devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Cut pages from pdf reader SDK application API .net html windows sharepoint 0125465-part84

3 - 1
CHA
P
TER 3
.
0
DR
I
LL
I
NG AND SAMPL
I
NG OF SO
I
L AND ROCK
This chapter describes the equipment and procedures commonly used for the drilling and sampling of soil and
rock.  The methods addressed in this chapter are  used to retrieve soil samples and rock cores for visual
examination and laboratory testing.  Chapter 5 discusses in-situ testing methods which should be included
in subsurface investigation programs and performed in conjunction with conventional drilling and sampling
operations.
3.1
SOIL EXPLORATION
3.1.1
Soil Drilling
A wide variety of equipment is available for performing borings and obtaining soil samples.  The method used
to advance the boring should be compatible with the soil and groundwater conditions to assure that soil
samples of suitable quality are obtained.  Particular care should be exercised to properly remove all slough
or loose soil from the boring before sampling.  Below the groundwater level, drilling fluids are often needed
to stabilize the sidewalls and bottom of the boring in soft clays or cohesionless soils .  Without stabilization,
the bottom of the boring may heave or the sidewalls may contract, either disturbing the soil prior to sampling
or preventing the sampler from reaching the bottom of the boring.  In most geotechnical explorations, borings
are usually advanced with solid stem continuous flight, hollow-stem augers, or rotary wash boring methods.
Solid Stem Continuous Flight Augers
Solid stem continuous flight auger drilling is generally limited to stiff cohesive soils where the boring walls
are stable for the entire depth of the boring.  Figure 3-1a shows continuous flight augers being used with a
drill rig.  A drill bit is attached to the leading section of flight to cut the soil.  The flights act as a screw
conveyor, bringing cuttings to the top of the hole.  As the auger drills into the earth, additional auger sections
are added until the required depth is reached. 
Due to their limited application, continuous flight augers are generally not suitable for use in investigations
requiring soil sampling.  When used, careful observation of the resistance to penetration and the vibrations
or "chatter" of the drilling bit can provide valuable data for interpretation of the subsurface conditions.  Clay,
or "fishtail", drill bits are commonly used in stiff clay formations (Figure 3-1b).  Carbide-tipped "finger" bits
are commonly used where hard clay formations or interbedded rock or cemented layers are encountered.
Since finger bits commonly leave a much larger amount of loose soil, called slough, at the bottom of the hole,
they should only be used when necessary.  Solid stem drill rods are available in many sizes ranging in outside
diameter from 102 mm (4.0 in) to 305 mm (12.0 in) (Figure 3-1c), with the 102 mm (4.0 in) diameter being
the most common.  The lead assembly in which the drill bit is connected to the lead auger flight using cotter
pins is shown in Figure 3-1d.  It is often desirable to twist the continuous-flight augers into the ground with
rapid advancement and to withdraw the augers without rotation, often termed “dead-stick withdrawal”, to
maintain the  cuttings  on  the auger flights with minimum  mixing.  This drilling  method aids visual
identification of changes in the soil formations.  In all instances, the cuttings and the reaction of the drilling
equipment should be regularly monitored to identify stratification changes between sample locations.
Cut pages from pdf reader - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete page from pdf preview; convert few pages of pdf to word
Cut pages from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
extract pdf pages for; copy web pages to pdf
3 - 2
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure  3-1.   Solid Stem Continuous Flight Auger Drilling System: (a) In use on drill rig, (b) Finger and
fishtail bits, (c) Sizes of solid stem auger flights, (d) Different assemblies of bits and auger flights. (All
pictures in the above format are courtesy of DeJong and Boulanger, 2000)
Hollow Stem Continuous Flight Augers
In general hollow stem augers are very similar to the continuous flight auger except, as the name suggests,
it has a large hollow center.  This is visually evident in Figure 3-3a, where a solid stem flight and a hollow
stem flight are pictured side-by-side.  The various components of the hollow stem auger system are shown
schematically in Figure 3-2 and pictured in Figure 3-3b to 3-3f.  Table 3-1 presents dimensions of hollow-
stem augers available on the market, some of which are pictured in Figure 3-3c.  When the hole is being
advanced, a center stem and plug are inserted into the hollow center of the auger.  The center plug with a drag
bit attached and located in the face of the cutter head aids in the advancement of the hole and also prevents
soil cuttings from entering the hollow-stem auger.  The center stem consists of rods that connect at the bottom
of the plug or bit insert and at the top to a drive adapter to ensure that the center stem and bit rotate with the
augers.   Some drillers prefer to advance the boring without the center plug, allowing a natural "plug" of
compacted cuttings to form.  This practice should not be used since the extent of this plug is difficult to
control and determine.
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed. Image resize function allows VB.NET users to zoom and crop image.
export pages from pdf online; delete page from pdf acrobat
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
copying a pdf page into word; convert selected pages of pdf to word online
3 - 3
Figure  3-2.  Hollow  Stem
Auger Components (ASTM D
4700).
Once the augers have advanced the hole to the desired sample depth, the
stem and plug are removed.  A sampler may then be lowered through the
hollow stem to sample the soil at the bottom of the hole.  If the augers have
been seated into rock, then a standard core barrel can be used.
Hollow-stem augering methods are commonly used in clay soils or in
granular soils above the groundwater level, where the boring walls may be
unstable.  The augers form a temporary casing to allow sampling of the
"undisturbed soil" below the bit.  The cuttings produced from this drilling
method are mixed as they move up the auger flights and therefore are of
limited use for visual observation purposes.  At greater depths there may
be considerable differences between the soil being augered at the bottom
of the boring and the cuttings appearing at the ground surface.  The field
supervisor must be aware of these limitations in identification of soil
conditions between sample locations.
Significant problems can occur where hollow-stem augers are used to
sample soils below the groundwater level.  The hydrostatic water pressure
acting against the soil at the bottom of the boring can significantly disturb
the soil, particularly in granular soils or soft clays.  Often the soils will heave and plug the auger, preventing
the sampler from reaching the bottom of the boring.  Where heave or disturbance occurs, the penetration
resistance to the driven sampler can be significantly reduced.  When this condition exists, it is advisable to
halt the use of hollow-stem augers at the groundwater level and to convert to rotary wash boring methods.
Alternatively the hollow-stem auger can be flooded with water or drilling fluid to balance the head;  however,
this approach is less desirable due to difficulties in maintaining an adequate head of water. 
TABLE  3-1.
D
I
MENS
I
ONS OF COMMON HOLLOW-STEM AUGERS
Inside Diameter of Hollow
Stem mm (in)
Outside Diameter of Flighting
mm (in)
Cutting Diameter of Auger
Head mm (in)
57 (2.250)
143 (5.625)
159 (6.250)
70 (2.750)
156 (6.125)
171 (6.750)
83 (3.250)
168 (6.625)
184 (7.250)
95 (3.750)
181 (7.125)
197 (7.750)
108 (4.250)
194 (7.625)
210 (8.250)
159 (6.250)
244 (9.625)
260 (10.250)
184 (7.250)
295 (11.250)
318 (12.000)
210 (8.250)
311 (12.250)
330 (13.000)
260 (10.250)
356 (14.000)
375 (14.750)
311 (12.250)
446 (17.500)
470 (18.500)
Note:  Adapted after Central Mine Equipment Company. 
For updates, see:  http://www.cmeco.com/
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
delete pages from pdf in reader; cut pages out of pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; copy pdf page to clipboard
3 - 4
(d)
(a)
(c)
(e)
(f)
(b)
Figure  3-3. 
Hollow Stem Continuous Flight Auger Drilling Systems:  (a) Comparison with solid
stem auger; (b) Typical drilling configuration;  (c) Sizes of hollow stem auger flights;
(d) Stepwise center bit;  (e) Outer bits;  (f) Outer and inner assembly.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
delete pages from pdf reader; extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
pdf extract pages; delete page from pdf file online
3 - 5
Figure 3-4.  Schematic of Drilling Rig for Rotary Wash  Methods
(After Hvorslev, 1948).
Rotary Wash Borings
The rotary wash boring method (Figures 3-4 and 3-5) is generally the most appropriate method for use in soil
formations below the groundwater level.  In rotary wash borings, the sides of the borehole are supported
either with casing or with the use of a drilling fluid.  Where drill casing is used, the boring or is advanced
sequentially by: (a) driving the casing to the desired sample depth,(b) cleaning out the hole to the bottom of
the casing, and (c) inserting the sampling device and obtaining the sample from below the bottom of the
casing.  
The casing (Figure 3-5b) is usually selected based on the outside diameter of the sampling or coring tools to
be advanced through the casing, but may also be influenced by other factors such as stiffness considerations
for borings in water bodies or very soft soils, or dimensions of the casing couplings.  Casing for rotary wash
borings is typically furnished with inside diameters ranging from 60 mm (2.374 in) to 130 mm (5.125 in).
Even with the use of casing, care must be taken when drilling below the groundwater table to maintain a head
of water within the casing above the groundwater level.  Particular attention must be given to adding water
to the hole as the drill rods are removed after cleaning out the hole prior to sampling.  Failure to maintain an
adequate head of water may result in loosening or heaving (blow-up) of the soil to be sampled beneath the
casing.  Tables 3-2 and 3-3 present data on available drill rods and casings, respectively.
For holes drilled using drilling fluids to
stabilize  the  borehole  walls,  casing
should still be used at the top of the hole
to protect against sloughing of the ground
due to surface activity, and to facilitate
circulation  of  the  drilling  fluid.    In
addition to stabilizing the borehole walls,
the drilling fluid (water, bentonite, foam,
Revert  or  other  synthetic  drilling
products) also removes the drill cuttings
from the boring.  In granular soils and
soft cohesive soils, bentonite or polymer
additives are typically used to increase
the weight of the drill fluid and thereby
minimize stress reduction in the soil at
the bottom of the boring.  For borings
advanced with the use of drilling fluids, it
is important to maintain the level of the
drilling  fluid  at  or  above  the  ground
surface to maintain a positive pressure
for the full depth of the boring. 
Two types of bits are often used with the
rotary wash method (Figure 3-5c).  Drag
bits  are  commonly used in  clays  and
loose sands, whereas roller bits are used
to  penetrate  dense  coarse-grained
granular soils, cemented zones, and soft
or weathered rock.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Able to cut and paste image into another PDF PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
acrobat export pages from pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
export pages from pdf preview; combine pages of pdf documents into one
3 - 6
Examination of the cuttings suspended in the wash fluid provides an opportunity to identify changes in the
soil conditions between sample locations (Figure 3-6d).  A strainer is held in the drill fluid discharge stream
to catch the suspended material (Figure 3-6e,f).  In some instances (especially with uncased holes) the drill
fluid return is reduced or lost.  This is indicative of open joints, fissures, cavities, gravel layers, highly
permeable zones and other stratigraphic conditions that may cause a sudden loss in pore fluid and must be
noted on the logs.
The properties of the drilling fluid and the quantity of water pumped through the bit will determine the size
of particles that can be removed from the boring with the circulating fluid.  In formations containing gravel,
cobbles, or larger particles, coarse material may be left in the bottom of the boring.  In these instances,
clearing the bottom of the boring with a larger-diameter sampler (such as a 76 mm (3.0 in) OD split-barrel
sampler) may be needed to obtain a representative sample of the formation. 
TABLE  3-2.
D
I
MENS
I
ONS OF COMMON DR
I
LL RODS
Size
Outside Diameter of Rod 
mm (in)
Inside Diameter of Rod 
mm (in)
Inside Diameter of
Coupling mm (in)
RW
27.8 (1.095)
18.3 (0.720)
10.3 (0.405)
EW
34.9 (1.375)
22.2 (0.875)
12.7 (0.500)
AW
44.4 (1.750)
31.0 (1.250)
15.9 (0.625)
BW
54.0 (2.125)
44.5 (1.750)
19.0 (0.750)
NW
66.7 (2.625)
57.2 (2.250)
34.9 (1.375)
Note 1: “W” and “X” type rods are the most common types of drill rod and require a separate coupling to
connect rods in series.  Other types of rods have been developed for wireline sampling (“WL”) and other
specific applications. 
Note 2:  Adapted after Boart Longyear Company and Christensen Dia-Min Tools, Inc.  For updates, see:  
http://www.boartlongyear.com/
TABLE  3-3.
D
I
MENS
I
ONS OF COMMON FLUSH-JO
I
NT CAS
I
NGS
Size
Outside Diameter of Casing 
mm (in)
Inside Diameter of Casing 
mm (in)
RW
36.5 (1.437)
30.1 (1.185)
EW
46.0 (1.811)
38.1 (1.500)
AW
57.1 (2.250)
48.4 (1.906)
BW
73.0 (2.875)
60.3 (2.375)
NW
88.9 (3.500)
76.2 (3.000)
Note 1: Coupling system is incorporated into casing and are flush, internally and externally.
Note 2:  Adapted after Boart Longyear Company and Christensen Dia-Min Tools, Inc.
For updates, see: 
http://www.boartlongyear.com/
3 - 7
(a)
(e)
(f)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure  3-5.
Rotary Wash Drilling System:  (a) Typical drilling configuration;  (b) Casing and
driving shoe;  (c) Diamond, drag, and roller bits;  (d) Drill fluid discharge;  (e) Fluid
cuttings catch screen;  (f) Settling basin (mud tank).
3 - 8
Figure 3-6.   Setup of Bucket Auger & Rig
(from ASTM D 4700)
Bucket Auger Borings
Bucket auger drills are used where it is desirable to remove and/or obtain large volumes of disturbed soil
samples, such as for projects where slope stability is an issue.  Occasionally, bucket auger borings can be
used to make observations of the subsurface by personnel.  However this practice is not recommended due
to safety concerns. Video logging provides an effective method for downhole observation. 
A common bucket auger drilling configuration is shown in Figure 3-6.  Bucket auger borings are usually
drilled with a 600 mm (24 in) to 1200 mm (48 in) diameter bucket.  The bucket length is generally 600 mm
(24 in) to 900 mm (36 in) and is basically an open-top metal cylinder having one or more slots cut in its base
to permit the entrance of soil and rock as the bucket is rotated.  At the slots, the metal of the base is reinforced
and teeth or sharpened cutting edges are provided to break up the material being sampled.  
The boring is advanced by a rotating drilling bucket with cutting teeth mounted to the bottom.  The drilling
bucket is attached to the bottom of a "kelly bar", which typically consists of two to four square steel tubes
assembled one inside another enabling the kelly bar to telescope to the bottom of the hole.  At completion of
each advancement, the bucket is retrieved from the boring and emptied on the ground near the drill rig.
Bucket auger borings are typically advanced by a truck-mounted drill.  Small skid-mounted and A-frame drill
rigs are available for special uses, such as drilling on steep hillsides or under low clearance (less than 2.5 m
(8 ft)).  Depending on the size of the rig and subsurface conditions, bucket augers are typically used to drill
to depths of about 30 m (100 ft) or less, although large rigs with capabilities to drill to depths of 60 m (200
ft) or greater are available.
The bucket auger is appropriate for most soil types and for soft to firm bedrock.  Drilling below the water
table can be completed where materials are firm and not prone to large-scale sloughing or water infiltration.
For these cases the boring can be advanced by filling it with
fluid (water or drilling mud), which provides a positive head and
reduces the tendency for wall instability.   Manual down-hole
inspection and logging should not be performed unless the hole
is cased.  Only trained personnel should enter a bucket auger
boring strict safety procedures established by the appropriate
regulatory  agencies  (e.g.  ADSC  1995).  Inspection  and
downhole logging can more safely be accomplished using video
techniques.
The bucket auger method is particularly useful for drilling in
materials containing gravel and cobbles because the drilling
bucket can auger through cobbles that may cause refusal for
conventional  drilling  equipment.    Also,  since  drilling  is
advanced in 300 mm (12 in) to 600 mm (24 in) increments and
is emptied after each of these advances, the bucket augering
boring method is advantageous where large-volume samples
from specific subsurface locations are required, such as for
aggregate studies. 
In hard materials (concretions or rocks larger than can enter the
bucket),  special-purpose  buckets  and  attachments  can  be
substituted for the standard "digging bucket".  Examples of
3 - 9
special attachments include coring buckets with carbide cutting teeth mounted along the bottom edge, rock
buckets that have heavy-duty digging teeth and wider openings to collect broken materials, single-shank
breaking bars that are attached to the kelly bar and dropped to break up hard rock, and clam shells that are
used to pick up cobbles and large rock fragments from the bottom of borings.
Area Specific Methods
Drilling contractors in different parts of the country occasionally develop their own subsurface exploration
methods which may differ significantly from the standard methods or may be a modification of standard
methods.  These methods are typically developed to meet the requirements of local site conditions. For
example, a hammer drill manufactured by Becker Drilling Ltd. of Canada (Becker Hammer) is used  to
penetrate gravel, dense sand and boulders. 
Hand Auger Borings
Hand augers are often used to obtain shallow subsurface information from sites with difficult access or terrain
where vehicle accessibility is not possible.  Several types of hand augers are available with the standard post
hole type barrel auger as the most common.  In stable cohesive soils, hand augers can be advanced up to 8
m (25 ft).  Clearly maintaining an open hole in granular soils may be difficult and cobbles & boulders will
create significant problems.  Hand held power augers may  be used, but are obviously more difficult to carry
into remote areas.  Cuttings contained in the barrel can be logged and tube samples can be advanced at any
depth.  Although Shelby tube samples can be taken, small 25- to 50- mm (1.0- to 2.0- inch) diameter tubes
are often used to facilitate handling.  Other hand auger sampling methods are reviewed in ASTM D 4700.
Exploration Pit Excavation
Exploration pits and trenches permit detailed examination of the soil and rock conditions at shallow depths
and relatively low cost.  Exploration pits can be an important part of geotechnical explorations where
significant variations in soil conditions occur (vertically and horizontally), large soil and/or non-soil materials
exist (boulders, cobbles, debris) that cannot be sampled with conventional methods, or buried features must
be identified and/or measured.
Exploration pits are generally excavated with mechanical equipment (backhoe, bulldozer) rather than by hand
excavation.  The depth of the exploration pit is determined by the exploration requirements, but is typically
about 2 m (6.5 ft) to 3 m (10 ft).  In areas with high groundwater level, the depth of the pit may be limited
by the water table.  Exploration pit excavations are generally unsafe and/or uneconomical at depths greater
than about 5 m (16 ft) depending on the soil conditions.
During excavation, the bottom of the pit should be kept relatively level so that each lift represents a uniform
horizon of the deposit.  At the surface, the excavated material should be placed in an orderly manner adjoining
the pit with separate stacks to identify the depth of the material.  The sides of the pit should be cleaned by
chipping continuously in vertical bands, or by other appropriate methods, so as to expose a clean face of rock
or soil. 
Survey control at exploration pits should be done using optical survey methods to accurately determine the
ground surface elevation and plan locations of the exploration pit.  Measurements should be taken and
recorded documenting the orientation, plan dimensions and depth of the pit, and the depths and the thickness
of each stratum exposed in the pit.
3 - 10
Exploration pits can, generally, be backfilled with the spoils generated during the excavation. The backfilled
material should be compacted to avoid excessive settlements.  Tampers or rolling equipment may be used to
facilitate compaction of the backfill.
The U.S. Department of Labor's Construction Safety and Health Regulations, as well as regulations of any
other governing agency must be reviewed and followed prior to excavation of the exploration pit, particularly
in regard to shoring requirements.
Logging Procedures
The appropriate scale to be used in logging the exploration pit will depend on the complexity of geologic
structures revealed in the pit and the size of the pit.  The normal scale for detailed logging is 1:20 or 1:10,
with no vertical exaggeration.
In logging the exploration pit a vertical profile should be made parallel with one pit wall.  The contacts
between geologic units should be identified and drawn on the profile, and the units sampled (if considered
appropriate by the geotechnical engineer).  Characteristics and types of soil or lithologic contacts should be
noted.  Variations within the geologic units must be described and indicated on the pit log wherever the
variations occur.  Sample locations should be shown in the exploration pit log and their locations written on
a sample tag showing the station location and elevation.  Groundwater should also be noted on the exploration
pit log. 
Photography and Video Logging
After the pit is logged, the shoring will be removed and the pit may be photographed or video logged at the
discretion of the geotechnical engineer.  Photographs and/or video logs should be located with reference to
project stationing and baseline elevation.  A visual scale should be included in each photo and video.
3.1.2
Soil Samples
Soil samples obtained for engineering testing and analysis, in general, are of  two main categories:
C
Disturbed (but representative)
C
Undisturbed
Disturbed Samples
Disturbed samples are those obtained using equipment that destroy the macro structure of the soil but do not
alter its mineralogical composition.  Specimens from these samples can be used for determining the general
lithology of soil deposits, for identification of soil components and general classification purposes, for
determining grain size, Atterberg limits,and compaction characteristics of soils. Disturbed samples can be
obtained with a number of different methods as summarized in Table 3-4.
Undisturbed Samples
Undisturbed samples are obtained in clay soil strata for use in laboratory testing to determine the engineering
properties of those soils. Undisturbed samples of granular soils can be obtained, but often specialized
procedures are required such as freezing or resin impregnation and block or core type sampling. It should be
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested