devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete pages from pdf software Library project winforms asp.net html UWP Converting%20Technical%20Content%20to%20Training%20Material0-part872

2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
Converting Technical Content to Training Material 
Speakers/Authors: Georgia L. Harris, Dana Leaman 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 
100 Bureau Drive 
Gaithersburg, MD 20899 
G. Harris: 301-975-4014, gharris@nist.gov
D. Leaman: 301-975-4679, dana.leaman@nist.gov
Abstract: This paper provides the basis for an interactive mini tutorial and covers how to 
convert  technical  content  to  training  materials.  It  includes:  defining  the  audience,  writing 
Learning Objectives, designing content and activities to achieve objectives, engaging participants 
in learning activities using adult learning methods, and assessing the learning event to determine 
whether objectives have been met. Examples are provided from NCSL International
1
resources. 
The instructional approach in this paper covers the Analysis, Design, and Development phases of 
the ADDIE instructional system development (ISD) model; due to time constraints, it will only 
briefly touch on the Implementation and Evaluation phases. The paper integrates concepts from 
Bloom’s  Taxonomy  and  criteria  from  the  ANSI/IACET
2
standard  for  offering  continuing 
education units as an Authorized Provider. 
Learning Objectives: Given the handouts and practical experience during the tutorial session, 
participants will be able to successfully:  
1.  Identify the phases of the ADDIE instructional design model; 
2.  Define the appropriate audience for training content;  
3.  Identify and Create well-written Learning Objectives; 
4.  Give examples of Activities  that will engage adult participants and achieve Learning 
Objectives; and  
5.  Identify appropriate Assessment methods to determine whether Learning Objectives have 
been met. 
Background 
The NCSLI Strategic Plan has identified an effort to 
create  training  resources  to  match  with  NCSLI 
publications as they are created and updated. NCSLI 
is  also  seeking  to  gain  compliance  with  the 
International Association for Continuing Education 
and  Training  (ANSI/IACET)  criteria  for  offering 
Authorized  Provider  Continuing  Education  Units 
(CEUs)  to  ensure  continual  improvement  and 
professional  training  approaches  in  our  metrology 
training. This session will use resources from three 
                                                           
 
1
NCSL International (also known as National Conference of Standards Laboratories, International). 
2
American National Standards Institute, International Association for Continuing Education and Training 
(ANSI/IACET). http://www.iacet.org
, 2010.  
Figure 1. Sample ANSI/IACET logo which we 
could apply to NCSLI content if we were an 
Authorized Provider.
Delete pages from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete pages from pdf preview; cut pages out of pdf
Delete pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
delete page from pdf preview; convert selected pages of pdf to word
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
new  NCSLI  publications  and  their  associated  conference/section  meeting  presentations  as 
Application examples throughout this paper. These publications include Recommended Practice 
(RP)  3,  “Calibration Procedures”, Recommended  Practice  (RP)  20,  “Metrology Laboratory 
Workforce Planning” and the “Metrology Human Resource Handbook” (HR Handbook).  
The ANSI/IACET criteria require organizations to use a systematic design and development 
process for developing all training materials. Most professional instructional designers follow 
some type of model, probably the most common of which is the ADDIE instructional system 
development  (ISD)  process.  ADDIE  refers  to  the  Analysis,  Design,  Development, 
Implementation, and Evaluation phases of the ISD process. One of the unique features of the 
metrology community  is that  instructors are  often subject matter  experts  (SMEs)  without  a 
formal background in  ISD. Our overall goal with this  paper and mini-tutorial is to provide 
guidance  to  the  NCSLI  technical  committee  members  who  are  SMEs  to  develop  training 
resources that follow a standardized practice, or model process, that will enable consistency in 
course development as well as compliance to the ANSI/IACET requirements.  
We will cover two modules (with integrated Activities) during the mini-tutorial. The first module 
provides background information on the ADDIE instructional system development model and 
the other provides Application examples for each phase in the ADDIE model. However, this 
paper integrates the Applications with each topic as it is covered. We have also organized the 
mini-tutorial modules directly around the five Learning Objectives stated on the first page. We 
will reflect on the Learning Objectives as we cover this ISD model and as we apply the model to 
our three case studies.  
One of the key things to consider in all adult learning events is that adults often preview your 
objectives or abstract to determine if there is something in your session for them. They ask the 
question “what’s in it for me?” Adults juggle many priorities and their time is valuable. So, we 
can apply that concept, right now – why are you here? What is it in this particular session that 
you hope to get? What’s in it for you? Why are you reading this paper? During the mini-tutorial, 
we will take some time to reflect on what aspects of the session are most important for each 
participant. 
To keep this session most applicable, we have selected three case studies and are relying on the 
subject matter experts (SMEs) from the committees responsible for the content to help us ensure 
the content  meets  the needs of the  participants  who might receive training.  So, our design 
process overlays these educational design concepts onto the technical content. We hope that this 
approach will serve as a useful model for speakers who want to ensure that ideas they present are 
applied in the workplace and that committee members who want to develop training material 
based  on the technical content  in guides, standards, and  recommended practices  are  able  to 
follow these steps to be successful in creating effective training materials. Our number one goal 
in training materials is to be able to reach a designated level of knowledge or application. 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
extract page from pdf online; extract page from pdf preview
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
delete pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf document
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
ADDIE Instructional Design Model 
There  are  many  instructional  system  development  models  and  you  can  see  it  graphically 
presented in a number of ways. The Laboratory Metrology Group of the Weights and Measures 
Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have chosen this particular 
approach because it follows a Plan, Do, Check, Act (PDCA) model with Evaluation forming a 
part of every phase. We will work through this diagram (See Fig. 2) and each of the phases, 
starting with Analysis. Every instructional  designer ends up tailoring this model to  his own 
processes, projects, and approaches to developing training. “One cardinal rule is to never leave 
out Analysis or Evaluation from the learning 
event  development  process  because  the 
projects  can  be  spotted  quickly  –  1)  these 
efforts  seldom  work  to  meet  learning 
objectives and  2) no  one ever really  figures 
out why.”
3
.  
There  are  a  number  of  websites  that  cover 
Instructional Design concepts and the ADDIE 
model. Some additional references include: 
Hodell, Chuck, “ISD From the Ground 
Up,  A  No-Nonsense  Approach  to 
Instructional  Design,”  ASTD  Press, 
August 2006. 
Elengold,  Linda  J.,  “Teach  SMEs  to 
Design  Training,”  ASTD  Info-Line, 
Tips,  Tools,  and  Intelligence  for 
Trainers, 2001.  
Harris, Georgia L., “Development of a 
CD-ROM  Metrology  Course  at 
NIST,” Measurement 
Science 
Conference, 2003. It is available here: 
http://ts.nist.gov/WeightsAndMeasures/upload/MSC2003CDROMPaper.pdf
Defining the Audience and Need for Training 
During the Analysis phase, the designer or, in most metrology cases, the instructor or SME 
defines the need, the target audience, and the expected outcome of the training. ANSI/IACET 
Criteria Number 4 is related to Learning Event Planning (4): “Each learning event is planned in 
response to the identified needs of a target audience.” There is room on the Case Study Planning 
Worksheet (Appendix A) and Learning Event Planning Worksheet (Appendix B) to make notes 
about the Audience and Need for a given training event.   
As a first step in Analysis, we need to answer a number of questions:  
Who is the audience? 
                                                           
 
3
 
Hodell, Chuck, “ISD From the Ground Up, A No-Nonsense Approach to Instructional Design,” ASTD Press, 
August 2006. 
 
Figure 2. ADDIE Instructional System Development 
(ISD) Model. ADDIE: Analysis, Design, Development, 
Implementation, Evaluation.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
extract pdf pages; delete pages out of a pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages of pdf online; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
Why conduct the training? 
What is the performance need?   
What is the root cause? 
How will the content be delivered and by whom?   
We may need to answer these questions from the perspective of laboratory management as well 
as the metrologist or person being trained. We must have an effective partnership between the 
trainer,  the  manager,  and  the  person  being  trained  for  the  training  to  be  effective  and 
used/applied back on the job. If a manager does not support change that might be required for 
applying training content, the training will have no impact. Identifying the real need and the best 
solution are important for everyone. 
One thing we might want to ask is: can other solutions meet the requirements without training? 
Sometimes when analyzing the need, we find that the root cause is lack of management support 
or lack of resources, rather than a lack of knowledge or awareness. Perhaps a simple publication 
and job aid such as a form or checklist serves an even better purpose than spending time in a 
training session. A step by step checklist or form may ensure consistent application of a new 
procedure, publication, or idea, without need for a training course.  
If we look at the ANSI/IACET criteria for offering CEUs, one of the things we find is that we 
can also refer to a “job standard” to define the need for training. For example, any single item in 
the ISO/IEC 17025 standard for calibration and testing laboratories is rich as training content in 
the  calibration  world.  One  example  might  be  a  course  on  “Writing  a  Calibration  Report 
(ISO/IEC 17025, Section 5.10.”  
Application: Identifying the Audience for our NCSLI Publications 
 The audience for the mini tutorial is primarily Committee Chairs and Members who 
want  to  develop  training  material  from  NCSLI  publications.  There  might  be 
additional benefits to regular conference presenters or tutorial instructors who want to 
improve the instructional value of their resources.  
 The audience for RP 3, “Calibration Procedures” might be: Calibration Laboratory 
Managers,  Metrologists/Engineers,  Technical  Managers,  or  the  Procedure 
Writing/Validation Team. 
 The  audience  for  RP  20,  “Metrology Laboratory Workforce Planning  and  the 
Metrology Human Resources Handbook”  might  include:  Laboratory  Managers, 
Human Resources staff, and Training Managers/Directors. 
Application: Examples of Need 
 The need for this mini-tutorial is that SMEs need formal training on methodologies 
and processes for developing training material from NCSLI publications to ensure 
compliance with standard training methodologies and the ANSI/IACET requirements. 
 The  need  for  training  on  RP  3,  “Calibration Procedures  could  include:  a 
requirement in ISO/IEC 17025 to document calibration procedures and validate them. 
 The need for training on RP 20, “Metrology Laboratory Workforce Planning” and the 
Metrology Human Resources Handbook”  include:  a  desire  for  international 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
export pages from pdf acrobat; cut pages from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
cutting pdf pages; cut pdf pages online
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
consistency and adoption of standardized job descriptions to enable recognition and 
professional status of metrology careers. 
Learning Objectives 
A Learning Objective or Learning Outcome (often interchangeably used), is a specific statement, 
written from the participant’s perspective, which provides information about what the participant 
will gain during a learning event.  They are  focused on  participant performance, not teacher 
performance.  
“Learning objectives: Statements about what a student will gain from a course or activity. These 
are specific statements about exactly what a student should know, be able to do, or value as a 
result of accomplishing a learning goal. Learning objectives form the basis for curriculum and 
course development as well as testing (Reed, 2005).”
4
The “Bloom’s to Assessment” graphic (Fig. 5) and  the Learning Event Planning Worksheet 
(Appendix B) are two tools that will help implement these concepts. They will help answer 
“what” and “why” of our learning event. Part of the Analysis phase helps determine what level 
of training and comprehension is required by the audience. Then, the Design process requires 
that we design training at the level needed to help the participant get what they need at the right 
level. 
Bloom’s Taxonomy 
We will consider these 
six 
levels 
of 
understanding  before 
we  consider  writing 
effective 
Learning 
Objectives.  We  need 
to  answer  what  level 
we 
want 
the 
participant  to  be  able 
to know and apply the 
material.  We  must 
accurately identify the 
audience,  understand 
their 
level 
of 
knowledge,  and  their 
unique needs. Each of 
the  six  areas  in  the 
taxonomy  builds  on 
the  previous  level  of 
knowledge.  A  key 
design 
and 
                                                           
 
4
From the University of Texas at Dallas, glossary: http://sacs.utdallas.edu/sacs_glossary
(March 2010). 
 
Figure 3. Bloom's Taxonomy Model.
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
cut pages from pdf file; extract pages pdf preview
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete blank page from pdf; cut and paste pdf pages
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
development concept is that a participant must have Knowledge about a topic before they can 
Analyze it. In Table 1, the six areas noted in the Bloom’s graphic (Fig. 3) are listed, with a brief 
description of each category, and a list of verbs that can be used to describe what the participant 
will need to  be able to Know, Do, or Think  after the session. These  sample verbs provide 
examples that can be used to reflect appropriate learning levels in each Learning Objective and 
to specify the level of mastery expected for the student.  
Table 1. Bloom's Taxonomy - Descriptions and Sample Verbs. 
Level 
Description 
Sample Verbs 
Knowledge 
Recall data or information 
describe, identify, recall, arrange, define, duplicate, 
label,  list,  memorize,  name,  order,  recognize, 
reproduce state 
Comprehension 
Understand  the  meaning  of  a 
problem, be able to translate into 
own words 
comprehend,  give  example,  classify,  describe, 
discuss, explain, express, identify, indicate, locate, 
recognize, report, restate, review, select, translate 
Application 
Use a concept in a new situation 
apply,  change,  construct,  compute,  choose, 
demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, 
operate, practice, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write 
Analysis 
Can split concepts into parts and 
understands the structure 
analyze,  break  down,  relate,  appraise,  calculate, 
categorize, 
compare, 
contrast, 
criticize, 
differentiate,  discriminate,  distinguish,  examine, 
experiment,  question,  make  inferences,  find 
evidence, test 
Synthesis 
Produce something from different 
elements (e.g., a report) 
summarize, arrange, combine, categorize, assemble, 
collect, compose, construct, create, design, develop, 
formulate,  manage,  organize,  plan,  prepare, 
propose, set up, write 
Evaluation 
Make  judgments,  justify  a 
solution 
appraise, interpret, argue, assess, attach, compare, 
defend, estimate, judge, predict, rate, core, select, 
support, value, evaluate, prove, deduct 
How to Write Learning Objectives 
The ANSI/IACET   standard for continuing education units identifies four categories in Section 5 
related  to  writing  Learning  Objectives.  These  are  the  four  criteria  required  for  writing  an 
effective Learning Objective. 
1.  They are written from the perspective of the learner, reflecting what the learner will achieve. 
2.  Learning objectives must be clear, specific, concise, and measurable (with four components): 
a.  They state the performance the learner should be able to accomplish. (Behavior) 
b.  They specify the conditions under which the learner is to perform. (Conditions) 
c.  They specify the criteria for acceptable performance. (Criteria) 
d.  They are directly related to the subject matter and content of the learning event. 
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
3.  Learning outcomes are established  for  each  session within  a large  event,  conference,  or 
convention.  
4.  Instructional delivery includes discussion of learning outcomes. 
If we  expand on category number 2, and consider the four components of a clear, specific, 
concise, and measurable objective, here are some additional notes to clarify what is meant. Each 
Learning  Objective  should  begin with:  After  this session (tutorial,  paper,  or  workshop) the 
participant will__________. 
Component 1:  This component covers the expected behavior after the training. Think about 
performance in terms of active verbs related to what you want the participant to know, do, or be, 
after the training:  identify, calculate, assess, present, analyze, and apply. (Refer back to Table 1 
for additional examples.) At this point, select an appropriate verb for the level of knowledge or 
application that is expected. 
Component 2: What are the conditions? Can the participant use their notes? Can they use a 
documented procedure? Can they use a calculator? Are computers allowed? Must they use Excel 
for  calculations?  Are  there  additional  reference  materials  provided?  Will  they  have  to  be 
assessed from memory? 
Component 3: What criteria will be used to judge acceptable performance? Is an 80 % passing 
grade acceptable? Would it be okay if they submit their response in text-message format? Must 
they provide a written response or can it be oral? What will a valid uncertainty statement look 
like? (Instructors need to make sure that the criteria for successful performance are covered in 
the course!) 
Component 4: Learning objectives must be directly related to the subject matter and content of 
the event. If you haven’t covered various types of statistical distributions in a course, you should 
not evaluate students against the criteria (unless of course it was given as a prerequisite). If a 
course is to cover how to correctly perform pressure calibrations, it would not make sense to 
have Learning Objectives related to the laboratory management system. This component should 
be obvious – but must be stated.   
Another approach commonly used is the A-B-C-D approach to writing Learning Objectives. A, 
B, C, and D stand for Audience, Behavior, Condition, and Degree. This approach matches up 
nicely with the ANSI/IACET criteria, in that the objective must focus on the Audience, and be 
written from the student perspective. Then, it needs to specify what Behavior is expected as a 
result of the training, must address the Conditions that will be allowed, and the Degree or level 
of mastery required (the Criteria for measuring successful mastery). We may not use this model 
in this tutorial, but you might see it in some references on this topic and the approach may be 
helpful to you. 
Developing Learning Objectives for our Application examples are next. You can see that we 
have included the Behavior, Condition, and Criteria in these examples. Note how you might 
improve or expand on ideas for appropriate Learning Objectives.  
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
Application:  Examples for NCSLI Publications 
 Five Learning Objectives for this mini tutorial were stated earlier on page 1. 
 Objectives for RP 3, “Calibration Procedures might include: given resources and 
examples  (condition), participants  will be able  to correctly (criteria) write, assess 
(identify good procedures, identify gaps and weaknesses), and validate procedures 
(behavior). 
 Objectives for RP 20, “Metrology Laboratory Workforce Planning” might include: 
given  the  resources  (condition),  participants  will  be  able  to  describe  the  overall 
workforce planning process (behavior), and successfully implement all or portions of 
(criteria) laboratory succession planning efforts (behavior), etc. 
 Objectives for the “Metrology Human Resources Handbook” might include: given the 
resources (condition), participants will be able to update job descriptions (behavior) 
consistent  with  standard  practice  (criteria),  collect  employment  data  (behavior) 
according  to  standard  classifications  (criteria),  participate  in  providing  input  to 
OPM/Department of Labor, etc. 
How to Select and Align Activities and Assessments with Learning Objectives 
The  triangle  shown  in 
Figure  4  represents  the 
relationship 
between 
Learning 
Objectives, 
Learning  Activities  and 
Assessment. If these three 
components  are  present 
and  compatible  then 
teaching  and  learning  is 
enhanced,  hence,  this 
model is often called “The 
Magic  Triangle.”  If  these 
three  components  are  not 
congruent  then  students 
become  discouraged  and 
unhappy  and  make  the 
assumption  the  objectives 
cannot be trusted and they 
will  stop  paying  attention 
to them. A key factor to consider with this model is that if one side of the triangle is missing, the 
learning collapses and is not effective.  
Note: Learning Activities are those things the instructional designer plans during the Design 
Phase and the student does to learn in the Implementation Phase. For example, listening to a 
lecture is a Learning Activity; engaging in a small group discussion led by a facilitator is a 
Learning Activity; evaluating a measurement instrument with a calibration technician clinician is 
a Learning Activity.  
Figure 4. "The Magic Triangle."  Used to align Learning Objectives, 
Activities, and Assessment Methods.
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
Evaluation  or  Assessment  (of  the  student,  not  the  course)  is  often  thought  of  as  a testing  
component. But,  Assessment could also be a project assignment that is graded or otherwise 
evaluated.  The important  factor to consider  is that whatever forms the Assessment  takes, it 
should measure the student’s accomplishment and provide specific feedback to the student(s) on 
how well they met the Learning Objectives.  
Figure 5. From Bloom's to Assessment. 
If you review the “Bloom’s to Assessment” graphic (Fig.  5), you can see that there are some 
activities more appropriate for some levels of learning than others. E.g., a Lecture/Test might be 
appropriate Activity and Assessment for the Knowledge level learning, but it is usually  the 
lowest level of engagement and retention. A Case Study Activity  and Assessment  are more 
appropriate for the Application and Synthesis levels. The concept of the Magic Triangle (Fig. 4) 
2010 NCSL International Workshop and Symposium 
 
should be considered when using the Learning Event Planning Worksheet (Appendix B) that we 
will  also  discuss  later.  Keep  this  idea  in  mind:  the  Objective,  Activity,  and  Assessment 
components are all a part of the triangle, all are essential, and all must be considered during the 
Design process. They must be selected to match the appropriate level of Bloom’s taxonomy.  
Designing Content 
ANSI/IACET Criteria 7 states that: the content and instructional methods are appropriate for 
each learning outcome; content is organized in a logical manner in support of learning outcomes; 
instructional methods are consistent with learning outcomes regardless of delivery mode; and 
instructional  methods  accommodate  various  learning  styles  and  are  designed  to  promote 
interaction between and among learners, instructors, and learning resources to achieve the stated 
learning outcomes. 
Depending on what topic is being converted to training material, a trainer might design around 
themes, chronology, or steps in a measurement process. It is important to make sure that topics 
are aligned around the objectives and to focus on ensuring that the technical content is effective 
as training material. Using a logical sequence of topics is one of the ANSI/IACET criteria and is 
important for training course development. One topic should typically build on the knowledge 
gained from previous topics or modules.  
In this mini tutorial we are taking PowerPoint®
5
slide content that is “about a publication” and 
converting it to a “training resource.” If the content were not available, we would have to start 
from scratch and design and build everything. Our focus is to convert the content in such a way 
as to comply with recognized ISD education and training models. 
Techniques, teaching methods, or activities need to be selected and aligned for each of our Case 
Studies  to  match  the  Bloom’s  Taxonomy  level  we  want  to  achieve,  as  well  as  the  KSA 
(Knowledge, Skill, Ability) we are trying to ensure the participant can KNOW or DO at the 
conclusion of the session. What are the best instructional methods that are likely to be used 
during the Implementation phases? Instructional designers must think about best instructional 
and Assessment methods during Analysis and Design to select the best activities and methods for 
teaching. They must also consider the best Assessment methods. Table 2 lists several examples 
of Teaching Activities/Methods.   
A traditional model of training that combines Activity and Assessment is Lecture, followed by a 
Test. In a conference setting, we often only see Lectures. As you can see by reviewing the 
“Bloom’s  to  Assessment” graphic (Fig.  5),  this  approach  is  not  very  effective  if  you  want 
participants to know or do something different. What makes it worse is that adults prefer to be 
involved in their learning and tend to hate the Lecture/Test model. What comes to mind is “death 
by PowerPoint!” This approach provides the lowest level of engagement and retention and treats 
the  audience  as  inexperienced/non  experts  (though  they  usually  do  bring something to  the 
learning event). During the Analysis and Design phase we must answer whether we want people 
to only be able to LIST information or be able to fully ANALYZE and APPLY the material on 
                                                           
 
5
The use of specific software products is not intended as an endorsement; it is simply the products that are 
commonly used in the development of training resources.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested