devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Extract one page from pdf online Library software component asp.net winforms web page mvc Aquinas__Theology_of_the_God_Who_Is0-part810

Seat of Wisdom, Issue 1 (Spring 2010): 27-57 
27 
A
RTICLE
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is: 
The Significance of Ipsum Esse Subsistens in the Summa theologiae  
I.   Introduction 
After a period of relative neglect following the Second Vatican Council, 
the theology of Thomas Aquinas has undergone a revival of interest, to the point 
that Aquinas has now become a resource for non-Catholic theologians too. Yet 
while various areas of his corpus have drawn respect, his theology of God 
receives a high degree of criticism. His position that God is immutable and has 
no real relation to creation is dismissed by contemporary theology on several 
justifications: as contrary to the biblical God intimately concerned with his 
covenanted people, as epitomizing the domineering God of classical theism 
rejected by modern atheism for threatening the autonomy of the world, and as 
unable to support a genuine religious subjectivity that requires our relationship 
with God to be fully mutual.
1
Criticisms from process and feminist theologies on 
his characterization of God’s attributes,
2
and from contemporary Trinitarian 
theology on the priority he gives the divine nature over the divine persons,
3
have 
1
Gerald Hanratty, “Divine Immutability and Impassibility Revisited,” in At the 
Heart of the Real, F. O’Rourke, ed. (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1992), 137-62, at 138. 
Hanratty offers a concise and fair presentation of the various arguments against or 
modifications of divine immutability in process philosophy and theology, and the 
theologies of Hans Küng, Jürgen Moltmann, Eberhard Jüngel, Heribert Mühlen, Jean 
Galot and Hans Urs von Balthasar. 
2
For the arguments of process thought that God changes, cf. Alfred North 
Whitehead, Process and Reality (New York: Free Press, 1969); Ewert Cousins, ed., 
Process Theology: Basic Writings (New York: Newman Press, 1972); Santiago Sia, “The 
Doctrine of God’s Immutability: Introducing the Modern Debate,” New Blackfriars 68 
(1987): 226-29; and David Pailin, “The Utterly Absolute and the Totally Related: Change 
in God,” New Blackfriars 68 (1987): 243-55. For a feminist critical reading of Aquinas’s 
classical theism, see Elizabeth A. Johnson, She Who Is: The Mystery of God in Feminist 
Theological Discourse (New York: Herder & Herder, 1993). For a theological reworking 
of God’s attributes, see Colin E. Gunton, Act & Being: Towards a Theology of the Divine 
Attributes (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2003). 
3
The initial charge, since taken up by others, was offered by Karl Rahner in 
“Remarks on the Dogmatic Treatise ‘De Trinitate,’” Theological Investigations, vol. 4, 
trans. K. Smyth (New York: Crossroad, 1982), 83-84, and The Trinity, Joseph Donceel, 
trans. (New York: Crossroad, 1997), 15-21 & 45-46. For a response that explains the 
Extract one page from pdf online - control application platform:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract one page from pdf online - control application platform:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
28 
likewise fostered a consensus that no matter how agile and penetrating Aquinas 
can be on a wide range of theological problems, his basic theology of God is 
fundamentally misconceived. 
This judgment of the inadequacy of Aquinas’ theology of God has not 
been an entirely external criticism offered by those whose philosophical premises 
and theological approaches widely differ from his. Certain scholars of Aquinas, 
too, in their engagement with the criticisms and concerns of process thought, 
have sought to qualify Aquinas’ teaching on divine immutability and God’s 
relation  to  the  world.
4
Although  carefully  correcting  contemporary 
misunderstandings of these notions and delineating the objectionable theological 
implications that arise when either is denied of God,
5
these writers suggest that 
the reality and depth of God’s involvement with creation can be expressed in 
Thomistic terms by saying that God’s knowing and willing of creation makes a 
real difference in God. Exploiting Aquinas’ own distinction between the entitive 
order of the divine essence itself and the intentional order of the divine knowing 
and willing of creation, these writers claim that in his creative, conscious 
intentions God’s relation to the world is more than merely rational and not 
absolutely immutable.
6
While their effort to use Aquinas to advance beyond him 
is commendable, still their solution, in addition to being somewhat ambiguous, 
has been questioned for its faithfulness to Aquinas.
7
Their position also seems to 
unity and trajectory of Aquinas’ discussion of God as three persons of one essence, see 
Giles Emery, “Essentialism or Personalism in the Treatise on God in Saint Thomas 
Aquinas?” The Thomist 64 (2000): 521-63. 
4
Anthony J. Kelly, “God: How Near a Relation?” Thomist 34 (1970), 191-229; 
W. Norris Clarke, “A New Look at the Immutability of God,” in God Knowable and 
Unknowable, Robert J. Roth, ed. (New York: Fordham University Press, 1973), 43-72; 
William J. Hill, “Does the World Make a Difference to God?” The Thomist 38 (1974), 
146-64. Walter Stokes sought the same end by different means, by attempting a synthesis 
between Thomistic and process metaphysics: “Is God Really Related to the World?” 
Proceedings of the American Philosophical Association, 39 (1965), 145-51. See also the 
brief synopsis of the debate opened up by process thought in Sia, “The Doctrine of God’s 
Immutability,” 229-32. 
5
According to Hill, positing a real relation of God to the world would imply: 
“that God is inconceivable apart from the world; that he is ontically dependent upon 
something other than himself; that the creative act is not free; that the creature no longer 
is fully contingent in existing. In short, it would subordinate God to a “whole” prior to 
and more ultimate than himself.” (154-55) 
6
Clarke, 52-53; Hill, 151-52. 
7
How changes in God’s intentional relation to the world do not involve change in 
God’s being is not very clear in their positions, given that God’s absolute simplicity 
excludes any real distinction between the entitive and intentional orders in God. For a 
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your PDF document, you can use
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class PDFPage page = (PDFPage)pdf.GetPage(0); // Extract all images on one pdf page.
www.rasteredge.com
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
29 
suggest agreement with contemporary critics that absolute divine immutability 
and a wholly one-way divine relation to the world are points of weakness in 
classical theism, requiring some moderation in order for the world to have the 
meaning and importance it ought to have for the Christian God.
8
Other Thomistic scholars have replied to these criticisms and defended 
both Aquinas’ predication of divine immutability and his denial that God’s 
relation to the world is real. Gerald Hanratty offers a fine explanatory summary 
of the arguments for divine immutability and impassibility offered by Thomas 
Aquinas.
9
Michael J. Dodds also explains the Thomistic reasons for predicating 
divine immutability and the ways that ‘motion’ may be properly said of God.
10
Martin J. De Nys has argued that the notion that God does not have a real 
relation to the world is “a substantially defensible, rationally complex, and 
interesting theological option” with the inner-consistency and resourcefulness to 
engage the concerns of contemporary theology.
11
I agree, and wish in this article 
to show this coherence and fecundity by taking a different approach than the 
mainly philosophical defenses offered so far. Rather than focus directly on the 
specifically ‘problematic’ issues of divine immutability and its attendant denial 
critical response to the Clarke and Hill articles cited above (n. 4, see Theodore J. 
Kondoleon,  “The  Immutability  of  God:  Some  Recent  Challenges,”  The  New 
Scholasticism 58/3 (1984), 293-315. While I accept the validity of his criticisms, in my 
opinion they apply more to Clarke’s arguments than to Hill’s, as well as to Kelly’s 
article, which Kondoleon does not engage. 
8
Kelly, for example, claims “classic theism (and Thomism is included explicitly 
in this) lacks existential allure for the men of our time.” (194) Supposedly because of “the 
existential repugnance of a statically indifferent Deity,” (196) “God must be conceived of 
as genuinely related to the world and as really affected by our actions.” (194) Clarke is 
another who accepts without question the current assumption that the measure of our 
value before God is how much we creatures ‘make a difference in him’ (44-45, 56-57)—
i.e., whether (and to what degree) we can change him. Yet this is a dubious standard by 
which to measure God’s love, the inverse of the biblical touchstone where the depths of 
God’s love for us rests upon what he has done for us. The problem of imperfection 
inherent to this measure of ‘how much we make a difference to God’ is the implication 
that before you prayed, acted, suffered, or sinned, God had less regard and compassion 
for you. Any difference that we can make in God presumes an initial divine indifference. 
9
Hanratty, 148-62. 
10
Michael J. Dodds, “St. Thomas Aquinas and the Motion of the Motionless 
God,” New Blackfriars 68 (1987): 233-42.  For a more extensive treatment see his book: 
The Unchanging God of Love: A Study of the Teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas on Divine 
Immutability in View of Certain Contemporary Criticisms of This Doctrine (Fribourg: 
Editions Universitaires Fribourg Suisse, 1986). 
11
Martin J. De Nys, “God, Creatures, and Relations: Revisiting Classical 
Theism,” Journal of Religion 81 (2001), 595-614, at 613-14. 
control application platform:VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
will get a simple VB.NET online PDF annotation tutorial. contains all information about source PDF document file PDFPage: As for one page of PDFDocument instance
www.rasteredge.com
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
30 
of a real divine relation to the world, I intend to show in a more theological and 
systematic way the deep and broad implications of Aquinas’ judgment that God 
is the act of subsistent existence itself. By tracing the trajectory of his discussion 
of God in the Summa theologiae I hope to indicate how his whole theology, 
especially an understanding of reality as created, rests upon this foundational 
claim and gives us a theological portrait of an unsurpassably active God. Because 
this understanding of how created things relate to God is so fundamental to his 
thought and so widely different from contemporary views, it is crucial that all 
readers be familiar with it if they are to faithfully interpret his treatment of any 
other theological topic within his great summary of theology. 
Since the fundamental accusation against the immutable God of classical 
theism is that his absolute perfections prohibit him from being in a mutual 
relationship with the world, it is imperative to explain why Aquinas considered 
his conception of God’s relation to the world as non-mutual to be fitting to God 
and faithful to the Christian doctrine of creation. Though God’s relation to the 
world is not ‘real’ in the Thomistic sense of being necessary for God to be God, 
nonetheless it is a dynamic relation of God acting on our behalf. Indeed in 
contrast to process theologies, in Aquinas’ theology God is active for the world 
with the eternal dynamism of the divine life itself, not with the mechanics of 
causality found in this world. Yet to be able to show all this requires grasping the 
richness of Aquinas’ theology of God as ipsum esse subsistens and the way it 
allows for his theology of creation in which the world proceeds from, is directed 
by, and returns to God.  
In order to show the how Aquinas’ conception of God’s engagement with 
the world surpasses contemporary alternatives, one must not defend the validity 
of particular attributes but attend to the role his understanding of God plays in 
the whole of his theology—that is, the way that Aquinas considers everything to 
be what it is on account of God being God to it. In the Summa theologiae 
discussion finds its ordering principle in God himself (sub ratione Dei), so that all 
things are discussed in relation to God as their beginning and end.
12
Given this 
systematic grounding of all reality in the mystery of God, to fault Aquinas on his 
12
Thomas Aquinas, Summa theologiae [ST], 5 vol. (Ottawa: Studii Generalis O. 
Pr., 1941 [Piana text of 1570 with some Leonine variants]), I, q. 1, a. 7. English 
translation: Summa Theologica, 3 vol. Trans. by Fathers of the English Dominican 
Province (New York: Benzinger Brothers, Inc., 1947). In the opening prologue to the 
whole work Aquinas states his intention to organize theology according to the inner 
dynamics of the subject matter (secundum ordine disciplinœ)—that is, giving primacy of 
discussion to what is first in reality (God) so that God may be the foundation of and 
ultimate context for all that follows in later questions. 
control application platform:C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Free online C# class source code for deleting Using RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF page deletion component, developers can easily select one or more
www.rasteredge.com
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
31 
understanding of God and continue to mine his theology for wisdom on other 
topics is thoroughly inconsistent with his overall intentions and liable to lead to 
grave misinterpretations of individual treatments.
13
Even a slight modification of 
his theology of God, such as those that have been proposed above, runs the grave 
risk of unmooring his understanding of creation, nature and grace from its stable 
foundation in the God who is simply the act of existence.  
Since Aquinas intentionally organizes theological discussion in his Summa 
theologiae to reflect the order of all things in their relation to God, it is important 
to pay close attention not only to what Aquinas says in individual articles but to 
the overall manner in which he says it. Accordingly, this article, in two parts, will 
trace his systematic reasoning in giving the reader an expansive appreciation of 
Aquinas’ theology of God. The first section will present the theological meaning 
of Aquinas’ judgment that God is ipsum esse subsistens given in the work’s 
opening treatise on the one God, questions 2-26. The intent here is not to focus 
upon any attribute or question in particular but to follow the weave of his 
theological argument: how all that is predicated of God, including the Creator-
creation relation, depends upon God’s absolute transcendence as the act of 
existence itself. The second section will indicate the ongoing significance of this 
theology for what follows later in the work, showing how this foundational 
theology of God remains operative in the explanation of created realities. Here 
the purpose is to appreciate Aquinas’ theological understanding of all reality that 
arises because created things participate in and are fundamentally ordered to 
God as their principle, agent and end.  
II.  The absolute simplicity and perfect fullness of ipsum esse 
subsistens  
The treatise on the one God begins with question two of the Summa 
theologae, where Aquinas offers five ways for demonstrating the existence of God. 
Doubtless the most discussed piece of all of Aquinas’ writings, still the interest 
has for the most part been philosophical: how the arguments work and whether 
they are convincing. Our concern, however, is with their theological significance. 
13
This liability of misinterpreting sections of the Summa theologiae read in 
isolation lies in the fact that the modern reader is not likely to relate created realities to 
God in the manner Aquinas is careful to work out in his theology of God. Whether it is 
the residue of deistic scientism, the modern predilection for making the autonomy of the 
world absolute, or the panentheism increasingly accepted in theology today, the 
contemporary reader of excised passages is likely to have an understanding of created 
realities antithetical to the one presupposed throughout this work. 
control application platform:C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Able to separate one PDF file into two PDF documents using C#.NET programming code; Free to extract page(s) from source PDF file and combine extracted
www.rasteredge.com
control application platform:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
how to copy an image from one page of PDF how to cut image from PDF file page by using doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Extract all images
www.rasteredge.com
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
32 
To read this second question theologically is to grasp its place within the larger 
context of this treatise on God, and thereby to recognize the way its conclusion 
becomes the principle and premise for what will be judged true of God’s essence 
and operations. For immediately following and interlocked with question two 
are the questions on the simplicity and perfection of God, where Aquinas 
presents his fundamental characterization of God which will steer the course of 
the discussion in the rest of the treatise. Indeed, because this characterization 
depends upon what God must be as the reason for the universe’s existence, here 
is also found the determinative principle for Aquinas’ understanding of the 
relation creation has with its Creator. 
Thus  in  appreciation of  the  systematic ordering  of the questions 
themselves, a reading of question two in the light of the subsequent discussion on 
God’s simplicity and perfection makes it clear that in the five ways Aquinas does 
not merely demonstrate that God exists. It is easy to assume, in the unending 
debate over the demonstrative merits of the five ways (a debate which tends to 
isolate question two from the movement inherent in the whole treatise), that all 
that Aquinas intends here is simply to reason to an actually existing God. Much 
more significantly for his theological project, Aquinas concludes to a God that is 
actual existence itself. The only adequate cause to explain the existence of this 
universe, in which the existence of each thing without exception is derived, is in 
an Origin that has not received its existence from anything prior.
14
“God as pure 
act, far from being an impairment to creating, is the absolute prolegomenon and, 
literally, sine qua non for creating.”
15
To be truly adequate to the task of 
14
The fundamental premise of the argument is stated twice in ST I, q. 2, a. 3: 
quod non est, non incipit esse nisi per aliquid quod est, and de potentia autem non potest 
aliquid reduci in actum, nisi per aliquod ens in actu. This undeniable metaphysical truth 
to which Aquinas is here referring—namely, that every change or becoming requires a 
pre-existent cause already possessive of the perfection it imparts to the effect—seems to 
be one completely missed by process thinkers. While in any process or change the state 
of potency precedes the state of actuality in the effect, still the fact that the realization of 
every potency always depends upon an already-in-act cause implies that act always 
precedes potency. No potency realizes itself; nothing can pull itself up by its own 
bootstraps. Although process thought claims to reach a more rationally consistent concept 
of God (cf. n. 36 below), the truth is that in indiscriminately applying the process of 
change to God these thinkers give potency an ontological and conceptual primacy that it 
does not even have in this world of change. 
15
Thomas G. Weinandy, Does God Suffer? (Notre Dame, IN: Univ. of Notre 
Dame Press, 1999), 133. God cannot undergo any change in himself in acting for the 
world “both because God is pure act and because creation itself demands an immutably 
pure act.” (ibid.) 
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
33 
origination the ultimate principle must be outside the category of received 
existence; he must be the “the sheer unreceived Act of Being.”
16
Therefore the 
theological import of question two is not so much that God must exist, but that 
he must also be his own existence, or else this universe would not be. In contrast 
to all created things that have their existence given to them, God alone is, not 
has, existence. 
As we will now show, this conclusion that God is his own actual existence 
is the basis for all that Aquinas will say on the nature and operations of God. All 
subsequent judgments about what is or is not true of God are compelled by 
fidelity to this insight that God must be ipsum esse per se subsistens [‘the act of 
subsistent existence itself’] in order to be the explanatory cause this universe 
requires.
17
The way Aquinas does this is by first arguing that the God who is his 
own act of existence must be both absolutely simple and perfect. Aquinas then 
employs these two complementary truths to guide the rest of the discussion in 
the treatise. To appreciate his theology of God as ipsum esse subsistens, therefore, 
requires first grasping how God’s simplicity and perfect fullness arise from God 
as the act of existence itself, and then seeing how these two truths flow into all 
further claims about God’s attributes, knowledge and will. The first step will 
involve a closer reading of Aquinas’ argument in questions 3-6. But due to the 
length of the rest of the treatise (qq. 7-26), accomplishing the second step within 
the limits of this paper will entail a more selective reading. To fit the overall 
theme of this article, I will focus on those passages that help show how God’s 
very active relation to the world is found in his simple and full act of existence. 
In the pedagogically advantageous ordering he gives to the subject, 
Aquinas immediately follows the argument of the five ways (q. 2. a. 3) with 
demonstrations that God is wholly simple (q. 3) and the fullness of all perfection 
or goodness (qq. 4-6). His reasoning very much depends upon the necessity that 
the source of all things be the act of unreceived existence itself and hence beyond 
even the possibility of having possibilities. As the transcendent I am,
18
God is to 
16
Hill, 154. 
17
ST I, q. 44, a. 1; Deus “est ipsum esse subsistens omnibus modis indeter-
minatum.” (ST I, q. 11, a. 4) Note therefore that Aquinas does not argue in the fashion of 
St. Anselm, deriving his theological conclusions in accordance with the logical axiom 
that God is aliquid quo nihil maius cogitari possit. Rather, Aquinas’ foundational 
principle for demonstrating the reasonableness of the faith is the cosmological premise or 
question of what this actually existing world requires for its ultimate ground and 
terminus. 
18
Like many of the patristic fathers, Aquinas explicitly refers to the revelation of 
the divine name in Exodus 3:14. Since this reference occurs in the sed contra of ST I, q. 
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
34 
be identified with being in the most active of senses, and anything that implies a 
kind  of  non-existence  or  non-actuality—including  potency,  composition, 
limitation, imperfection, and the process of becoming—must be excluded as 
contrary to the divine nature. Or in positive terms, God must be wholly simple 
and perfect in himself, and thus both transcendently other than creation (q. 4, a. 
3) and yet entirely operative upon it (q. 6, a. 4). 
Whatever is not simple can be divided so that each of its parts is not 
identical with any other or with the whole. Since the real distinctiveness of each 
part is assured only by a negation of it not being any other, this “is not” of the 
part is antithetical of the absolute “is” that God must be for the universe to truly 
exist. Division also introduces potentiality in the subject, not just the possibility 
of corruption but also the necessity that each part receive qualification from and 
thus stand in potency to the other’s distinctiveness (q. 3, aa. 1 & 2). Composition 
is thus contrary to the one whose essence is to be existence itself. Although all 
created things, no matter how simple, are ‘composed’ of an essence with the act 
of existence (since what they are cannot be identified with that they are), God in 
contrast is beyond even this most basic and universal composition. If God cannot 
be divided between his essence and his existence, he cannot be divided at all (q. 
3, aa. 4 & 7). Theologically, his simplicity is important because it requires us to 
affirm that anything true about God is true of him wholly and absolutely, not 
partially or conditionally. Indeed, the many ways that God is great can be 
encapsulated in the simply truth that God is, so that no addendum over and 
above his essence need be admitted.  
The divine simplicity of pure existence is infinitely rich in perfection. Now 
what is most simple in our experience is a geometric point—indivisible yes, but 
of very little substance. The simplicity of God, however, is of a richness of depth 
and breadth beyond our comprehension. For the is of God that excludes any 
imperfection also encompasses all perfections, “for a thing is perfect in 
proportion to its state of actuality.”
19
Furthermore, because the universe comes 
from God, all the good found in it must in a greater manner pre-exist in the 
Creator for him to be rightly regarded as its point of origin (q. 4, a. 2). 
Consequently, the judgment that God is utter simplicity must be complemented 
2, a. 3, on the basis of the argument offered here one could say that the entirety of 
Aquinas’ theology of God explicates the meaning of the biblical name Yahweh, by far the 
predominant designation of God in the Old Testament.  
19
ST I, q. 4, a. 1; also q. 4, a. 2: “Since therefore God is subsisting being itself, 
nothing of the perfection of being can be wanting to Him. Now all created perfections are 
included in the perfection of being; for things are perfect, precisely so far as they have 
being after some fashion.” 
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
35 
by the judgment that God is the fullness of perfection, containing within himself, 
without loss of that simplicity, the exemplary type of every sort of created good. 
As created being exists because God is pure act, so created goodness exists 
because God is absolute perfection. Of course, divine ‘perfection’ is not an 
attained state, the terminus of a process, as it is in all created things that are 
perfected.
20
With this negation, the term perfection is justifiably applied to God 
because everything that is perfect is, as such, in act. “The first active principle 
must necessarily be most actual, and therefore most perfect.” (q. 4, a. 1)  
As the perfect one, however, God is not just the source of goodness in 
creation. He is also the end of creation, the absolute goodness that gives all 
change and activity in creation a direction and final intelligibility. For Aquinas, 
just as this changing universe requires an absolutely transcendent Beginning, so 
too does it require an absolutely transcendent End. Creation includes a two-fold 
relation to God: a) only because God is its source is the universe not nothing; b) 
only because God is its end is the universe not nonsense. Without telos order is 
impossible; without resultant good change is meaningless.
21
Each end of action is 
a good sought only because its very desirability derives from its participation in 
the goodness of God.
22
Only because God is simple and absolute perfection is he 
supreme goodness itself, in relation to which all other ends derive their character 
20
In this sense the ordinary meaning of the word is misleading: perfection, from 
the Latin perfectus, past participle of perficere—to finish, to bring to completion; per, 
through + ficere, combining form of facere, to make, do (Random House Webster’s 
College Dictionary, New York: Random House, 1992). Perhaps this is the reason why 
Paul S. Fiddes mistakenly describes Aquinas as saying that God “has no potentialities 
that he does not eternally actualize,” and that “there are no unrealized potentials in God.” 
(The Creative Suffering of God, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988, 50)  God’s pure act is 
not perfectly realized potentiality, but the absolute absence of potentiality. 
21
ST I, q. 45, a. 1, ad 2: Mutationes accipiunt speciem et dignitatem...a termino 
ad quem. “Changes receive species and dignity...from the term to which [they tend].” 
Aquinas is convinced no change would occur at all without the specification of action 
given by the end: “Besides, if an agent did not incline toward some definite effect, all 
results would be a matter of indifference for him. Now, he who looks upon a manifold 
number of things with indifference no more succeeds in doing one of them than another. 
Hence, from an agent contingently indifferent to alternatives no effect follows, unless he 
is determined to one effect by something. So, it would be impossible for him to act. 
Therefore every agent tends toward some determinate effect, and this is called his end.” 
(Summa contra gentiles [hereafter, SCG] Bk. III, chap. 2) 
22
ST I, q. 6, a. 4. Furthermore, no such consistent direction of action which we 
see in the patterns of nature is possible unless the good God has established for creatures 
what they could not establish for themselves: their own proper end (SCG Bk. I, chap. 44; 
ST I, q. 19, a. 4; cf. the fifth way of q. 2, a. 3).  
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
36 
as good.
23
As we shall later see, the direction God gives to creation as the End of 
all ends, the Goodness of all good, is an important element in his theology of 
God as ipsum esse subsistens. 
Now it is in the question on divine goodness that Aquinas first states that 
God has only a logical but not a real relation to creation.
24
From what has 
already been said it is clear that a real and necessary relation exists from creation 
to God.
25
Aquinas is denying the reverse—that God is necessarily related to 
creation—yet this does not mean that there is no divine relation to the world.
26
23
Aquinas summarizes the relation of creation to God’s goodness in this way: 
“Everything is therefore called good from the divine goodness, as from the first, 
exemplary, effective and final principle of all goodness.” (ST I, q. 6, a. 4) 
24
ST I, q. 6, a. 2, ad 1: “Now a relation of God to creatures is not a reality in God, 
but in the creature, for it is in God in our idea only.”  Aquinas clarifies the point more 
thoroughly in ST I, q. 13, a. 7: “Sometimes a relation in one extreme may be a reality, 
while in the other extreme it is an idea only. And this happens whenever two extremes 
are not of one order.”  An example of this kind of relation whose terms are of different 
orders is the relation between things in nature and the same things as sensible and 
intelligible. The relation of things sensed and understood to the actual existing things is 
real, but the relation of actual things to their sensible and intellectual counterparts is only 
a relation of reason, since a particular tree exists regardless of whether it is ever sensed or 
understood. This same kind of disparity of orders is found in the relation between God 
and creation. “Since therefore God is outside the whole order of creation, and all 
creatures are ordered to him, and not conversely, it is manifest that creatures are really 
related to God himself, whereas in God there is no real relation to creatures, but only a 
relation of idea, inasmuch as creatures are referred to him.” (ibid.; cf. ST I, q. 28, a. 1, ad 
3; q. 45, a. 3, ad 1)  For an elucidation of this distinction and its significance, as well as a 
clarification of an ambiguity in an example Aquinas uses to demonstrate it, see Thomas 
G. Weinandy, Does God Change? The Word's Becoming in the Incarnation (Still River, 
MA: St. Bede's Publications, 1985), 88-96. See also David B. Burrell, Aquinas: God and 
Action (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1979), 84-87. 
25
It deserves elucidation that by ‘relation’ Aquinas means a specific predication 
of reference posited of a singular reality, not what today we call a “relationship” which 
joins two participants in a common bond. Whereas in modern parlance one relationship 
exists between two terms, in this Aristotelian usage a distinct relation is predicated for 
each term, resulting in two relations or predications which may or may not be equivalent. 
The Creator-creation pairing is such a case of non-equivalent relations; the relation of 
creation to God is real or necessary (relatio realis) for its very existence, but the relation 
of God to creation is only in idea (relatio rationis)—i.e., necessary not for divine 
existence but necessary for a truthful predication that God is Creator. Thus, saying that 
God has no ‘relation’ to creation cannot be equivalent to saying that God has no 
‘relationship’ with it.  
26
De Nys (599-600) points out that Aquinas’ denial of a real relation occurs in the 
midst of his affirming and explaining the theological propriety of predicating relative 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested