation requires very high sampling rates, 
typically 20× the highest frequency of interest, as opposed to Nyquist rate of 2×.  
For these reasons, delta modulation and differential PCM have never achieved any 
significant degree of popularity, however a slight modification of the delta modulator 
1-BIT
DAC
+
N-BIT
DAC
+
N-BIT 
FLASH
ADC
ANALOG
INPUT
ANALOG
INPUT
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
(A) DELTA MODULATION
(B) DIFFERENTIAL PCM
SAMPLING CLOCK
SAMPLING CLOCK
SLOPE OVERLOAD
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# users are able to extract image from PDF document page and get image information for indexing and accessing. C# Project: DLLs for PDF Image Extraction.
acrobat extract pages from pdf; acrobat remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
extract page from pdf reader; extract pages from pdf file online
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.111 
leads to the basic sigma-delta architecture, one of the most popular high resolution ADC 
architectures in use today.  
In 1954 C. C. Cutler of Bell Labs filed a very significant patent which introduced the 
principle of oversampling and noise shaping with the specific intent of achieving higher 
resolution (Reference 7). His objective was not specifically to design a Nyquist ADC, but 
to transmit the oversampled noise-shaped signal without reducing the data rate. Thus 
Cutler's converter embodied all the concepts in a sigma-delta ADC with the exception of 
digital filtering and decimation which would have been too complex and costly at the 
time using vacuum tube technology.  
The basic single and multibit first-order sigma-delta ADC architecture is shown in Figure 
3.121A and 3.121B, respectively. Note that the integrator operates on the error signal, 
whereas in a delta modulator, the integrator is in the feedback loop. The basic 
oversampling sigma-delta modulator increases the overall signal-to-noise ratio at low 
frequencies by shaping the quantization noise such that most of it occurs outside the 
bandwidth of interest. The digital filter then removes the noise outside the bandwidth of 
interest, and the decimator reduces the output data rate back to the Nyquist rate.  
Figure 3.121: Single and Multibit Sigma-Delta ADCs 
Occasional work continued on these concepts over the next several years, including an 
important patent of C. B. Brahm filed in 1961 which gave details of the analog design of 
the loop filter for a second-order multibit noise shaping ADC (Reference 8). Transistor 
circuits began to replace vacuum tubes over the period, and this opened up many more 
possibilities for implementation of the architecture.  
In 1962, Inose, Yasuda, and Murakami elaborated on the single-bit oversampling noise-
shaping architecture proposed by Cutler in 1954 (Reference 9). Their experimental 
1-BIT
DAC
+
ANALOG
INPUT
SAMPLING CLOCK
DIGITAL
FILTER
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
N-BIT
DAC
+
ANALOG
INPUT
SAMPLING CLOCK
DIGITAL
FILTER
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
N-BIT
FLASH
ADC
(A) SINGLE BIT
(B) MULTIBIT
( f
s
)
( K•f
s
)
(K•f
s
)
( f
s
)
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
from PDF page. // Open a document. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; add and delete pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support to create new page to PDF document in both web server-side application and Windows Forms. DLLs for Inserting Page to PDF Document.
add and remove pages from pdf file online; extract page from pdf file
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.112 
circuits used solid state devices to implement first and second-order sigma-delta 
modulators. The 1962 paper was followed by a second paper in 1963 which gave 
excellent theoretical discussions on oversampling and noise-shaping (Reference 10). 
These two papers were also the first to use the name delta-sigma to describe the 
architecture. The name delta-sigma stuck until the 1970s when AT&T engineers began 
using name sigma-delta. Since that time, both names have been used; however, sigma-
delta may be the more correct of the two (see later discussion in this section by Dan 
Sheingold on the terminology).  
It is interesting to note that all the work described thus far was related to transmitting an 
oversampled digitized signal directly rather than the implementation of a Nyquist ADC. 
In 1969 D. J. Goodman at Bell Labs published a paper describing a true Nyquist sigma-
delta ADC with a digital filter and a decimator following the modulator (Reference 11). 
This was the first use of the sigma-delta architecture for the explicit purpose of producing 
a Nyquist ADC. In 1974 J. C. Candy, also of Bell Labs, described a multibit 
oversampling sigma-delta ADC with noise shaping, digital filtering, and decimation to 
achieve a high resolution Nyquist ADC (Reference 12).  
The IC sigma-delta ADC offers several advantages over the other architectures, 
especially for high resolution, low frequency applications. First and foremost, the single-
bit sigma-delta ADC is inherently monotonic and requires no laser trimming. The sigma-
delta ADC also lends itself to low cost foundry CMOS processes because of the digitally 
intensive nature of the architecture. Examples of early monolithic sigma-delta ADCs are 
given in References 13-21. Since that time there have been a constant stream of process 
and design improvements in the fundamental architecture proposed in the early works 
cited above. A summary of the key developments relating to sigma-delta is shown in 
Figure 3.122.  
Figure 3.122: Sigma-Delta ADC Architecture Timeline 
‹ Delta Modulation
‹ Differential PCM
‹ Single and multibit oversampling with noise shaping
‹ First called ∆-Σ, "delta-sigma"
‹ Addition of digital filtering and decimation for Nyquist ADC
‹ Bandpass Sigma-Delta
1950
1950
1954
1962
1969
1988
Note: Dates are first publications or patent filings
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB.NET programming. This page will supply
acrobat export pages from pdf; extract one page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete PDF Document Page in VB.NET. Please follow the sections below to learn more. DLLs for Deleting Page from PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
extract page from pdf online; deleting pages from pdf
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.113 
Sigma-Delta (Σ-∆) or Delta-Sigma (∆-Σ)? Editor's Notes from Analog 
Dialogue Vol. 24-2, 1990, by Dan Sheingold 
This is not the most earth-shaking of controversies, and many readers may wonder what 
the fuss is all about—if they wonder at all. The issue is important to both editor and 
readers because of the need for consistency; we'd like to use the same name for the same 
thing whenever it appears. But which name? In the case of the modulation technique that 
led to a new oversampling A/D conversion mechanism, we chose sigma-delta. Here's 
why. 
Ordinarily, when a new concept is named by its creators, the name sticks; it should not be 
changed unless it is erroneous or flies in the face of precedent. The seminal paper on this 
subject was published in 1962 (References 9, 10), and its authors chose the name "delta-
sigma modulation," since it was based on delta modulation but included an integration 
(summation, hence Σ). 
Delta-sigma was apparently unchallenged until the 1970s, when engineers at AT&T were 
publishing papers using the term sigma-delta. Why? According to Hauser (Reference 1), 
the precedent had been to name variants of delta modulation with adjectives preceding 
the word "delta." Since the form of modulation in question is a variant of delta 
modulation, the sigma, used as an adjective—so the argument went—should precede the 
delta. 
Many engineers who came upon the scene subsequently used whatever term caught their 
fancy, often without knowing why. It was even possible to find both terms used 
interchangeably in the same paper. As matters stand today, sigma-delta is in widespread 
use, probably for the majority of citations. Would its adoption be an injustice to the 
inventors of the technique? 
We think not. Like others, we believe that the name delta-sigma is a departure from 
precedent. Not just in the sense of grammar, but also in relation to the hierarchy of 
operations. Consider a block diagram for embodying an analog root-mean-square 
(finding the square root of the mean of a squared signal) computer. First the signal is 
squared, then it is integrated, and finally it is rooted (see Figure 3.123). 
If we were to name the overall function after the causal order of operations, it would have 
to be called a "square mean root" function. But naming in order of the hierarchy of its 
mathematical operations gives us the familiar—and undisputed—name, root mean-
square. Consider now a block diagram for taking a difference (delta), and then 
integrating it (sigma).  
Its causal order would give delta-sigma, but in functional hierarchy it is sigma-delta, 
since it computes the integral of a difference. We believe that the latter term is correct 
and follows precedent; and we have adopted it as our standard.  
Dan Sheingold, 1990.  
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
extract pages from pdf without acrobat; delete page from pdf online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
C#.NET PDF Library - Delete PDF Document Page in C#.NET. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file.
a pdf page cut; export one page of pdf preview
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.114 
Figure 3.123: Sigma-Delta (
Σ
-
) or Delta-Sigma (
-
Σ
)? 
Basics of Sigma-Delta ADCs 
Sigma-Delta Analog-Digital Converters (Σ-∆ ADCs) have been known for over thirty 
years, but only recently has the technology (high-density digital VLSI) existed to 
manufacture them as inexpensive monolithic integrated circuits. They are now used in 
many applications where a low-cost, low-bandwidth, low-power, high-resolution ADC is 
required. 
There have been innumerable descriptions of the architecture and theory of Σ-∆ ADCs, 
but most commence with a maze of integrals and deteriorate from there. Some engineers 
who do not understand the theory of operation of Σ-∆ ADCs are convinced, from study of 
a typical published article, that it is too complex to comprehend easily. 
There is nothing particularly difficult to understand about Σ-∆ ADCs, as long as you 
avoid the detailed mathematics, and this section has been written in an attempt to clarify 
the subject. A Σ-∆ ADC contains very simple analog electronics (a comparator, voltage 
reference, a switch, and one or more integrators and analog summing circuits), and quite 
complex digital computational circuitry. This circuitry consists of a digital signal 
processor (DSP) which acts as a filter (generally, but not invariably, a low pass filter). It 
is not necessary to know precisely how the filter works to appreciate what it does. To 
understand how a Σ-∆ ADC works, familiarity with the concepts of over-sampling, 
quantization noise shaping, digital filtering, and decimation is required (see Figure 
3.124).  
Root-Mean-Square:
SQUARE
MEAN
ROOT
Hierarchy of Mathematical Operations: ROOT  MEAN (SQUARE)
1
2
3
+
Sigma-Delta:
Hierarchy of Mathematical Operations: SIGMA (DELTA)
1
2
Delta
Sigma
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.115 
Figure 3.124: Sigma-Delta ADCs 
Let us consider the technique of over-sampling with an analysis in the frequency domain. 
Where a dc conversion has a quantization error of up to ½ LSB, a sampled data system 
has quantization noise. A perfect classical N-bit sampling ADC has an rms quantization 
noise of q/√12 uniformly distributed within the Nyquist band of dc to f
s
/2 (where q is the 
value of an LSB and f
s
is the sampling rate) as shown in Figure 3.125A. Therefore, its 
SNR with a full-scale sinewave input will be (6.02N + 1.76) dB. If the ADC is less than 
perfect, and its noise is greater than its theoretical minimum quantization noise, then its 
effective resolution will be less than N-bits. Its actual resolution (often known as its 
Effective Number of  Bits or ENOB) will be defined by 
6.02dB
1.76dB
SNR
ENOB
=
.   
Eq. 3.16 
If we choose a much higher sampling rate, Kf
s
(see Figure 3.125B), the rms quantization 
noise remains q/√12, but the noise is now distributed over a wider bandwidth dc to Kf
s
/2. 
If we then apply a digital low pass filter (LPF) to the output, we remove much of the 
quantization noise, but do not affect the wanted signal—so the ENOB is improved. We 
have accomplished a high resolution A/D conversion with a low resolution ADC. The 
factor K is generally referred to as the oversampling ratio. It should be noted at this point 
that oversampling has an added benefit in that it relaxes the requirements on the analog 
antialiasing filter.  
‹ Low Cost, High Resolution (to 24-bits) 
‹ Excellent DNL
‹ Low Power, but Limited Bandwidth (Voiceband, Audio)
‹ Key Concepts are Simple, but Math is Complex
Oversampling
Quantization Noise Shaping
Digital Filtering
Decimation
‹ Ideal for Sensor Signal Conditioning
High Resolution
Self, System, and Auto Calibration Modes
‹ Wide Applications in Voiceband and Audio Signal 
Processing
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.116 
Figure 3.125: Oversampling, Digital Filtering, Noise Shaping, and Decimation 
Since the bandwidth is reduced by the digital output filter, the output data rate may be 
lower than the original sampling rate (Kf
s
) and still satisfy the Nyquist criterion. This 
may be achieved by passing every Mth result to the output and discarding the remainder. 
The process is known as "decimation" by a factor of M. Despite the origins of the term 
(decem is Latin for ten), M can have any integer value, provided that the output data rate 
is more than twice the signal bandwidth. Decimation does not cause any loss of 
information (see Figure 3.125B).  
If we simply use oversampling to improve resolution, we must oversample by a factor of 
22N to obtain an N-bit increase in resolution. The Σ-∆ converter does not need such a high 
oversampling ratio because it not only limits the signal passband, but also shapes the 
quantization noise so that most of it falls outside this passband as shown in Figure 
3.125C. 
If we take a 1-bit ADC (generally known as a comparator), drive it with the output of an 
integrator, and feed the integrator with an input signal summed with the output of a 1-bit 
DAC fed from the ADC output, we have a first-order Σ-∆ modulator as shown in Figure 
3.126. Add a digital low pass filter (LPF) and decimator at the digital output, and we 
have a Σ-∆ ADC—the Σ-∆ modulator shapes the quantization noise so that it lies above 
the passband of the digital output filter, and the ENOB is therefore much larger than 
would otherwise be expected from the over-sampling ratio. 
f
s
2
f
s
Kf
s
2
Kf
s
Kf
s
Kf
s
2
f
s
2
f
s
2
DIGITAL FILTER
REMOVED NOISE
REMOVED NOISE
QUANTIZATION
NOISE = q /  12 
q = 1 LSB
ADC
ADC
DIGITAL
FILTER
Σ∆
MOD
DIGITAL
FILTER
f
s
Kf
s
Kf
s
DEC
f
s
Nyquist
Operation
Oversampling
+ Digital Filter
+ Decimation
Oversampling
+ Noise Shaping
+ Digital Filter
+ Decimation
A
B
C
DEC
f
s
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.117 
Figure 3.126: First-Order Sigma-Delta ADC 
Intuitively, a Σ-∆ ADC operates as follows. Assume a dc input at V
IN
. The integrator is 
constantly ramping up or down at node A. The output of the comparator is fed back 
through a 1-bit DAC to the summing input at node B. The negative feedback loop from 
the comparator output through the 1-bit DAC back to the summing point will force the 
average dc voltage at node B to be equal to V
IN
. This implies that the average DAC 
output voltage must equal the input voltage V
IN
. The average DAC output voltage is 
controlled by the ones-density in the 1-bit data stream from the comparator output. As the 
input signal increases towards +V
REF
, the number of "ones" in the serial bit stream 
increases, and the number of "zeros" decreases. Similarly, as the signal goes negative 
towards –V
REF
, the number of "ones" in the serial bit stream decreases, and the number of 
"zeros" increases. From a very simplistic standpoint, this analysis shows that the average 
value of the input voltage is contained in the serial bit stream out of the comparator. The 
digital filter and decimator process the serial bit stream and produce the final output data.  
For any given input value in a single sampling interval, the data from the 1-bit ADC is 
virtually meaningless. Only when a large number of samples are averaged, will a 
meaningful value result. The sigma-delta modulator is very difficult to analyze in the 
time domain because of this apparent randomness of the single-bit data output. If the 
input signal is near positive full-scale, it is clear that there will be more 1s than 0s in the 
bit stream.  Likewise, for signals near negative full-scale, there will be more 0s than 1s in 
the bit stream.  For signals near midscale, there will be approximately an equal number of 
1s and 0s.  Figure 3.127 shows the output of the integrator for two input conditions.  The 
first is for an input of zero (midscale).  To decode the output, pass the output samples 
through a simple digital lowpass filter that averages every four samples.  The output of 
the filter is 2/4.  This value represents bipolar zero.  If more samples are averaged, more 
dynamic range is achieved.  For example, averaging 4 samples gives 2 bits of resolution, 
while averaging 8 samples yields 4/8, or 3 bits of resolution.  In the bottom waveform of 
+
_
+V
REF
–V
REF
DIGITAL
FILTER
AND
DECIMATOR
+
_
CLOCK
Kf
s
V
IN
N-BITS
f
s
f
s
A
B
1-BIT DATA
STREAM
1-BIT
DAC
LATCHED
COMPARATOR
(1-BIT ADC)
1-BIT,
K
f
s
SIGMA-DELTA MODULATOR
INTEGRATOR
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.118 
Figure 3.127, the average obtained for 4 samples is 3/4, and the average for 8 samples is 
6/8.   
Figure 3.127: Sigma-Delta Modulator Waveforms 
The sigma-delta ADC can also be viewed as a synchronous voltage-to-frequency 
converter followed by a counter.  If the number of 1s in the output data stream is counted 
over a sufficient number of samples, the counter output will represent the digital value of 
the input.  Obviously, this method of averaging will only work for dc or very slowly 
changing input signals.  In addition, 2
N
clock cycles must be counted in order to achieve 
N-bit effective resolution, thereby severely limiting the effective sampling rate. 
Further time-domain analysis is not productive, and the concept of noise shaping is best 
explained in the frequency domain by considering the simple Σ-∆ modulator model in 
Figure 3.128.  
The integrator in the modulator is represented as an analog lowpass filter with a transfer 
function equal to H(f) = 1/f. This transfer function has an amplitude response which is 
inversely proportional to the input frequency. The 1-bit quantizer generates quantization 
noise, Q, which is injected into the output summing block. If we let the input signal be X, 
and the output Y, the signal coming out of the input summer must be X – Y. This is 
multiplied by the filter transfer function, 1/f, and the result goes to one input of the output 
summer. By inspection, we can then write the expression for the output voltage Y as: 
(X Y) ) Q
f
1
Y
+
=
.    
Eq. 3.17 
This expression can easily be rearranged and solved for Y in terms of X, f, and Q: 
f 1
Q f
f 1
X
Y
+
+
+
=
.    
Eq. 3.18 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested