2 - 7
Geotechnical Project Information
Project No.:
Name:
Location:
Site Contact (Project Engineer):
Phone:
Utility Contact:
Reference No.:
Right of Entry Contact:
Other Contact (specify): 
Home Phone:  
Estimated Time:
Soil Test Boring & Drilling Information 
Boring No.
Depth
Drilling Sequence
Sampling
Remarks 
(piezometers, water levels, etc.)
Health and Safety Provisions: Special Plan:
Sample type, frequency:
Disposal of Cuttings/Drill Fluids:
Boring Closure:  Cuttings:  
Grout:
Remarks:
Figure 2-3.  Example Field Instructions Form for Geotechnical Investigations.
Cut pages from pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
acrobat extract pages from pdf; extract page from pdf document
Cut pages from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete page from pdf acrobat; copy pages from pdf to word
2 - 8
2.5
SUBSURFACE EXPLORATION PLANNING
Following the collection and evaluation of available information from the above sources, the geotechnical
engineer  is  ready  to  plan  the  field  exploration  program.    The  field  exploration  methods,  sampling
requirements, and types and frequency of field tests to be performed will be determined based on the existing
subsurface information, project design requirements, the availability of equipment, and local practice.  The
geotechnical engineer should develop the overall investigation plan to enable him or her to obtain the data
needed to define subsurface conditions and perform engineering analyses and design.  A geologist can often
provide valuable input regarding the type, age and depositional environment of the geologic formations
present at the site for use in planning and interpreting the site conditions.
Frequently, the investigation program must be modified after initiating the field work because of site access
constraints or to address variations in subsurface conditions identified as the work proceeds.  To assure that
the necessary and appropriate modifications are made to the investigation program, it is particularly important
that the field inspector (preferably a geotechnical engineer or geologist) be thoroughly briefed in advance
regarding the nature of the project, the purpose of the investigation, the sampling and testing requirements,
and the anticipated subsurface conditions.  The field inspector is responsible for verifying that the work is
performed in accordance with the program plan, for communicating the progress of the work to the project
geotechnical engineer, and for immediately informing the geotechnical engineer of any unusual subsurface
conditions or required changes to the field investigation.  Table 2-1 lists the general guidelines to be followed
by the geotechnical field inspectors.
2.5.1 Types of Investigation
Generally, there are five types of field subsurface investigation methods, best conducted in this order:
1.
Remote sensing 
2.
Geophysical investigations
3.
Disturbed sampling
4.
In-situ testing
5.
Undisturbed sampling
Remote Sensing
Remote sensing data can effectively be used to identify terrain conditions, geologic formations, escarpments
and surface reflection of faults, buried stream beds, site access conditions and general soil and rock
formations.  Remote sensing data from satellites (i.e LANDSAT images from NASA), aerial photographs
from the  USGS or  state  geologists,  U.S.  Corps of  Engineers,  commercial  aerial  mapping service
organizations can be easily obtained, State DOTs use aerial photographs for right-of-way surveys and road
and bridge alignments, and they can make them available for use by the geotechnical engineers.
The geotechnical engineer needs to be familiar with these sampling, investigation and testing techniques,
as well as their limitations and capabilities before selecting their use on any project.  The details of these
investigation methods will be presented in subsequent chapters of this module.
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting. So, in C# demo code below, we will explain how to cut image from PDF file page by using image deleting API.
acrobat remove pages from pdf; cut pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting. So, below example explains how to cut image from PDF file page by using image deleting API.
delete page from pdf preview; delete pages out of a pdf
2 - 9
TABLE 2-1.
GENERAL GU
I
DEL
I
NES FOR GEOTECHN
I
CAL F
I
ELD 
I
NS
PECTORS
Fully comprehend purpose of field work to characterize the site for the intended engineering applications.:
C
Be thoroughly familiar with the scope of the project, technical specifications and pay items (keep a
copy of the boring location plan and specifications in the field).
C
Be familiar with site and access conditions and any restrictions. 
C
Review existing subsurface and geologic information before leaving the office.
C
Constantly review the field data obtained as it relates to the purpose of the investigation.
C
Maintain daily
contact with the geotechnical project engineer; brief him/her regarding work
progress, conditions encountered, problems, etc.
C
Fill out forms regularly (obtain sufficient supply of forms, envelopes, stamps if needed before
going to the field).  Typical forms may include:
-
Daily field memos
-
Logs of borings, test pits, well installation, etc.
-
Subcontract expense report - fill out daily, co-sign with driller
C
Closely observe the driller’s work at all times, paying particular attention to:
-
Current depth (measure length of rods and samplers)
-
Drilling and sampling procedures
-
Any irregularities, loss of water, drop of rods, etc.
-
Count the SPT blows and blows on casing
-
Measure depth to groundwater and note degree of sample moisture
C
Do not hesitate to question the driller or direct him to follow the specifications
C
Classify soil and rock samples; put soil samples in jars and label them; make sure rock cores are
properly boxed, photographed, stored and protected.
C
Verify that undisturbed samples are properly taken, handled, sealed, labeled and transported.
C
Do not divulge information to anyone unless cleared by the geotechnical project engineer or the
project manager.
C
Bring necessary tools to job (see Table 2-4).
C
Take some extra jars of soil samples back to the office for future reference.
C
Do not hesitate to stop work and call the geotechnical project engineer if you are in doubt or if
problems are encountered.
C
ALWAYS REMEMBER THAT THE FIELD DATA ARE THE BASIS OF ALL
SUBSEQUENT ENGINEERING DECISIONS AND AS SUCH ARE OF PARAMOUNT
IMPORTANCE.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
extract pdf pages acrobat; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET. This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific location of current PDF file.
delete pages out of a pdf file; cut and paste pdf pages
2 - 10
Geophysical Investigation
Some of the more commonly-used geophysical tests are surface resistivity (SR), ground penetrating radar
(GPR), and  electromagnetic conductivity  (EM)  that are  effective  in  establishing ground  stratigraphy,
detecting sudden changes in subsurface formations, locating underground cavities in karst formations, or
identifying underground utilities and/or obstructions.  Mechanical waves include the compression (P-wave)
and shear (S-wave) wave types that are measured by the methods of seismic refraction, crosshole, and
downhole seismic tests and these can provide information on the dynamic elastic properties of the soil and
rock for a variety of purposes.  In particular, the profile of shear wave velocity is required for seismic site
amplification studies of ground shaking, as well as useful for soil liquefaction evaluations.
Disturbed Sampling
Disturbed samples are obtained to determine the soil type, gradation, classification, consistency, density,
presence of contaminants, stratification, etc.  Disturbed samples may be obtained by hand excavating methods
by picks and shovels, or by truck-mounted augers and other rotary drilling techniques.  These samples are
considered “disturbed” since the sampling process modifies their natural structure.  
In-Situ Investigation
In-situ testing and geophysical methods can be used to supplement soil borings.  Certain tests, such as the
electronic  cone  penetrometer  test  (CPT),  provide  information  on  subsurface  soils  without  sampling
disturbance  effects  with  data  collected  continuously  on  a  real  time  basis.  Stratigraphy  and  strength
characteristics are obtained as the CPT  progresses in the field.  Since all measurements are taken during the
field operations and there are no laboratory samples to be tested, considerable time and cost savings may be
appreciated.    In-situ  methods  can  be  particularly  effective  when  they  are  used  in  conjunction  with
conventional sampling to reduce the cost and the time for field work.  These tests provide a host of subsurface
information in addition to developing more refined correlations between conventional sampling, testing and
in-situ soil parameters.
Undisturbed Sampling
Undisturbed samples are used to determine the in place strength, compressibility (settlement), natural
moisture content, unit weight, permeability, discontinuities, fractures and fissures of subsurface formations.
Even though such samples are designated as “undisturbed,” in reality they are disturbed to varying degrees.
The degree of disturbance depends on the type of subsurface materials, type and condition of the sampling
equipment used, the skill of the drillers, and the storage and transportation methods used.  As will be
discussed later, serious and costly inaccuracies may be introduced into the design if proper protocol
and care is not exercised during recovery, transporting or storing of the samples. 
2.5.2
Frequency and Depth of Borings
The location and frequency of sampling depends on the type and critical nature of the structure, the soil and
rock formations, the known variability in stratification, and the foundation loads.  While the rehabilitation
of an existing pavement may require 4 m deep borings only at locations showing signs of distress, the design
and construction of a major bridge may require borings often in excess of 30 m.  Table 2-2 provides
guidelines for selecting minimum boring depths, frequency and spacing for various geotechnical features.
Frequently, it may be necessary or desirable to extend borings beyond the minimum depths to better define
the geologic setting at a project site, to determine the depth and engineering characteristics of soft underlying
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
delete pages from pdf reader; delete pages of pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Ability to remove consecutive pages from PDF file in VB.NET. Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class.
delete page from pdf preview; extract pages from pdf without acrobat
2 - 11
TABLE 2-2.
M
I
N
I
MUM REQU
I
REMENTS FOR BOR
I
NG DEP
THS
Areas of Investigation
Recommended  Boring Depth
Bridge Foundations*
Highway Bridges  
1.  Spread Footings
2.  Deep Foundations
For isolated footings of breadth L
f
and width 
#
2B
f
, where L
f
#
2B
f
, borings shall
extend a minimum of two footing widths below the bearing level.
For isolated footings where L
f
$
5B
f
, borings shall extend a minimum of four
footing widths below the bearing level.
For 2B
f
#
L
f
#
5B
f
, minimum boring length shall be  determined by linear
interpolation between depths of 2B
f
and 5B
f
below the bearing level.
In soil, borings shall extend below the anticipated pile or shaft tip elevation a
minimum of 6 m, or a minimum of two times the maximum pile group dimension,
whichever is deeper.
For piles bearing on rock, a minimum of 3 m of rock core shall be obtained  at
each boring location to verify that the boring has not terminated on a boulder.
For shafts supported on or extending into rock, a minimum of 3 m of rock core,
or a length of rock core equal to at least three times the shaft diameter for isolated
shafts or two times the maximum shaft group dimension, whichever is greater,
shall be  extended below the anticipated shaft tip elevation to determine the
physical characteristics of rock within the zone of foundation influence.
Retaining Walls
Extend borings to depth below final ground line between 0.75 and 1.5 times the
height of the wall.   Where stratification indicates possible deep stability or
settlement problem, borings should extend to hard stratum.
For deep foundations use criteria presented above for bridge foundations.
Roadways
Extend borings a minimum of 2 m below the proposed subgrade level.
Cuts
Borings should extend a minimum of 5 m below the anticipated depth of the cut
at the ditch line.  Borings depths should be increased in locations where base
stability is a concern due to the presence of soft soils, or in locations where the
base  of  the  cut is  below  groundwater  level  to  determine  the  depth  of  the
underlying pervious strata.
Embankments
Extend borings a minimum depth equal to twice the embankment height unless a
hard stratum is encountered above this depth.  Where soft strata are encountered
which may present stability or settlement concerns the borings should extend to
hard material.
Culverts
Use criteria presented above for embankments.
*Note:   Taken from AASHTO Standard Specifications for Design of Highway Bridges
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
copy one page of pdf to another pdf; delete page from pdf document
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position. Parameters:
extract pages from pdf on ipad; delete pages of pdf online
2 - 12
soil strata, or to assure that sufficient information is obtained for cases when the structure requirements are
not clearly defined at the time of drilling.  Generally it should be assumed that the structure may have an
influence on the supporting subgrade soils down to a depth of twice the foundation width for static loads and
four times the foundation width for seismic loads. Where borings are drilled to rock and this rock will impact
foundation performance, it is generally recommended that a minimum 1.5-m length of rock core be obtained
to verify that the boring has indeed reached bedrock and not terminated on the surface of a boulder. Where
structures are to be founded directly on rock, the length of rock core should be not less than 3 m, and
extended further if the use of socketed piles or drilled shafts are anticipated.  Selection of boring depths at
river and stream crossings must consider the potential scour depth of the stream bed.
The frequency and spacing of borings will depend on the variability of subsurface conditions, type of facility
to be designed, and the investigative phase being performed.  For conceptual design or route selection studies,
very wide boring spacing (up to 300 m, or more) may be acceptable particularly in areas of generally uniform
or simple subsurface conditions.  For preliminary design purposes a closer spacing is generally necessary,
but the number of borings would be limited to that necessary for making basic design decisions.  For final
design, however, relatively close spacings of borings may be required, as suggested in Table 2-3.
Subsurface investigation programs, regardless to how well they may be planned, must be flexible to adjust
to variations in subsurface conditions encountered during drilling.  The project geotechnical engineer should
at all times be available to confer with the field inspector.  On critical projects, the geotechnical engineer
should be present during the field investigation.  He/she should also establish communication with the design
engineer to discuss unusual field observations and changes to be made in the investigation plans.
2.5.3
Boring Locations and Elevations
It is generally recommended that a licensed surveyor be used to establish all planned drilling locations and
elevations.  For cases where a surveyor cannot be provided, the field inspector has the responsibility to locate
the borings and to determine ground surface elevations at an accuracy appropriate to the project needs.
Boring locations should be taped from known site features to an accuracy of about ±1.0 m for most projects.
Portable global positioning systems (GPS) are also of value in documenting locations. When a topographic
survey is provided, boring elevations can be established by interpolation between contours.  This method of
establishing boring elevations is commonly acceptable, but the field inspector must recognize that the
elevation measurement is sensitive to the horizontal position of the boring.  Where contour intervals change
rapidly, the boring elevations should be determined by optical survey. 
A reference benchmark (BM) should be indicated on the site plans and topographic survey.  If a BM is not
shown, a  temporary benchmark (TBM) should  be  established on a permanent feature (e.g., manhole,
intersection of two streets, fire hydrant, or existing building).  A TBM should be a feature that will remain
intact during future construction operations.  Typically, the TBM is set up as an arbitrary elevation (unless
the local ground elevation is uniform).  Field inspectors should always indicate the BM and/or TBM that was
used on the site plan.
An engineer’s level may be used to determine elevations.  The level survey should be closed to confirm the
accuracy of the survey.  Elevations should be reported on the logs to the nearest tenth of a meter unless other
directions are received from the designers.  In all instances, the elevation datum must be identified and
recorded.  Throughout the boring program the datum selected should remain unchanged.
2.5.4
Equipment
A list of equipment commonly needed for field explorations is presented in Table 2-4.
2 - 13
TABLE 2-3.
GU
I
DEL
I
NES FOR BOR
I
NG LAYOUT*
Geotechnical Features
Boring Layout
Bridge Foundations
For piers or abutments over 30 m wide, provide a minimum of
two borings.
For piers or abutments less than 30 m wide, provide a minimum
of one boring.
Additional  borings  should  be  provided  in  areas  of  erratic
subsurface conditions.
Retaining Walls
A minimum of one boring should be performed for each retaining
wall.  For retaining walls more than 30 m in length, the spacing
between borings should be no greater than 60 m.  Additional
borings    inboard  and  outboard  of  the  wall  line  to  define
conditions at the toe of the wall and in the zone behind the wall
to  estimate  lateral loads  and anchorage  capacities should  be
considered.
Roadways
The spacing of borings along the roadway alignment generally
should not exceed 60 m.  The spacing and location of the borings
should  be selected considering  the geologic  complexity  and
soil/rock  strata  continuity  within  the  project  area,  with  the
objective of defining the vertical and horizontal boundaries of
distinct soil and rock units within the project limits.
Cuts
A minimum of one boring should be performed for each cut
slope.  For cuts more than 60 m in length, the spacing between
borings along the length of the cut should generally be between
60 and 120 m. 
At critical locations and high cuts, provide a minimum of three
borings  in  the  transverse  direction  to  define  the  existing
geological conditions for stability analyses.  For an active slide,
place at least one boring upslope of the sliding area.
Embankments
Use criteria presented above for Cuts.
Culverts
A minimum of one boring at each major culvert.  Additional
borings should be provided for long culverts or in areas of erratic
subsurface conditions.
*Also see FHWA Geotechnical Checklist and Guidelines;  FHWA-ED-88-053
2 - 14
TABLE 2-4.
L
I
ST OF EQU
I
PMENT FOR F
I
ELD EX
PLORATI
ONS
Paperwork/Forms
Site Plan
Technical specifications
Field Instructions Sheet(s)
Daily field memorandum forms
Blank boring log forms
Forms for special tests (vane shear, permeability tests, etc.)
Blank sample labels or white tape
Copies of required permits
Field book (moisture proof)
Health and Safety plan
Field Manuals
Subcontractor expense forms
Sampling Equipment
Samplers and blank tubes etc.
Knife (to trim samples)
Folding rule (measured in 1 cm increments)
25 m tape with a flat-bottomed float attached to its end so that  
it can also be used for water level measurements
Hand level (in some instances, an engineer’s level is needed)
Rags
Jars and core boxes
Sample boxes for shipping (if needed)
Buckets (empty) with lid if bulk samples required
Half-round file
Wire brush
Safety/Personal Equipment
Hard hat
Safety boots
Safety glasses (when working with hammer or chisel)
Rubber boots (in some instances)
Rain gear (in some instances)
Work gloves
Miscellaneous Equipment 
Clipboard
Pencils, felt markers, grease pencils
Scale and straight edge
Watch
Calculator
Camera
Compass
Wash bottle or test tube
Pocket Penetrometer and/or Torvane
Communication Equipment (two-way radio, cellular phone)
2 - 15
2.5.5
Personnel and Personal Behavior
The field crew is a visible link to the public.  The  public's perception of the reputation and credibility of the
agency represented by the field crew may be determined by the appearance and behavior of the personnel
and field equipment.   It is the drilling supervisor’s duty to maintain a positive image of field exploration
activities, including the appearance of equipment and personnel and the respectful behavior of all  personnel.
In addition, the drilling supervisor is responsible for maintaining the safety of drilling operations and related
work, and for the personal safety of all field personnel and the public.  The designated Health and Safety
Officer is responsible for verifying compliance of all field personnel with established health and safety
procedures related to contaminated soils or groundwater.  Appendix A presents typical safety guidelines for
drilling into soil and rock and health and safety procedures for entry into borings.
The field inspector may occasionally be asked about site activities.  The field inspector should always identify
the questioner. It is generally appropriate policy not to provide any detailed project-related information, since
at that stage the project is normally not finalized, there may still be on going discussions, negotiations, right-
of-way acquisitions and even litigation. An innocent statement or a statement  based on one’s perception of
the project details may result in misunderstandings or potentially serious problems.  In these situations it is
best to refer questions to a designated officer of the agency familiar with all aspects of the project.
2.5.6
Plans and Specifications
Each subsurface investigation program must include a location plan and technical specifications to define and
communicate the work to be performed.
The project location plan(s) should include as a minimum: a project location map; general surface features
such as existing roadways, streams, structures, and vegetation; north arrow and selected coordinate grid
points; ground surface contours at an appropriate elevation interval; and locations of proposed structures and
alignment of proposed roadways, including ramps.  On these plans, the proposed boring, piezometer, and in-
situ test locations should be shown. A table which presents the proposed depths of each boring and sounding,
as well as the required depths for piezometer screens should be given.
The technical specifications should clearly describe the work to be performed including the materials,
equipment and procedures to be used for drilling and sampling, for performing in situ tests, and for installing
piezometers.  In addition, it is particularly important that the specifications clearly define the method of
measurement and the payment provisions for all work items.
2.6
STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES
Field exploration by borings should be guided by local practice, by applicable FHWA and state DOTs
procedures, and by the AASHTO and ASTM standards listed in Table 2-5.
Current copies of these standards and manuals should be maintained in the engineer’s office for ready
reference.  The geotechnical engineer and field inspector should be thoroughly familiar with the contents of
these documents, and should consult them whenever unusual subsurface situations arise during the field
investigation.  The standard procedures should always be followed; improvisation of investigative techniques
may result in erroneous or misleading results which may have serious consequences on the interpretation of
the field data.
2 - 16
TABLE 2-5.
    FREQUENTLY-USED STANDARDS FOR F
I
ELD 
I
NVESTI
GATI
ONS
Standard
Title
AASHTO
ASTM
M 146
C 294
Descriptive Nomenclature for Constituents of Natural Mineral Aggregates
T 86
D 420
Guide for Investigating and Sampling Soil and Rock
-
D 1194
Test Method for Bearing Capacity of Soil for Static Load  on Spread
Footings
-
D 1195
Test Method for Repetitive Static Plate Load Tests of Soils and Flexible
Pavement Components, for Airport and Highway Pavements
-
D 1196
Test  Method  for  Nonrepetitive  Static  Plate  Load  Tests  of  Soils and
Flexible Pavement Components, for Use in Evaluation and Design of
Airport and Highway Pavements
T 203
D 1452
Practice for Soil Investigation and Sampling by Auger Borings
T 206
D 1586
Standard Penetration Test (SPT) and Split-Barrel Sampling of Soils
T 207
D 1587
Practice for Thin-Walled Tube Sampling of Soils
T 225
D 2113
Practice for Diamond Core Drilling for Site Investigation
M 145
D 2487
Test Method for Classification of Soils for Engineering Purposes
-
D 2488
Practice  for  Description  and  Identification  of  Soils (Visual-Manual
Procedure)
T 223
D 2573
Test Method for Field Vane Shear Test (VST) in Cohesive Soil
-
D 3550
Practice for Ring-Lined Barrel Sampling of Soils
-
D 4220
Practice for Preserving and Transporting Soil Samples
-
D 4428
Test Method for Crosshole Seismic Test (CHT)
-
D 4544
Practice for Estimating Peat Deposit Thickness
-
D 4700
General Methods of Augering, Drilling, & Site Investigation
-
D 4719
Test Method for Pressuremeter Testing (PMT) in Soils
-
D 4750
Test Method for Determining Subsurface Liquid Levels in a Borehole or
Monitoring Well (Observation Well)
-
D 5079
Practices for Preserving and Transporting Rock Core Samples
-
D 5092
Design and Installation of Ground Water Monitoring Wells in Aquifers
-
D 5777
Guide for Seismic Refraction Method for Subsurface Investigation
-
D 5778
Test Method for Electronic Cone Penetration Testing (CPT) of Soils
-
D 6635
Procedures for Flat Plate Dilatometer Testing (DMT) in Soils
-
G 57
Field Measurement of Soil Resistivity (Wenner Array)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested