devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Extract pages from pdf reader SDK Library service wpf asp.net web page dnn AR4-WG3-FOD-Review-Ch082-part819

IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 21 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
(Paul Baer, Stanford University) 
0-58 
Generally I am surprised there is not an element in the structure that identifies key 
weaknesses in literature/knowledge to assist future work 
(Andrew Dlugolecki, university of east anglia) 
Noted. We do note whether there is lack of 
knowledge and uncertainty within Ch. 8 
0-59 
A second practical consequence is that uncertainty becomes much more important. 
Subjective expected utility maximization requires a unique probability distribution 
for outcomes as well as a unique utility function. Such unique probability 
distributions do not exist for most parameters of interest (both “scientific” and 
“economic”) in the climate policy debate (see Baer et al 2005 and Baer 2005). The 
consequences of this kind of multi-dimensional uncertainty for decision-making 
have barely begun to be explored, but again, it implies that most economic analyses 
which suppress this uncertainty through unexplained value choices of the analysts, 
do not provide the kind of “objectivity” that they are presumed to have. 
(Paul Baer, Stanford University) 
Noted. Not relevant for Ch. 8 
0-60 
Whenever data for the European Union are mentioned, it is important to make clear 
"which" EU it refers to.  The EU has been enlarged from 15 to 25 member states in 
2004, and it maybe further enlarged by 2007.  Some data cannot be interpreted 
without the knowledge whether it refers to the EU-15, the EU-25 (and perhaps later 
the EU-27). 
(Diana Urge-Vorsatz, Central European University) 
Noted. We will follow guidance from TSU in 
this respect (Ch. 8) 
0-61 
All authors and lead authors must be commended for bringing a large amount of 
valuable material in this first order draft. There at this stage many redundancies, 
which should be reduced in the further development of the report. However, despite 
these redundancies, or perhpas because of them, there are several topics that are not 
addressed with sufficient scope and detail altogether - or presented in a misleading 
manner. I shall limit my general comments to two of them: renewables, and long 
term strategy (though a third one could be discounting, but I hope the detailed 
comments that follow will be sufficient). 1. RENEWABLE. It is hardly surprising 
that in a 1255 page draft renewables are only covered in a few pages, and with 
somehow misleadidng information. First, a global perspective could be given about 
the overall potential. Solar energy exceeds 8,000 times our primary energy supply. 
Although the technico-economic potential is certainly orders of magnitude lowers 
than the overall potential, it is still likely to ultimately cover a large percentage of 
our needs, if not all. Second, a fair assessment could be made of the "technico-
economic potential" that could be reached, say, in 2050 and 2100, for all 
technologies. For example, table 4.3.1 narrows solar thermal to solar thermal 
Noted. We do cover the biomass aspects from 
the agriculture sector in Ch.8 
Extract pages from pdf reader - Library software component:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract pages from pdf reader - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 22 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
electricity alone - and mixes estimates of overall technical potential, such as 
indicated for PV (1600 Ej/y), and assessments likely to be derived from technico-
economic consideration, such as that for solar thermal (1.7 Ej/y). Although the 
confusion is in the source, IPCC role is to critically assess the information. What 
solar technology is more likely to provide more electricity in 2050 or 2100 is hard 
to guess, but they may end with comparable contributions: PV is handicapped by its 
costs and intermittent nature, CSP technologies being cheaper and more easily 
made guaranteed and even dispatachable, but limited to areas with strong direct 
insulation unless exported. In any case, both technologies may remain outweigthed 
by far, as they are today, by solar thermal contribution to heating and cooling needs 
(see comments on chapt'er 4). 2. LONG TERM STRATEGY.The report could 
perhaps more clearly make three points: 1) cooperative strategies oriented toward 
research and development, as useful they might be, are unlikely to produce 
sufficient results by themselves in the absence of carbon prices throughout the 
economy; 2 Economic instruments, as useful they might be, need to be 
complemented by other instruments to address market imperfections, including 
R&D support and some specific financing mechanisms for technologies in their 
infancy, in order to bring down their costs through learning by doing processes; 3 
Uncertainties on both costs and benefits of climate policies conflict with inertia to 
create a dilemma on long term objective(s): it cannot be defined once for all, but its 
absence is detrimental to the process. An abundant literature showing firm targets 
do not really fit the long terme cumulative nature of the climate change problem in 
the context of uncertainties. Combined with periodic revisions of an educated guess 
on what we would like to pay for mitigating climate change, the most pragmatic 
way to drive action by all countries and all players would be set indicative 
ambitious long term targets while making their full achievement dependent on 
actual costs - ie a sustained use of price capping mechanisms to accompany 
tradable permit schemes. This and similar suggestions could be more extensively 
discussed, in particular, but not exclusively in chapter 13 (see detailed comments). 
(Cédric Philibert, International Energy Agency) 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report 
Expert Review of the First-Order Draft 
Library software component:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 23 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
8-1 
Overall: very interesting comprehensive chapter. It covers most of the relevant 
issues in relation to agriculture and mitigation 
(Berien Elbersen, Alterra) 
Noted. Thank you. 
8-2 
Chapter on Agriculture is a major effort and significant improvement on dealing 
with the agricultural sector including multi – gas approaches and listing pit-falls, 
trade – offs and co – benefits not only for C (CO2 and CH4) but also N (N2O). The 
separation in regions is appreciated yet an approach on the basis of farming systems 
and differences between regions would signigicantly improve the chapter and have 
farmers recognize issues 
(Peter Kuikman, Alterra) 
Accepted. Acknowedgement of regional 
differences between farming systems added, 
stating that different measures will be used in 
different regions, depending on local farming 
systems. 
8-3 
The following recent publications are highly relevant to this chapter and should be 
consulted by the authors to include considerations on tradeoffs between agriculture, 
abandonement of agriculture through urban migration, forest recovery, different 
agricultural alternatives with different GHG emissions, etc.. Grau, H.R. et al., 2003. 
The Ecological Consequences of Socioeconomic and Land-Use Changes in 
Postagriculture Puerto Rico. BioScience, 53, 1159-1168. Aide, T.M. and Grau, 
H.R., 2004. Globalization, migration and Latin American Ecosystems. Science, 
305, 1915-1916. Grau, H.R., Aide, T.M., Zimmerman, J.K. and Thomlinson, J.R., 
2004. Trends and scenarios of the carbon budget in postagricultural Puerto Rico 
(1936-2060). Global Change Biology, 10, 1163-1179. As well as the excellent New 
Zealand overview of PCE, 2004. Growing for good: Intensive farming, 
sustainability and New Zealand’s environment. Parliamentary Commissioner for 
the Environment, Wellington, 238 pp. 
(Stephan Halloy, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés) 
These publications were consulted. Section on 
regional trends revised but trends analysed at 
regional level rather than individual countries, 
as discussed in these studies. 
8-4 
Comprehensive, it presents also comparison with SAR and TAR, missing in other 
chapter. The UN convention are present also in other part of the report 
Noted. Thank you. 
Library software component:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 24 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
(Marco Mazzotti, Institute of Process Engineering) 
8-5 
General Comment here: Section 8.8 on Co-benefits and Trade-offs is by far the 
weakest of any in this chapter and needs to be reconsidered. Of course, every action 
has a reaction, but not always "equal and opposite". Some examples of rather inane 
entries follow: 
(Norman Rosenberg, 0) 
Accepted. Completey rewritten and much of 
the information summarised in a table (8.8). 
8-6 
Your allocated pages are 30 IPCC pages, which means max. 60 A4, including 
references and tables and figures. You are now :57 (text) and 20 (T&F). These 
usually tend to increase towards the SOD!! 
(Sander Brinkman, TSU WG III / Brinkman Climate Change) 
Accepted. In the SOD we now have 61 pages 
in total. 
8-7 
The chapter is mainly written as a top-down approach, while it might be useful to 
explore bottom-up options: what exists at farm level management? 
(Sander Brinkman, TSU WG III / Brinkman Climate Change) 
Noted. All of the per-area potentials are 
“bottom up”. New table added comparing to 
29 other regional (bottom up) studies for 
comparison. See also response to 8-2. 
8-8 
It should be considered if Chapter 8 should refer to the recent study of Keppler et 
al. published in Nature (Vol. 439, 12 Jan 2006, pages 187-191 with comments on 
pages 128, 148 and 149) that plants, by some still unknown mechanism, might 
produce a significant proportion of the total global methane emission. One also 
could consider this information as too premature. 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Noted. The Keppler et al. paper was published 
after the FOD was submitted. We considered 
its inclusion for SOD but, as noted by the 
reviewer, it is premature  as the findings have 
yet to be corroborated. 
8-9 
22 
22 
Remove the word "each"   (...potential of agricultural management practices) 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Accepted. Rewritten. 
8-10 
23 
23 
IThis item is related to the existent Kyoto Protocol mechanisms only or to paralell 
iniciatives? 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Accepted. Rewritten. 
8-11 
Thanks for the authors for the update on agriculture, inparticular on mitigation 
potential, and the clear presentation of that quite complex area. 
(Radunsky Klaus, Umweltbundesamt) 
Noted. Thank you. 
8-12 
23 
The executive summary does not refer to the livestock revolution (term introduced 
by IFPRI, Washington), while it is done so in the subsequent chapters. The 
executive summary as a whole does not refer to mitigation measures presumed to 
be effective and has a somewhat fatalistic 'flavour' as if nothing is likely to happen 
(at least until 2010) 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Noted. The “livestock revolution” is now 
inherently included in the mitigation potentials 
section. The executive summary notes 
significant potential but that little has so far 
been implemented. This is not fatalistic, but a 
statement of reality. 
Library software component:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 25 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
8-13 
25 
48 
One of the first ~3 paragraphs should clearly state the major sources of agricultural 
emissions for each gas .  For example, "Agricultural CH4 emissions result mainly 
from rice paddies (x%) and ruminant animals (x%). It is important to avoid a 
laundry list of sources, but also very important to avoid excessively vague 
language. 
(W. Troy Baisden, Landcare Research) 
Accepted. This has now been done. 
8-14 
25 
A critical point not to overlook in the Exevcutive summary (and to develop in the 
body of the ms) is a point, obvious to the authors but not necessarily so clear to 
plicy people, that C sinks in agriculture are once-only sinks because there is a limit 
to how much the land can absorb before saturation.  And furthermore, that once the 
land-based sinks are increased for GHG mitigation purposes, the sequestered C will 
not necessarily stay put without continuing stewardship (via certain management 
options thast may not be the most profitable ones) indefinitely by future land 
managers.  In this way biological sequestration is fundamnetally different from 
energy conservation, switching to non-GHG-emitting energy sources  or, if it 
works, even geosequestration. For geosequestration the advocates hold out the 
promise of permanency without indefinite stewardship, but for biosequestration 
there is not even a such a potential. It is important that policy makers are 
unambiguosly clear about that.  Also that this situation for C-sinks is fundamtally 
diferent from the situation for methane abd nitorus oxide for which an emission 
curtailed does not carry a steardship legacy  of the same kind. 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Reject. Saturation and permanence issues are 
listed in the barriers section – this is a cross-
cutting issue – not specific to agriculture. Our 
mitigation potentials are estimated for a fixed 
period of time (2030), and this includes due 
consideration of saturation.  
8-15 
25 
Text suggest that Agriculture accounts for 49% of (GHG?) 
emissions source FAO 2003.   This text should be cross-checked with 
figures provided in  Page 4:Line 17: to ensure that data are consistent 
and may be at odds with the 30% figure on Page 7 line 19.  These data 
seem to have a similar source. 
(Frank McGovern, Environmental Protection Agency) 
Accepted – all figures now consistent (US-
EPA, 2006 and FAOSTAT, 2006). 
8-16 
29 
This should refer to methane emissions?  But it would be useful to have a global 
sum as well. 
(W. Troy Baisden, Landcare Research) 
Accepted. See also 8-16 to 8-21. 
8-17 
29 
29 
The word methane is missing. 
(Lenny Bernstein, L. S. Bernstein & Associates, L.L.C.) 
Accepted. See also 8-16 to 8-21. 
8-18 
29 
29 
..anthropogenic emissions.. should be ..anthropogenic "methane" emissions.. 
(Shigeo Murayama, The Federation of Electric Power Companies) 
Accepted See also 8-16 to 8-21. 
8-19 
29 
29 
Insert CH4 with reference to '49%'. 
Accepted. See also 8-16 to 8-21. 
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 26 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
8-20 
29 
29 
.... global anthropogenic methane emissions 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Accepted. See also 8-16 to 8-21. 
8-21 
29 
29 
,,,,of global athropogenic METANE emissions…. 
(Bas van Wesemael, Université catholique de Louvain) 
Accepted. See also 8-16 to 8-21. 
8-22 
29 
29 
The contribution of agriculture should be checked against the figures provided on 
page 7, chapter 8, line 19. Probably a more precise explanation about the scope of 
the figures (including/excluding land-use change) might help the reader to better 
understand those figures. 
(Radunsky Klaus, Umweltbundesamt) 
Accepted – all figures now consistent (US-
EPA, 2006 and FAOSTAT, 2006). 
8-23 
29 
add methane between anthropogenic and emissions 
(Michel  Petit, CGTI) 
Accepted. See also 8-16 to 8-21. 
8-24 
41 
48 
The mitigation potential should be related to total GHG emisssions 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Accepted. This has been done. 
8-25 
42 
It is unclear what is meant by the ranges shown in parentheses (ie -200 to 3400) 
because a range is already shown in the primary estimate (ie 700-1500).  What are 
these different ranges? 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Accepted. Uncertainty ranges now clarified 
and new plot added to show ranges (Figure 
8.4.3c). 
8-26 
44 
It is unclear which of the upper and lower limts are being referred to - those in 
parentheses or those in the primary estimate 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Accept. Uncertainty ranges now clarified and 
new plot added to show ranges (Figure 
8.4.3c). 
8-27 
46 
24 
It would be useful to directly tie the projection of realistic mitigation potential made 
at the bottom of Pg. 2 to the cost curve information provided on Pg. 3, lines 12-24. 
The numbers suggest that you are assuming < 30% of biophysical potential and a 
price of ~17 US$/tCO2-eq., but it would help the reader to have this stated 
explicitly. 
(Lenny Bernstein, L. S. Bernstein & Associates, L.L.C.) 
Accepted – now all analysed on basis of 
economic potentials – artibtrary10 and 20% 
implementations dropped. 
8-28 
10 
GHG emission reduction potential of bioenergy produced from agricultural or 
forestry land it is necessary to include the GHG emsiion implications of the activity 
that was displaced from that land by the bioenergy crops.  Iew the opportunity cost. 
If it were agricultural land in the first place then the agricultural production 
displaced will happen some where else either by more land opened up or higher 
yield eslewhere. Either way this has its own GHG implcations which may offset the 
gain from the bioenergy crop. 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Noted. This trade-off is already incorporated 
in the cost analysis. We are now using the bio-
energy figures from Chapter 4. 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 27 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
8-29 
10 
I have lost your argumentation. Are you really substracting avoided emissions from 
biomass emissions and relate that to energy?? In addition, this part on biomass 
energy is completely different than what was mentioned in Chapter 4, also mainly 
refering to energy crops... 
(Monique Hoogwijk, Ecofys) 
Noted. We are now using the bio-energy 
figures from Chapter 4. 
8-30 
yields are expressed in ton oven dry matter. I am not familiar with this abbreviation 
(odt). Is this explained in a list of abbreviations? 
(Bas van Wesemael, Université catholique de Louvain) 
Noted. Odt = oven dry tones, but this text 
removed in the rewrite. 
8-31 
As the abbreviation "odt" is not so common, it might be more user friednly to 
include some explanation when this abbreviation is used for the first time. This 
might also help the reader to interpret "od" in line 4 on the same page. 
(Radunsky Klaus, Umweltbundesamt) 
Noted. Odt = oven dry tones, but this text 
removed in the rewrite. 
8-32 
This text must be reviewed, since it is not clear. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Accepted. Reworded. 
8-33 
10 
1) I don't understand your calculation when accounting for 270 - 660MtCO2eq./yr 
from biomass burning. TAR Assumed an average sustainable yield of 15 odt/há 
which means that all CO2 from burning is captured by forest growth. Essentially 
there is no CO2 net emission from biomass burning as is set in the IPCC Inventory 
and used extensively in CDM projects approved by the CDM - Executive Board.  2) 
If you are accounting for other GHGs emissions be clear in the textThis means that 
if you want to consider an yield of 4 and 12 odt/ha/yr this produces a CO2 
mitigation of 270 - 660MtCO2eq./yr.  3) The amount of energy calculated as 2EJ/yr 
is tied with the yield of 4 odt/ha/yr in an area of 25Mha (at 20GJ/odt). These figures 
are fully uncompatible with the numbers assumed in TAR, which is valid for an 
area of 1.3 billion ha. 4) Thus your critic to TAR doesn't proceed due the two 
differences: 1. assumption that biomass burning yields net CO2 and 2: the different 
areas considered. Please, review your calculation and assumptions and don't make 
critics to early IPCC results unless you have full confidence in your assumptions. 2 
or 22EJ are peanuts!!  Finally, TAR concludes that primary forest energy is 400EJ 
which is fully independent of how much you are using combined heat and power. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Noted. This estimate and text removed since 
we are now using the bio-energy figures from 
Chapter 4. 
8-34 
why increased GHG emissions from biomass burnimg? Explain 
(Norman Rosenberg, 0) 
Accepted. We have explained. Burning 
biomass now defined and explained more 
clearly. 
8-35 
Emissions from biomass burning is regarded as "carbon neutral", according to 
Guidance for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, and all Kyoto practices are 
Accepted. We have explained. Burning 
biomass now defined and explained more 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 28 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
based on this principle. We would like to confirm that this article does not give any 
influence to the Kyoto principle. 
(Shigeo Murayama, The Federation of Electric Power Companies) 
clearly. 
8-36 
10 
The sentence "Most modeling studies…" is likely to leave the reader with the 
impression that forestry-related mitigation options (the subject of the sentence) are 
not worth pursuing because of the likelhood of adverse impacts on forest 
ecosystems and biodiversity. This could be made more accurate by changing the 
words "are likely to be adversely impacted" to "can be adversely impacted". This 
helps introduce the opportunities for mitigation and adaptation synergies mentioned 
in the following sentence. 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Comment on Chapter 9, not 
chapter 8 
8-37 
12 
16 
The claim that "price-based constraints on implementation diminish as the price per 
tCO2-eq. in-creases" needs to be supported by citation, as does the basis behind 
citing ~17 US$ tCO2-eq.-1 as a low price and prices of ~33 and 50 as high. 
(Spencer Edwards, Australian Greenhouse Office) 
Reject first part of the comment. As the price 
paid for CO
2
offset goes up, it becomes more 
economical to offset CO
2
. This is the case by 
definition and the McCarl and Schneider 
reference, in any case, is provided to support it 
in the main part of the text – this is the 
executive summary. 
Accepted second part. All price categories 
now as per Price and Blok. See also 8-39. 
8-38 
12 
26 
I would not include this paragraph in the executive summary of that report, as well 
as the tables. There are too many details for a summary. By the way, there is any 
mention about the author (s) of that analysis. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Reject. This is crucial information that 
belongs in the summary. The full details are 
given in the main part of the chapter – this is 
the summary.  
8-39 
14 
14 
The low price of CO2 credit is assumed to be under 17US$. As we suppose it is 
higher than current prices, we are afraid that it might give some implication to 
carbon markets. 
(Shigeo Murayama, The Federation of Electric Power Companies) 
Accepted. All price categories now as per 
Price and Blok. See also 8-37. 
8-40 
28 
30 
An important example or two in parentheses of such synergistic activities would be 
worthwhile in this Exec Summary. 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Accepted. Done. 
8-41 
33 
It would be helpful to add a sentence saying "Recent studies have helped define the 
benefits of policies to encourage the use of biomass-based products in place of 
more carbon intensive products." We have provided references for use in Chapter 6 
illustrating this point. 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Comment on Chapter 9, not 
chapter 8. 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 29 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
8-42 
40 
41 
Sorry but I don't agree that very little progress has been made and little is expected 
by 2010. On the contrary very large extensions of sugarcane, corn and rapeseed are 
being planted for alternative fuel production. And if storage of C is not being 
pursued is because economic, as well as physical CO2 mitigation, is much better 
accounted with the annual production of energy crops (an so small amount of 
accummulated C on biomass) then with long-term storage in forests. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Reject. In terms of meeting the full 
biophysical potential for GHG mitigation in 
agriculture globally, little progress has been 
made so far. That is a fact, not a matter of 
opinion. Total biophysical potential ~6000 Mt 
CO
2
-eq. yr
-1
. This is equivalent to 1.5-2 PgC 
y
-1
. There is no way that this is currently being 
achieved (larger than the total land sink) by 
changes in agricultural management. We have 
provided the numbers to support this. 
8-43 
45 
50 
Agree with comment that trade-offs and co-benefits need to be balanced.  However, 
the statement that “many options…could be implemented immediately, without 
further technological development…” has a mixed message.  The message inferred 
is that these options could be implemented without the need to check the balance 
between trade-offs and co-benefits.  Probably this is true, but the statement about 
balance suggests that implementation of things that could make a difference 
immediately should be put on hold until the balance is checked.  I don’t think that is 
the intended message. 
(Michael Ebinger, Atmosphere, Climate, & Environmental Dynamics (EES-2)) 
Accept. Agreed, this is not the intended 
message. This has been reworded. 
8-44 
47 
48 
The few options that are undergoing development are constrained by the political 
difficult to compete with the fossil fuel industry and other political interest of 
developed countries that set barrier for importantion of biofuels.  At least in Brazil, 
where the practice is under implementation for three decades and there was enough 
time to optimize production, the cost of ethanol is lower than oil derivatives for oil 
above US$35/bbl. The slow growth isn't set by agricultural constrants. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Accepted. Text reworded in the rewrite. 
8-45 
Define terms like "odt" the first time you use them since not all readers may be 
familiar with bioenergy vocabulary. 
(Kristen Elizabeth Sukalac, International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA)) 
Accepted. Term no longer appears. See also 8-
30 and 8-31 
8-46 
20 
23 
The role of technical measures versus management is outlined by Oenema et al. in 
Technical and policy aspects of strategies to decrease greenhouse gas emissions 
from agriculture (Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 60: 301–315, 2001). The 
Oenema et al. (2001) paper stresses the multi – gas approach and the importance of 
addressing the efficiency of use of C and N; this concerns in most cases proper and 
adjustment of management and managers rather than implementing technologies 
only (see also section 8.9, l 21 -34). Even technologies need to be managed (see 
Accepted. These references are now included 
– thank you – see also response to 8-2. 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 30 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
issue of water in Africa). SEE ALSO P.37, l 33 - 34 and reference and finding of 
Rounsevell who stresses technology as key factor; other views (of definitions?) are 
in literature and deserve consideration in this review. A further improvement would 
be to address these issues from a perspective of farm systems approaches (see 
Schils et al., 2005 GCB (in press); Schils et al., NCA; Oleson, DIAS, Denmark and 
the EU project Greengrass). 
(Peter Kuikman, Alterra) 
8-47 
25 
30 
Please, rank the alternatives in such way that the most promising show up first. 
Start with option f. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Noted. No longer relevant - the paragraph has 
been removed. 
8-48 
25 
34 
Section 8.1.1.  Lns 25-34 suggest certain mechanisms of CO2 emissions (and GHG 
for that matter), but this is only a basic conceptual model of mechanisms; at best, 
this paragraph describes general processes through which strategies for mitigation 
can be developed for region-specific application.  I suggest that 1) “mechanisms” 
be restricted to actual processes that can be defined either globally or regionally, 
then quantified to some degree; 2) the general processes listed in the paragraph be 
called that; 3) that the “practices” after ln 35 be used to suggest basic strategies to 
mitigate emissions.  This comment carries into Section 8.4.1.1 and includes the 
“mechanisms” listed in sections 8.4.1.1.1-12 (pp12 – 18).  The “mechanisms” listed 
in section 8.4.1.1 fall short of becoming strategies, and I think the role of IPCC here 
is to highlight strategies to implement. 
(Michael Ebinger, Atmosphere, Climate, & Environmental Dynamics (EES-2)) 
Noted. The mechanisms section and paragraph 
here have been removed. 
8-49 
26 
Add "reduced" in front of "decomposition" 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Noted. The mechanisms section and paragraph 
here have been removed. 
8-50 
26 
26 
.."losses" from agricultural soils.. should be .."emissions" from agricultural soils, 
same as other parts of the article. 
(Shigeo Murayama, The Federation of Electric Power Companies) 
Noted. The mechanisms section and paragraph 
here have been removed. 
8-51 
27 
Liming improves the pH of soils with benefits on chemical, physical and biological 
soil properties. These improvements can in turn foster greater fertilizer use 
efficiency (FUE), which would then reduce N2O emissions. It is therefore 
important to consider the net effects of lime on greenhouse gas emissions from 
arable land. 
(Kristen Elizabeth Sukalac, International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA)) 
Noted. The mechanisms section and paragraph 
here have been removed. 
8-52 
30 
32 
Reducing excessive mineral N fertilizer use could be also a powerful mitigation 
measure (I specify this later on) 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Noted. The mechanisms section and paragraph 
here have been removed. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested