devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Combine pages of pdf documents into one software Library project winforms asp.net .net UWP Chapter%203%20Data%20Converter%20Architectures%20F3-part805

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.1 DAC A
RCHITECTURES
3.29 
Figure 3.36: A.H. Reeves' 5-Bit Counting DAC 
Resolution must be traded for update rate in a counting DAC, because the counter must 
cycle through all possible outputs in the sampling interval. Counting DACs do have the 
advantage, however, that they are inherently monotonic.  
Cyclic Serial DACs 
Cyclic serial DACs are rarely used today, but in the early days of PCM they were 
somewhat attractive because they took advantage of the serial nature of the PCM pulse 
stream. An example of a 4-bit implementation is shown in Figure 3.37 and is based on 
1948 patent filing (Reference 25). Proper operation of this DAC depends on receiving the 
PCM data in the proper order: the LSB is first, and the MSB is last.  
Assume that the initial charge on the capacitor is zero and that the serial PCM data 
represents the digital code 1011. The receipt of a pulse in Position 1 (n = 1) closes S1 and 
connects S2 to the output of the G =  0.5 amplifier. The voltage V
R
/2 is stored on the 
capacitor, and S2 is then connected to the input of the summer. The receipt of a pulse in 
Position 2 (n = 2) closes S2 and connects V
R
to the summer, whose other input is V
R
/2. 
S2 is then connected to the amplifier output, and the charge on the capacitor is now V
R
/4 
+ V
R
/2. The receipt of no pulse in Position 3 (n = 3) simply causes the capacitor output to 
be divided by two, leaving V
R
/8 + V
R
/4 on the amplifier output. This voltage is 
transferred to the capacitor by S2. In the final cycle, the receipt of a pulse in Position 4 (n 
= 4) adds V
R
to V
R
/8 + V
R
/4 which is then divided by two, leaving a final voltage on the 
capacitor of V
R
/16 + V
R
/8 + V
R
/2 = 11 V
R
/16. The final output voltage is then sampled 
by a sample-and-hold which holds the output voltage until the completion of the next 
cycle.  
5-BIT 
COUNTER
CLOCK
600kHz
÷100
FF
R
S
LPF
PWM
LOAD
6 kHz
DATA INPUT
VOICE
OUTPUT
CK
Adapted from: Alec Harley Reeves, 
"Electric Signaling System," 
U.S. Patent 2,272,070
Filed November 22, 1939, 
Issued February 3, 1942
Combine pages of pdf documents into one - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
convert selected pages of pdf to word online; export pages from pdf reader
Combine pages of pdf documents into one - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
cut pages from pdf preview; pdf extract pages
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.30 
Figure 3.37: 4-Bit Cyclic Serial DAC 
It should be noted that this architecture can be made to handle PCM data which has the 
MSB first, by using a G = 2 amplifier and making a few other minor modifications 
relating to signal scaling.  
A truly elegant serial PCM DAC architecture—for its time—was developed by C. E. 
Shannon and A. J. Rack in 1948 (References 26, 27). The original concept was 
Shannon's, but Rack added an improvement that made the DAC less sensitive to timing 
jitter in the PCM pulse stream. The concept circuits are shown in Figure 3.38.  
In Figure 3.38A, the serial PCM pulses (LSB first, MSB last) control a switch which is 
closed for a small amount of time if a pulse is present (representing a logic "1"), thereby 
injecting a fixed charge into the capacitor.  If no pulse is present in a given pulse position 
(representing a logic "0"), the switch remains open, and no additional charge is injected. 
The RC time constant is chosen such that the capacitor voltage discharges to exactly one-
half its initial value in the time interval between PCM pulses, T. The equation which 
must be satisfied is simply RC = T/ln2.  
The diagram shows the capacitor voltage for the binary code 1011. The vertical axis is 
normalized so that unity represents the voltage change produced by a single switch 
closure. At the end of the fourth pulse position, the voltage on the capacitor is 11/16, 
which corresponds to the binary code of 1011 with an LSB weight of 1/16. The sample-
and-hold is activated at the end of the fourth pulse position to acquire and hold the 
capacitor voltage until the next PCM word is completed.  
SAMPLE
AND HOLD
C
GAIN = 0.5
+
+
V
R
V
OUT
LSB
MSB
CODE = 1 0 1 1
V
n
n = 0,  V
0
= 0
t
SERIAL PCM
n=1 n=2 n=3 n=4
n = 1,  V
1
=  V
R
/2
n = 2,  V
2
=  V
R
/4 + V
R
/2
n = 3,  V
3
=  V
R
/8 + V
R
/4
n = 4,  V
4
=  V
R
/16 + V
R
/8  + V
R
/2   = 11V
R
/16
S1
S2
1
0
1
1
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET framework. You may also combine more PDF documents together.
copy web pages to pdf; add or remove pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
NET. Batch merge PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class program. NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. Able
extract page from pdf reader; delete blank page from pdf
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.1 DAC A
RCHITECTURES
3.31 
Figure 3.38: Shannon and Shannon-Rack Decoder 
Notice that any jitter in the PCM pulses or the sample-and-hold clock will produce an 
error in the final held output voltage. A. J. Rack devised an elegant solution to this 
problem, as shown in Figure 3.38B. Rack added a second capacitor, shunted by both a 
resistor and an inductor, in series with the original R1-C1 network. The values of the 
second capacitor, C2, and the inductor, L, used with it are such as to make the circuit 
resonant at the PCM pulse frequency, 1/T. The second resistor, R2, is adjusted so that the 
oscillation developed across the resonant circuit is reduced to exactly one-half amplitude 
between each pulse period. The resulting composite waveform has regions of zero-slope 
spaced one code period, T, apart, thereby making the circuit much less sensitive to timing 
jitter in either the PCM pulse train or the sample-and-hold clock. The Shannon-Rack 
encoder was implemented in a experimental late-1940s Bell Labs PCM system described 
in Reference 27. The resolution was 7 bits, the sampling rate was 8 kSPS, and the 
frequency of the PCM pulses was 672 kHz.  
Other Low-Distortion Architectures 
Modern low-glitch segmented DACs are capable of very low levels of distortion. 
However, in some cases, further distortion improvements can be obtained using a 
technique called deglitching. The concept requires a track-and-hold and is illustrated in 
Figure 3.39.  
LSB
MSB
1
3
2
3
8
11
8
11
16
t
1
3
2
3
8
11
8
11
16
t
SAMPLE
AND HOLD
SAMPLE
AND HOLD
R1
C1
C2
R2
L
C
R
(A)
SHANNON
(B)
SHANNON-RACK
LSB
MSB
CODE = 1 0 1 1
1
2
1
2
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
v(t)
v(t)
k•v(t)
HOLD
HOLD
T
T
k•v(t)
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application. You may also combine more PowerPoint documents
extract page from pdf document; delete pages of pdf reader
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application. You may also combine more Word documents together.
delete page from pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.32 
Figure 3.39: Deglitching DAC Outputs Using a Track-and-Hold 
Just prior to latching new data into the DAC, the track-and-hold is put into the hold mode 
so that the DAC switching glitches are isolated from the output. The switching transients 
produced by the SHA are code-independent and occur at the clock frequency, and hence 
are easily filtered. However, great care must be taken so that the relative timing between 
the track-and-hold clock and the DAC update clock is optimum. In addition, the 
distortion performance of the track-and-hold must be at least 6- to 10-dB better than the 
DAC, or no improvement in SFDR will be realized. Achieving good results using an 
external track-and-hold deglitcher becomes increasingly more difficult as clock 
frequencies approach 100 MSPS. In most cases, designers should try and use self-
contained devices that are fully specified for low distortion without the requirement of 
additional external circuitry, but the technique may still  be of use in some applications. 
Digital audio applications require DACs with resolutions of over 16-bits and extremely 
low total harmonic distortion (THD). One way to make them is to use the segmented 
architecture with several decoded MSBs as previously described, but this is likely to have 
comparatively large DNL at the MSB transition, which is just where low DNL is needed 
for low-level audio distortion. This problem can be avoided by using a digital adder to 
put a digital offset in the DAC code, so that the MSB transition of the input code is well 
offset from the mid-point of the DAC transfer characteristic, and then using an analog 
offset on the DAC output to restore the dc level at the crossover. This technique, of 
course, renders part of the DAC's range unusable, but it does minimize mid-scale 
distortion.  
Figure 3.40 shows the AD1862 20-bit DAC (introduced in 1990) where a digital offset of 
1/16
th
full-scale is added to the incoming 20-bit binary word. The DAC fully decodes the 
3 MSBs and generates the 17 LSBs using a binary R-2R DAC section. In order to prevent 
clipping at the positive end of the range, the carry output of the adder drives an additional 
current switch having a weight equal to bit 4. Finally, an offset current equal to 1/16
th
DAC
INPUT
OUTPUT
DAC
OUTPUT
MODE
OUTPUT
T
T
H
T
H
T
DAC
MODE CONTROL
0111 . . . 1
1000 . . . 0
H
T/H
T/H
T/H
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
List<BaseDocument> docList, String destFilePath) { PDFDocument.Combine(docList, destFilePath and the rest five pages will be C#.NET APIs to Divide PDF File into
delete pages from pdf acrobat; copy pdf page to powerpoint
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
create a new TIFF document from the source pages. docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
extract pages pdf; extract pages from pdf online tool
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.1 DAC A
RCHITECTURES
3.33 
full-scale is subtracted from the DAC output to compensate for the constant digital offset. 
It should be noted that since the introduction of the AD1862 in 1990, most modern low-
distortion audio DACs today utilize the sigma-delta architecture almost exclusively.  
Figure 3.40: Digital Offset Minimizes Mid-Scale Distortion of Small Signals 
DAC Logic Considerations 
The earliest monolithic DACs contained little, if any, logic circuitry, and parallel data had 
to be maintained on the digital input to maintain the digital output. Today almost all 
DACs are latched and data need only be written to them, not maintained. Some even have 
nonvolatile latches and remember settings while turned off. 
There are innumerable variations of DAC input structure, which will not be discussed 
here, but nearly all are described as "double-buffered." A double-buffered DAC has two 
sets of latches. Data is initially latched in the first rank and subsequently transferred to 
the second as shown in Figure 3.41. There are two reasons why this arrangement is 
useful. 
Figure 3.41: Double-Buffered DAC Permits Complex 
Input Structures and Simultaneous Update 
BIT 1
BIT 2
BIT 3
BIT 4
BIT 5
ADDER
+0001
CARRY
CURRENT
OUTPUT
25-BIT
LATCH
EQUAL
CURRENT
SWITCHES
BIT 20
R-2R
3 TO 7
DECODE
FROM SERIAL
INPUT
REGISTER
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/2
I/2
I/4
I
2
20
AD1862: Released in 1990
OUTPUT
DIGITAL
INPUT
INPUT STRUCTURE:
MAY BE SERIAL,
PARALLEL, BYTE-WIDE,
ETC.
OUTPUT LATCH
TRANSFERS DATA
TO DAC -
TIMING IS
INDEPENDENT OF
INPUT
DAC
OUTPUT STROBE -
MAY GO TO MANY DACs
f
c
= SAMPLING FREQUENCY
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Just like we need to combine PPT files, sometimes, we also the split PPT document will contain slides/pages 1-4 If you want to see more PDF processing functions
add and remove pages from pdf file online; extract one page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
destnPath As [String]) DOCXDocument.Combine(docList, destnPath and encode created sub-documents into stream or profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy pdf pages to another pdf; delete pages out of a pdf file
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.34 
The first is that it allows data to enter the DAC in many different ways. A DAC without a 
latch, or with a single latch, must be loaded in parallel with all bits at once, since 
otherwise its output during loading may be totally different from what it was, or what it is 
to become. A double-buffered DAC, on the other hand, may be loaded with parallel data, 
or with serial data, with 4-bit or 8-bit words, or whatever, and the output will be 
unaffected until the new data is completely loaded and the DAC receives its update 
instruction.  
The other convenience of the double-buffered structure is that many DACs may be 
updated simultaneously: data is loaded into the first rank of each DAC in turn, and when 
all is ready, the output buffers of all the DACs are updated at once. There are many DAC 
applications where the output of a number of DACs must change simultaneously, and the 
double-buffered structure allows this to be done very easily. 
Most early monolithic high resolution DACs had parallel or byte-wide data ports and 
tended to be connected to parallel data buses and address decoders and addressed by 
microprocessors as if they were very small write-only memories. (Some parallel DACs 
are not write-only, but can have their contents read as well—this is convenient for some 
applications, but is not very common.) A DAC connected to a data bus is vulnerable to 
capacitive coupling of logic noise from the bus to the analog output, and therefore many 
DACs today have serial data structures. These are less vulnerable to such noise (since 
fewer noisy pins are involved), use fewer pins and therefore take less board space, and 
are frequently more convenient for use with modern microprocessors, most of which 
have serial data ports. Some, but not all, of such serial DACs have both data outputs and 
data inputs so that several DACs may be connected in series, with data clocked to all of 
them from a single serial port. This arrangement is often referred to as "daisy-chaining." 
Of course, serial DACs cannot be used where high update rates are involved, since the 
clock rate of the serial data would be too high. Some very high speed DACs actually have 
two parallel data ports, and use them alternately in a multiplexed fashion (sometimes this 
is called a "ping-pong" input) to reduce the data rate on each port as shown in Figure 
3.42. The alternate loading (ping-pong) DAC in the diagram loads from port A and port 
B alternately on the rising and falling edges of the clock, which must have a mark-space 
ratio close to 50:50. The internal clock multiplier ensures that the DAC itself is updated 
with data A and data B alternately at exactly 50:50 time ratio, even if the external clock is 
not so precise. 
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
pages of document 1 and some pages of document docList.Add(doc); } PPTXDocument.Combine( docList, combinedPath & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
delete pages from pdf; reader extract pages from pdf
VB.NET Word: Extract Word Pages, DOCX Page Extraction SDK
multiple pages from single or a list of Word documents? What VB.NET demo code can I apply to extract Word page(s) and combine extracted page(s) into one Word
delete pages from pdf preview; copy one page of pdf to another pdf
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.1 DAC A
RCHITECTURES
3.35 
Figure 3.42: Alternate Loading (Ping-Pong) High Speed DAC 
DATA
MULTIPLEXER
DAC
LATCH
DAC
N
N
LATCH
A
LATCH
B
×2 CLOCK
MULTIPLIER
N
N
N
N
DATA PORT A
DATA PORT B
CLOCK
(50% DUTY
CYCLE)
OUTPUT
OUTPUT
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.36 
REFERENCES: 
3.1 DAC ARCHITECTURES
1.  Peter I. Wold, "Signal-Receiving System," U.S. Patent 1,514,753, filed November 19, 1920, issued 
November 11, 1924. (thermometer DAC using relays and vacuum tubes). 
2.  Clarence A. Sprague, "Selective System," U.S. Patent 1,593,993, filed November 10, 1921, issued 
July 27, 1926. (thermometer DAC using relays and vacuum tubes). 
3.  Leland K. Swart, "Gas-Filled Tube and Circuit Therefor," U.S. Patent 2,032,514, filed June 1, 1935, 
issued March 3, 1936. (a thermometer DAC based on vacuum tube switches). 
4.  Robert Adams, Khiem Nguyen, and Karl Sweetland,  "A 113 dB SNR Oversampling DAC with 
Segmented Noise-Shaped Scrambling, " ISSCC Digest of Technical Papers, vol. 41, 1998, pp. 62, 
63, 413. (describes a segmented audio DAC with data scrambling). 
5.  Robert W. Adams and Tom W. Kwan, "Data-directed Scrambler for Multi-bit Noise-shaping D/A 
Converters,"   U.S. Patent 5,404,142, filed August 5, 1993, issued April 4, 1995. (describes a 
segmented audio DAC with data scrambling). 
6.  Paul M. Rainey, "Facimile Telegraph System," U.S. Patent 1,608,527, filed July 20, 1921, issued 
November 30, 1926. (the first PCM patent. Also shows a relay-based 5-bit electro-mechanical flash 
converter and a binary DAC using relays and multiple resistors). 
7.  John C. Schelleng, "Code Modulation Communication System," U.S. Patent 2,453,461, Filed June 19, 
1946, Issued November 9, 1948. (vacuum tube binary DAC using binary weighted voltages summed 
into load resistor with equal resistor weights). 
8.  B. D. Smith, "Coding by Feedback Methods," Proceedings of the I. R. E., Vol. 41, August 1953, pp. 
1053-1058. (Smith uses an internal binary weighted DAC and also points out that a non-linear transfer 
function can be achieved by using a DAC with non-uniform bit weights, a technique which is widely 
used in today's voiceband ADCs with built-in companding. He was also one of the first to propose 
using an R/2R ladder network within the DAC core). 
9.  Bruce K. Smith, "Digital Attenuator," U.S. Patent 1,976,527, filed July 17, 1958, issued March 21, 
1961. (describes a transistorized voltage output DAC similar to B. D. Smith above). 
10.  Bernard M. Gordon and Robert P. Talambiras, "Signal Conversion Apparatus," U.S. Patent 3,108,266, 
filed July 22, 1955, issued October 22, 1963. (classic patent describing Gordon's 11-bit, 50kSPS 
vacuum tube successive approximation ADC done at Epsco. The internal DAC represents the first 
known use of equal currents switched into an R/2R ladder network.) 
11.  James J. Pastoriza, "Solid State Digital-to-Analog Converter," U.S. Patent 3,747,088, filed December 
30, 1970, issued July 17, 1973. (the first patent on the quad switch approach to building high 
resolution DACs).  
12.  Eugene R. Hnatek, A User's Handbook of D/A and A/D Converters, John Wiley, New York, 1976, 
ISBN 0-471-40109-9, pp. 282-295. (contains an excellent description of the Analog Devices' AD550 
monolithic µDAC quad current switch, and AD850 thin film network—building blocks for 12-bit DACs  
introduced in 1970 ). 
13.  Adrian Paul Brokaw, "Digital-to-Analog Converter with Current Source Transistors Operated 
Accurately at Different Current Densities," U.S. Patent 3,940,760, filed March 21, 1975, issued 
February 24, 1976. (the most referenced data converter patent ever issued). 
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.1 DAC A
RCHITECTURES
3.37 
14.  Dennis Dempsey and Christopher Gorman, "Digital-to-Analog Converter," U.S. Patent 5,969,657, 
filed July 27, 1997, issued October 19, 1999. (describes an elegant solution for segmented unbuffered 
string DACs). 
15.  John A. Schoeff, "An Inherently Monotonic 12 Bit DAC," IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, 
Vol. SC-14, No. 6, December 1979, pp. 904-911. (describes one of the first monolithic DACs to use 
segmentation). 
16.  G. R. Ritchie, J. C. Candy, and W. H. Ninke, "Interpolative Digital-to-Analog Converters," IEEE 
Transactions on Communications, Vol. COM-22, November 1974, pp. 1797-1806. (one of the 
earliest papers written on oversampling interpolative DACs). 
17.  H. G. Musmann and W. W. Korte, "Generalized Interpolative Method for Digital/Analog Conversion 
of PCM Signals," U.S. Patent 4,467,316, filed June 3, 1981, issued August 21, 1984. (a description of 
interpolating DACs). 
18.  B. Smith, "Instantaneous Companding of Quantized Signals, Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 36, 
May 1957, pp. 653-709. (one of the first papers written about using nonlinear coding techniques for 
speech signals in PCM). 
19.  H. Kaneko and T. Sekimoto, "Logarithmic PCM Encoding Without Diode Compandor," IEEE 
Transactions on Communications Systems, Vol. 11, No. 3, September 1963, pp. 296-307. (describes 
several methods for nonlinear encoding speech directly without the need for diode compandors).  
20.  C. L. Dammann, "An Approach to Logarithmic Coders and Decoders," NEREM Record, Boston MA, 
November 2-4, 1966, pp. 196-197. (more discussions on nonlinear coders and decoders for PCM). 
21.  H. Kaneko, "A Unified Formulation of Segment Companding Laws and Synthesis of Codecs and 
Digital Compandors," Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 49, September 1970, pp. 1555-1558. 
(discusses the piecewise linear approximation to the logarithmic transfer companding function).  
22.  M. R. Aaron and H. Kaneko, "Synthesis of Digital Attenuators for Segment Companded PCM Codes," 
Transactions on Communications Technology, COM-19, December 1971, pp. 1076-1087. (more on 
nonlinear coding). 
23.  C. L. Dammann, L. D. McDaniel, and C. L. Maddox, "D2 Channel Bank: Multiplexing and Coding," 
Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 51, October 1972, pp. 1675-1699. (still more on nonlinear 
coding). 
24.  A.H. Reeves, "Electric Signaling System," U.S. Patent 2,272,070, filed November 22, 1939, issued 
February 3, 1942. (Reeves' classic PCM patent which describes a 5-bit PWM counting ADC and 
DAC). 
25.  R. L. Carbrey, "Decoder for Pulse Code Modulation," U.S. Patent 2,579,302, filed January 17, 1948, 
issued December 18, 1951. (describes cyclic or sequential attenuation DAC). 
26.  R. L. Carbrey, "Decoding in PCM,", Bell Labs Record, November 1948, pp. 451-456. (describes the 
Shannon-Rack PCM DAC). 
27.  L.A. Meacham and E. Peterson, "An Experimental Multichannel Pulse Code Modulation System of 
Toll Quality," Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 27, No. 1, January 1948, pp. 1-43. (further details 
of the Shannon-Rack decoder as part of the experimental PCM system). 
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.38 
NOTES:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested