devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Extract pdf pages SDK software service wpf winforms .net dnn AR4-WG3-FOD-Review-Ch085-part826

IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 51 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
8-190  A 
17 
29 
17 
29 
BSt - in some countries its use is prohibited 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Noted. 
8-191  A 
17 
30 
17 
30 
change to '…but can to a certain, very limited, extent reduce methane… 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Noted. Section revised and new figures used 
not available for FOD. 
8-192  A 
17 
36 
17 
37 
Clarify better the text (avoid using terms as " perhaps.." ) 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Noted. Section revised and new figures used 
not available for FOD. 
8-193  A 
17 
39 
17 
39 
supplement '…lifetime emissions, but requires more reproductive animals for their 
delivery.' 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Noted. Section revised and new figures used 
not available for FOD. 
8-194  A 
17 
42 
17 
42 
Biogas plants should be mentioned 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Accepted. New section (and emissions 
estimates) included under manure 
management. 
8-195  A 
17 
44 
17 
49 
Text was already used before in some place. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Noted. Text improved. 
8-196  A 
18 
18 
Khalil and Shearer (2005; see below) recently mentioned that one important reason 
for the reduction of methane emission also seems to be the exchange of organic 
(manure) by anorganic N fertilizers since this reduces C sources; the unfavourable 
side-effet is that nitrous oxide emissions increase 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Noted. 
8-197  A 
18 
18 
20 
The use of no-tillage used for rice producing (flooded conditions) should be 
explored, since some studies indicate a slight reduction in CH4 emissions (Costa et 
al. (2003)). COSTA, F. S., LIMA, M. A., BAYER, C., FRIGHETTO, R. T S, 
BOHNEN, H., MACEDO, V. R M, MARCOLIN, E. Methane emissions from a 
flooded rice field in the south of brazil In: 3rd international methane and nitrous 
oxide mitigation conference, 2003, Beijing.   Proceedings of the 3rd international 
methane and nitrous oxide mitigation conference. 2003. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Noted. This was explored in the Smith et al. 
(2006a) and US-EPA (2006a) studies now 
cited in the SOD. 
8-198  A 
18 
22 
Sections 8.4.1.1.13 and 8.4.2 should incorporate a recently accepted paper utilizing 
the DNDC model to assess the biophysical mitigation potential of rice CH4 (along 
with N2O and soil C) for China: Li et al. (2006) "Assessing Alternatives for 
Mitigating Net Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Increasing Yields from Rice 
Production in China Over the Next 20 Years", Journal of Environmental Quality 
(forthcoming). 
Accepted. This paper will be cited if published 
in time. We have used the US-EPA (2006a) 
estimates based on the Li et al. paper cited. 
Extract pdf pages - application Library tool:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Extract pdf pages - application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 52 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
(Francisco  de la Chesnaye, USEPA) 
8-199  A 
18 
18 
20 
Information about possibilities of mitigating methane emissions from rice 
cultivation is now available from a number of studies since the 1980's. Those are 
summarized and evaluated the potentials of the mitigation options, which are 
published in several review papers, e.g., Yagi, K., Tsuruta, H., and Minami, K. 
(1997): Possible options for mitigating methane emission from rice cultivation, 
Nutr. Cycling Agro-Ecosys., 49, 213-220; Wassmann, R., Lantin, R.S., Neue, H.U., 
Buendia, L.V., Corton, T.M., and Lu, Y. (2000): Characterization of methane 
emission from rice fields in Asia. III. Mitigation options and future research needs, 
Nutr. Cycle. Agroecosys., 58, 23-36. Those reviews should be refered and cited in 
the text. Also, summarization with the table attached, for example, would be useful 
(Kazuyuki Yagi, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences) 
Accepted. We have now used figures from 
US-EPA (2006a) and used in Smith et al. 
(2006a). These papers are now cited. 
8-200  A 
18 
24 
18 
28 
In some developing countries (Brazil, e.g.) social constraints must be considered, 
since many rural workers depend on these jobs, which involve the burned residues 
of sugar cane.  Many discussions have been spent on this matter in the country, and 
the social and economic pressures on the existing regional laws become them 
ineficients still today. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Accepted. Social and other constraints are 
now listed in co-benefits and trade-off section 
(8.8). See also 8-201. 
8-201  A 
18 
28 
18 
28 
At this point it could be useful to say that sugarcane harvesting in Brazil is being 
pushed to mechanization due legislation that forbids pre-harvest burning. Presently, 
30% of the sugarcane is machine harvested and should reach 100% by the year 
2020. Brazil sugarcane area is 1/4 of total world area. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Accept. Social and other constraints are now 
listed in co-benefits and trade-off section 
(8.8). See also 8-200. 
8-202  A 
18 
32 
19 
21 
There is a startling mismatch of the discussion here and the main thrust of the Table  
8.4.1.2a to which it refers.  Taking the Table  on face value, the main message is 
that all the non-livestock mitigation optiosn are trival alongside the one that stands 
out as dominat - namely"Management of organic soils", which overwhelms all 
other numbers in the Table.  Yet when you look at thre footnote for  that entry you 
find that it is based on IPCC defalut methodology, while the other etsimates are 
based on more solid information. This requires cpomment and analysis.  If the 
default methodolgy is reasonable then there is a huge conclusion to bedrawn for the 
role of agricultural management to reduce GHG emisisons.  If the deflaut 
methodology is evaluated as erroneous then that needs to be spelled out very clearly 
and if possible some approaches to improve it suggested.  Either way this mismatch 
between the content of the text and of the table must be fixed. 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Reject. Misunderstanding. See communication  
with the reviewer below. “Dear Pete, Thank 
you for checking up on what I was arguing. 
My comments were based on Table 8.4.1.2a 
from the downloaded draft Chapter.  The third 
column (first column of numbers) is the 
emission reduction potential from various 
activity categories...Ah-ha!  As I write I have 
just noticed that that is the potential per 
hectare, not a total figure.  So that resolves 
the issue.   I am wrong.  While the potential 
per unit area for organic soils is huge there 
isn’t much organic soil. My apologies for that 
application Library tool:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 53 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
oversight.  It did seem odd and I should have 
been more alert. Good luck with your trying 
task. Roger” 
8-203  A 
18 
41 
18 
41 
Ogle et al 2005: missing in reference list 
(Bas van Wesemael, Université catholique de Louvain) 
Accepted. This is now added. 
8-204  A 
19 
19 
In my point of view, it does not make sense to separate livestock and not livestock-
based options. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Noted. We do not assume that they happen 
independently; we simply assess the GHG 
impacts separately. 
8-205  A 
19 
Footnote of Table 8.4.1.2b: replace 'Machmuller et al. (2004)' by 'Machmüller et al. 
(2003)'. 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
Accepted. 
8-206  A 
20 
20 
10 
Why does the biomass potential assessment only rely on IMAGE model 
calculations? There are several other potential studies for global biomass which 
should also be involved in the assessment. Preferably models which have worked 
with less course input data than the IMAGE model does. 
(Berien Elbersen, Alterra) 
Accepted. We now use bio-energy figures 
from Chapter 4. 
8-207  A 
20 
Given the rapid changes in the bioenergy production, it would be highly desirable 
to cite a much more recent source. 
(Kristen Elizabeth Sukalac, International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA)) 
Accepted. We now use bio-energy figures 
from Chapter 4. The IMAGE 2.2 reference has 
been updated to Strengers et al. (2004) when 
used later in the chapter. 
8-208  A 
20 
17 
Figure 8.4.2 seems to be missing.  But presumably the management of organic soils 
works out as ovewrwhelmimg the potential of all the rest  combined. 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Noted. It is not missing. It does show a large 
potential (mean estimate) but not 
overwhelming. Although the per-area 
estimates are high, the areas affected are 
relatively small. See response to comment 8-
202. 
8-209  A 
20 
20 
20 
22 
I don't see why is impossible to implement a certain action at a rate higher than 
20% over the next years. Take a look in the rate of increase in production of ethanol 
from sugarcane in Brazil and from corn in USA and it is very clear that annual 
increase of 10% per year has been achieved during several years period. Thus, if 
there is pressure to obtain a particular product, the implementation rate can be over 
20%. Such implementation may be driven by the lack of fossil fuel and thus very 
little related with CO2 financial value. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Noted. We have dropped the 10-20% 
implementation assumption. Now we use on a 
CO
2
-eq. price / cost based response. 
8-210  A 
20 
28 
Figure 8.4.2a:The role of livestock seems surprisingly low in this graph. Please 
Noted. Livestock figures reanalysed in Smith 
application Library tool:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 54 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
check again if this is not a calculation error. Independent from that, psychologically 
this is not ideal and also not entirely true to separate livestock from grazing land 
and, cropping land, since management of grazing land and, partially, of cropping 
land is in reality a livestock-related activity (feeding). 
(Michael Kreuzer, Institute of Animal Science, Swiss Federal Institute of 
Technology (ETH)) 
et al. (2006a) based on new FAO and US-EPA 
(2006a) numbers. Livestock numbers 
comparable to US-EPA (2006a) estimates for 
the same cost. 
8-211  A 
20 
29 
20 
36 
The discussion of biodiversity could be improved by making it clear that the effects 
of forest management on biodiversity are very site specific and can often be 
mitigated by selection of appropriate management methods. References illustrating 
the opportnities for maintaining and enhancing biodiversity through proper forest 
management are (1) Bird, S. et. al., "Impacts of silvicultural practices on soil and 
litter arthropod diversity in a Texas plantation", Forest Ecology and Management 
131 (2000) 65-80. and (2) Wilson, M.D. and Watts, "Breeding bird communities in 
pine plantations on the coastal plain of North Carolina", The Chat, published by teh 
Carolina Bird Club, West Columbia SC, Winter 2000 - more references are listed 
below 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not a comment on Chapter 8 – presumably 
should be Chapter 9 
8-212  A 
20 
29 
20 
36 
More references explaining the opportunities to address biodiversity through proper 
forest management (continued from above) include (7) Tucker, J.W., et. al., 
"Managing mid-rotation pine plantations to enhance Bachman's sparrow habitat", 
Wildlife Society B u l l e t i n 1998, 26(2):342-348, and (8) Rosenfeld, R.N., 
"Breeding distribution and nest-site habitat of northern Goshawks in Wisconsin", 
Journal of Raptor Rresearch Vol 32 (3): 189-194 September 1998,, published by 
the Raptor Research Foundation, OSNA, Waco TX 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not a comment on Chapter 8 – should be 
Chapter 9 
8-213  A 
20 
29 
20 
36 
More references explaining the opportunities to address biodiversity through proper 
forest management (continued from above) include (5)  Tappe P.A. et. al., 
"Breeding bird communities on four watersheds under differetn forest management 
scenarios in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas", in in Guldin, James M., tech. 
comp. 2004. Ouachita and Ozark Mountains symposium: ecosystem management 
research. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 321 p and (6) Carnus, J_M, et. al., 
"Planted forests and BIodiversity," UNFF Intersessional Experts Meeting on the 
Role of Planted Forests in Sustainable Forest Management, 
24-30 March 2003, New Zealand, available at http://www.maf.govt.nz/mafnet/unff-
planted-forestry-meeting/ - More references are listed below 
Not a comment on Chapter 8 – should be 
Chapter 9 
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 55 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
8-214  A 
20 
29 
20 
36 
More references explaining the opportunities to address biodiversity through proper 
forest management (continued from above) include (3)  Fox, T.F. et. al., 
"Amphibian communities under diverse forest management in the Ouachita 
Mountains, Arkansas", in Guldin, James M., tech. comp. 2004. Ouachita and Ozark 
Mountains symposium: ecosystem management research. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–74. 
Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research 
Station. 321 p.and (4) Shipman, P.A. et. al., "Reptile communities under diverse 
forest management in teh Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas", in in Guldin, James M., 
tech. comp. 2004. Ouachita and Ozark Mountains symposium: ecosystem 
management research. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 321 p - more references 
are listed below 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not a comment on Chapter 8 – should be 
Chapter 9 
8-215  A 
20 
46 
If about 90% of the total agricultural mitigation potential calculated derives from 
the IPCC default methodology for organic soil management, surely this desreves 
comment as to a) its significance of true or b) the credibility of the estimates for 
orgqnic soil management. Given this it is quite misleading to compare this overall 
figure with other etsimates without looking at the composition of the overall figures 
being compared. 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Reject. See comment 8-202. 
8-216  A 
21 
25 
21 
30 
In each argument, floor area data is necessary. 
(Mario Tonosaki, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute) 
Not a comment on Chapter 8 – should be 
Chapter 9 
8-217  A 
21 
30 
32 
22 
In relation to the calculation of the mitigation options through biomass crop 
production (IMAGE) it should be made clear what type of land use categories are 
assumed to be converted to biomass crop production. Is the starting point land in 
agricultural statistics? If so what type of land is included? Is it assumed that e.g. 
abandoned farmlands, semi-natural grasslands, forests are converted to biomass 
crops? If so has the clearing and ploughing up of such lands be accounted for in 
terms of CO2 losses and other biodiveristy losses? 
(Berien Elbersen, Alterra) 
Accepted. We now use bio-energy figures 
from Chapter 4. 
8-218  A 
21 
30 
32 
22 
In relation to the calculation of the mitigation options through biomass crop 
production (IMAGE) it should also be made clear what type of biomass crop mixes 
are assumed in space and in time. 
(Berien Elbersen, Alterra) 
Noted. We now use bio-energy figures from 
Chapter 4. 
8-219  A 
21 
32 
p21, calculation of technical potential fossil fuel offset in  2025 (100-2070 MT 
Accepted. We now use bio-energy figures 
application Library tool:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
application Library tool:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 56 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
CO2eq/yr). Calculation to be made comparable with Ch4 p.39, l.49 solving the 
discussion with ch 9 authors, who state in ch.9, p22. line 12 that there is no sink. 
Note also that in several places of the report, including the glossary biomass has 
been given a classifier “carbon neutral”. 
(Peter Bosch, IPCC TSU WGIII) 
from Chapter 4. 
8-220  A 
21 
34 
21 
34 
The assumed yield of 4 and 12 dry t/h/yr are small compared with results from 
sugarcane. Sugarcane yield in well managed crop is 100 tonnes/há/yr from which 
total sugars represent 13.5% and dry biomass 14%. On top of that, sugarcane 
residues adds another 14% to the yield of dry matter. All these together represents 
13.5 tonnes of sugar, 14 tonnes of dry bagasse and 14 tons of dry residues, yielding 
near 40 tones of matter per hectare per year. It is expected that most biomass for 
energy will be produced from high yield crop like sugarcane, instead of corn. When 
using fast growing trees it is expected to obtain yields of 20 tonnes of dry wood 
from eucalyptus plantation per ha per yr. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Accepted. We now use bio-energy figures 
from Chapter 4. 
8-221  A 
21 
35 
21 
45 
In the case of alcohol from sugarcane total net CO2 displaced by its use in 
automobiles is 2.6 tCO2/m3 of ethanol (Macedo et al., 2004). Assuming 13.5 
tonnes of total reducible sugar it is possible to produce 7500 l/há, displacing 19.5 t 
CO2/há. On top of that surplus electricity is sold to the grid at a rate of 80kWh per 
tonne of sugarcane processed, or 8MWh/ha. Assuming a C-electric average grid 
intensity of 0.5 tCO2/MWh, this represents 4tCO2/ha.  Total displacement is 
23.5tCO2/ha(19.5 + 4), or 0.9tCO2/tonne of dry matter. Based in sugarcane grown 
in 60Mha it should be possible to produce 2400M tonnes of biomass, instead of the 
230 to 1700Mtonnes quoted. Regarding CO2 abatement it would yield 
2100Mtonnes of CO2 instead of the figures ranging from 360 to 2730<tCO2 
quoted. All the results presented are from Macedo I., 2004 valid for sugarcane in 
Brazil and they already include net CO2 emission, that is CH4 and N2O emitted 
from biomass burning is already accounted. This amount of biomass (60Mha at 
7,500l of ethanol and 8MWh per ha) represents a final energy of 12EJ /yr instead of 
2EJ. Regarding the upper value it would be 120EJ/yr. 
(Jose Moreira, Institute of Electrotechnology and Energy - University of Sao Paulo) 
Accepted. We now use bio-energy figures 
from Chapter 4. 
8-222  A 
21 
35 
More key references regarding the opportunities to improve a structure's carbon 
footprint by using low-carbon materials and systems. (4) Peirquet, P., Bowyer, J., 
and Huelman, P.  1998.  Thermal performance and embodied energy of cold 
climate wall systems.  Forest Products Journal 48(6):53–60, (5) Lenzen, M., and 
Treloar, G.  2002.  Rejoinder to: Greenhouse gas balanced in building construction: 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 57 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
Wood versus concrete from life-cycle and forest land-use perspectives.  Energy 
Policy 30(2002):249-255, (6) Sarri, A.  2001.  Environmental specifications of 
building parts and buildings (in Finnish).  TKK Rakentamistalous [Helsinki 
University of Technology, Construction Economics and Management].  Published 
by Rakennustietosaatio RTS [Building Information Foundation RTS], Helsinki.  
Sponsored by Rakennustieto Oy [Building Information Ltd.].  
http://www.rts.fi/Ymparistoselosteet.pdf. 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
8-223  A 
21 
35 
Additional references for this section include; (1) Borjesson, P., and Gustavsson, L.  
2000.  Greenhouse gas balanced in building construction: Wood versus concrete 
from life-cycle and forest land-use perspectives.  Energy Policy 28(2000):575 588, 
(2) Lippke, B., Wilson, J., Perez-Garcia, J., Bowyer, J., and Meil, J.  2004.  
CORRIM: Life-cycle environmental performance of renewable building materials.  
Forest Products Journal 54(6):8 19, (3) Scharai-Rad, M., and Welling, J.  2002.  
Environmental and energy balances of wood products and substitutes.  Food and 
Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).  http://www.fao.org (June 
4, 2005). More references on this list are shown in the cell below 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
8-224  A 
22 
22 
10 
This item is based only the Kyoto Protocol or also in other iniciatives? 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Noted. We now use bio-energy figures from 
Chapter 4. 
8-225  A 
22 
23 
25 
Section 8.4.3 should include a recently accepted paper looking at the global ag 
mitigation potential for CH4 (from livestock management, manure, and rice) and 
N2O (from croplands) at different costs using an engineering approach to develop 
marginal abatement curves: DeAngelo et al. (2006) Methane and Nitrous Oxide 
Mitigation in Agriculture, Energy Journal (forthcoming). 
(Francisco  de la Chesnaye, USEPA) 
Accepted. This is now used extensively and 
figures derived in Smith et al. (2006a) which 
also include CO2, are compared to the US-
EPA figures upon which the DeAngelo et al. 
paper is based. 
8-226  A 
22 
23 
25 
Section 8.4.3 should include a new report that was not available to the authors at 
the time of writing. This report is focused on the U.S. and assesses effectiveness of 
agricultural (as well as forestry) net GHG mitigation options in response to 
different price incentives and different price paths over time:  U.S. EPA (2005) 
Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Potential in U.S. Forestry and Agriculture, EPA 430-R-
05-006, Washington, DC.  Available at:  www.epa.gov/sequestration 
(Francisco  de la Chesnaye, USEPA) 
Accepted. Now included for US comparison. 
8-227  A 
22 
11 
22 
23 
This discussion of biomass energy is unnecessarily negative in tone and potentially 
misleading in that it attempts to blur the distinction between the carbon in biomass 
fuels and the carbon in fossil fuels. Biomass fuels are fundamentally different than 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 58 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
fossil fuels in that biomass carbon is returned to the atmosphere only years to 
centuries after having been removed from the atmosphere. The benefits of biomass 
fuels depend on several things, most importantly on whether the biomass is used to 
avoid the use of fossil fuel and whether it is used efficiently. Biomass carbon is 
destined to be recycled to the atmosphere whether humans intervene or not. By 
diverting biomass through an oxidation pathway that allows us to displace fossil 
fuels, we can benefit the global carbon (providing we do not deplete global forest 
carbon stocks in the process).  Whether the benefit can be sustained depends on a 
continuous supply of biomass. We recommend that the paragraph be replaced with 
several sentences that say simply that the value of biomass fuels depends on how 
efficiently they are used to displace fossil fuels. 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
8-228  A 
22 
25 
30 
The discussion of biodiversity might better focus on the fact that the effects of 
intensive forest management on biodiversity are very site specific and can often be 
mitigated by selection of appropriate management methods. References illustrating 
the opportnities for maintaining and enhancing biodiversity through proper forest 
management are (1) Bird, S. et. al., "Impacts of silvicultural practices on soil and 
litter arthropod diversity in a Texas plantation", Forest Ecology and Management 
131 (2000) 65-80. and (2) Wilson, M.D. and Watts, "Breeding bird communities in 
pine plantations on the coastal plain of North Carolina", The Chat, published by teh 
Carolina Bird Club, West Columbia SC, Winter 2000 - more references are listed 
below 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
8-229  A 
22 
25 
30 
More references explaining the opportunities to address biodiversity through proper 
forest management (continued from above) include (7) Tucker, J.W., et. al., 
"Managing mid-rotation pine plantations to enhance Bachman's sparrow habitat", 
Wildlife Society B u l l e t i n 1998, 26(2):342-348, and (8) Rosenfeld, R.N., 
"Bredding distribution and nest-site habitat of northern Goshawks in Wisconsin", 
Journal of Raptor Rresearch Vol 32 (3): 189-194 September 1998,, published by 
the Raptor Research Foundation, OSNA, Waco TX 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
8-230  A 
22 
25 
30 
More references explaining the opportunities to address biodiversity through proper 
forest management (continued from above) include (5)  Tappe P.A. et. al., 
"Breeding bird communities on four watersheds under differetn forest management 
scenarios in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas", in in Guldin, James M., tech. 
comp. 2004. Ouachita and Ozark Mountains symposium: ecosystem management 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 59 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
research. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 321 p and (6) Carnus, J_M, et. al., 
"Planted forests and BIodiversity," UNFF Intersessional Experts Meeting on the 
Role of Planted Forests in Sustainable Forest Management, 
24-30 March 2003, New Zealand, available at http://www.maf.govt.nz/mafnet/unff-
planted-forestry-meeting/ - More references are listed below 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
8-231  A 
22 
25 
30 
More references explaining the opportunities to address biodiversity through proper 
forest management (continued from above) include (3)  Fox, T.F. et. al., 
"Amphibian communities under diverse forest management in the Ouachita 
Mountains, Arkansas", in Guldin, James M., tech. comp. 2004. Ouachita and Ozark 
Mountains symposium: ecosystem management research. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–74. 
Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research 
Station. 321 p.and (4) Shipman, P.A. et. al., "Reptile communities under diverse 
forest management in teh Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas", in in Guldin, James M., 
tech. comp. 2004. Ouachita and Ozark Mountains symposium: ecosystem 
management research. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 321 p - more references 
are listed below 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
8-232  A 
22 
30 
Another reference discussing the use of wood ash to replenish forest nutrients is 
Vance, E.. "Land application of Wood-fired and combination boiler ashes: An 
overivew", Journal of Environnmental Quality, Vol,. 25, No. 5, September 1996 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
8-233  A 
23 
10 
The discussion of studies of forestry-related mitigation opportunities in North 
America should include  EPA 2005, "Greenhouse gas mitigation potential in U.S. 
forestry and agriculture," Report EPA 430-R-05-006, November 2005, which is 
perhaps the best study of this issue ever performed for the US. 
(Reid Miner, NCASI) 
Not comments on Chapter 8. These belong 
in Chapter 9. 
8-234  A 
23 
37 
23 
41 
This is an important paragrpah that desrves greater prominance, 
(Roger Gifford, CSIRO) 
Noted. We have already done this by putting it 
in the summary (both the text and table) and in 
the TS. 
8-235  A 
24 
24 
10 
In addition the positive effects of agro-forestry for biodiversity should also be 
mentioned. Agro-forestry habitats are very rich in biodiversity (e.g. Dehesas and 
Montados in Spain and Portugal). 
(Berien Elbersen, Alterra) 
Accepted. Now dealt with in the new table 8.8 
and revised supporting text. 
IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, First Order Draft 
Expert Review of First-Order-Draft 
Confidential, Do Not Cite or Quote 
Page 60 of 84
C
h
a
p
t
e
r
-
C
o
m
m
e
n
t
B
a
t
c
h
F
r
o
m
P
a
g
e
F
r
o
m
L
i
n
e
T
o
P
a
g
e
T
o
l
i
n
e
Comments 
Considerations by the writing team 
8-236  A 
24 
24 
32 
It should be discussed the influence of external markets on the mitigation options. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Noted. Already done. That is what section 
8.4.3 is devoted to. 
8-237  A 
24 
24 
MA, 2005 is not included in the references. 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Accepted. Added to the list. 
8-238  A 
24 
15 
24 
31 
A sentence could be added to introduce shadow pricing and methods for valuing 
environmental impacts such as effects on production or health, preventive costs, 
replacement costs, travel costs, wage differences, proprty values, proxy marketed 
goods, artificial markets, contingent valuation, benefit transfer, etc. Details may be 
found in (MM 1992); (IPCC 2000); (MMRS 2005); or  Freeman, M. 1993. The 
Measurement of Environmental and Resource Values: Theory and Methods. 
Resources for the Future, Washington D.C. 
(Mohan Munasinghe, Munasinghe Institute for Development (MIND)) 
Noted – but could not find appropriate place 
to place the sentence – perhaps it should go in 
one of the cross cutting chapters. 
8-239  A 
24 
35 
25 
19 
The interactions between adaptation and mitigation deserve more discussion than 
given in the FOD and identification of do’s and don’t’s on the basis of literature 
should be feasible. 
(Peter Kuikman, Alterra) 
Accepted – section rewritten and focussed 
better on agriculture. 
8-240  A 
24 
38 
24 
38 
Conversely, actions to enhance adaptation... (add some examples) 
(Magda Aparecida Lima, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa) 
Accepted – section rewritten and focussed 
better on agriculture. 
8-241  A 
24 
41 
24 
42 
Statement “Mitigating GHG emissions has global benefits regardless…”  needs to 
be restated many time in this chapter.  I suggest adding it to sections 8.1.1 and 
8.4.1.1 in a highly visible spot, maybe at the beginning of the lists of “mechanisms” 
and “practices”. 
(Michael Ebinger, Atmosphere, Climate, & Environmental Dynamics (EES-2)) 
Reject. Repetition is not necessary. This is 
covered in section co-benefits and trade-offs 
and is apparent from the sections where the 
greatest impact on agricultural mitigation is 
shown to be in non-climate policy, rather than 
climate policy. 
8-242  A 
24 
The information in section 8.5 is not very well worked out and could perhaps move 
to the introduction of the chapter. Also here the farm level is not mentioned. 
(jan verhagen, plant research international, wageningen ur) 
Accepted – section rewritten and focussed 
better on agriculture. 
8-243  A 
25 
21 
33 
29 
A number of statements are made about other sectors.  This is good in principle, but 
the authors must be careful to make the link to mitigation in the agricultural sector 
explicit. 
(W. Troy Baisden, Landcare Research) 
Accepted – section rewritten and focussed 
better on agriculture. 
8-244  A 
25 
24 
26 
41 
What about Asia? 
(Kristen Elizabeth Sukalac, International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA)) 
Accepted – Asia now included. 
8-245  A 
25 
41 
25 
42 
As far as I know there are no specific policies targeted at reducing GHG emissions 
from agriculture in Belgium. However, several authors have evaluated the effect of 
agro-environmental policies (designed for other purposes) on the potential for GHG 
Accepted. Wording has been changed. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested