devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete pages of pdf reader control Library utility azure asp.net windows visual studio Aronson20-part905

763 
Elite  Law  Firm  Mergers  and 
Reputational  Competition:    Is 
Bigger  Really  Better?      An 
International Comparison 
Bruce E. Aronson
A
BSTRACT
Although  rapid  law  firm  growth  has  persisted  since  the 
1980s,  the  acceleration  of  this  trend  over  the  last  decade  by 
means  of  mergers  is  puzzling.    Why  would  normally 
conservative  law  firms  embark  on  a  merger  strategy  that 
appears to encompass significant risk and uncertain benefits?  
Is this trend a peculiarly U.S. phenomenon? 
Most  of  the  popular  explanations  for  law  firm  mergers 
focus  on a single factor:  Law firms everywhere cite  strikingly 
similar reasons based on a presumed client demand for “one-
stop  shopping.”    This  Article  contributes to providing a more 
robust, multi-causal explanation for law firm behavior through 
 comparative  study  of  reputational  competition  among  elite 
law  firms  in  selected  jurisdictions—the  United  States,  the 
United  Kingdom,  Germany,  Australia,  and  Japan.    It  posits 
that  industry  consolidation  and  changing  market  conditions 
have  intensified  law  firm  competition  and  that  since  firm 
quality is hard to measure, law firms compete largely on the 
basis of reputation.  Due to their risk-averse nature and the fear 
of losing existing clients, many law firms are thus paradoxically 
driven to engage in (defensive) mergers to meet the competition. 
________________________________________________________________ 
Associate  Professor  of  Law,  Creighton  University  School  of  Law.    Prior  to 
beginning his full-time academic career, the Author spent seventeen years in private 
practice, including eleven years as a partner at a major New York law firm.  
The Author thanks Curtis Milhaupt, Mark Ramseyer, and Frank Upham, as well 
as participants in presentations at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. 
Boyd School of Law; the University of Oregon School of Law; and the Japanese Legal 
Studies Conference, Cornell Law School, New York (May 2004) for comments on earlier 
drafts; and John Roebuck, Hitoshi Sumiya, and Akihiro Wani for helpful discussions 
and aid in gathering materials and arranging interviews.  The Author acknowledges 
the research assistance provided by Keith Volpi.  For this Article, the Author conducted 
a series of interviews covering all of the jurisdictions included in the Article, and he 
wishes to thank the interviewees for their cooperation.  
Delete pages of pdf reader - control Library utility:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages of pdf reader - control Library utility:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
764 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
Through  an examination  of reputational  competition, the 
Article  considers  circumstances  that  are  likely  to  lead  to 
mergers,  particularly  the  elements  of  reputational  signaling, 
herd behavior, and reputational status as “first-tier” law firms. 
It identifies “rules of the game” for firm behavior with respect to 
international mergers.  The Article finds that the impact of a 
strategic decision, such as a merger, by a first-tier firm is of far 
greater significance than a similar action by another elite firm 
and is much more  likely to  lead to  defensive actions, such as 
mergers,  by  competitor  firms.    Thus,  which  firms  engage  in 
merger  activity  in  a  given  market  is  an  important  factor  in 
explaining and predicting both the reaction of competitors and 
whether mergers will become widespread in that market. 
This Article further suggests that the common phenomenon 
of law firm mergers is likely a result of law firms reacting to 
similar types of changes in their operating environment (i.e., a 
parallel development), rather than convergence to a U.S. model 
of the law firm.   
T
ABLE OF 
C
ONTENTS
I.
I
NTRODUCTION
..............................................................  
765
II.
R
ECONSIDERING 
A
CADEMIC 
T
HEORY 
R
ELATING TO 
L
AW 
F
IRM 
G
ROWTH BY 
M
ERGER
...................................  
769
A.    Market Change and Law Firms’ Response:  
The U.S. Experience ............................................  
769
B.    Academic Theory and the Puzzle of Law  
Firm Mergers ......................................................  
773
C.    Developing a More Robust Explanation ............  
778
III.
T
HE 
U
NITED 
S
TATES AND THE 
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
:
N
ATIONAL OR 
G
LOBAL 
M
ARKETS
? .................................  
785
A.     United States.......................................................  
785
B.    United Kingdom .................................................  
792
IV.
I
NTERNATIONAL 
M
ERGERS AND 
A
LLIANCES
:
T
HE 
E
XAMPLES OF 
G
ERMANY AND 
A
USTRALIA
..............  
798
A.     Germany ..............................................................  
798
B.    Australia .............................................................  
804
V.
T
HE 
E
MERGENCE OF 
E
LITE 
L
AW 
F
IRMS AND 
M
ERGERS IN 
J
APAN
........................................................  
810
VI.
R
ECONSIDERING 
E
XPLANATIONS FOR 
L
AW 
F
IRM 
M
ERGERS
..............................................................  
823
A.    Evaluation of the Case Studies and  
Reputational Competition ..................................  
823
B.    Convergence or Parallel Development? ..............  
828
control Library utility:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
765 
VII.
C
ONCLUSION
..................................................................  
829
I.  I
NTRODUCTION
Over the last decade, the legal profession in the United States 
has gradually become accustomed to the idea that bigger is better for 
law  firms,  and a merger is now  a  common  tool  to achieve greater 
scale.    In  one  recent  example,  within  five  years  two  little-known 
regional  law  firms  merged,  added  three  smaller  firms  by  merger, 
doubled  in  size  through  another  merger  in  October  2004,  and  in 
January  2005  completed  an  international  merger  with  an  English 
firm  to  create  the  world’s  third-largest  law  firm,  with  more  than 
2,700 lawyers at forty-nine offices in eighteen countries.1   
This recent trend of “serial mergers” highlights a seemingly ever-
accelerating race among law firms to grow and achieve a credible size 
and national (and, increasingly, international) presence or platform.  
But why would generally conservative law firms embark on a merger 
strategy which appears to encompass significant risk and uncertain 
benefits?    Is  the  merger  trend  truly  a  result  of  sophisticated 
multinational  clients  demanding  “one-stop  shopping”  for  legal 
services on a  global scale, or  are there other causes?  Which firms 
among the large or elite corporate law firms are likely to pursue a 
merger strategy?   
These questions are not unique to the United States, as the law 
firm  merger  wave  has  also  seemingly  engulfed  other  developed 
countries.  Most of  Germany’s leading law firms have  entered into 
international mergers or alliances.   Even  in Japan,  which is  often 
perceived as a society where law firms, lawyers, and the law itself are 
unimportant,  all  of  the  top  four  law  firms  entered  into  domestic 
________________________________________________________________ 
1. 
The  merger,  by  Piper  Rudnick  LLP  (with  main  offices  in  Chicago  and 
Baltimore)  and  London-based  DLA,  created  a  firm  that  was  behind  only  Clifford 
Chance  and  Baker  &  McKenzie  in  number  of  attorneys.    With  projected  annual 
revenues of $1.5 billion, it is second only to Clifford Chance.  See, e.g., Martha Neil, A 
Mondo Merger:  Piper Rudnick Teams with London’s DLA to Get Really Big, Really 
Fast, A.B.A.
J.
E-R
EPORT
, Dec. 10, 2004.  Aggressive expansion continued thereafter, as 
in  mid-2005  the  new  firm  of  DLA  Piper  Rudnick  Gray  Cary  acquired  a  group  of 
seventy-seven lawyers from Ernst & Young’s Russia practice, instantly giving it the 
largest law office in Moscow.  See, e.g., In Brief, N
AT
L.
J., July 4, 2005, at 3.  It next 
acquired a forty-two attorney group from the disbanded Coudert Brothers to open a 
Beijing office at the end of 2005.  See, e.g., Gina Passarella, DLA Piper Gets Green Light 
for  Office  in  Beijing,  T
HE 
L
EGAL 
I
NTELLIGENCER
 Dec.  13,  2005,  available  at 
http://www.law.com/ jsp/article.jsp?id=1134394508413.  By mid-2006, it was the world’s 
second  largest  law  firm  with  3,100  lawyers  in twenty-two  countries  and  fifty-nine 
offices.  See, e.g., Lynne Marek, DLA Piper Aims for Shorter Name and Stronger Brand, 
N
AT
L.
J.,  Aug.  18,  2006,  available  at  http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id= 
1155822492779&rss= newswire. 
control Library utility:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
766 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
mergers  during  the  period 2000-2005.   And,  the first international 
merger between a significant Japanese firm and a foreign firm (a top 
English firm, Linklaters) also occurred in 2005.  How do these firms’ 
circumstances and motivations  compare  to  those of law  firms  that 
undertake mergers in the United States?   
The recent wave of mergers among large law firms, both in the 
United States and in many other countries, presents an interesting 
puzzle.  Neither the prior literature on the growth and development 
of law firms nor the business strategy explanations provided by the 
firms  themselves  fully  explain  this  trend.    Supply-side  theories, 
emphasizing how law firms’ internal structures can provide a strong 
impetus for growth,2 encounter difficulty in explaining mergers, as a 
merger  would  presumably  tend  to  destabilize  any  such  internal 
system.    Demand-side  explanations  emphasize  client  demand  and 
often include application of the traditional “theory of the firm” to law 
firm growth with the resulting view that firms will merge if it is more 
efficient for them to do so.3  But efficiency is difficult to measure, and 
it is unclear that law firms are even attempting to measure it.   
Law  firms  themselves  justify  mergers  with  demand-side 
explanations that are surprisingly consistent: Mergers are a response 
to  client  needs  for  greater  attorney  specialization,  large  teams  of 
lawyers for significant projects, one-stop shopping, and a greater law 
firm presence in the relevant market. There is no empirical evidence 
to back up this presumption of client demand, and one can find large 
corporations and law firm consultants who claim it is unfounded.5  By 
nature,  mergers are  a  risky  business,  and  it  is  unclear that  most 
mergers are successful.  What then seemingly compels law firms to 
undertake mergers to achieve growth? 
In  addition,  the  wave  of  law  firm  mergers  is  by  no  means 
uniform.  Despite the decade-long trend of law firm mergers in the 
United  States,  a  number  of  leading  firms  have  not  engaged  in 
mergers  and  apparently  have  no  intention  of  doing  so.    On  an 
international level, nine out of ten law firms in Germany entered into 
________________________________________________________________ 
2. 
The best-known  supply side  theory  posits  a stable  promotion-to-partner 
tournament within law firms.  See infra note 20 and accompanying text. 
3. 
See infra note 26 and accompanying text. 
4. 
See, e.g., Betiayn Tursi, Firms Should Resist the Urge to Merge, N
AT
L.
J. 
Feb. 17, 2003, at C3 (“With the trend toward megamerger firms, the current thinking 
is that existing clients will be in a  position to benefit from one-stop shopping”); Leigh 
Jones, First the Merger, Then the Brand; Stand-Alone Firms Seek New IDs Also, N
AT
L.
J. May 8, 2006 (referring to law firms’ “tired clichés about providing clients with one-
stop shopping”). 
5. 
See, e.g., id. (“Corporate Counsel look at various aspects of a firm in their 
selection  process and  it  doesn’t  always mean  that they prefer one-stop  shopping.”); 
Spoilt for Choice, E
CONOMIST
, July 5, 2001 (stating that “[p]rofessional service firms 
insist  that  they  want  to  diversify because  their  corporate  clients demand it.    But 
evidence for such claim is hard to find.”). 
control Library utility:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
767 
international mergers  or  alliances  within a year’s time  around the 
year 2000, while in other developed countries, such as Australia, no 
international  merger  activity  occurred.6    And  while  most  of  the 
leading U.K. firms have embraced a full-service global strategy, the 
top  U.S.  firms  continue  to  rely  on  a  national  strategy  with  only 
selective international expansion.   
As law firms themselves have struggled to keep pace in a rapidly 
changing operating environment over the last decade, scholars face 
the challenge of providing a  more robust  theoretical explanation of 
firm behavior with respect to the recent wave of law firm mergers.  To 
contribute  to  this  effort,  this  Article  focuses  on  reputational 
competition,  in  particular  on  three  reputational  elements  that 
deserve greater emphasis or are absent from the literature.  The first 
element is reputational signaling.7  This Article posits that law firms 
are  reacting  to  changes  in  their  operating  environment  (including 
deregulation, consolidation of clients, and globalization) which have 
made the  market  for legal  services more  fluid and have increased 
competition  among  law  firms.   As  competition  is  based  largely  on 
firms’ reputations for quality, elite firms have become desperate to 
signal their quality to clients and other core constituencies. 
The  second  reputational  element  is  herd  behavior.    Under 
conditions of uncertainty and incomplete information, firms that are 
concerned about their  reputational  standing may be more  likely to 
engage  in  defensive  mergers  based  on  the  actions  of  other  firms.  
Finally, the third element is the role of first-tier law firms.8  First-tier 
law firms are a small group of the most profitable firms that have 
established reputations for expertise in important areas.  The concept 
of first-tier firms is significant both because it has not been explicitly 
discussed  in  the  academic  literature  and  because  it  is  the 
reputational element most readily observable in actual firm behavior.  
In general, first-tier firms, at least in large domestic markets like the 
United States, do not pursue a strategy of rapid growth and mergers 
that might place their high profitability at risk.  It is the other elite 
firms or first-tier firms in smaller markets (like the United Kingdom) 
that are likely to compete through a growth-by-merger strategy.   
The international and comparative aspect of law firm growth and 
mergers has been largely ignored,9 despite its potential to shed light 
________________________________________________________________ 
6. 
See infra Part IV. 
7. 
For  a  discussion  of  reputational  signaling,  see  infra  notes  33-38  and 
accompanying text. 
8. 
For a discussion of the role of first-tier law firms, see infra Part II(C). 
9. 
The Author is unaware of any article that attempts to compare law firm 
growth and its possible causes in several countries.  U.S. commentators have written 
on a number of topics broadly related  to law firms and international  activities.  A 
partial  list  would  include  the  following:  for  globalization  of  the  market  for  legal 
services, see, e.g., David M. Trubeck et al., Global Restructuring and the Law:  Studies 
control Library utility:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
www.rasteredge.com
control Library utility:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
768 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
on the causes of law firm behavior in the United States.  This Article 
demonstrates  that  law  firm  mergers  are  not  a particularly  Anglo-
American  phenomenon  driven  by  aggressive  management  of  law 
firms as  large businesses, but rather also occur  in other developed 
countries.  This raises an additional question from a comparative law 
perspective of whether, in terms of the recent debate in the area of 
comparative  corporate governance,  there  is  a  worldwide  movement 
towards convergence to a U.S. or Anglo-Saxon model of the elite law 
firm  or  whether  local  conditions  lead  to  a  path-dependent  result 
preventing any such convergence. 
Although  these  are  broad issues,  the goals  of  this  Article  are 
modest.    First,  the  Article  emphasizes  reputational  competition 
through an examination of reputational signaling, herd behavior, and 
the role of first-tier law firms, and suggests a possible model for law 
firm reputational signaling.  The intention is to extend the existing 
literature by  forming a more generalized  and complete view  of the 
role of reputation in the law firm context.  As noted above, this is not 
intended as a complete explanation for law firm mergers, but rather 
as an aid in providing a  multi-causal, robust picture of actual law 
firm behavior in the merger area.  Second, the Article examines the 
issue of law firm growth by merger from a comparative perspective.  
Although this study covers only a limited number  of countries and 
issues,  it  provides  both  an  introduction  to  common  elements  or 
parallel  developments  among  a  number  of  jurisdictions  and 
additional perspectives concerning the factors in the U.S. system that 
have contributed to the phenomenon of law firm growth by merger.   
A third goal of this initial survey is to stimulate further research 
in this area by highlighting the lack of data and the use of unproven 
assertions regarding law firm growth and mergers on both a domestic 
and comparative basis.  The increasingly important role of law firms 
is  an  area  that  has  not  received  the  attention  it  deserves  in  the 
academic  literature.    This  is  not  simply  a  question  either  of  the 
business  success  or  growing  influence  of  large  law  firms or,  more 
of the Internationalization of Legal Fields and the Creation of Transnational Arenas, 44 
C
ASE 
W.
R
ES
.
L.
R
EV
. 407 (1994); for the expansion of U.S. law firms overseas, see, e.g., 
Carole Silver, Globalization and U.S. Market in Legal Services—Shifting Identities, 31 
L
AW 
&
P
OL
I
NT
B
US
.  1093  (2000);  for the  regulation of foreign  lawyers and the 
possible liberalization of legal services under international trade agreements, see, e.g., 
S
YDNEY 
M.
C
ONE 
III,
I
NTERNATIONAL 
T
RADE  IN 
L
EGAL 
S
ERVICES
:
R
EGULATION OF 
L
AWYERS  AND 
F
IRMS  IN 
G
LOBAL 
P
RACTICE 
(1996);  for  overseas  examples  of 
multidisciplinary  partnerships  (as  part  of  the  debate  as  to  whether  such  “MDPs” 
should be allowed in the United States), see Laurel Terry, German MDPs:  Lessons to 
Learn, 84 M
INN
.
L.
R
EV
. 1547 (2000); and for ethical considerations in transnational 
legal  practice,  see  e.g.,  Richard  L.  Abel,  The  Future  of  the  Legal  Profession:  
Transnational Law Practice, 44 C
ASE 
W.
R
ES
.
L.
R
EV
 737 (1994) and Mary C. Daly, 
The Ethical Implications of the Globalization of the Legal Profession, 21 F
ORDHAM 
I
NT
L.J. 1239 (1998).    
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
769 
narrowly, of the fact that many students from elite law schools end up 
spending much of their professional lives in such firms.  Rather, the 
broader implications of the study of law firms relate to their model for 
the provision of legal services.  The elite U.S. law firm model has had 
a widespread impact on many other legal service providers, including 
public interest  organizations,  government  agencies,  small  boutique 
law firms, corporate law departments, and as noted in this Article, 
elite law firms in other countries.  Accordingly, what happens to elite 
law  firms—and  their  model  for  the  provision  of  legal  services—is 
potentially a matter of great importance and interest. 
This Article examines domestic and international mergers in a 
limited  number  of  jurisdictions,  based  partly  on  the  differing 
reactions of law firms in countries where English firms with global 
strategies wish to gain entry.  The Article is divided into six Parts.  
Part II considers the causes of change and the reaction of law firms to 
such  change  in  the  United  States.    It  also  examines  the  current 
literature and argues for the necessity of including the elements of 
reputational  signaling,  herding,  and  first-tier  firms  to  provide  a 
robust explanation for the growth of law firms by merger.  Part III 
contrasts  the  differing  approaches  of  English  and  U.S.  firms  to 
globalization and international markets.  Part IV compares law firms 
in two federal jurisdictions:  a country where the leading firms have 
undertaken  international  mergers (Germany)  with  one where  they 
have  not  (Australia).    Part  V  presents  a  case  study  of  law  firm 
mergers  in  Japan.    Part  VI  reconsiders  the  question  of  law  firm 
mergers in light of the application of these reputational elements in 
the case studies.  It suggests that the international merger trend is 
likely a parallel development based on rational responses to similar 
changes in law firms’ operating environments rather than primarily a 
result of the influence of a U.S. or Anglo-American model. 
II.
R
ECONSIDERING 
A
CADEMIC 
T
HEORY 
R
ELATING TO 
L
AW 
F
IRM 
G
ROWTH BY 
M
ERGER
A.  Market Change and Law Firms’ Response: The U.S. Experience 
The United  States  represents  the  largest  and  most  developed 
market for legal services and is an appropriate starting point both for 
considering  reputational  elements  in  law  firm  mergers  and  for 
establishing  a  basis  for  comparison  with  other  legal  systems.  
Therefore, it is important to first examine changes in the U.S. market 
for legal services and the responses of U.S. law firms thereto, which 
created the conditions conducive to growth by merger.  The wave of 
law  firm  mergers  beginning  in  the  mid-1990s  represents  the 
culmination of a series of changes in law firms which began in the 
770 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
1970s.  In general, mergers did not result from law firms voluntarily 
engaging  in  a  stereotypical  transformation  from  gentlemanly 
professional organizations to cutthroat businesses in order to increase 
profits.    Rather,  firms  responded  to  changes  in  their  operating 
environments by altering their internal structure, business strategy, 
compensation, and ultimately, their view of themselves in relation to 
the new operating environment.  These changes provided the setting 
and, more importantly, the competitive mindset which led to law firm 
mergers becoming a commonplace phenomenon. 
The  most  fundamental  change  in  law  firms’  operating 
environment was the increased competition among law firms.  This 
competition  resulted  from  changes  in  the  business  operations  of 
clients  and  clients’  expectations  concerning  the  role  of  law  firms.  
During the mergers and acquisitions (M&A) boom of the 1980s, many 
large  U.S.  corporations  expanded  the  nature  and  scope  of  their 
business activities, while others ceased to exist.  This consolidation of 
industry generally resulted in clients’ transactions becoming larger, 
more time-sensitive, more complex, and increasingly cross-border in 
nature.  At the same time corporate clients expanded and upgraded 
their in-house counsel and began using different law firms for specific 
matters, in accordance with the capacities and expertise of each firm, 
rather  than  relying  on a general  relationship with  one  firm.10   In 
addition to law firms competing for work assignments, sometimes in 
the  form  of  “beauty  contests,”  the  new  availability  of  market 
information  on  law  firms,  including  statistics  on  compensation, 
operated  as  an  additional  factor  that  stimulated  law  firm 
competition.11
________________________________________________________________ 
10. 
See infra note 36 and accompanying text.   
11. 
“Beauty contest” generally refers to the process by which a corporate client 
establishes a competitive procedure to select outside counsel.  They have become larger 
and more elaborate in recent years.  See, e.g., Eriq Gardner, Pfizer Litigators Endure 
Beast of a Beauty Contest, C
ORP
.
C
OUNSEL
, Oct. 31, 2005.  Changes in the law firms’ 
operating environment and the firms’ responses to such changes can be conveniently 
tracked by the growth and expansion of the legal press.  In the early 1980s, the legal 
press began to provide extensive coverage on what had generally been private matters 
within firms. See, e.g., Ellen Joan Pollock, Singing the Latham Song: To Partners and 
Association, Latham and Watkins is Not Just a Law Firm, It’s a Place of Worship.  Will 
All the  Good Feelings—and  High  Profits—Surviving When  Clinton  Stevenson Steps 
Down?, A
M
.
L
AW
., Oct. 1986, at 125; Claudia Weinstein, Heavy Hitter: Calling the Plays 
at Baker and Daniels, A
M
.
L
AW
., Apr. 1987, at 21.   The most significant event was 
probably the initial publication of the “AmLaw 100” in 1985 (which began in that year 
as the “AmLaw 50”), with its change of focus from “large” law firms, measured by the 
number  of  attorneys,  to  “large  businesses”  measured  by  revenue  and  profits.  See 
Steven  Brill,  The  AmLaw  50:  America’s  Fifty  Highest-Grossing  Firms,  A
M
.
L
AW
., 
July/Aug. 1985, at 1.  The subsequent tracking of new phenomena by the legal press 
(such  as  law  firm  merger  data  tracked  by  law  firm  consultants  Hildebrandt 
International beginning in the mid-1990s and the annual lateral report begun by The 
American Lawyer in 2001), reflected new trends.  See Hildebrandt.com, Mergers and 
Acquisitions, http://www.hildebrandt.com/Consulting Services.aspx?BD_ID=4852 (last 
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
771 
Many  law  firms  responded  in  a  dramatic  fashion  to  these 
changes in clients’ businesses and expectations, as well as to the new 
competition  to  provide  legal  services.   Firms grew  rapidly  in  size, 
opened  new  offices both  domestically  and  overseas,  developed  new 
areas  of  expertise  to  complement  their  existing  practices,  and  in 
many  cases  merged  with  other  law  firms.12    There  was  a  new 
emphasis on productivity and profitability, including a fundamental 
change among many U.S. firms in the compensation of partners from 
 lockstep  compensation  system  based  strictly  on  seniority  to  a 
performance-based system.13  Partners who did not meet productivity 
visited Apr.  23, 2007) (describing Hildebrandt’s consulting service which tracks law 
firm mergers and acquisitions).  The legal press rankings also provided new metrics 
(such as profitability rather than size) and highlighted firms that were rapidly and 
aggressively  adapting  to  new  market  conditions  (generally  portraying  them  in  a 
positive  light).  This  also  extended  to  a  direct  ranking  of  reputation  based  on 
perceptions  of  currently  practicing  attorneys.  See,  e.g.,  Vault.com,  Rankings 
Methodology, 
http://www.vault.com/nr/lawrankings.jsp?law2006=7&ch_id=242 
(commenting that “Vault does not assess[ ] firms by profit, size, lifestyle, number of 
deals or quality of service; [it] rank[s] the  most prestigious law firms based on the 
perceptions of currently practicing lawyers at peer firms”).  
12. 
While a firm of 200 attorneys was considered a “big” New York firm in the 
1980s, in 2005 a law firm needed 400 lawyers for inclusion in a list of the 100 largest 
U.S. law firms.  See The NLJ 250, N
AT
L.J., Nov. 14, 2005, at S22.  The total number 
of lawyers in AmLaw 100 firms has nearly tripled between the first survey in 1986 and 
a  recent  survey  in  2005  (i.e.,  25,994  in  1986  versus  70,161 in  2005).    See  Alison 
Frankel, The AmLaw 100 2006: Growing Pains, A
M
.
L
AW
., May 2006, at 94, available 
at 
http://www.law.com/jsp/tal/PubArticleTAL.jsp?hubtype=Cover+Story&id= 
1145964622373.  Firms in the 150-400 lawyer range are now routinely referred to as 
“mid-size” firms. See, e.g., Vivia Chen, Success on a Smaller Scale:  Focus, Creativity, 
and Reinvention Help Second Hundred Firms Survive—and Thrive—in the Shadow of 
the AM LAW 100, A
M
.
L
AW
. Aug. 2005 (noting that the total head count at the second 
hundred firms below the Am Law 100 was 25,940 in 2003, or an average of 259 lawyers 
per firm). 
13. 
This merit-based  pay system  is  sometimes  referred to  by  the  inelegant 
expression that you “eat what you kill.”  See, e.g., Leigh Jones, Plunging Into a Global 
Practice; Overseas Mergers Are No Easy Task, N
AT
L.
J., Oct. 11, 2004 (noting that a 
seniority-based partner compensation system contrasts “with the so-called eat-what-
you-kill approach, a form of merit pay in which attorney compensation correlates with 
how much business they bring in”). Under the traditional lockstep system, younger 
partners were generally underpaid for their efforts, while older partners tended to be 
overcompensated relative to their contribution to the firm.  This system worked in a 
well-capitalized firm in a stable setting where young partners were confident that the 
system  would  still be in place and work to their  benefit when they  became  senior 
partners.  However, as firms grew and it became common for partners to move among 
firms, it became increasingly difficult to pay partners on any basis other than current 
performance.  Young partners will generally not agree to delay receiving compensation 
and invest in a firm's future when other firms will pay them more in accordance with 
their current market value.  However, a number of highly profitable first-tier firms 
were able to maintain a lockstep system with its greater stability.  See infra note 41; 
see generally M
ARC 
S.
G
ALANTER 
&
T
HOMAS 
M.
P
ALAY
,
T
OURNAMENT OF 
L
AWYERS
:
T
HE 
T
RANSFORMATION OF THE 
B
IG 
L
AW 
F
IRM 
(1991); Marc S. Galanter & Thomas M. Palay, 
Why the  Big  Get  Bigger:  The  Promotion-to-Partner Tournament  and  the Growth  of 
Large Law Firms, 76 V
A
.
L.
R
EV
.
727 (1990).    
772 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
standards could essentially be fired, while successful partners could 
easily  move  their  portable  business  to  another  firm.    Increased 
mobility is both a cause and an effect of other changes in the market 
for legal services and law firm structures. This new role of lawyers as 
free agents adds to the pressure for each firm to perform on par with 
its peers.   
The rapid growth of law firms into large, complex businesses also 
meant  that  they  outgrew  their  traditional  cultures,  staffing  and 
promotion systems, and methods of governance.  There has been  a 
large growth in non-equity partners, such that some have proclaimed 
the  end  of  the law  firm  “pyramid  structure,”  with  its  replacement 
being dubbed the “diamond” structure.14  As law firms have grown 
larger,  the  traditional partnership form of  management  has  grown 
increasingly  unwieldy.    Firms  have gradually evolved  into  a  more 
corporate structure, and on a daily basis individual partners are not 
involved  with,  and  are  often  not  aware  of,  detailed  matters 
concerning firm management.15  
In response to the perceived need to remain competitive in terms 
of size or credible mass, since the late 1990s there has been a wave of 
domestic mergers between large firms, despite the considerable risks 
________________________________________________________________ 
14. 
See Joel F. Henning, The New Reality in the Legal Profession, 70 T
EMP
.
L.
R
EV
. 1247, 1251 (1997).  Non-equity partners are attorneys who are treated as partners 
in terms of outward appearance (i.e., in relations with clients and other outside parties) 
but do not share in a percentage of the firm’s profits and are therefore not owners of 
the  firm.   A  majority  of  large  law  firms  now have  non-equity partners, and  their 
numbers are increasing.  For example, during the period from 2000 to 2005, non-equity 
partners at AmLaw 100 firms grew by 88% while equity partners grew by only 17%.  
(Overall  attorney  headcount  increased  by  26%.)    See  The  AmLaw  100  2006:  The 
Century thus far, A
M
.
L
AW
., May 2006, at 125.  Some law firms have been accused of 
rapidly increasing their non-equity partners to unfairly boost their profit per equity 
partner and their ranking in the AmLaw 100 and other annual law firm surveys.  See, 
e.g., Lauren Gard, Pillsbury Revamps Partnership, Talks Merger, N.Y.
L.J., Mar. 16, 
2000.  This is analogous to corporations managing their reported earnings, with the 
result that equity analysts of corporations began to emphasize cash flow or free cash 
flow, which is considered more difficult to manipulate.  The law firm equivalent has 
been a similar movement toward an emphasis on “revenue per lawyer” (or “revenue per 
legal professional”) as a replacement for the traditional profitability metric of income 
per  partner.    See  Lisa  Isom-Rodriguez,  I
NST
.
OF 
M
GMT
.
&
A
DMIN
.,
A
RE 
P
ARTNER 
A
DMISSIONS 
E
ATING 
Y
OUR 
F
IRM 
P
ROFITS
? (2001).     
15. 
This is similar to the path previously followed by other large professional 
service organizations, such as accounting firms, and includes, in many cases, a change 
to a limited liability partnership  when that corporate form became available in the 
mid-1990s.  Day-to-day management has also come to resemble more of a corporate 
form  with  a  managing  partner  (similar  to  the  president  of  a  corporation)  and  a 
management  committee  (like  a  board  of  directors).    The  “corporatization”  of  firm 
management  has reached  the point  where there  may now  be a  serious issue as  to 
whether a partner may be characterized as an employee, rather than an employer, for 
purposes of an EEOC investigation of age discrimination.  See EEOC v. Sidley Austin 
Brown & Wood LLP, 406 F. Supp. 2d 991 (N.D. Ill. 2005) (claiming damages on behalf 
of thirty-one former partners who  were either fired  or demoted  during a  law  firm 
restructuring).   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested