devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete pages out of a pdf Library software class asp.net windows web page ajax Chapter%203%20Data%20Converter%20Architectures%20F13-part803

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.129 
filter. The cutoff frequency and output rate of this first stage filter is programmable. The 
second stage filter has three modes of operation. In its normal mode, it is a 22-tap FIR 
filter that processes the output of the first stage filter. When a step change is detected on 
the analog input, the second stage filter enters a second mode (FASTStep™) where it 
performs a variable number of averages for some time after the step change, and then the 
second stage filter switches back to the FIR filter mode. The third option for the second 
stage filter (SKIP mode) is that it is completely bypassed so the only filtering provided on 
the AD7730 is the first stage. Both the FASTStep mode and SKIP mode can be enabled 
or disabled via bits in the control register.  
Figure 3.142 shows the full frequency response of the AD7730 when the second stage 
filter is set for normal FIR operation. This response is with the chop mode enabled and an 
output word rate of 200 Hz and a clock frequency of 4.9152 MHz. The response is shown 
from dc to 100 Hz. The rejection at 50 Hz ± 1 Hz and 60 Hz ± 1 Hz is better than 88 dB.  
Figure 3.142: AD7730 Digital Filter Response 
Figure 3.143 shows the step response of the AD7730 with and without the FASTStep 
mode enabled. The vertical axis shows the code value and indicates the settling of the 
output to the input step change. The horizontal axis shows the number of output words 
required for that settling to occur. The positive input step change occurs at the 5th output. 
In the normal mode (FASTStep disabled), the output has not reached its final value until 
the 23rd output word. In FASTStep mode with chopping enabled, the output has settled 
to the final value by the 7th output word. Between the 7th and the 23rd output, the 
FASTStep mode produces a settled result, but with additional noise compared to the 
specified noise level for normal operating conditions. It starts at a noise level comparable 
to the SKIP mode, and as the averaging increases ends up at the specified noise level. The 
complete settling time required for the part to return to the specified noise level is the 
same for FASTStep mode and normal mode.  
0
–10
–20
–30
–40
–50
–60
–70
–80
–90
–110
–120
–130
      10        20      30       40       50       60       70
80      90       100
GAIN
(dB)
FREQUNCY (Hz)
SINC
3
+ 22-TAP FIR FILTER,
CHOP MODE ENABLED
Delete pages out of a pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
deleting pages from pdf file; export pages from pdf acrobat
Delete pages out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
export one page of pdf preview; crop all pages of pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.130 
Figure 3.143: AD7730 Digital Filter Settling Time Showing FASTStep™ Mode 
The FASTStep mode gives a much earlier indication of where the output channel is going 
and its new value. This feature is very useful in weigh scale applications to give a much 
earlier indication of the weight, or in an application scanning multiple channels where the 
user does not have to wait the full settling time to see if a channel has changed.  
Note, however, that the FASTStep mode is not particularly suitable for multiplexed 
applications because of the excess noise associated with the settling time. For 
multiplexed applications, the full 23-cycle output word interval should be allowed for 
settling to a new channel. This points out the fundamental issue of using Σ-∆ ADCs in 
multiplexed applications. There is no reason why they won't work, provided the internal 
digital filter is allowed to settle fully after switching channels.  
The calibration modes of the AD7730 are given in Figure 3.144. A calibration cycle may 
be initiated at any time by writing to the appropriate bits of the Mode Register. 
Calibration removes offset and gain errors from the device. 
The AD7730 gives the user access to the on-chip calibration registers allowing an 
external microprocessor to read the device's calibration coefficients and also to write its 
own calibration coefficients to the part from prestored values in external E
2
PROM. This 
gives the microprocessor much greater control over the AD7730's calibration procedure. 
It also means that the user can verify that the device has performed its calibration 
correctly by comparing the coefficients after calibration with prestored values in 
E
2
PROM. Since the calibration coefficients are derived by performing a conversion on 
the input voltage provided, the accuracy of the calibration can only be as good as the 
noise level the part provides in the normal mode. To optimize calibration accuracy, it is 
recommended to calibrate the part at its lowest output rate where the noise level is lowest. 
The coefficients generated at any output rate will be valid for all selected output update 
0                  5                    10                 15   
20                 25
20,000,000
15,000,000
10,000,000
5,000,000
0
CODE
NUMBER OF OUTPUT SAMPLES
FASTStep ENABLED
FASTStep DISABLED
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET
extract pages from pdf reader; extract pages from pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
export pages from pdf preview; extract one page from pdf reader
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.131 
rates. This scheme of calibrating at the lowest output data rate does mean that the 
duration of the calibration interval is longer.  
Figure 3.144: AD7730 Calibration Options 
The AD7730 requires an external voltage reference, however, the power supply may be 
used as the reference in the ratiometric bridge application shown in Figure 3.145. In this 
configuration, the bridge output voltage is directly proportional to the bridge drive 
voltage which is also used to establish the reference voltages to the AD7730. Variations 
in the supply voltage will not affect the accuracy. The SENSE outputs of the bridge are 
used for the AD7730 reference voltages in order to eliminate errors caused by voltage 
drops in the lead resistances.  
Figure 3.145: AD7730 Bridge Application (Simplified Schematic) 
‹ Internal Zero-ScaleCalibration
22 Output Cycles (CHP = 0)
24 Output Cycles (CHP = 1)
‹ Internal Full-Scale Calibration
44 Output Cycles (CHP = 0)
48 Output Cycles (CHP = 1)
‹ Calibration Programmed via the Mode Register
‹ Calibration Coefficients Stored in Calibration 
Registers
‹ External Microprocessor Can Read or Write to
Calibration Coefficient Registers
+5V
AV
DD
AGND
+ A
IN
–A
IN
+ V
REF
–V
REF
R
LEAD
R
LEAD
6-LEAD
BRIDGE
AD7730
ADC
24 BITS
+SENSE
–SENSE
V
O
+FORCE
–FORCE
DV
DD
+5V/+3V
DGND
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
deleting pages from pdf document; add remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete pages of pdf; cutting pdf pages
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.132 
Bandpass Sigma-Delta Converters 
The Σ-∆ ADCs that we have described so far contain integrators, which are low pass 
filters, whose passband extends from dc. Thus, their quantization noise is pushed up in 
frequency. At present, most commercially available Σ-∆ ADCs are of this type (although 
some which are intended for use in audio or telecommunications applications contain 
bandpass rather than lowpass digital filters to eliminate any system dc offsets). But there 
is no particular reason why the filters of the Σ-∆ modulator should be LPFs, except that 
traditionally ADCs have been thought of as being baseband devices, and that integrators 
are somewhat easier to construct than bandpass filters. If we replace the integrators in a 
Σ-∆ ADC with bandpass filters (BPFs) as shown in Figure 3.146, the quantization noise 
is moved up and down in frequency to leave a virtually noise-free region in the pass-band 
(see References 31, 32, and 33). If the digital filter is then programmed to have its 
pass-band in this region, we have a Σ-∆ ADC with a bandpass, rather than a lowpass 
characteristic. Such devices would appear to be useful in direct IF-to-digital conversion, 
digital radios, ultrasound, and other undersampling applications. However, the modulator 
and the digital BPF must be designed for the specific set of frequencies required by the 
system application, thereby somewhat limiting the flexibility of this approach.   
Figure 3.146: Replacing Integrators with Resonators  
Gives a Bandpass Sigma-Delta ADC 
In an undersampling application of a bandpass Σ-∆ ADC, the minimum sampling 
frequency must be at least twice the signal bandwidth, BW. The signal is centered around 
a carrier frequency, f
c
. A typical digital radio application using a 455-kHz center 
frequency and a signal bandwidth of 10 kHz is described in Reference 32.  An 
oversampling frequency Kf
s
= 2 MSPS and an output rate f
s
= 20 kSPS yielded a 
dynamic range of 70 dB within the signal bandwidth.  
Σ
Σ
+
-
+
-
1-BIT
DAC
ANALOG
BPF
ANALOG
BPF
DIGITAL
BPF AND
DECIMATOR
CLOCK 
Kf
s
f
s
SHAPED
QUANTIZATION
NOISE
DIGITAL BPF
RESPONSE
f
c
f
BW
f
s
> 2 BW
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
delete page from pdf file online; delete pages of pdf preview
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
combine pages of pdf documents into one; extract pdf pages reader
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.133 
Another example of a bandpass is the AD9870 IF Digitizing Subsystem having a nominal 
oversampling frequency of 18 MSPS, a center frequency of 2.25 MHz, and a bandwidth 
of 10 kHz - 150 kHz (see details in Reference 33).  
Sigma-Delta DACs 
Sigma-delta DACs operate very similarly to sigma-delta ADCs, however in a sigma-delta 
DAC, the noise shaping function is accomplished with a digital modulator rather than an 
analog one.  
A Σ-∆ DAC, unlike the Σ-∆ ADC, is mostly digital (see Figure 3.147A). It consists of an 
"interpolation filter" (a digital circuit which accepts data at a low rate, inserts zeros at a 
high rate, and then applies a digital filter algorithm and outputs data at a high rate), a Σ-∆ 
modulator (which effectively acts as a low pass filter to the signal but as a high pass filter 
to the quantization noise, and converts the resulting data to a high speed bit stream), and a 
1-bit DAC whose output switches between equal positive and negative reference 
voltages. The output is filtered in an external analog LPF. Because of the high 
oversampling frequency, the complexity of the LPF is much less than the case of 
traditional Nyquist operation.  
Figure 3.147: Sigma-Delta DACs 
It is possible to use more than one bit in the Σ-∆ DAC, and this leads to the multibit 
architecture shown in Figure 3.147B. The concept is similar to that of interpolating DACs 
previously discussed in Chapter 2, with the addition of the digital sigma-delta modulator. 
In the past, multibit DACs have been difficult to design because of the accuracy 
requirement on the n-bit internal DAC (this DAC, although only n-bits, must have the 
linearity of the final number of bits, N). The AD185x-series of audio DACs, however use 
a proprietary data scrambling technique (called data directed scrambling) which 
N-BITS @ f
s
N-BITS @ K f
s
ANALOG SIGNAL:
2 LEVELS
ANALOG
OUTPUT
DIGITAL
INTERPOLATION
FILTER
DIGITAL
Σ∆
MODULATOR
1-BIT
DAC
ANALOG
OUTPUT
FILTER
1- BIT @ Kf
S
N-BITS @ f
s
N-BITS @ K f
s
ANALOG SIGNAL:
2
M
LEVELS
ANALOG
OUTPUT
DIGITAL
INTERPOLATION
FILTER
DIGITAL
Σ∆
MODULATOR
M-BIT
DAC
ANALOG
OUTPUT
FILTER
M- BITS @ Kf
S
SINGLE BIT
MULTIBIT
MULTIBIT
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
installed. Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in VB.NET. VB.NET: Replace Text in Consecutive PDF Pages. Demo
extract one page from pdf file; delete pages from pdf file online
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET NET control allows users to black out image in PDF
cut pdf pages online; extract one page from pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.134 
overcomes this problem and produces excellent performance with respect to all audio 
specifications (see References 27 and 28). For instance, the AD1853 dual 24-bit, 192-
kSPS DAC  has greater than 104-dB THD + N at a 48-kSPS sampling rate.  
One of the newest members of this family is the AD1955 multibit sigma-delta audio 
DAC shown in Figure 3.148. The AD1955 also uses data directed scrambling, supports a 
multitude of DVD audio formats and has an extremely flexible serial port. THD + N is 
typically 110 dB.  
Figure 3.148: AD1955 Multibit Sigma-Delta Audio DAC 
Summary
Sigma-delta ADCs and DACs have proliferated into many modern applications including 
measurement, voiceband, audio, etc. The technique takes full advantage of low cost 
CMOS processes and therefore makes integration with highly digital functions such as 
DSPs practical. Resolutions up to 24-bits are currently available, and the requirements on 
analog antialiasing/anti-imaging filters are greatly relaxed due to oversampling. Modern 
techniques such as the multibit data scrambled architecture minimize problems with idle 
tones which plagued early sigma-delta products.  
Many sigma-delta converters offer a high level of user programmability with respect to 
output data rate, digital filter characteristics, and self-calibration modes. Multi-channel 
sigma-delta ADCs are now available for data acquisition systems, and most users are 
well-educated with respect to the settling time requirements of the internal digital filter in 
these applications.  Figure 3.149 summarizes some final thoughts about sigma-delta 
converters.  
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
VB.NET extract PDF pages, VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET PDF Viewer, such as rotate PDF page and zoom in or zoom out PDF page.
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Extract highlighted text out of PDF document. Image text extraction control provides text extraction from PDF images and image files.
convert selected pages of pdf to word; copy web page to pdf
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.135 
Figure 3.149: Sigma-Delta Summary 
‹ Inherently Excellent Linearity
‹ High Resolution Possible (24-Bits)
‹ Oversampling Relaxes Analog Antialiasing Filter Requirements
‹ Ideal for CMOS Processes, no Trimming
‹ No SHA Required
‹ Added Functionality: On-Chip PGAs, Analog Filters, 
Autocalibration
‹ On-Chip Programmable Digital Filters (AD7725: Lowpass, 
Highpass, Bandpass, Bandstop)
‹ Upper Sampling Rate Currently Limits Applications to 
Measurement, Voiceband, and Audio, except for Bandpass Sigma-
Delta ADCs
‹ Analog Multiplexer Switching Speed Limited by Internal Filter 
Settling Time. 
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.136 
REFERENCES: 
3.3 SIGMA-DELTA CONVERTERS
1.  Max W. Hauser, "Principles of Oversampling A/D Conversion," Journal Audio Engineering Society
Vol. 39, No. 1/2, January/February 1991, pp. 3-26. (one of the best tutorials and practical discussions 
of the sigma-delta ADC architecture and its history). 
2.  E. M. Deloraine, S. Van Mierlo, and B. Derjavitch, "Methode et systéme de transmission par 
impulsions," French Patent 932,140, issued August, 1946. Also British Patent 627,262,  issued 1949.
3.  E. M. Deloraine, S. Van Mierlo, and B. Derjavitch, "Communication System Utilizing Constant 
Amplitude Pulses of Opposite Polarities," U.S. Patent  2,629,857, filed October 8, 1947, issued 
February 24, 1953.
4.  F. de Jager, "Delta Modulation: A Method of PCM Transmission Using the One Unit Code," Phillips 
Research Reports, Vol. 7, 1952, pp. 542-546. (additional work done on delta modulation during the 
same time period). 
5.  H. Van de Weg, "Quantizing Noise of a Single Integration Delta Modulation System with an N-Digit 
Code," Phillips Research Reports, Vol. 8, 1953, pp. 367-385. (additional work done on delta 
modulation during the same time period). 
6.  C. C. Cutler, "Differential Quantization of Communication Signals," U.S. Patent 2,605,361, filed June 
29, 1950, issued July 29, 1952. (recognized as the first patent on differential PCM or delta modulation, 
although actually first invented in the Paris labs of the International Telephone and Telegraph 
Corporation by E. M. Deloraine, S. Mierlo, and B. Derjavitch a few years earlier) 
7.  C. C. Cutler, "Transmission Systems Employing Quantization," U.S. Patent 2,927,962, filed April 26, 
1954, issued March 8, 1960. (a ground-breaking patent describing oversampling and noise shaping 
using first and second-order loops to increase effective resolution. The goal was transmission of 
oversampled noise shaped PCM data without decimation, not a Nyquist-type ADC). 
8.  C. B. Brahm, "Feedback Integrating System,"  U.S. Patent 3,192,371, filed September 14, 1961, 
issued June 29, 1965. (describes a second-order multibit oversampling noise shaping ADC). 
9.  H. Inose, Y. Yasuda, and J. Murakami, "A Telemetering System by Code Modulation: -Σ 
Modulation," IRE Transactions on Space Electronics Telemetry, Vol. SET-8, September 1962, pp. 
204-209. Reprinted in N. S. Jayant, Waveform Quantization and Coding, IEEE Press and John 
Wiley, 1976, ISBN 0-471-01970-4. (an elaboration on the 1-bit form of Cutler's noise-shaping 
oversampling concept. This work coined the description of the architecture as 'delta-sigma 
modulation'). 
10.  H. Inose and Y. Yasuda, "A Unity Bit Coding Method by Negative Feedback," IEEE Proceedings, 
Vol. 51, November 1963, pp. 1524-1535. (further discussions on their 1-bit 'delta-sigma' concept). 
11.  D. J. Goodman, "The Application of Delta Modulation of Analog-to-PCM Encoding," Bell System 
Technical Journal, Vol. 48, February 1969, pp. 321-343. Reprinted in N. S. Jayant, Waveform 
Quantization and Coding, IEEE Press and John Wiley, 1976, ISBN 0-471-01970-4. (the first 
description of using oversampling and noise shaping techniques followed by digital filtering and 
decimation to produce a true Nyquist-rate ADC). 
12.  J. C. Candy, "A Use of Limit Cycle Oscillations to Obtain Robust Analog-to-Digital Converters," 
IEEE Transactions on Communications, Vol. COM-22, December 1974, pp. 298-305. (describes a 
multibit oversampling noise shaping ADC with output digital filtering and decimation to interpolate 
between the quantization levels). 
13.  R. J.  van de Plassche, "A Sigma-Delta Modulator as an A/D Converter," IEEE Transactions on 
Circuits and Systems, Vol. CAS-25, July 1978, pp. 510-514. 
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.3 S
IGMA
-D
ELTA 
C
ONVERTERS
3.137 
14.  B. A. Wooley and J. L. Henry, "An Integrated Per-Channel PCM Encoder Based on Interpolation," 
IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, Vol. SC-14, February 1979, pp. 14-20. (one of the first all-
integrated CMOS sigma-delta ADCs). 
15.  B. A. Wooley et al, "An Integrated Interpolative PCM Decoder," IEEE Journal of Solid State 
Circuits, Vol. SC-14, February 1979, pp. 20-25.  
16.  J. C. Candy, B. A. Wooley, and O. J. Benjamin, "A Voiceband Codec with Digital Filtering," IEEE 
Transactions on Communications, Vol. COM-29, June 1981, pp. 815-830. 
17.  J. C. Candy and Gabor C. Temes, Oversampling Delta-Sigma Data Converters, IEEE Press,  ISBN 
0-87942-258-8, 1992. 
18.  R. Koch, B. Heise, F. Eckbauer, E. Engelhardt, J. Fisher, and F. Parzefall, "A 12-bit Sigma-Delta 
Analog-to-Digital Converter with a 15 MHz Clock Rate," IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 
SC-21, No. 6, December 1986. 
19.  D. R. Welland, B. P. Del Signore and E. J. Swanson, "A Stereo 16-Bit Delta-Sigma A/D Converter for 
Digital Audio," J. Audio Engineering Society, Vol. 37, No. 6, June 1989, pp. 476-485. 
20.  B. Boser and Bruce Wooley, "The Design of Sigma-Delta Modulation Analog-to-Digital Converters," 
IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 23, No. 6, December 1988, pp. 1298-1308. 
21.  J. Dattorro, A. Charpentier, D. Andreas, "The Implementation of a One-Stage Multirate 64:1 FIR 
Decimator for use in One-Bit Sigma-Delta A/D Applications," AES 7th International Conference
May 1989. 
22.  W.L. Lee and C.G. Sodini, "A Topology for Higher-Order Interpolative Coders," ISCAS PROC. 
1987. 
23.  P.F. Ferguson, Jr., A. Ganesan and R. W. Adams, "One-Bit Higher Order Sigma-Delta A/D 
Converters," ISCAS PROC. 1990, Vol. 2, pp. 890-893. 
24.  Wai Laing Lee, A Novel Higher Order Interpolative Modulator Topology for High Resolution 
Oversampling A/D Converters, MIT Masters Thesis, June 1987. 
25.  R. W. Adams, "Design and Implementation of an Audio 18-Bit Analog-to-Digital Converter Using 
Oversampling Techniques," J. Audio Engineering Society, Vol. 34, March 1986, pp. 153-166. 
26.  P. Ferguson, Jr., A. Ganesan, R. Adams, et. al., "An 18-Bit 20-kHz Dual Sigma-Delta A/D Converter," 
ISSCC Digest of Technical Papers, February 1991. 
27.  Robert Adams, Khiem Nguyen, and Karl Sweetland,  "A 113 dB SNR Oversampling DAC with 
Segmented Noise-Shaped Scrambling, " ISSCC Digest of Technical Papers, vol. 41, 1998, pp. 62, 
63, 413. (describes a segmented audio DAC with data scrambling). 
28.  Robert W. Adams and Tom W. Kwan, "Data-directed Scrambler for Multi-bit Noise-shaping D/A 
Converters,"   U.S. Patent 5,404,142, filed August 5, 1993, issued April 4, 1995. (describes a 
segmented audio DAC with data scrambling). 
29.  Y. Matsuya, et. al., "A 16-Bit Oversampling A/D Conversion Technology Using Triple-Integration 
Noise Shaping," IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. SC-22, No. 6, December 1987, pp. 921-
929.  
30.  Y. Matsuya, et. al., "A 17-Bit Oversampling D/A Conversion Technology Using Multistage Noise 
Shaping," IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol. 24, No. 4, August 1989, pp. 969-975. 
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.138 
31.  Paul H. Gailus, William J. Turney, and Francis R. Yester, Jr., "Method and Arrangement for a Sigma 
Delta Converter for Bandpass Signals," U.S. Patent 4,857,928, filed January 28, 1988, issued August 
15, 1989.  
32.  S.A. Jantzi, M. Snelgrove, and P.F. Ferguson Jr., "A 4
th
-Order Bandpass Sigma-Delta Modulator," 
IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, Vol. 38, No. 3, March 1993, pp. 282-291.  
33.  Paul Hendriks, Richard Schreier, Joe DiPilato, "High Performance Narrowband Receiver Design 
Simplified by IF Digitizing Subsystem in LQFP," Analog Dialogue, Vol. 35-3, June-July 2001. 
available at http://www.analog.com (describes an IF subsystem with a bandpass sigma-delta ADC 
having a nominal oversampling frequency of 18MSPS, a center frequency of 2.25MHz, and a 
bandwidth of 10kHz  - 150kHz). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested