devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete pages of pdf SDK application API .net windows html sharepoint Chapter%203%20Data%20Converter%20Architectures%20F4-part806

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.39 
SECTION 3.2: ADC ARCHITECTURES 
Walt Kester, James Bryant  
Introduction 
As in the case of DACs, the relationship between the digital output and the analog input 
of an ADC depends upon the value of the reference, and the accuracy of the reference is 
almost always the limiting factor on the absolute accuracy of a ADC. We shall consider 
the various architectures of ADCs, and the forms which the reference may take, later in 
this section.  
Similar to DACs, many ADCs use external references (see Figure 3.43) and have a 
reference input terminal, while others have an output from an internal reference. The 
simplest ADCs, of course, have neither—the reference is on the ADC chip and has no 
external connections.  
Figure 3.43: Basic ADC with External Reference 
If an ADC has an internal reference, its overall accuracy is specified when using that 
reference. If such an ADC is used with a perfectly accurate external reference, its 
absolute accuracy may actually be worse than when it is operated with its own internal 
reference. This is because it is trimmed for absolute accuracy when working with its own 
actual reference voltage, not with the nominal value. Twenty years ago it was common 
for converter references to have accuracies as poor as ±5% since these references were 
trimmed for low temperature coefficient rather than absolute accuracy, and the 
inaccuracy of the reference was compensated in the gain trim of the ADC itself. Today 
the problem is much less severe, but it is still important to check for possible loss of 
absolute accuracy when using an external reference with an ADC which has a built-in 
one. 
V
DD
V
SS
GROUND
(MAY BE INTERNALLY 
CONNECTED TO V
SS
)
ADC
ANALOG
INPUT
V
REF
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
SAMPLING 
CLOCK
EOC, DATA READY, ETC.
Delete pages of pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract page from pdf online; copy page from pdf
Delete pages of pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copying a pdf page into word; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.40 
ADCs which have reference terminals must, of course, specify their behavior and 
parameters. If there is a reference input the first specification will be the reference input 
voltage—and of course this has two values, the absolute maximum rating, and the range 
of voltages over which the ADC performs correctly. 
Most ADCs require that their reference voltage is within quite a narrow range whose 
maximum value is less than or equal to the ADC's V
DD
. Notice that this is unlike DACs, 
where many allow the reference to be varied over a wide range (as in the MDACs or 
semi-multiplying DACs previously discussed in Section 3.1 of this chapter).  
The reference input terminal of an ADC may be buffered as shown in Figure 3.44, in 
which case it has input impedance (usually high) and bias current (usually low) 
specifications, or it may connect directly to the ADC. In either case, the transient currents 
developed on the reference input due to the internal conversion process need good 
decoupling with external low-inductance capacitors. Most ADC data sheets recommend 
appropriate decoupling networks.  
Figure 3.44: ADC with Reference and Buffer 
Where an ADC has an internal reference, it will carry a defined reference voltage, with a 
specified accuracy. There may also be specifications of temperature coefficient and long-
term stability. 
The reference input may be buffered or unbuffered. If it is buffered, the maximum output 
current will probably be specified. In general such a buffer will have a unidirectional 
output stage which sources current but does not allow current to flow into the output 
terminal. If the buffer does have a push-pull output stage, the output current will probably 
be defined as ±(SOME VALUE) mA. If the reference output is unbuffered, the output 
V
DD
V
SS
GROUND
(MAY BE INTERNALLY 
CONNECTED TO V
SS
)
ADC
ANALOG
INPUT
V
REF
VOLTAGE
REFERENCE
Any, all or none of these pins may be
connected internally or brought off the chip.
BUFFER
AMP
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLING 
CLOCK
EOC, DATA READY, ETC.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
a pdf page cut; extract page from pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
copy one page of pdf; export pages from pdf online
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.41 
impedance may be specified, or the data sheet may simply advise the use of a high input 
impedance external buffer.  
The sampling clock input (sometimes called convert-start or encode command) is a 
critical function in an ADC and a source of some confusion. Many of the early integrated 
circuit ADCs (such as the industry-standard AD574) did not have a built-in sample-and-
hold function, and were known simply as encoders. These converters required an external 
clock to begin the conversion process. In the case of the AD574, the application of the 
external clock initiated an internal high-speed clock oscillator which in turn controlled 
the actual conversion process.  
Most modern ADCs have the sample-and-hold function on-chip and require an external 
sampling clock to initiate the conversion. In some ADCs, only a single sampling clock is 
required—in others, both a high frequency clock as well as a lower speed sampling clock 
are required. Regardless of the ADC, it is extremely important to read the data sheet and 
determine exactly what the external clock requirements are because they can vary widely 
from one ADC to another, since there is no standard.  
At some point after the assertion of the sampling clock, the output data is valid. This data 
may be in parallel or serial format depending upon the ADC. Early successive 
approximation ADCs such as the AD574 simply provided a STATUS output (STS) 
which went high during the conversion, and returned to the low state when the output 
data was valid. In other ADCs, this line is variously called busy, end-of-conversion 
(EOC), data ready, etc. Regardless of the ADC, there must be some method of knowing 
when the output data is valid—and again, the data sheet is where this information can 
always be found.  
There are one or two other practical points which are worth remembering about the logic 
of ADCs. On power-up, many ADCs do not have logic reset circuitry and may enter an 
anomalous logical state. One or two conversions may be necessary to restore their logic 
to proper operation so: (a) the first and second conversions after power-up should never 
be trusted, and (b) control outputs (EOC, data ready, etc.) may behave in unexpected 
ways at this time (and not necessarily in the same way at each power-up), and (c) care 
should be taken to ensure that such anomalous behavior cannot cause system latch-up. 
For example, EOC (end-of-conversion) should not be used to initiate conversion if there 
is any possibility that EOC will not occur until the first conversion has taken place, as 
otherwise initiation will never occur.  
Some low-power ADCs now have power-saving modes of operation variously called 
standby, power-down, sleep, etc. When an ADC comes out of one of these low-power 
modes, there is a certain recovery time required before the ADC can operate at its full 
specified performance. The data sheet should therefore be carefully studied when using 
these modes of operation, and there may be several different levels of power-down.  
Another detail which can cause trouble is the difference between EOC and DRDY (data 
ready). EOC indicates that conversion has finished, DRDY that data is available at the 
output. In some ADCs, EOC functions as DRDY—in others, data is not valid until 
several tens of nanoseconds after the EOC has become valid, and if EOC is used as a data 
strobe, the results will be unreliable.  
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page from pdf acrobat; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
deleting pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf in reader
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.42 
As a final example, some ADCs use CS (Chip Select) edges to reset internal logic, and it 
may not be possible to perform another conversion without asserting or reasserting CS 
(or it may not be possible to read the same data twice, or both).  
For more detail, it is important to read the whole data sheet before using an ADC since 
there are innumerable small logic variations from type to type. Unfortunately, many data 
sheets are not as clear as one might wish, so it is also important to understand the general 
principles of ADCs in order to interpret data sheets correctly. That is one of the purposes 
of this section.  
We are now ready to discuss the various architectures for ADCs. Because it is a 
fundamental building block used in all ADCs, the comparator (a 1-bit ADC) is treated 
first. It is logical to follow this with the flash converter architecture because it is 
somewhat analogous to the fully-decoded (thermometer) DAC architecture previously 
discussed. The successive approximation ADC architecture is treated next followed by 
subranging and pipelined architectures. The folding (Gray-code) architecture completes 
the primary architectures used in so-called high-speed ADCs. 
The last part of this sections discusses the various counting and integrating architectures 
which are generally more suited to high resolution lower speed ADCs. Sigma-Delta (Σ-∆) 
ADCs and DACs are treated in a separate section which concludes this chapter. 
The Comparator: A 1-Bit ADC 
As a changeover switch is a 1-bit DAC, so a comparator is a 1-bit ADC (see Figure 3.45). 
If the input is above a threshold, the output has one logic value, below it has another. 
Moreover, there is no ADC architecture which does not use at least one comparator of 
some sort.  
The most common comparator has some resemblance to an operational amplifier in that it 
uses a differential pair of transistors or FETs as its input stage, but unlike an op amp, it 
does not use external negative feedback, and its output is a logic level indicating which of 
the two inputs is at the higher potential. Op amps are not designed for use as 
comparators—they may saturate if overdriven and recover slowly. Many op amps have 
input stages which behave in unexpected ways when used with large differential voltages, 
and their outputs are rarely compatible with standard logic levels. There are cases, 
however, when it may be desirable to use an op amp as a comparator, and an excellent 
treatment of this subject can be found in Reference 1.  
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf document; extract one page from pdf online
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
extract pages pdf preview; copy pdf page to clipboard
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.43 
Figure 3.45: The Comparator: A 1-Bit ADC 
Comparators used as building blocks in ADCs need good resolution which implies high 
gain. This can lead to uncontrolled oscillation when the differential input approaches 
zero. In order to prevent this, hysteresis is often added to comparators using a small 
amount of positive feedback. Figure 3.45 shows the effects of hysteresis on the overall 
transfer function. Many comparators have a millivolt or two of hysteresis to encourage 
"snap" action and to prevent local feedback from causing instability in the transition 
region. Note that the resolution of the comparator can be no less than the hysteresis, so 
large values of hysteresis are generally not useful.  
Early comparators were designed with vacuum tubes and were often used in radio 
receivers—where they were called discriminators, not comparators. Most modern 
comparators used in ADCs include a built-in latch which makes them sampling devices 
suitable for data converters. A typical structure is shown in Figure 3.46 for the AM685 
ECL (emitter-coupled-logic)  latched comparator introduced in 1972 by Advanced Micro 
Devices, Inc. (see Reference 2). The input stage preamplifier drives a cross-coupled latch. 
The latch locks the output in the logic state it was in at the instant when the latch was 
enabled. The latch thus performs a track-and-hold function, allowing short input signals 
to be detected and held for further processing. Because the latch operates directly on the 
input stage, the signal suffers no additional delays—signals only a few nanoseconds wide 
can be acquired and held. The latched comparator is also less sensitive to instability 
caused by local feedback than an unlatched one.  
+
DIFFERENTIAL
ANALOG INPUT
LOGIC
OUTPUT
LATCH
ENABLE
DIFFERENTIAL ANALOG INPUT
COMPARATOR 
OUTPUT
"0"
"1"
0
V
HYSTERESIS
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
delete pages from pdf online; extract pages from pdf file online
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
cut pages from pdf reader; extract one page from pdf preview
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.44 
Figure 3.46: The AM685 ECL Comparator (1972) 
Where comparators are incorporated into IC ADCs, their design must consider resolution, 
speed, overload recovery, power dissipation, offset voltage, bias current, and the chip 
area occupied by the architecture which is chosen. There is another subtle but 
troublesome characteristic of comparators which can cause large errors in ADCs if not 
understood and dealt with effectively. This error mechanism is the occasional inability of 
a comparator to resolve a small differential input into a valid output logic level. This 
phenomenon is known as metastability—the ability of a comparator to balance right at its 
threshold for a short period of time.  
The metastable state problem is illustrated in Figure 3.47. Three conditions of differential 
input voltage are illustrated: (1) large differential input voltage, (2) small differential 
input voltage, and (3) zero differential input voltage. The approximate equation which 
describes the output voltage, V
O
(t) is given by: 
τ
=∆
t/
IN
O
Ae
V
V (t)
 
Eq. 3.1 
Where ∆V
IN
= the differential input voltage at the time of latching, A = the gain of the 
preamp at the time of latching, τ = regeneration time constant of the latch, and t = the 
time that has elapsed after the comparator output is latched (see References 3 and 4).  
For small differential input voltages, the output takes longer to reach a valid logic level. 
If the output data is read when it lies between the "valid logic 1" and the "valid logic 0" 
region, the data can be in error. If the differential input voltage is exactly zero, and the 
comparator is perfectly balanced at the time of latching, the time required to reach a valid 
logic level can be quite long (theoretically infinite). However, hysteresis and noise on the 
input makes this condition highly unlikely. The effects of invalid logic levels out of the 
comparator are different depending upon how the comparator is used in the actual ADC.  
+
PREAMP
Q
Q
LATCH
LATCH
ENABLE
From James N. Giles, "High Speed Transistor
Difference Amplifier," U.S. Patent 3,843,934,
filed January 31 1973, issued October 22, 1974
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.45 
Figure 3.47: Comparator Metastable State Errors 
From a design standpoint, comparator metastability can be minimized by making the 
gain, A, high, minimizing the regeneration time constant, τ, by increasing the gain-
bandwidth of the latch, and allowing sufficient time, t, for the output of the comparator to 
settle to a valid logic level. It is not the purpose of this discussion to analyze the complex 
tradeoffs between speed, power, and circuit complexity when optimizing comparator 
designs, but an excellent treatment of the subject can be found in References 3 and 4.  
From a user standpoint, the effect of comparator metastability (if it affects the ADC 
performance at all) is in the bit error rate (BER)—which is not usually specified on most 
ADC data sheets. A discussion of this specification can be found in Chapter 2 of this 
book. The resulting errors are often referred to as sparkle codes, rabbits, or flyers.  
Bit error rate should not be a problem in a properly designed ADC in most applications, 
however the system designer should be aware that the phenomenon exists. An application 
example where it can be a problem is when the ADC is used in a digital oscilloscope to 
detect small-amplitude single-shot randomly occurring events. The ADC can give false 
indications if its BER is not sufficiently small.  
t
t
LATCH
ENABLE
COMPARATOR
OUTPUT
VALID LOGIC "1"
VALID LOGIC "0"
LARGE ∆V
IN
SMALL ∆V
IN
1
2
DATA 1
VALID
DATA 2
VALID
UNDEFINED
TRANSPARENT MODE (TRACK)
LATCHED MODE (HOLD)
3
ZERO ∆V
IN
DATA 3
VALID
∆V
O
v
o
(t) =  ∆V
in
Ae
t/
τ
t = 0
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.46 
High Speed ADC Architectures 
Flash Converters 
Flash ADCs (sometimes called parallel ADCs) are the fastest type of ADC and use large 
numbers of comparators. An N-bit flash ADC consists of 2N resistors and 2N–1 
comparators arranged as in Figure 3.48. Each comparator has a reference voltage from 
the resistor string which is 1 LSB higher than that of the one below it in the chain. For a 
given input voltage, all the comparators below a certain point will have their input 
voltage larger than their reference voltage and a "1" logic output, and all the comparators 
above that point will have a reference voltage larger than the input voltage and a "0" logic 
output. The 2N–1 comparator outputs therefore behave in a way analogous to a mercury 
thermometer, and the output code at this point is sometimes called a thermometer code. 
Since 2N–1 data outputs are not really practical, they are processed by a decoder to 
generate an N-bit binary output. 
Figure 3.48: 3-bit All-Parallel (Flash) Converter 
The input signal is applied to all the comparators at once, so the thermometer output is 
delayed by only one comparator delay from the input, and the encoder N-bit output by 
only a few gate delays on top of that, so the process is very fast. However, the 
architecture uses large numbers of resistors and comparators and is limited to low 
resolutions, and if it is to be fast, each comparator must run at relatively high power 
levels. Hence, the problems of flash ADCs include limited resolution, high power 
dissipation because of the large number of high speed comparators (especially at 
sampling rates greater than 50 MSPS), and relatively large (and therefore expensive) chip 
sizes. In addition, the resistance of the reference resistor chain must be kept low to supply 
adequate bias current to the fast comparators, so the voltage reference has to source quite 
large currents (typically  > 10 mA). 
N
R
PRIORITY
ENCODER
AND LATCH
ANALOG
INPUT
DIGITAL
OUTPUT
+V
REF
R
R
R
R
R
0.5R
STROBE
1.5R
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
RCHITECTURES
3.2 ADC A
RCHITECTURES
3.47 
The first documented flash converter was part of Paul M. Rainey's electro-mechanical 
PCM facsimile system described in a relatively ignored patent filed in 1921 (Reference 
5—see further discussions in Chapter 1 of this book). In the ADC, a current proportional 
to the intensity of light drives a galvanometer which in turn moves another beam of light 
which activates one of 32 individual photocells, depending upon the amount of 
galvanometer deflection (see Figure 3.49). Each individual photocell output activates part 
of a relay network which generates the 5-bit binary code. 
Figure 3.49: A 5-Bit Flash ADC Proposed by Paul Rainey  
Adapted from Paul M. Rainey, "Facsimile Telegraph System," U.S. Patent 
1,608,527, Filed July 20, 1921, Issued November 30, 1926 
A significant development in ADC technology during the period was the electron beam 
coding tube developed at Bell Labs and shown in Figure 3.50. The tube described by R. 
W. Sears in Reference 6 was capable of sampling at 96 kSPS with 7-bit resolution. The 
basic electron beam coder concepts are shown in Figure 3.50 for a 4-bit device. The tube 
used a fan-shaped beam creating a "flash" converter delivering a parallel output word.  
Early electron tube coders used a binary-coded shadow mask (Figure 3.50A), and large 
errors can occur if the beam straddles two adjacent codes and illuminates both of them. 
The errors associated with binary shadow masks were later eliminated by using a Gray 
code shadow mask as shown in Figure 3.50B. This code was originally called the 
"reflected binary" code, and was invented by Elisha Gray in 1878, and later re-invented 
by Frank Gray in 1949 (see Reference 7). The Gray code has the property that adjacent 
levels differ by only one digit in the corresponding Gray-coded word. Therefore, if there 
is an error in a bit decision for a particular level, the corresponding error after conversion 
to binary code is only one least significant bit (LSB). In the case of midscale, note that 
only the MSB changes. It is interesting to note that this same phenomenon can occur in 
TRANSPARENCY
(NEGATIVE)
DEFLECTED
LIGHT BEAM
PHOTOCELL BANK (32)
SERIAL DATA TO RECEIVER
RECEIVING
PHOTOCELL
RELAY DECODING 
LOGIC
PARALLEL BINARY
OUTPUT DATA
LIGHT 
SOURCE
GALVANOMETER
ROTATING COMMUTATOR
STATIONARY
ELECTRICAL CONTACTS
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
3.48 
modern comparator-based flash converters due to comparator metastability. With small 
overdrive, there is a finite probability that the output of a comparator will generate the 
wrong decision in its latched output, producing the same effect if straight binary decoding 
techniques are used. In many cases, Gray code, or "pseudo-Gray" codes are used to 
decode the comparator bank output before finally converting to a binary code output.  
Figure 3.50: The Electron Beam Coder from Bell Labs (1948) 
In spite of the many mechanical and electrical problems relating to beam alignment, 
electron tube coding technology reached its peak in the mid-l960s with an experimental 
9-bit coder capable of 12-MSPS sampling rates (Reference 8). Shortly thereafter, 
however, advances in all solid-state ADC techniques made the electron tube technology 
obsolete.  
It was soon recognized that the flash converter offered the fastest sampling rates 
compared to other architectures, but the problem with this approach is that the 
comparator circuit itself is quite bulky using discrete transistor circuits and very 
cumbersome using vacuum tubes. Constructing a single latched comparator cell using 
either technology is quite a task, and extending it to even 4-bits of resolution (15 
comparators required) makes it somewhat unreasonable. Nevertheless, work was done in 
the mid 1950s and early 1960s as shown in Robert Staffin and Robert D. Lohman's patent 
which describes a subranging architecture using both tube and transistor technology 
(Reference 9). The patent discusses the problem of the all-parallel approach and points 
out the savings by dividing the conversion process into a coarse conversion followed by a 
fine conversion. 
Tunnel (Esaki) diodes were used as comparators in several experimental early flash 
converters in the 1960s as an alternative to a latched comparator based solely on tubes or 
transistors (see References 10-13).  
Electron gun
Collector
Y Deflectors
Shadow Mask
Collector
(A) BINARY CODED
SHADOW MASK
(B) GRAY CODED
SHADOW MASK
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested