IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 11 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
I believe should be the central theme of the Report, "what will it take to stabilize"?  
As Chapter 11 makes clear, it is now widely accepted that technology and 
technological change will be crucial to stabilization.  How much technological 
change, and how to assure the necessary research, development and deployment, 
remains uncertain and in dispute. The answers to these questions are the key to 
successful stabilization and to whether stabilization can be achieved before the 
threshold of DAI is breached. The science of climate change, as reported by IPCC 
WG I, convincingly demonstrates  that we face major problems from rising 
emissions and concentrations of GHGs, especially CO^2. Unfortunately, WG III in 
its TAR fumbled the ball in failing to make clear just how difficult achieving 
stabilization short of DAI will be, both technologically and economically.  Based 
on my reading of  the First Order Draft of WG III AR4, the fumble has not yet been 
recovered. It is to be hoped that recovery is still possible before final publication. 
(Christopher Green, McGill University) 
0-18 
I am missing in the report the ugency of the geopolitical dimension of climate 
change in relation to energy provision. (Even more) serious conflicts could arise as 
a result of the increased demands for oil and other resources by countries like China 
en India. 
(Gert de Gans, Kerkinactie) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-19 
Congratulations on such an excellent start!  The emphasis on sustainable 
development hits the very heart of the GHG problem in the future. 
(Tao Ren, Utrecht University) 
Noted 
0-20 
There is much new literature about regional abatement costs of allocation schemes, 
which are not described in this report. Herewith a brief summary.  Studies of 
energy system-models: Criqui, P. et al.: 2003. Greenhouse gas reduction pathways 
in the UNFCCC Process up to 2025; den Elzen, M.G.J. and Lucas, P.: 2005, ‘The 
FAIR model: a tool to analyze environmental and costs implications of climate 
regimes’, Environmental Modeling and Assessment 10(2), 115-134; den Elzen, 
M.G.J., Lucas, P. and van Vuuren, D.P.: 2005b, ‘Abatement costs of post-Kyoto 
climate regimes’, Energy Policy 33(16), pp. 2138-2151; Nakicenovic, N. and Riahi, 
K.: 2003. Model runs with MESSAGE in the Context of the Further Development 
of the Kyoto-Protocol. WBGU - German Advisory Council on Global Change, 
WBGU website, http://www.wbgu.de/, Berlin, Germany; Persson, T.A., Azar, C. 
and Lindgren, K.: 2006, ‘Allocation of CO2 emission permits – economic 
incentives for emission reductions in developing countries’, Energy Policy In Press. 
Also of macro-economic model analyses (although there are many others as well): 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
Delete pages from pdf - application software utility:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages from pdf - application software utility:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 12 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
Buchner, B. and Carraro, C., 2003. Emissions Trading Regimes and Incentives to 
Participate in International Climate Agreements. FEEM Working paper 104.03, 
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM), Milan, Italy. Böhringer, C. and Löschel, 
A., 2003. Climate Policy Beyond Kyoto: Quo Vadis? A Computable General 
Equilibrium Analysis Based on Expert Judgements. ZEW Discussion Paper No. 03-
09, Centre for European Economic Research, Mannheim, Germany.; Böhringer, C. 
and Welsch, H., 1999. C&C - Contraction and Convergence of Carbon Emissions: 
The Economic Implications of Permit Trading, ZEW Discussion Paper No. 99-13, 
Centre for European Economic Research, Mannheim, Germany; Bollen, J., C , 
Manders, A.J.G.  and Veenendaal, P.J.J., 2004. How much does a 30% emission 
reduction cost? Macroeconomic effects of post-Kyoto climate policy in 2020. CPB 
Document no 64, Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, The Hague. 
(Michel den Elzen, The Netherlands Environmental Agency) 
0-21 
The regional costs implications of post-2012 regimes for the allocation of emission 
allowances (future commitments) is not described in the overall report. Chapter 3 
describes the regional costs of 4 IPCC SRES regions (based on EMF study), based 
on one (costs-based) regimes based on full IET and marginal costs. This seems 
rather ad-hoc choice, as there are many allocation schemes based on various equity 
principles and allocation schemes (i.e. Multi-Stage, Triptych, Contraction & 
Convergence, costs-allocation etc) (IIASA, WBGU, MNP-RIVM, Chalmers 
University/Gothenburg, CIRED, University in USA, MIT, etc. etc.). Chapter 13 
describes part of these regimes (in fact not the costs-based regimes) as analyzed in 
the literature, but do not describe the regional costs implications (* see comment-
block: in which I have included the some of the new  literature in this field). In fact 
Chapter 11, discusses only one macro-economic study, i.e. Bollen et al.  I would 
recommend discussing the regional costs in Chapter 3, and in Chapter 13 and 
Chapter 11. I can deliver some text on this issue. 
(Michel den Elzen, The Netherlands Environmental Agency) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-22 
WGIII is not the competent IPCC Working Group to assess vulnerability of 
systems to temperature rise - that is principally the task of WGII and, to an extent, 
WGI. Throughout the WGIII report a figure of 2ºC for DAI is used, however, this 
has very little explanation or underpinning in the literature cited.  For consistency 
the range of values expressed in the WGII report should be reflected in the WGIII 
report. 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-23 
Throughout the sectoral chapters there is no consistency in the dates used to report  Noted. We will follow guidance from TSU in 
application software utility:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 13 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
proportions of sectoral emissions (for example in Chapter 5 - Transport -  figures 
for greenhouse gas emissions in 2000 are used; while in Chapter 6 - Residential and 
Commercial Buildings - 2004 figures are used).  If there is no consistent use of 
dates/figures across sectors in the literature, this should be clearly explained and 
accounted for in a framework/consolidation chapter. 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
this respect (Ch. 8) 
0-24 
Throughout the report, mitigation efforts are equated with political instruments 
(particularly the Kyoto Protocol).   For example in Chapter 1 at page 2 it is stated 
that "The entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in February 2005 marks a first, 
though modest step, towards the implementation of Article 2".  This statement fails 
to take into account the significant mitigation efforts already being implemented by 
Parties under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the plethora 
of national mitigation measures that have been underway in a host of countries for 
many years. References in the WGIII report should concern specific mitigation 
activities rather than to compliance (or otherwise) with any particular political 
instrument. It is, therefore, submitted that a review be conducted of the report to 
ensure that references to the Kyoto Protocol are proportionate to its role in the body 
of mitigation literature. 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-25 
The use of 2006 references throughout the report, tends to obscure the transparency 
of the expert review process. If reviewers cannot obtain cited papers, it becomes 
difficult for an adequate assessment to be made of the literature used to constitute 
and support the assessment report. 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
Noted. We will ensure transparency in this 
regard (Ch. 8) 
0-26 
see my word paper on two proposed Common Methodologies for  
Priority Assessment of Mitigation Measures (PAMM) and for Priority Assessments 
of Adaptation (PAA) 
(Robbert Misdorp, PUM) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-27 
Each of the sectoral chapters focuses on different regions to provide examples as to 
mitigation efforts. A more uniform treatment of the regions is necessary to provide 
a comprehensive summary of each mitigation sector. 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
Noted. We will follow guidance from TSU in 
this respect (Ch. 8) 
0-28 
Considered as a FOD, the report is in reasonable shape, and may---given progress 
already made at this stage--be reasonably expected to be up to (if not actually even 
over) the high standard already set by previous AR's.  As advised, comments below 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
application software utility:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 14 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
concentrate on attempting to add value to specific content in, and the general 
direction of, AR4 as specified in its TOR.  As also advised, therefore, comments 
made here specifically exclude  any grammatical, linguistic and/or syntactic errors 
(glaring or otherwise) still present in this draft.   In view of the time available to 
me, unfortunately only selected chapters are reviewed here in detail (naturally, 
without prejudice to the remainder).  That said however (based on an initial, 
somewhat abridged, reading) I have reservations that a number of the most crucial 
cross-cutting issues have themselves not been adequately synthesised in terms of an 
overall requirement to get to grips with a global mitigation challenge that many 
policymakers still  appear to be at risk of failing if Article 2 of UNFCCC is to be 
ultimately fullfilled.  The introduction of Art 2 itself as a cross-cutter provides--it 
seems to me at least--- an opportunity to situate the challenge more firmly (vis a vis 
previous reports) where it ultimately belongs---i.e. explicitly within the arena of 
UNFCCC. Therefore one of the biggest problems (familiar to us all) namely the 
Annex-1 vs NA1 configuration has unfortunately not been adequately tackled 
throughout the report in my view.  This is unfortunate, as I believe it is certainly 
highly arguable that a synthesis of the decision and policy-making, sustainable 
development, regional issues and short vs long-term cross cutting drivers could 
reasonably be summoned up as a strong case to incorporate a much larger and 
wider-spread review of the plentiful literature concentrating on the A1 vs NA1 
dialectic. Subsequent comments below are framed against this context. 
(Pat Finnegan, Grian) 
0-29 
Confidence ranges that are used for mitigation technology development could be 
included. The Working Group II practice of including specific confidence ranges in 
brackets after a forecast is made (as is done to a small extent in the Executive 
Summary of Chapter 9) could provide a useful addition to the report. 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
Noted. We will provide uncertainty ranges 
associated with our estimations (Ch. 8) 
0-30 
chapters 5-10 disregard generaly the social and regional differences when 
addressing the problems and solutions of these sectors as if these problems emanate 
from only one single society or region. 
(Mohammed Alfehaid, Saudi Aramco) 
Noted. Regional analysis will be improved for 
SOD (Ch. 8) 
0-31 
As  former Technical Secretary of the IPCC-WGII-Subgroup Coastal Zone 
Management 1989 - 1994 and present Netherlands Governmental IPCC Peer 
Reviewer WGII and III, I strongly suggest to the IPCC - Chair:   do not shy away, 
do not introduce the word uncertainties" unnecessarily too much in the text of the 
FAR. Replace the word "uncertainty", because the cause you are fighting for is a 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
application software utility:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 15 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
right cause, and too much use of this word "uncertainties" will shy away the needed 
future investors. And I assume that that is not the intention of IPCC. Furthermore 
please come up with clear instructions on systematic mitigation and adaptation for 
each country so that all the 190 member countries will follow your leadership and 
enjoy the transfer of knowledge provided by IPCC in an harmonized and effective 
fashion. • I politely invite the chairman of IPCC to announce the introduction of the 
hereunder proposed Common Methodologies on PAMM and PAA in the IPCC-
FAR, which in my view ought to be developed by IPCC. 
(Robbert Misdorp, PUM) 
0-32 
Discussion(s) of carbon sequestration are difficult to identify in the outline of the 
entire report.  There is a clear inclusion of sequestration in the agriculture and 
forestry chapters -- but it took me a while to find the discussion of sequestration 
related to fossil fuels. 
(Stan  Bull, National Renewable Energy Laboratory) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-33 
Throughout the whole draft report there is almost a total absence of gender analysis 
in relation to climate change and mitigation. From the limited research done it is 
clear that different energy and mitigation options have different impacts on men 
and women and this should be reflected in this report. See for example: 
Mainstreaming Gender into the Climate Change Regime 
14 December 2004 COP10 Buenos Aires 
http://www.genanet.de/fileadmin/downloads/Stellungnahmen_verschiedene_en/Ge
nder_and_climate_change_COP10.pdf and Lorena Aguilar (2004) Climate Change 
and Disaster Mitigation (IUCN) available on-line: 
http://www.iucn.org/congress/women/Climate.pdf 
(Lars Friberg, Climate Action Network (CAN) Europe) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-34 
The sections on innovation and technological change in chapter 2, 3, 4 and 11 need 
a common view on how innovation processes work. All of them should include the 
perspective of the systems of innovation literature and the model of feedbacks 
between all phases of innovation. Chapters 3, 4, and 11 already imply that climate 
policies also have important feedbacks on generation of technologies. This view 
should be more thoroughly discussed in chapter 2, which lays out the foundations 
on how innovation processes work (see comment on chapter 2 below) 
(Rainer Walz, Fraunhofer Institute Systems and Innovation Research) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-35 
My general impression is that the report should highlight the changes compared to 
TAR more specifically. In many chapters, the 'delta' to TAR is hard to conceive. 
(Fritz Reusswig, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research) 
Noted. We will ensure a comparison with 
main TAR findings is made in SOD (Ch.8) 
application software utility:C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 16 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
0-36 
It is noted that the terms are not used in a consistent manner throughout the whole 
report. It is strongly encouraged to better harmonize. 
(Radunsky Klaus, Umweltbundesamt) 
Noted. We will follow guidance from TSU in 
this respect (Ch. 8) 
0-37 
It is noted that the scope of the WG3 report should be to provide on a 
comprehensive, objective, open and transparent basis, the scientific, technical and 
socio-economic information relevant to understanding the scientific basis of climate 
change mitigation. However, in its current status not all subchapters of the FOD are 
consistent with that scope. This is because a) the scope has been interpreted too 
broad and information clearly goes beyond the scientific basis of climate change 
mitigation, covering e.g. issues of a primarily political nature as the scientific basis 
of climate change should be mainly limited to methodological and conceptual 
issues but clearly shall not include issues related to implementation; b) the literature 
to be addressed should in general be limited to literature published after 1999 as it 
has to be assumed that the TAR already covered all relevant literature until 1999, c) 
the report should also be limited to more robust findings that can be based on more 
than one publication; d) conclusions included in the TAR need not be replicated but 
providing detailed reference could also help to keep the report concise and short. 
(Radunsky Klaus, Umweltbundesamt) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-38 
It is noted that the length of the FOD (about 1300 pages) is considerable above the 
envisaged length. However, there seems to be room to shorten the report, e.g. be 
limiting the text to the scope as specified by the IPCC plenary (see below) and by 
streamlining the text by avoiding addressing the same information more than once. 
(Radunsky Klaus, Umweltbundesamt) 
Noted. We will comply with our page 
allocation for SOD (Ch. 8) 
0-39 
It is noted that the FOD includes whole paragraphs without any linkage to other 
parts of the report or to literature. This clearly is inconsistent with the requirement 
of providing information on an open and transparent basis but may be interpreted as 
an indication that the text reflects the views of the authors but not findings 
identified in the underlying literature. Any text, that cannot be linked to underlying 
literature therefore should also be deleted in the SOD. If there are gaps in literature 
that do not allow to provide information based on literature but that should be 
provided according to the agreed outline than such findings should also be clearly 
indicated as that could help to guide future research. 
(Radunsky Klaus, Umweltbundesamt) 
Noted. We will ensure to support all our main 
statements with approapriate references (Ch. 
8) 
0-40 
I am very concerned that the focus of the Report, and particularly Chapters 3 and 4, 
is predominantly on the next 50 years, and subdominantly on the remainder of this 
century. The reality illustrated by the analysis of Wigley, Richels and Edmonds 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 17 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
(and later analyses provided for example on pages 223-224 of the TAR Climate 
Change 2001, The Scientific Basis) BUT IGNORED HERE, is that the problem is 
much longer term than this. Furthermore, the problem is 10x larger in the long term 
(~50,000 EJ / 50 years)  than in the short term (~5000 EJ / 50 years). As part of the 
resolution of this problem, we need to introduce technologies in the present century 
that can almost fully replace carbon-emitting technologies in the next century. Thus 
we need to be advancing new energy technologies with very high total potential, 
and we need to be moving to energy uses that are consistent with very low CO2 
emission. While it is important to pay attention to the near term, this report must 
absolutely also keep the much larger long term challenge in focus. It is critical that 
analyses looking to 2200 be included in this report, as they were in the TAR. See 
the attached analysis of future non-carbon energy needs, labeled "WRE 
Analysis.pdf". 
(Robert Goldston, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) 
0-41 
Preliminary Comments: 
My relevant areas of expertise are inverse integrated assessment modeling for 
climate change decision support and energy system modeling for energy policy 
support. The integrated assessment modeling is based on the tolerable windows 
approach (TWA) (other broadly equivalent terms include the guard-rail approach 
and safe-landing analysis).  I have therefore concentrated on those parts of the WG 
III AR4 (principally chapters 2, 3, and the glossary), where the tolerable windows 
approach is discussed. As one of the lead developers of the TWA, I paid particular 
attention to the consistent usage of TWA-related terminology throughout the entire 
report. And as the AR4 is intended to provide a comprehensive assessment of 
scientific progress since the TAR, I took the liberty of adding two publications to 
the cited literature in order to highlight recent advances in the applicability of the 
TWA method. I have also proposed a substantial revision to the glossary entry for 
TWA. 
(Thomas Bruckner, Technical University of Berlin) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-42 
IPCC, 2001 and the like are not valid references. The particular chapter of the 
assessment should be referenced using the lead authors' names. 
(Nick Campbell, ARKEMA SA) 
Noted. We will follow guidance from TSU in 
this respect (Ch. 8) 
0-43 
In many of the chapters there should be further reference to relevant sections from 
WG I and or II FOD report. This would be useful to ensure full consistency of the 
reported findings and to demonstrate the interactions between the WGs, which do 
Noted. We will ensure to make the necessary 
linkages with WGI and WGII (Ch. 8) 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 18 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
not seem fully optimal at this stage. Such systematic linking work will be time 
consuming, it is though necessary. 
(Philippe Tulkens, TERI School of Advanced Studies) 
0-44 
Do a clear distinction between "Biological carbon sequestration" involving the 
enhanced uptake of atmospheric CO2 by plants, forest, soils, and ocean fertlisation, 
and "Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) involving the capture of CO2 
from industrial and energy-related sources and its long-term storage. This 
disctinction is very clear in the IPCC Special Report on CO2 Capture and Storage. 
It never uses the term "sequestration" for the CCS technology, and mentions 
explicitely that it does not cover "biological carbon sequestration". 
Such distinction is for instance clear in Chapters 3, 7, 8, 12 but should be made in 
other Chapters such as Chapters 4, 5, 11 etc. 
(CZERNICHOWSKI-LAURIOL Isabelle, BRGM) 
Noted. 
0-45 
Chapter "GLOSSARY":  Page 21: Line 35-40: Please replace the old TWA 
definition by (see cell above): 
"The tolerable windows approach (TWA) seeks to identify the set of all climate 
protection strategies that are simultaneously compatible with (a) prescribed long-
term climate protection goals, and (b) normative restrictions placed on the 
emissions mitigation burden. These constraints or guard-rails can include limits on 
the magnitude and rate of global mean temperature change, on the weakening of the 
thermohaline circulation, on ecosystem type loss, and on economic welfare losses 
originating from selected climate damages, adaptation costs, and directed 
mitigation efforts. For a given set of guard-rails, and assuming that a solution 
exists, the TWA outputs an emissions corridor which delineates all complying 
emissions paths. Safe-landing analysis is similar in concept and if no particular 
research line is indicated, then the term guard-rail approach covers both." 
(Thomas Bruckner, Technical University of Berlin) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-46 
The Report do not include any section about reserves, resources and prices, as it 
was not planned, but now under present conditions and the important relation to 
mitigation and not conventional technologies I suggest to consider some assessment 
of latest trends. 
(Juan Llanes, Havana University) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-47 
The integration of the whole report requires much more work. Particularly in the 
treatment of costs and benefits of mitigation and technology, there is a lack of 
integration over chapters 2, 3, 4-10 and 11. My suggestion as to how to divide up 
the costs literature over chapters 2, 3 and 11 is that concepts should be in 2, 
Noted. We will follow guidance from TSU in 
this respect (Ch. 8) 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 19 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
numbers for 2050 to 2100 should be in 3 and numbers for 2000 to 2050 in 11. 
However, Figures in chapter 3 may well need data over history and between 2005 
and 2050 to make a point. Dividing up the technology literature is more difficult. 
My suggestion is that chapter 2 covers concepts and definitions, and explains the 
main ways that technology has been modelled (e.g. covering Clarke and Weyant, 
2002) and later developments in the treatment as in Edenhofer, 2006), 3 covers 
baseline issues and effects of technology in cost-benefit studies which require a 
very long-term analysis and cost-effectiveness studies of stabilisation covering 
2050 to 2100, and 11 covers technology in cost-effectiveness studies and attempts 
to integrate them with the technologies discussed in 4 to 10. When covering both 
cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness studies, it should be made clear in chapter 3 that 
there is a subsantial different between them as regards costs and effects of induced 
technological change as brought out in (Goulder and Matthai, 2000). There are so 
many estimates of GDP costs and carbon permit prices in recent literature that a 
meta-analysis is worth doing to supplement the tabulated comparison on models 
and qualitative discussion with some quantitative estimates to sort out the reasons 
for the differences. 
(Terry Barker, 4CMR Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research, University 
of Cambridge) 
0-48 
References: only 7.6 percent from developing countries in chapters 1,2,3,11,12.!!!!! 
(Juan Llanes, Havana University) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-49 
Chapter 1, 2 and 12 dedicate more than 70 pages to Sustainable Development, 
suggest reviewing chapter 2 and 12 overlaps 
(Juan Llanes, Havana University) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-50 
Also overlaps with regards to ancillary benefits within chapter 11 and 4-10 
(Juan Llanes, Havana University) 
Noted. We will ensure there are no overlaps in 
SOD (Ch. 8) 
0-51 
Almost all quotations to economic issues relays on the neoclassical approach, other 
approaches as ecological economics and bioeconomics both with  well-known 
Journals are not included as alternatives to be assessed, specially on chapter 2,3, 
and 11. 
(Juan Llanes, Havana University) 
Noted 
0-52 
There is a general problem how to handle the TAR. Should it be summarized or just 
cited as a reference? THis issue is not dealt with in the same way in the different 
chapters. 
(Marco Mazzotti, Institute of Process Engineering) 
Noted. We will follow guidance from TSU in 
this respect (Ch. 8) 
0-53 
The whole present report gives a good updated material and captures as well new 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 20 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
recent information. Chapters 2, 3, 11 and 12 will be in that regard very important, 
in the sense they are going to capture cross sectoral informations as well as long 
term perspective consequences of all the relevant informations. I recommend that 
particular attention is given to these chapters, which will be of added value, for the 
whole process. 
(Jean-Yves CANEILL, Electricité de France) 
0-54 
Very comprehensive document, but from the Chapters I have carefully read, I 
would like to see more integration between Ch. 4 and the general aspects covered in 
Ch. 2, 12 and 13. Presume this also relates to the other sectoral chapters. 
(Oren Kjell, Norsk Hydro ASA) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-55 
There are a number of practical consequences of taking such a view seriously. One 
is that distributional issues are much more important than commonly recognized. 
Mainstream economics acknowledges the existence of a “declining marginal utility 
of income”, but with limited exception it is not incorporated into economic 
analysis. Frankly, there is not - and I would argue cannot be - an “objective” 
measure of the declining marginal utility of income; in practice it is a choice of the 
analyst, and - as with the choice of a discount rate - it implies that costs are 
fundamentally indeterminate, and specifiable only by value choices of the analyst. 
The few studies (e.g., the work of Richard Tol and Christian Azar) that have taken 
this up have demonstrated that the conclusions of climate policy analyses are 
enormously dependent on these choices, but the consequences of this indeterminacy 
haven’t been widely acknowledged. 
(Paul Baer, Stanford University) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-56 
One issue that seems to have fallen between the scope of chapter outlines is any 
analysis of the financial sector. I am not expert in this field but surely it plays an 
important role and the literature on this should be covered somewhere? 
(Michael Grubb, Cambridge University) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-57 
Indeed, if I had one meta-level comment to make about all of the WGIII FOD, it’s 
that the draft needs to be more self-conscious about the deep controversy about 
values at the heart of the economic paradigm. In particular, the assumption that 
“utility” is something objective that can be measured through market or non-market 
valuation, and thus that economic analysis is a useful approximation of “true” 
values, is only one perspective, albeit the dominant one. What I would consider the 
primary alternative - that valuation is an ongoing a social process, and that the 
value of “outcomes” is a question of meaning and choice rather than utility - is not 
well represented in this document. 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested