devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Acrobat export pages from pdf Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax Aquinas__Theology_of_the_God_Who_Is1-part811

Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
37 
Granted that this non-necessary universe does indeed exist, not only must it be in 
relation to God, but also God must be active towards it, extending, as it were, his 
act of existence and goodness to it.
27
Thomas Weinandy labels this non-
necessary, more than merely logical relation of God toward the world an ‘actual 
relation,’ in order to express that God is actually, if not necessarily, related to the 
world because the world is really related to him.
28
Actual is an especially fitting 
term because the reality of God’s relation to the world is found not in the 
necessity of God’s nature but in the act of all that God is freely willing and doing 
for creation. 
Having given the substance of what Aquinas means in insisting God is 
absolutely simple and perfect, it is now vital to indicate how these claims work 
as a ‘double hermeneutic’ to shape the rest of his theology of God. Both of these 
primary theological judgments work together and complement one another, so 
that divine simplicity is not understood as insubstantial or vacuous, nor the 
fullness of divine perfection (goodness) understood as implying multiplicity or 
composition. Applied to our ideas about God, the first is principally exclusionary 
and refining, the second predominantly expansive and enriching. For proper 
theological language involves acts of judgment about what God is and is not 
based upon the relation creatures have to God, a relation which entails the 
negating truth that God is transcendently unlike creatures, and the affirming one 
that all the good in creatures must be found more eminently in God. Predications 
terms of God, for “God is related to creatures in so far as creatures are related to him.” 
(ST I, q. 13, 7, ad 5: cum ea ratione referatur Deus ad creaturam que creatura 
refer[a]tur ad ipsum) We speak truly when we call God “Creator” or “Lord,” because the 
world has a real relation to God, and this only because God is truly in the act of eternally 
knowing and freely willing the world. A lack of a real (necessary) divine relation to the 
world is therefore not a denial of God’s engagement with the world; it is rather an 
affirmation of it, one that is made in respect of the freedom of the creative act of One 
who absolutely transcends the world. 
27
ST I, q. 45, a. 3, ad 1: “Creation signified actively means the divine action, 
which is God’s essence, with a relation to the creature.”  Aquinas holds that given that 
there is a creation—a necessary supposition contingent upon divine freedom—we can 
truly say that God’s essence is identical to the divine power that acts to effect creation. 
(cf. ST I, q. 25, a. 1c. & ad 3) “Power is predicated of God not as something really 
distinct from his knowledge and will, but as differing from them logically; inasmuch as 
power implies a notion of principle putting into execution what the will commands, and 
what knowledge directs, which three things in God are identified.” (ST I, q. 25, a. 1, ad 4) 
Therefore, although there is in God no real—i.e., necessary—relation to creation, 
nevertheless the divine action by which there is a creation is nothing less than the divine 
essence itself in execution. God is the Act by which creation is. 
28
Weinandy (1985), 94-95.  
Acrobat export pages from pdf - Library application class:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Acrobat export pages from pdf - Library application class:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
38 
of abstract names fall under the hermeneutic of divine simplicity, while 
predications of God’s supereminence fall under the hermeneutic of divine 
perfection.
29
All these theological affirmations are analogical because the world 
depends upon the ipsum esse subsistens, since analogy “requires…that God be in 
act and that the creature exist in real dependence upon the divine actus essendi.”
30
In every subsequent judgment Aquinas makes about God’s essence in 
questions 7-11, and about God’s operations in questions 14-26, the notions of 
divine simplicity and perfection respectively purify and exalt all that is judged 
true of God according to the theological exigency that he is subsistent existence 
itself. On that basis, none of these subsequent predications of God in terms of 
what he is (not) or how he acts introduce composition or imperfection in God. 
This  means  first of  all that the various  divine attributes  or operations 
distinguished by us in God are never an added property which qualifies the 
divine essence; rather, each is nothing other than identical to the divine essence 
itself. Given that God is esse, the proper verb for theological predication is not 
‘has’ but the verb that designates the act of subsisting: God is his own eternity, 
God is his own knowing, etc.
31
Secondly, whatever is rightly said about God’s 
29
“We know God from creatures as their principle, and also by way of excellence 
and remotion.” (ST I, q. 13, a. 1) “As God is simple and subsisting, we attribute to him 
abstract names to signify his simplicity, and concrete names to signify his substance and 
perfection, although both these kinds of names fail to express his mode of being, 
forasmuch as our intellect does not know him in this life as he is.” (ST I, q. 13, a. 1, ad 2) 
“Thus whatever is said of God and creatures is said according to the relation of a creature 
to God as its principle and cause, wherein all perfections of things pre-exist excellently.” 
(ST I, q. 13, a. 5) 
30
William J. Hill, ‘On “Knowing the Unknowable God”’ [review of Knowing the 
Unknowable God: Ibn-Sina, Maimonides, Aquinas by David Burrell], The Thomist, 51 
(1987): 699-709, at 706. Affirming that in God essence and existence are absolutely 
identical distinguishes God from the world, enabling the theologian “to safeguard God’s 
unknowability and at the same time, paradoxically, to indicate how he may be known.” 
(ibid., 704)  
31
ST I, q. 10, a. 2: “Not only is God eternal, but he is his eternity; whereas, no 
other being is its own duration, as no other is its own being. Now God is his own uniform 
being; and hence as he is his own essence, so he is his own eternity.” ST I, q. 14, a. 4: “It 
must be said that the act of God's intellect is his substance. For if his act of understanding 
were other than his substance, then something else, as the Philosopher says [Metaphysics, 
Bk XII], would be the act and perfection of the divine substance, to which the divine 
substance would be related, as potentiality is to act, which is altogether impossible; 
because the act of understanding is the perfection and act of the one understanding. … 
Now in God there is no form which is something other than his existence, as shown 
above [q. 3]. Hence as his essence itself is also his intelligible species, it necessarily 
follows that his act of understanding must be his essence and his existence.” 
Library application class:C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Able to export PDF document to HTML file. C#.NET can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
www.rasteredge.com
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
39 
essence or operations must be affirmed or else God would be less than perfect, 
yet affirmed only in a way where no limitation, characteristic of created reality, is 
introduced into the theology of God.  
In order to complete this examination of Aquinas’ theology of God and its 
systematic inner coherence, let us now attend to some instances which suitably 
demonstrate how the rest of the treatise, under the rubrics of divine simplicity 
and perfection, express that God is the act of subsistent existence itself. From the 
remaining questions on the divine essence (ST I, qq. 7-11) we will focus not on 
God’s immutability (q. 9), but on the question that immediately precedes it and 
therefore gives it some context: question 8 on divine omnipresence. From the 
questions on the divine operations (qq. 14-26), discussion will center on God’s 
knowing and willing of creation, crucial for appreciating Aquinas’ take on the 
divine-world relation and how his conception differs from what is put forth 
today. 
After Aquinas explains  that  God is  infinite  only  in that manner 
conformable with his simplicity and perfection,
32
his next theological interest is to 
discuss God’s active omnipresence in the universe (q. 7, prologue; q. 8). This 
eighth question, together with significant portions of question 6 and questions 
14-25 that concern the extension of the divine operations into the world, are prima 
facie evidence that even in his effort to treat “God in himself” Aquinas’s 
theological portrait is far removed from its contemporary caricature of a God 
with little regard for the world. As the infinite act of existence, God is the active 
presence underlying and permeating creation. Yet his presence throughout the 
universe is not like some ether distended through space, for then his presence 
would be divisible into parts. Since divine simplicity excludes division, God is 
present “primarily” in every aspect of creation with the entirety of his being (q. 8, 
a. 4). Indeed, his presence is not one of spatial occupation, but of universal 
activity: Deus est in omnibus rebus, non quidem sicut pars essentiæ, vel sicut accidens, 
sed sicut agens adest ei in quod agit,
33
per contactum virtutis.
34
By his essential esse 
32
“Since therefore the divine being is not a being received in anything, but he is 
his own subsistent being, as was shown above [q. 3, a. 4], it is clear that God himself is 
infinite and perfect.” (ST I, q. 7, a. 1) God is absolutely, essentially infinite (a. 2), without 
limitations of any sort. His infinity is not a greatness of the kind found in creation—i.e., 
that of an unending extension in size or number (aa. 3 & 4). His greatness is infinite 
actual existence, not an unlimited potency (as in process thought). In sum, divine infinity 
is another way of naming God’s simple and absolute perfection, a greatness wholly 
without demarcation, augmentation, succession or number.  
33
ST I, q. 8, a. 1: “God is in all things; not, indeed, as part of their essence, nor as 
an accident, but as an agent is present to that upon which it works.” 
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
40 
God is present to all things as the unceasing cause of their being, and therefore 
his universal presence must be absolute, since that to which God’s agency is not 
extending is simply not existing.
35
Worth  highlighting  about  God’s  universal  activity  is  Aquinas’ 
transcendent sense of its manner of operation. As question eight denies that God 
is actively present in spatial terms, so the next two questions, on divine 
immutability and eternity, forbid conceiving divine action as involving change or 
time. God is the constant, changeless agent operative in the world, and while the 
created effects of his agency vary over time and space (and are thus historical 
and existentially experienced as changing and diverse), his agency is simple and 
perfect. Being infinite, God does not even move to extend his power, which is 
already perfectly extended to all its effects (q. 9, a. 1). Likewise, God is 
universally operative in every moment, yet not successively, as that is another 
form of division incompatible with his simplicity (q. 10, aa. 1 & 4). Thus Aquinas 
teaches us to subordinate the conditions and categories of space and time to 
God’s esse, for they are the effects of his creative action, not the conditions under 
which he must operate. In contrast to process thought, Aquinas sees universal 
change in the world not as an indication of a changing God, but of an immutable 
God who is operative universally.
36
The wonderful implication of all this is the 
central biblical truth that as God is, so does God act for us. No change between 
34
ST I, q. 8, a. 2, ad 1: “by contact of power.” 
35
ST I, q. 8, a. 3: “Therefore, God is in all things by his power, inasmuch as all 
things are subject to his power; he is by his presence in all things, as all things are bare 
and open to his eyes; he is in all things by his essence, inasmuch as he is present to all as 
the cause of their being.” (cf. q. 8, a. 4) Note, therefore, that creation’s contact with 
God’s agency is not just at its beginning, but continues as long as it exists.  
36
Process theology considers itself to be philosophically rigorous in its 
willingness to say God is subject to the same exact conditions that apply to our reality: 
“God is not to be treated as an exception to all metaphysical principles, invoked to save 
their collapse.” (Whitehead, 1969, 405) As David Pailin explains, process metaphysics 
seeks “to determine the ‘unconditionally necessary or eternal truths about existence’ 
which therefore apply a priori to all possible (and hence all actual) modes of existence. 
If, then, to be real is necessarily to be constituted by a temporally-oriented process, this 
must be true of the divine reality.” (246) Two points can be made in rebuttal, one 
philosophical and one theological. 1) This axiom that universal features of our reality 
apply equally to God cannot be consistently applied—e.g., dissolution or death occurs to 
everything that changes in our reality, yet process theologians exclude God from the 
possibility, let alone the eventual actuality, of non-existence. 2) This axiom cannot be 
reconciled with the Christian teaching that God is the Creator of all things, for any feature 
of our world that is seen as necessarily applying to God’s being (like space and time) 
cannot then be the work of his hand, but instead become a condition of that making. 
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
41 
primordial and consequent states is found in God; no intermediary exists 
between the absolute God and the conditional world.
37
In the second half of this opening treatise on the one God, concerning the 
divine operations (ST I, qq. 14-26), Aquinas expands the understanding of divine 
activity beyond the terms of general causality and into the more proper terms of 
the personal operations of one who is both intelligent and free. Of course, the 
hermeneutics of divine simplicity and fullness of perfection continue to apply; 
God can be said to be understanding and willing because these operations 
involve no composition (potentiality) or imperfection.
38
In the case of God, since 
he exists simply and perfectly, he understands and wills simply and perfectly. 
Indeed, in God alone to exist is to understand and to will. To express it in a more 
appropriate active tense: as God exists, so he understands, so he wills—
necessarily, supremely, always, etc. No operations other than these two are 
comparable in simplicity and perfection as the act of existing itself. 
It is because God is the act of existence itself that God perfectly knows 
himself with supreme comprehension and wills his own goodness with the 
awesome fullness of love. Regarding divine knowing, Aquinas’ argument rests 
37
It seems to me that the weakness of the Thomistic response to process thought 
that emphasizes the distinction between the entitive order of God’s being and the 
intentional order of God’s knowing and willing of the world is that it tends to assume, 
and perhaps even promote, this idea that if God is truly immanent and active in the world 
there must be a difference between God in himself and God for us. Yet even as it is 
theologically proper to acknowledge the reality of change and diversity in what God 
accomplishes for us in history, this does not mean that one must apply to God the 
changes and conditions of how things occur to the way God operates. Since time and 
space do not measure God, but he determines them, his reality and agency must not be 
understood according to their exigencies, but in accordance with his own. 
38
See the objections and responses to ST I, q. 14, aa. 1-5 & q. 19, aa. 1 & 2 which 
deny any potency, composition, external movement or imperfection to these divine 
operations; cf. also q. 14, a. 8 & q. 19, a. 4 which exclude a cause outside of God for 
these acts. Aquinas also insists that these operations are immanent so that, for 
simplicity’s sake, their perfection lies in the act themselves, not in any external resultant 
term (q. 14, prologue).  Similarly, note Aquinas’ insistence that the act of understanding 
involves no inherent dualism of the mind knowing and object known: intelligibile in actu 
est intellectus in actu  (ST I, q. 14, a. 2). Throughout his discussion of the divine 
operations it is crucial to realize that though Aquinas will liken these internal operations 
to movements (anticipating the discussion of the Trinitarian processions), yet they are not 
movements involving change over space or time (ST I, q. 14, a. 2, ad 2). They are 
dynamic in that activity is occurring, but said activity is without beginning, sequence or 
end. For a discussion of how Aquinas felt free enough to predicate ‘movement’ of the 
immutable God, see Dodds, “St. Thomas Aquinas and the Motion of the Motionless 
God,” 238-41. 
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
42 
on the truth that both the mind’s power to know (strength of intellect) and the 
knowability of the object (depth of intelligibility) are directly proportional to 
their degree of immateriality or actuality (ST I, q. 14, a. 1). Being unsurpassable in 
act, the ipsum esse subsistens is thus simultaneously the pure power to 
comprehend and the pure intelligibility of what is comprehensible: God is 
perfect acuity of perfect lucidity.
39
Similar reasoning is used to characterize 
divine willing. Just as reality is the measure of a thing’s truth and knowability, so 
also is being the measure of a thing’s goodness and desirability.
40
Since there 
cannot be anything more full of being, truth or goodness than the God whose 
essence is subsistent existence, the divine will cannot love anything more than 
the reality of God, the perfect good perfectly known. And since the act of God 
excludes process, God’s willing cannot be a desiring of a good yet to be acquired, 
but the loving of goodness already and always possessed as an ever is (ST I, q.19, 
a. 1, ad 2). God’s willing of his own goodness is God’s restful act of delight in 
being God. 
As a theologian of the Creator, Aquinas is equally concerned with 
explaining God’s knowledge and willing of creation. His key insight is to root 
God’s understanding and willing of the world within his act of understanding 
and willing himself.
41
Once again it is divine simplicity and perfection that frame 
Aquinas’ theological conception of how God knows and wills the world. Both 
premises require that the world not be considered as another object adding to 
God’s great wisdom or the willing of his own supremely resplendent goodness. 
If the world could be said to inform God’s awareness and teach him what he 
otherwise would not already know, his knowledge would be composite and 
imperfect. Likewise, if the world could offer to God a desirable good not initially 
and more eminently found in God’s own goodness, then the simplicity of the 
divine will would be divided between two loves and the goodness of God would 
be imperfect for being supplemented by something beyond him. God truly 
knows and wills (loves) the world, but does so in the act of knowing and willing 
39
ST I, q. 14, aa. 2-4; in Deo intellectus, et id quod intelligitur, et species 
intelligibilis, et ipsum intelligere, sunt omnino unum et idem. (a. 4) 
40
The faculty of the will is concomitant with understanding since, as intellectual 
appetite or desire, ‘to will’ is to love the good as known (ST I, q. 19, a. 1). The 
interpenetration of the faculties of knowing and willing reflects the convertibility or 
direct proportionality of being, truth and goodness—i.e., what exists, is true and good, 
and conversely so (cf. ST I, q. 5, aa. 1-3; q. 16, a. 3; q. 79, a. 11, ad 2). 
41
ST I, q. 14, aa. 5 & 6; q. 19, aa. 2 & 5. “So as God understands things apart 
from himself by understanding his own essence, so he wills things apart from himself by 
willing his own goodness.” (q. 19, a. 2, ad 2) 
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
43 
himself, for his essence contains all the intelligibility and goodness found by 
likeness in creation.
42
Denying that God’s knowing and willing is in any way 
caused by the world not only maintains the necessity that God be the pure act 
which the universe requires as its ultimate cause, it enfolds God’s creative 
knowing and willing of us into the supremely blissful act of God being God. 
Aquinas realizes that divine knowledge and will cannot depend even in 
part upon a world that in its entirety depends upon God knowing and willing it 
into existence. Divine knowledge is not derived from the universe, but rather, 
like the artist, extends outward to produce it.
43
Because the object of his self-
understanding is the fullness of perfection, in knowing himself God knows all 
there is to be known. For included in his knowing himself perfectly is God’s 
knowing of himself as cause, and thus his knowing of all that he can effect. “His 
knowledge extends as far as his causality extends,” which, because the proper 
effect of his essence is being, means that God properly knows all things that exist 
in any way, whether actually or possibly, down to the least minutiae.
44
Thus in 
his self-understanding God not only knows all that he actually creates, he knows 
42
ST I, q. 14, a. 6: “As therefore the essence of God contains in itself all the 
perfection contained in the essence of any other being, and far more, God can know in 
Himself all of them with proper knowledge.  For the nature proper to each thing consists 
in some degree of participation in the divine perfection.  Now God could not be said to 
know Himself perfectly unless He knew all the ways in which His own perfection can be 
shared by others.  Neither could He know the very nature of being perfectly, unless He 
knew all modes of being.  Hence it is manifest that God knows all things with proper 
knowledge, in their distinction from each other.” ST I, q. 19, a. 2: “Thus, he wills both 
himself to be, and other things to be; but himself as the end, and other things as ordained 
to that end; inasmuch as it befits the divine goodness that other things should be partakers 
therein.” ST I, q. 19, a. 2, ad 2: “Hence, although God wills things apart from Himself 
only for the sake of the end, which is His own goodness, it does not follow that anything 
else moves His will, except His goodness.  So, as He understands things apart from 
Himself by understanding His own essence, so He wills things apart from Himself by 
willing His own goodness.” 
43
Charles Hartshorne has accused Aquinas of being inconsistent to the rules of 
analogous theological predication on this point, arguing that since analogy requires some 
likeness of our reality to the nature of God, then God’s knowledge must in some way be 
dependent upon the world if our knowledge is going to reflect it in any way (Man’s 
Vision of God, and the Logic of Theism [Hamden, NY: Archon Books, 1964], 235-36). 
Yet he seems to have reduced human knowledge to its acquisition, ignoring its retention 
and application. The created analogy Aquinas gives for divine knowing is not human 
learning, but the creative application of human knowledge in artistic production—e.g., 
the house built in accordance with the architect’s originate idea for it (ST I, q. 14, a. 8).  
44
ST I, q. 14, a. 11; cf. q. 14, a. 5 and q. 25, a. 3 
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
44 
all that his boundless power could create (ST I, q. 14, aa. 9 & 12). To know esse 
essentially is to know whatever is, in all the senses and tenses “is” is used.  
The operation of God’s willing of creation reflects the same dynamism: 
what is properly willed is God’s own goodness, yet in that most sublime act all 
that God wills other than himself is willed as well. “His goodness is the reason of 
his willing all other things.” (q. 19, a. 4, ad 3) He freely wills the world in the 
natural necessity of delightfully willing his own goodness. Thus in parallel to 
how God’s knowledge causes, and is not caused by, created things, God’s will is 
the cause of the good found in created things, rather than created goods 
motivating the divine will to want them (q. 19, a. 5). His willing of creation in the 
willing of his own goodness ensures that creation is a free, gratuitous, and 
ordered act of God—free because God necessarily wills only his own goodness (q. 
19, aa. 3 & 4); gratuitous because God, infinitely satisfied with his own goodness, 
seeks or needs nothing from creation (q. 20, a. 2); and ordered because God wills 
creation on account of, and as a manifestation of, his own goodness (q. 22, aa. 1 & 
2). In this way Aquinas conceives of the bountiful love of God for the world not 
as a love that is attracted by created good, but as the love that causes the good 
which makes created things lovable.
45
It is pure gift-love, not acquisitional love.
46
This theological conception of God’s relation to this world is simply the 
working out of the implications of faith’s claim that the world is God’s creation, 
made from nothing by his power, in accordance with his wisdom, on account of 
his goodness. The divine-world relation is not mutual, precisely because such 
mutuality or reciprocity would mean that God is not really Creator. For example, 
if God were to come to know what will happen in the world only from the actual 
outcomes of contingent events, then the world could not spring forth from the 
Creator’s knowledge and will. Part of it at least would proceed from his 
ignorance, and as a consequence the whole of it could not be grounded in his 
love. Or to say that God is affected by the world, and receives some good from 
the world that he otherwise did not eternally possess, is to radically change the 
reason for the world from the pure gratuity of the Creator to a utilitarian need on 
45
ST I, q. 19, a. 2: “To every existing thing, then, God wills some good. Hence, 
since to love anything is nothing else than to will good to that thing, it is manifest that 
God loves everything that exists. Yet not as we love. Because since our will is not the 
cause of the goodness of things, but is moved by it as by its object, our love, whereby we 
will good to anything, is not the cause of its goodness; but conversely its goodness, 
whether real or imaginary, calls forth our love….”  
46
ST I, q. 44, a. 4: “But it does not belong to the first agent, who is agent only, to 
act for the acquisition of some end; he intends only to communicate his perfection, which 
is his goodness.” 
Seat of Wisdom (Spring 2010) 
45 
the part of God for some good (in process thought: divine actualization) he 
cannot possess otherwise. It also removes the end of creation out of God himself 
(where humanity comes to share and rest in unchanging divine life) into a never-
ending process of incremental aggrandizement of the God-world reality. The act 
of creation cannot involve or lead to a mutual relation between God and the 
world without contradicting the very nature of such an act as one of absolute 
origination and ultimate culmination. Happily, given that it is only a God who is 
pure act of existence, understanding, loving, perfection that can create, the 
Creator-creature relation is truly dynamic even though it is not mutual.  
To grasp how this relation is also dynamic on the side of creation—
without making passive the God who is pure act—we must now see how this 
theology of God grounds and shapes Aquinas’ understanding of all that 
proceeds out from and returns back to God.  
III.   Ipsum esse subsistens – Foundation of the Summa theologiae 
What impact does this theology of God have on the rest of the Summa 
theologiae, as the inquiry moves on from discussing God himself to things in their 
relation to God?  Let me offer first a few general remarks that suggest its 
influence in various ways, before specifically elucidating one important point 
where this theology of God explicitly grounds the explanation Aquinas offers—
that of the relation of creation to God in the third section of the Prima pars. 
First of all, the theological characterization of God that Aquinas presents 
in the opening treatise is clearly determinative for how the whole Summa 
unfolds. We have noted that Aquinas orders all the subject matter in the Summa 
theologiae according to reality’s relation to God as its beginning and end. This 
ordering of creation to God (and the corresponding arrangement of the theology) 
is possible only if God is ipsum esse subsistens. Only as absolutely simplicity and 
the fullness of perfection can God be the singular, ultimate origin of creation and 
the sole exemplar of the grand diversity within it. His simple-perfect essence is 
the simultaneous one and many the ancients realized the world required, 
without any of the further, necessary emanations postulated in neo-Platonism.
47
47
Because Aquinas identifies oneness, existence, goodness, understanding and 
willing in God as the divine essence itself, his theology can transcend the thought of 
Plotinus, whose supreme, the One, had to be conceived as above being, understanding 
and goodness because the latter were held to involve some dualism. Cf. The Essential 
Plotinus: Representative Treatises from The Enneads, trans. by Elmer O’Brien 
(Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 1975; facsimile reprint of The New American Library 
edition, 1964). 
Aquinas’ Theology of the God Who Is 
46 
Likewise, at creation’s other pole, it is due to his radical simplicity and perfection 
that God can be the end of all things, the one transcendent vanishing point to 
which the multiple and various trajectories inherent in all things converge. 
According to Aquinas, order is required when a diverse many proceed from one 
source,
48
and order is possible for the many and different only if all have a 
common, transcendent end.
49
The theology of God expounded in the opening 
treatise intends to show how God meets both conditions for the order of the 
world. With such a theology of God as origin and end, it makes eminent sense to 
structure one’s theological exposition in the pattern of an exitus et reditus.  
Besides being responsible for the structure of the whole theological 
presentation, this theology of God bears a general influence upon particular 
points of discussion within each part of the Summa theologiae. In the Prima pars, 
this theology of the one God is proper preparation for the treatise on the Trinity, 
for only such a radical simplicity that is never simplistic or monadic can 
adequately exclude  a  tritheistic  understanding  of  the  Trinity. Also,  the 
application of the hermeneutic of simplicity/perfection to the operations of God 
is a necessary prelude to the discussion of the processions in the Trinity, which 
are likened to these two conscious operations.
50
In the Prima secundae, the 
discussion of grace presupposes an understanding of how God is the Act behind 
all created movements and perfections.
51
Grace can be seen as the perfection of 
48
ST I, q. 42, a. 3: ordo semper dicitur per comparationem ad aliquod 
principium. “Order always has reference to some principle.”  Cf. ST I, q. 36, a. 2; II-II, q. 
26, a. 1. 
49
De potentia Dei, 7, 9; SCG Bk. III, 64. For Aquinas, the order of the universe is 
twofold—the intrinsic order of its many parts to one another and to the whole, and the 
order of the whole to God (ST I, q. 103, a. 2, ad 3).  
50
Unless the operations of understanding and willing are immanent, simple (not 
requiring introduction of composite elements), and perfect in themselves (its good 
consisting in the very act itself), they could not be fitting analogies for the Trinitarian 
processions. Furthermore, Aquinas’ theological reach to identify God with his acts of 
understanding and willing leads him to identify each Person of the Trinity with his 
personal processional act: the Father is the act of begetting, the Son is the act of being 
begotten, and the Holy Spirit is the act of love spirated.  
51
ST, I-II, q. 109, a. 1: “…all movements, both corporeal and spiritual, are 
reduced to the simple First Mover, Who is God. And hence no matter how perfect a 
corporeal or spiritual nature is supposed to be, it cannot proceed to its act unless it be 
moved by God; but this motion is according to the plan of His providence, and not by 
necessity of nature…. Now not only is every motion from God as from the First Mover, 
but all formal perfection is from Him as from the First Act. And thus the act of the 
intellect or of any created being whatsoever depends upon God in two ways: first, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested