devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Extract pages from pdf without acrobat software control project winforms web page html UWP Course_Book_Ppt_TIUD_Conference_Posters101-part895

PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
IT Learning Programme 
1 Introduction 
Welcome to the course PowerPoint: Academic Conference Posters. 
This booklet accompanies the course delivered by University of Oxford IT 
Services, IT Learning Programme. Although the exercises are clearly explained so 
that you can work through them yourselves, you will find that it will help if you 
also attend the taught session where you can get advice from the teachers, 
demonstrators and even each other! 
If at any time you are not clear about any aspect of the course, please make sure 
you ask your teacher or demonstrator for some help. If you are away from the 
class, you can get help by email from your teacher or from help@it.ox.ac.uk 
1.1. What You Should Already Know 
This session assumes that you are familiar with the basic features of PowerPoint. 
For example, you should be able to: 
Insert slides 
Add and edit text 
Apply simple formatting such as changing font size and colour 
We will also assume that you are familiar with opening files from particular 
folders and saving them, perhaps with a different name, back to the same or a 
different folder. 
The computer network in the teaching rooms may differ slightly to that which you 
are used to in your College or Department; if you are confused by the differences, 
ask for help from the teacher or demonstrators. 
By the way, we did say that you can ask for help from the teachers or 
demonstrators 
1.2. What You Will Learn 
This session covers the use of PowerPoint in producing scientific posters. It 
concentrates on the techniques of the tool, rather than the design of the poster. 
Poster design is covered in an accompanying session. 
We will cover the following topics: 
Setting up the page 
Adding and manipulating text 
Adding and manipulating graphics 
Adding and manipulating charts and tables 
Previewing and printing your poster 
1.3. Using Office 2010 
If you have previously used another version of Office, you may find Office 2010 
looks rather unfamiliar. “Office 2010: What’s New” is a self-study guide covering 
the Ribbon, Quick Access Toolbar and so on. This can be downloaded from the 
ITLP Portfolio at portfolio.it.ox.ac.uk . 
For anyone who prefers not to use the mouse to control software, or who finds a 
keyboard method more convenient, it is possible to control Office 2010 
applications without using a mouse. Pressing A
LT
once displays a white box with 
Extract pages from pdf without acrobat - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
copy pdf page to clipboard; acrobat extract pages from pdf
Extract pages from pdf without acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
copy web pages to pdf; delete pages of pdf reader
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
a letter or character next to each visible item on the Ribbon and title bar (shown 
in Figure 1). 
Figure 1 Keystrokes to Control Ribbon Tabs and Title Bar 
(Press A
LT
to Show These) 
After you type one of the letters/characters shown, the relevant Ribbon tab or 
detail appears, with further letters/characters for operating the buttons and 
controls (shown in Figure 2). 
Figure 2 Further Keystrokes to Control Buttons 
The elements of a dialog can be controlled, as usual with Windows applications, 
by using T
AB
to navigate between items or typing the underlined character shown 
beside an item. 
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
deleting pages from pdf document; extract pages from pdf files
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
extract pdf pages reader; delete pages from pdf document
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
IT Learning Programme 
1.4. What is PowerPoint (a reminder)? 
PowerPoint 2010 is part of the Microsoft Office 2010 package. It enables you to 
create professional, attractive slides for presentations. These can include not only 
text, but images, animations, movies and sound. 
Each slide can have notes associated with it which can be printed out to help you 
through the presentation. You can also produce hand-outs based on your 
presentation to supply to your audience. 
As well as a presentation tool, PowerPoint can be used to produce simple 
drawings, sketches and posters. 
1.5. Where can I get a copy of PowerPoint? 
If you have a copy of Microsoft Office 2010, then you already have a copy of 
PowerPoint 2010. If you are unable to find it on your computer, it may not have 
been installed and you should talk to your IT support contact (or the IT Services 
Help desk). 
If you are a member of staff, you can obtain a copy of Microsoft Office 2010 from 
the IT Services on-line shop.  
If you are a student, Microsoft often run special offers where students can get the 
Microsoft Office suite at greatly reduced cost. Most on-line software resellers sell 
the student versions, although you may need to prove your student status. 
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
delete pages of pdf online; extract pages from pdf document
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
deleting pages from pdf in reader; extract one page from pdf online
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
2 Poster Design 
What can be difficult about creating a poster? After all, you just take some text – 
maybe an extended abstract from one of your recent papers – throw in an image, 
a graph of some data and a diagram or two, switch on the blender and stand back. 
At least, that’s what we might guess has happened when we look at some posters! 
Creating a good poster is just like creating a good anything; it takes time and 
careful planning and a little skill. 
If you have the budget, then hire a graphic designer and you will end up with an 
attractive poster. Most of us don’t have that luxury, and even if we do, it doesn’t 
absolve us from coming up with the text and graphical content for the designer to 
work from. So, below and in the rest of this booklet you will find some guidance 
on poster design and implementation. 
2.1. The focus of your poster 
One of the most difficult decisions when designing your poster will be what to 
leave out. People who visit your poster will have a limited amount of time they are 
willing to invest in it – there will be many more posters they want to look at. You 
need to think carefully what it is you want that you want to say, and how much 
they will be able to absorb in those few minutes of attention. 
There are four common reasons why you might create a poster: 
Outreach and engagement – communicating your research and other 
activities with people outside your field 
An overview – Past, present and/or future 
Results – Your research results, either interim or final.  
Event awareness – advertising a conference or workshop 
However, there are a number of different strategies employed by marketing 
agencies that you could consider for your poster. Here are some (from an article 
by Tiffany Farrant Gonzalez and Jarred Romley, in .net magazine January 2013): 
History
How xyz got to be here 
Summary
an overview of xyz. 
Results
“I’ve finished!”; here is xyz. 
Enlightenment: You might not know that xyz exists; here’s how it does. 
Opportunity
You might think xyz isn’t possible; here is why it is. 
Fear
You might think that xyz is OK; here is why it isn’t. 
Soothing
You might think that xyz is not OK; here is why it is. 
Humour
You might think that penguins would make poor researchers, 
and you would be absolutely right! 
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
copy pdf pages to another pdf; cut pages out of pdf
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
IT Learning Programme 
2.2. What you must have 
The majority of posters follow a tried and tested standard format: 
Figure 3 Example poster layouts 
If you want your poster to stand out, and surely you do, you might decide to break 
out of the mould and create something different: 
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
Figure 4 A more unusual poster layout 
Whatever your design is, there are four elements that your poster MUST have: 
Title  
Clearly the title should represent the content of the poster, but at the same 
time it should attract people’s attention. If you decide to use a slightly 
cryptic title, it can help to have a more informative sub-title. 
Author 
It is surprising how many people forget to put their names on the poster! 
Affiliation 
You should always make it clear who/where you work. If the project is 
sponsored, then you should also include the sponsor’s name and/or logo. 
Always use the correct Oxford logo. Details (and downloadable images) are 
available from the University web site at: 
www.ox.ac.uk/branding_toolkit 
Contact details 
Make sure that you include your contact details. Many authors include their 
email address. If you do so, use your Oxford address in preference to your 
hotmail/gmail address. It is also becoming common to include a small 
‘passport’ photo next to your name so that people can recognise you if they 
want to talk to you about your poster. 
2.3. Size and orientation 
Conference organisers will tell you how much space you will have available, or the 
maximum size of the poster. They may also request that posters are in a 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
IT Learning Programme 
particular orientation (portrait or landscape). Very occasionally they may specify 
other layout requirements, such as the font size for titles. 
Make sure that you comply with their instructions! If unsure, ask for clarification. 
Standard poster sizes are: 
Paper Size 
Portrait (w x h) 
Landscape (w x h) 
A0 
84.1 x 118.9 cm 
118.9 x 84.1 cm 
A1 
59.4 x 84.1 cm 
84.1 x 59.4 cm 
A2 
42.0 x 59.4 cm 
59.4 x 42.0 cm 
2.4. Trimming to size 
Your poster will be printed on a large roll of paper and then trimmed to the 
correct size. To make sure it gets trimmed correctly, it is helpful to print a thin 
‘trim line’ at the very edge of the poster. This can be particularly important for 
posters on a white background, where there is a risk that your carefully 
considered (blank) border gets trimmed off. 
2.5. Structure 
Your poster will be one of many, and visitors will not have long to spend looking 
at yours. Make sure that the structure of the poster guides them through the 
content in a logical order. 
It would be unusual for a poster not to adhere to the Start
Middle
End 
convention. How you satisfy this depends on your content; in many research 
contexts, this might be Introduction
Method
Results
Conclusion. 
The path a visitor should follow through a poster is often implied by one of: 
Layout 
For example, a columned layout would normally be read starting with the 
left-hand column. 
Headings 
For example, the headings Introduction, Method, Results, Conclusion 
would immediately suggest an order in which sections are to be read. 
Numbering 
Self-evident but, of course, you could use letters instead. 
Graphic device 
For example, in the poster layout we saw in Figure 4 above, the 
arrangement of the circles suggested we read the content from top left to 
bottom right, but with the connecting lines showing that certain circles 
should be read as a collection. 
Occasionally, you may decide to have some central diagram or image and then 
arrange your content around it, on the assumption that visitors will read those 
items that are interesting to them. If there is a danger that they might then miss 
important information, direct their attention to it by colour, size, or placement. 
Or indeed, using numbering to give a structure to the items. 
2.6. Using a grid 
There is one important design rule for those of us who are not graphic designers: 
“Everything should line up with something” 
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
An easy way to help with this is to set up a grid, dividing the poster up into a 
series of blocks or cells. The boundaries of these blocks can then be used to help 
with alignment. 
Having set up a grid, you can decide to ‘break out’ from it, but this should be a 
conscious decision rather than an accident. Below is a gridded layout, with an 
example of a poster rigorously conforming to the grid, and another example of 
content that ‘breaks’ the grid, but still lines up with ‘something’. 
Figure 5 Two posters based on the same grid 
Even without a grid, you should try and make the placement of items on the 
poster look purposeful rather than random, accidental or clumsy. 
2.7. The importance of empty space 
It is very tempting to fill every part of your poster with information – text, 
images, diagrams, logos. However it is important to give each item on the poster 
enough space around it to make it easy for the visitor to see that it is a separate 
item, distinct from other content. 
You will find that most successful posters have a significant amount of empty 
space; a good rule of thumb is: 
20 - 25% text 
40 - 45% graphics 
30 - 40% empty space 
Be very careful about placing content right to the edge of the poster; it can make 
the poster look ‘cramped’, but also there is a risk that the printer may not print to 
the edge, or that content gets trimmed off. 
2.8. Colour 
Colour is very subjective in design. Good advice is, as ever, if you are not a 
graphics designer, or you don’t have confidence in your use of colours, keep it 
simple; one or two predominant colours work well, with extra colour being 
provided by your images and diagrams. 
Printed colour will often be different to the colour you see on the screen when 
designing your poster, with colours often appearing much more vibrant on-screen 
than on the poster. It is difficult to avoid this without properly calibrating your 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
IT Learning Programme 
monitor to the ink-paper-printer combination used, and calibration is not 
straightforward. 
If a particular colour is important to you, then you might want to co-ordinate with 
the people printing your poster and perhaps carry out some test prints. 
2.8.1. Background colour 
The majority of posters use a white background. This gives good contrast with 
most sensible text colours, and works well when diagrams also have a white 
background. 
Dark backgrounds can also work well, but diagrams may then need extra work 
to integrate them with the poster design. 
If you choose a gradient background, be sure that the colour gradient is not 
too exaggerated otherwise you will have trouble choosing a suitable font colour 
that will stand out on all parts of the poster. 
If you decide to use an image background  take care that it doesn’t detract 
unnecessarily from the content. 
2.8.2. Text colour 
The text colour should always provide a good contrast with any background. 
If you use more than one text colour, do so for a reason – perhaps to highlight a 
particular word or section of text – and be consistent in the way that you use the 
colour variations. 
Artistic effects and fills to text are usually best avoided – they can make the text 
difficult to read. 
2.8.3. Diagram colour 
If you have chosen a particular colour theme for the rest of your poster, then you 
should consider carrying this through to your diagrams. For example, a bar chart 
might use hues of the main poster colour for the different bars. 
Blocks of colour work much better than patterns when filling bars and segments. 
You will need to make lines on the diagrams thicker than normal so that they can 
be seen from a distance. 
2.8.4. Image colour 
On an otherwise plain, one or two colour poster, you can add extra colour interest 
through the use of appropriate images. Particular issues that are important to 
consider about images are covered later. 
If you are using artwork such as the University or sponsor’s logo, you should keep 
the original colours. In particular, there are strict guidelines on the colours that 
can be used for the Oxford University logo: 
www.ox.ac.uk/branding_toolkit/the_brand_colours/index.html 
2.9. First step 
Bearing in mind the advice given above, and before starting to construct your 
poster in your chosen design tool, you should first spend some time with pencil 
and paper and produce one or more sketches of possible layouts. 
This will save time in the long run, and avoid the tool directing you along a 
particular path. 
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
10 
3 Tools 
Choosing the right tool for the job can make a big difference in both the time 
taken to create the poster and the quality of the final product. 
What makes a tool the ‘best’ for your circumstances depends on a number of 
factors: 
The features the tool has that help with poster creation 
Your experience with the tool 
The training resources available 
The cost and availability of the tool 
The availability of help and support within your college and/or 
department. 
3.1. Poster design 
The table on the next page gives a brief comparison of the main tools you might 
consider using to create a poster. 
The majority of posters sent for printing to the IT Services printing service are 
created in PowerPoint
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested