devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader application software utility azure windows web page visual studio Course_Book_Ppt_TIUD_Conference_Posters102-part896

PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
11 
IT Learning Programme 
Tool 
Platform 
Cost 
Ease of use 
Can create posters bigger than A2 
Auto-flow between text boxes 
Graphics handling 
Text wrap around graphics 
Layers 
Drawing tools 
Adobe 
InDesign 
Windows, 
Mac 
Expensive 
Has a 
learning curve 
Excellent 
Yes 
Many 
OK, integrates well with 
Illustrator and Photoshop 
PowerPoint 
Windows, 
Mac 
Part of MS 
Office 
Uses the MS 
Office 
interface 
 N 
Good 
No 
Multiple, only 
one fixed 
Good 
Impress 
Windows, 
Mac, 
Linux 
Free, part of 
Open Office 
Similar to 
PowerPoint 
2003 
Good 
No 
Multiple, only 
one fixed 
Good 
Publisher 
Windows 
Inexpensive/part 
of MS Office 
Uses the MS 
Office 
interface 
 Y 
Good 
Some 
Multiple, only 
one fixed 
Good 
Word 
Windows, 
Mac 
Part of MS 
Office 
Uses the MS 
Office 
interface 
Average 
Some 
Multiple, none 
fixed 
Good 
Keynote 
Mac 
Part of iWorks 
Standard Mac 
interface 
 N 
Good 
No 
Multiple, only 
one fixed 
Good 
Pages 
Mac 
Part of iWorks 
Standard Mac 
interface 
Good 
Yes 
Multiple, only 
one fixed 
Good 
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
delete blank page from pdf; crop all pages of pdf
Delete pages from pdf acrobat reader - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
cut pages out of pdf online; copy page from pdf
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
12 
3.2. Image editing 
Most of the tools mentioned in the previous table include some image 
manipulation features. For example, PowerPoint can apply effects such as 
cropping, rotating, resizing and colouring images. 
For more sophisticated image manipulation, for example retouching or 
enhancing part of an image, you will need to use an image editor. Two that we 
recommend are: 
Photoshop (Windows, Mac) 
This is the most widely used and respected image editing application. It is 
expensive, although there is a cut-down version, Adobe Elements, which 
retains the most useful editing features, but is significantly cheaper. 
GIMP (Windows, Mac) 
GIMP is an open source editing application. Photoshop has the edge in the 
number of features and ease of use, but GIMP is a very close second. 
iPhoto (Mac) 
iPhoto is part of the iLife suite on a Mac. It is not a full featured image 
editing tool (for example it does not implement layers), but it does provide 
a wider range of tools than those built in to most poster creation 
applications. 
The IT Learning Programme runs introductory sessions covering these tools. 
3.3. Data analysis 
Some poster creation tools, such as PowerPoint, include the ability to produce 
charts and graphs from data. Generally it is more effective to analyse your data in 
your preferred data analysis tool (for example ExcelSPSS, MatLab) and then 
export the resulting charts and graphs as images. 
You need to take care that the images are of sufficient resolution for use on a 
large poster. Image resolution and the design of charts and graphs are covered in 
the next section. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
extract pdf pages online; reader extract pages from pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
extract page from pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
13 
IT Learning Programme 
4 Using graphics 
Images and diagrams will typically occupy about 40% of your poster. They are an 
opportunity not only to get across a lot of information (a picture often IS worth a 
thousand words), but also to make your poster interesting and eye-catching. 
Graphics on the poster must be large enough to be seen and understood by 
someone standing about a metre away. They therefore need to be well chosen and 
of good quality. 
4.1. Images 
There are two broad types of image: 
Vector images 
Bitmap images 
4.1.1. Vector images 
A vector image is made up of lines and shapes. These are described within the 
program using a series of mathematical formulas. The advantage of this is that 
lines and shapes scale very effectively; if you want a larger circle, the formula for a 
circle can be used to redraw it perfectly. 
Diagrams drawn in your poster creation tool are usually vector images and so will 
resize well.  
Vector images tend to take up very little storage space, and so don’t add much to 
the file size of a poster. 
4.1.2. Bitmap images 
Bitmaps are images made up of a large collection of very small, fixed size dots 
(usually called dots on paper, or pixels on screen), which from a distance merge 
together to give an image. When you want to resize a bitmap image the software 
needs to decide which dots to leave out (if you are shrinking the image) or what 
sort of dots to insert (if you are enlarging the image). This often leads to a 
reduction in the image quality. 
Images from scanners and cameras will be bitmaps and so should be resized with 
care on your poster. Reducing an image in size usually gives fewer problems than 
increasing it. 
There are a number of different formats for bitmap images, but for our purpose 
here we can treat them as the same. The important consideration is the pixel 
dimensions of the image. 
For good quality printing, you should aim for at least 200 dots per inch (dpi), i.e. 
80 dots per cm, but preferably 300 dpi (120 dpcm). 
You can find the number of pixels in an image very easily: 
In Windows you simply open the My Computer window, navigate to the 
folder containing the image, and move your mouse pointer to rest over the 
image. The pixel dimensions will appear in a small information box over the 
image. 
On a Mac, open a Finder window, CTRL+click on the image and choose 
Get Info
fo
from the menu that appears. The pixel dimensions are listed 
under the 
More Info
section of the Info panel that appears. 
Once you have found the pixel dimensions, the calculation is simple: 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
extract pages from pdf acrobat; delete pages from pdf acrobat
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
cut pdf pages; delete pages out of a pdf file
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
14 
Divide by 200 (or 300 for better quality) to get the image dimensions in 
inches, or 
Divide by 80 (or 120 for better quality) to get the image dimensions in cm 
The dimensions you calculate are a guide to the maximum size at which you can 
use the image on the poster. It is only a guide; it also depends on the quality of 
the original image – for example how ‘sharp’ the image is in terms of focus. 
4.1.3. Sourcing your images 
Digital cameras 
Images from digital cameras are bitmap images (usually in the JPEG format). The 
resolution rule described above applies, and so to give you the most flexibility you 
should use the highest resolution setting on the camera. Check the camera 
manual for details. 
Scanning 
When scanning an image, you will have the option of choosing the final resolution 
of the image. To determine this (we will work in inches here): 
Decide the dimensions of the image on the poster 
e.g. 6 in 
Calculate the number of dots you therefore need based on 200 dpi (300 dpi for 
high quality) 
e.g. 6 x 200 = 1200 
Take the original image dimensions 
e.g. 8 in 
Divide the required number of pixels by the original dimension to calculate the 
scanning resolution 
i.e. 1200 /8 = 150 dpi 
This gives you the scanning resolution to use, i.e. 150 dpi. 
You may not be able to set the exact, calculated, scanning resolution in the 
scanner’s software, but choose the closest match. 
Academic collections 
Your faculty library staff should be able to give you details of image libraries that 
specifically cover your topic area. In particular, the University subscribes to a 
number of image collections such as: 
www.artstor.org 
www.bridgemaneducation.com 
Stock photo collections 
These are collections of images that are made available for use for a small fee, 
typically of the order of £1 per image but dependent on size and quality. 
Examples are: 
www.123rf.com  
www.istockphoto.com  
www.fotolia.co.uk  
The range of topics covered is wide, but the images tend not to be particularly 
technical or academic. 
Free collections 
These are collections of images that can be freely used, although an 
acknowledgement usually has to be included. Examples are: 
www.morguefile.com  
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages of pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete pages of pdf preview; extract pages from pdf
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
15 
IT Learning Programme 
www.freefoto.com  
www.microsoft.com (in the clip art section) 
Photo sharing applications 
There are a number of web sites that allow registered users to upload their own 
images to be shared with others. One of the better known is Flickr at 
www.flickr.com  
Although these images are copyright, some contributors use the creative 
commons licence so that their images can be used within certain limitations. 
Generic search engines 
Search tools such as Google, Yahoo!, Bing or Ask allow you to search for images 
on the web. All images found using this method are copyright unless stated 
otherwise and so cannot be used without permission. 
Note: Most of the images from Internet based sources are meant for use on-
screen, mainly in web pages and so the resolution may not be good enough for 
printing large on a poster. 
4.1.4. Copyright 
You need to be careful that you do not infringe the copyright of the owners of 
images that you use. If the source does not state the conditions of use you should 
assume that you cannot use the image without first contacting the owner and 
getting their permission. 
Some images are made available under a Creative Commons agreement. For 
more details about the Creative Commons licences and what each allows, visit 
www.creativecommons.org.uk  
It would be embarrassing at a prestigious conference to be accused of infringing 
copyright. 
The Creative Commons website also has a search tool that will search particular 
web resources for creative commons licenced material: 
search.creativecommons.org 
4.1.5. Placing images 
Most poster creation programs will allow you to place images anywhere on the 
poster. However, programs with full desk top publishing features such as 
InDesign and Publisher allow you to flow text around inserted images. 
If your program does not support text flow around images (PowerPoint does not), 
you may have to resort to using multiple text boxes to simulate the effect when 
needed. 
By default, images are inserted with their defined shape (usually rectangular) and 
at a size that is determined by their size in pixels and their resolution in dots per 
inch. These values are held within the image, but not all poster creation 
applications respect the values. You may find that images are inserted at a size 
that you were not expecting. 
You will be able to resize the image, usually by clicking and dragging an image 
corner. Remember that you should not exceed your calculated maximum size on 
the poster based on a printing resolution of about 200 dpi (80 dots per cm). 
When resizing an image, take care not to distort it. Most applications will 
preserve the aspect ratio of an image if you hold down the S
HIFT
key while 
clicking and dragging an image corner. 
Most applications allow you to insert an image into a shape (such as a circle or an 
ellipse) which can add interest and individuality to your poster. 
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
convert few pages of pdf to word; extract one page from pdf preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe reader.
delete pages out of a pdf; copy pages from pdf to word
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
16 
4.2. Diagrams 
You will probably already be familiar with creating diagrams for papers and 
articles. Bear in mind that visitors tend to spend much less time with a poster 
than they might spend reading an article. Therefore your diagrams need to be 
easy to interpret quickly. 
4.2.1. Creating diagrams 
Most poster creation tools include features for drawing diagrams. Some, such as 
PowerPoint, include some pre-designed diagrams that you can customise. 
You will also find that the drawing tools in each application are very similar (in 
WordPowerPoint and Excel they are exactly the same), enabling you to: 
Draw lines and simple shapes 
Fill shapes with colour and images 
Group diagram elements 
Resize and move diagrams 
Include text and annotations 
When designing your diagrams, you must remember that they have to be easy to 
see from about a metre away. This means that the lines on the diagrams will need 
to be heavier, and any text annotations need to be readable. 
When choosing colours, you should use the poster colour scheme for underlying 
elements such labels, and distinctive colours to draw attention to important parts 
of the diagram. 
Most poster design applications create diagrams in vector format so they will 
resize very well. 
4.2.2. Importing diagrams 
If you have a preferred drawing tool, or diagrams already created in another 
application, you may find that you can import them into your poster creation 
application. This is certainly the case with the Microsoft Office programs. 
If your poster creation application shares a common format with your 
diagramming application then you may find that copy and paste is successful. If 
this is not the case then you will need to export your diagram, saving it in a 
format that you can then import into your poster. 
Ideally you should export in a vector format; however it can sometimes be 
difficult to find a format that both applications share. On a Windows platform the 
most likely choice is the Windows Metafile Format (WMF), or possibly 
Encapsulated Postscript (EPS). EPS is also widely supported by Mac based 
applications. 
More likely, you will have to export the diagram as a bitmap image (probably in 
the JPEG format). If this is the case, make sure you export it at the highest quality 
so that you can have the diagram as large as necessary on the poster. 
4.3. Equations 
Some poster creation programs, such as PowerPoint, include an equation editor; 
however these tend to have quite limited features. Their one advantage is that you 
can size the equation to be as large as you want and still retain good quality. 
If yours is a discipline that requires equations, you probably already have a 
preferred equation editor. If not, you should investigate the various 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
17 
IT Learning Programme 
implementations of the LaTeX Equation Editor. There are a number, and you 
should be able to find one for your type of computer. 
You are unlikely to be able to copy and paste effectively between your equation 
editor and your poster application and so you will need to save the equation in a 
common format. 
Ideally this will be a vector format (see above). If it is a bitmap format (such as 
JPEG) then choose the highest resolution available. 
Some equation editors will prefer to export equations as Adobe Acrobat PDF files. 
These are a good compromise, however inserting PDFs into a PowerPoint file on 
Windows is not straightforward (it is more so on a Mac). A bitmap version may be 
easier to manage. 
4.4. Charts and graphs 
If you have data to present on a poster, your first choice should be to display them 
as a chart or graph; large tables of data are rarely an effective use of poster space. 
You can create simple charts and graphs inside many poster design applications, 
but for more complex data representations, it is probably easier to create these in 
a specialist data analysis application. Once created, you can export the chart and 
then import it into the poster.  
The same issues apply here as for diagrams and equations. Vector formats are 
preferable, but if you have to use a bitmap version as the shared format, then the 
highest resolution should be used.  
Remember, you will need at least 200 dpi (80 dots per cm) just as you do for 
images. 
If you are using PowerPoint to create your poster and Excel for your data 
analysis, you will find that copy and paste can often produce good results. 
4.4.1. Chart design 
Simplification is the key to producing effective charts and graphs for a poster.  
Think carefully before taking a graph created for a report and reusing it on a 
poster. 
For a report or article you may need to incorporate features in your graphs to help 
readers interpret your data in detail; that is rarely necessary on a poster. Charts 
and graphs on posters are best used to show trends and outliers in your data. 
To make the chart or graph easy to read, you should remove all unnecessary 
‘furniture’. For example, Excel tends to add grid lines and a shaded background, 
both of which are generally unnecessary: 
4.5. Quick Response (QR) codes 
A Quick Response (QR) code is a two-dimensional bar-code; you will have seen 
these on commercial posters and advertisements. These can be used in many 
different ways, but commonly they are an easy way to direct visitors to a web site 
for more information – the visitor points their phone or hand-held device at the 
QR code and it translates it into a web address and automatically 
opens up the web page (providing they have access to the 
internet). 
There are a number of sites that enable you to create  
QR codes, for example www.qrstuff.com  
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
18 
US Health R & D Support
0
5000
10000
15000
20000
25000
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
Year
Dollars (millions)
Private 
Nonprofit
Industry
Government
57%
57%
57%
53%
53%
51%
51%
49%
39%
39%
39%
42%
42%
44%
45%
46%
Figure 6  A typical Excel generated chart 
With a little bit of work, we can make the chart much more suitable for a poster: 
US Health Research and Development Spending
0
10
20
83
85
87
89
$ (billions)
Private
Nonprofit
Industry
Government
Figure 7 An improved version of Figure 6 for a poster 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
TIUD 
19 
IT Learning Programme 
5 Using Text 
One of the most difficult things to do when creating a poster about your own work 
is deciding what to leave out! It is tempting to fill the poster with text explaining 
the topic in detail. 
Remember that on a poster we generally expect only 20-25% of it to be text. 
5.1. Font sizes 
It is important that your poster can be read from a distance of about a metre. 
Experience has shown that this means that the following font sizes are a good 
starting point: 
Main title 
72+ 
The title should be readable from much 
further away than 1m; you need to be 
able to attract the attention of people as 
they wander past. 
Sub titles 
54+ 
Headings and subtitles will often give 
structure to your poster and so they 
need to be easy to identify. 
Text  
30+ 
This is the text of the main body of the 
poster 
Sub text 
20+ 
Information that needs to be available, 
but is not important to the 
understanding of the topic, does not 
have to be readable from 1m, but large 
enough that it can be read without 
getting too close 
The above values are very much a guideline – you should vary them as necessary 
for your poster, usually upwards, but always maintaining the readability of the 
text. 
Also be aware that the same point size in different fonts often translates to very 
different physical sizes. The values given are typical for a ‘standard’ font such as 
Arial, Times Roman, Trebuchet, Georgia, etc. 
5.2. Fonts 
There are two broad categories of font: serif and sans-serif. Serif fonts have 
decoration at the end of character strokes, sans-serif don’t. 
There is debate about whether it is easier, on a poster, to read a sans-serif font 
such as 
Trebuchet
as opposed to a serif font such as 
Georgia
. Most 
successful posters opt for a sans-serif font. 
Use your chosen font consistently. You can add emphasis by making characters 
bold or italic. Underlining is rarely effective; it makes the text look cluttered, and 
so should be avoided. 
TIUD 
PowerPoint: Conference Posters 
University of Oxford IT Services 
20 
You might choose to use one font for the body text and a different font for your 
titles. If so, choose a font which is clearly different to the main body text font 
otherwise it looks as though you mistakenly used the wrong font!  
It can sometimes be effective to use a serif font for the headings and a sans-serif 
font for the body text. 
5.3. How much text? 
Based on the rule of thumb of about 20-25% of the poster being text, and the font 
size needed for the text to be readable, you will find that on an A1 or A0 poster 
you will have room for about 400-600 words. 
You should avoid the temptation to fit more words on a larger poster; visitors will 
only be willing to spend a few minutes with your poster, and more than 600 
words will take too long to read.  
It can be difficult to read large blocks of text when standing at a poster, so: 
Have a maximum of 10-12 words per line. Avoid having lines of text that 
stretch across the full width of the poster. 
Restrict blocks of text to 50-100 words, separating blocks with white space 
or graphics. 
5.4. Managing text boxes 
Rather than placing the text directly on to your poster, it is better to create boxes 
for your text which can be resized and repositioned to suit your poster design. 
Ideally, your poster creation application should enable you to link one text box 
with another. This means that when there is too much text for one box, it 
automatically flows into the next. Unfortunately, few of the tools commonly used 
have this feature, in which case you will have to manage the distribution of text 
between text boxes by hand. 
Usually your text boxes will be rectangular but you can also use other shapes, 
particularly circles and ellipses, to good effect.  
A strategy that works well in most poster creation tools is to add your preferred 
shape, fill the shape with your chosen colour, and then convert the shape into a 
text box. This way your text will wrap to the shape outline. 
5.4.1. Using text from elsewhere 
Copy and paste of text between applications usually works well, and so you 
should be able to copy existing text into a text box. However, if you are using 
applications which understand each other’s formatting conventions, you may find 
that the text formatting is also copied; this is rarely what you want. 
Most applications have the option to paste plain text, or remove any text 
formatting. It is best to start with plain text and then apply the formatting that is 
used elsewhere on the poster. 
5.5. Using Tables 
Large tables are not a good way of presenting information in a poster – where 
possible table data should be presented as a chart or graph. 
If you do use a table, the same font size rules apply, any text that is important 
should be readable from a distance. You might also find it helps to ‘band’ the 
table to make it easier to interpret: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested