devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete page from pdf Library software component .net windows html mvc Aronson21-part906

2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
773 
involved.16  Significantly, in recent years many of these mergers have 
resulted from strategic behavior.  That is, rather than having specific 
knowledge of a firm that would be a good fit, a law firm may decide it 
wants a merger partner with certain characteristics (i.e., a New York 
presence) and, aided by one of the increasingly important law firm 
consultants,  will  go  down  the  list  of  firm  rankings  and  identify 
possibilities.    It  is  not  unusual  that  the  first  serious  merger 
discussions are not ultimately fruitful and the firm proceeds to the 
next candidate(s) on its list before achieving a successful merger.17  
B.  Academic Theory and the Puzzle of Law Firm Mergers 
Law firm mergers provide perhaps the best illustration of some 
of the problems encountered by the academic literature in explaining 
law firm growth.  Various theories have emphasized some aspect of 
economic analysis to explain the phenomenon of law firm growth and 
the evolution of organizational structure.  Although somewhat of an 
oversimplification,  these  theories  can  be  divided  into  two  main 
approaches  to  identifying  and  analyzing  law  firms’  economic 
incentives  for  growth:    supply-side  theories,  which  emphasize  law 
firms’  internal  structure  as  a  response  to  the  mutual  monitoring 
problem, and demand-side theories, which focus on the demand for 
legal services and firm efficiency.18    
________________________________________________________________ 
16. 
There is no  universally accepted data on  law  firm  mergers.    The  most 
widely  cited  data  is  from  Hildebrandt  International,  which  attempts  to  track  all 
mergers involving firms with more than five attorneys.  Their reported numbers range 
from a high of seventy-five for the year 2000 to forty-seven in 2004.  Although the 
number of mergers has fallen since 2000, on average they involve larger firms.  See 
generally  Hildebrandt  International  Press  Room:  MergerWatch,  http://www. 
hildebrandt.com/Documents.aspx?WP_ID=422  (last  visited  Apr.  23,  2007).    The 
perception  of  a  wave  of  mergers  beginning  in  the  mid-to-late  1990s  may  also  be 
influenced by poor law firm performance and a decline in merger activity in the early 
1990s.  See, e.g., Thom Weidlich, Law Firm Mergers Dwindle, but Acquiring Practice 
Groups Remains Popular, N
AT
L.
J., Apr. 19, 1993 (noting that “the wave of law firm 
mergers in the 1980s has dwindled to a drip . . .”).    
17. 
See, e.g., Brenda Sapino Jeffreys, Locke Liddell Merger with Lord Bissel 
Will Form 700-Lawyer Firm, T
EX
.
L
AW
., May 25, 2007 (quoting the managing partner 
of Locke Liddell as stating that the firm, having been searching for a merger partner 
for several years, found “one that finally made sense”).  
18. 
Some  commentators have  pointed  to other  trends not  directly related to 
either  supply  or demand,  which are not  discussed  in this Article.   Most  prominent 
among them is the view that technology would have a decisive influence on the form 
and method of providing legal services.  See, e.g., R.
S
USSKIND
,
T
HE 
F
UTURE OF 
L
AW
:
F
ACING THE 
C
HALLENGES OF 
I
NFORMATION 
T
ECHNOLOGY 
270-71
(1996) (predicting that 
in the cyberspace era, lawyers would need to change from reactive work based on client 
requests  for  legal  advice  to  proactive  “legal  information  engineers,”  providing 
information  to  a  broader  audience  with  a  different  method  of  compensation  than 
current advisory  services).   For  an  update  as to  this prediction,  see  R. S
USSKIND
,
T
RANSFORMING THE 
L
AW 
(2000). 
Delete page from pdf - Library software component:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete page from pdf - Library software component:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
774 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
On  the  supply  side,  Gilson  and  Mnookin’s  seminal  work 
emphasized law firm growth as a method of leveraging and effectively 
using  surplus  human  capital  accumulated  by  the  partners  into  a 
portfolio of capital within the firm.19  Galanter and Palay provided 
the  most  prevalent  view  of  the  growth  of  law  firms,  positing  that 
growth resulted from internal pressure generated by a promotion-to-
partner tournament as  the means  by which associates would work 
hard despite serious monitoring costs and information asymmetries.20 
Subsequently,  Wilkins  and  Gulati  reconceived  the  tournament  in 
response to changing law firm practices,21 while in a contrary labor 
production  thesis,  Kordana  asserted  that  there  really  was  no 
monitoring problem, as senior attorneys can easily track associates 
hours,  and  that  the  growth  of  law  firms  resulted  from  the  use  of 
associates as labor production factors.22    
Despite the valuable contributions provided by these works, in 
particular  Gilson  and  Mnookin’s  fundamental  insight  concerning 
firm-specific capital and the “renting” of firm reputation and Wilkins 
However, there is anecdotal evidence that, much like associate salaries, most firms 
seek only to keep up with the prevalent big-firm standards in technology, rather than 
seeking to use it as a competitive advantage.  See, e.g., M. Voorhees, Faraway Pay Day:  
When will Firms’ Investment  in Technology Produce Dividends?, A
M
.
L
AW
., Mar. 7, 
2000 (noting that although large law firms invest in technology, such investment is not 
linked to profitability).  
19. 
See generally Ronald J. Gilson & Robert H. Mnookin, Sharing Among the 
Capitalists:  An Economic Inquiry into the Corporate Law Firm and How Partners Split 
Profits, 37 S
TAN
.
L.
R
EV
. 313 (1985) (stating that law firms are structured so as to 
maximize gains from diversification and minimize agency costs). 
20. 
See generally G
ALANTER 
&
P
ALAY
,
supra note 13; Galanter & Palay, supra 
note 13.  According to this view, the governing mechanisms adopted by law firms to 
monitor performance also require growth at an exponential rate.  Firms must promote 
a steady percentage of associates to partner to incentivize associates to work diligently 
in the absence of monitoring, thereby creating constant internal pressure for growth so 
that they can maintain enough partner position prizes for the tournament.      
21. 
See, e.g., David B. Wilkins & G. Mitu Gulati, Reconceiving the Tournament 
of Lawyers:  Tracking, Seeding, and Information Control in the Internal Labor Markets 
of  Elite  Law  Firms,  84  V
A
.
L.
R
EV
 1581  (1998)  (utilizing  signaling  theory  and 
relational capital to characterize firms as adapting a multiple incentive system which 
includes  as  one  factor  a  “multiround”  tournament  more  akin  to  actual  sporting 
events—including  “tracking,” “seeding,” and “information control”—than tournaments 
under standard economic theory; in  other words,  it  describes a  limited competition 
among senior associates to make partner as one factor, although not necessarily the 
main cause, contributing to law firm growth); see also Scott Baker et al., The Rat Race 
as an Information-Forcing Device, 81 I
ND
.
L.J. 53, 57-58 (2006) (characterizing the first 
round of a tournament as a “revelation tournament” in which objective factors like 
billable hours are used to force information about more important subjective factors, 
such as good judgment, to choose candidates for the next round of the tournament). 
22. 
See  Kevin  A.  Kordana,  Note,  Law  Firms  and  Associate  Careers:  
Tournament Theory Versus the  Production-Imperative Model, 104 YALE L. J. 1907, 
1908 (1995) (suggesting that “the type of work performed in law firms dictates their 
structure, that law firms hire associates to keep their costs down and profits up, and 
that  associates  come  to  large  firms  mainly  to  improve  their  lawyering  skills  and 
increase their human capital”). 
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. This page is aimed to help you learn how to delete page from your PDF document in VB.NET application.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
775 
and Gulati’s use of signaling theory, all of these supply-side theories 
are subject to similar limitations.  They tend to focus primarily on the 
institutional structures of law firms and largely ignore other factors, 
such  as the  demand for  legal services.23   A  tournament  theory,  in 
particular, encounters difficulty in  explaining the increasingly  long 
and  tenuous  partnership  track24  and  the active  lateral market  for 
attorneys,  let  alone  the  recent  wave  of  law  firm  mergers.    There 
would presumably be no better way to destabilize the expectations (or 
the  rules)  implicit  in  a  tournament  than  to  suddenly  add  a  large 
number of new partners and associates to the mix.  It is also possible 
that the supply-side views are, in part, asking the wrong question by 
focusing exclusively on an economic explanation as to why associates 
work hard in the absence of meaningful firm monitoring.25  
On  the  demand  side,  some  commentators  have written  of  the 
potential  effect  of  multidisciplinary  practices,  in  particular  the 
competitive  role  of  the  big  accounting  firms,  with  their  greater 
capability  of  providing  one-stop  shopping.26    Thomas  proposed  a 
________________________________________________________________ 
23. 
This was the main theme in a number of  book  reviews of Galanter and 
Palay’s  book.    See,  e.g.,  Robert  L.  Nelson,  Of  Tournaments  and  Transformations: 
Explaining the Growth of Large Law Firms, 1992 W
IS
.
L.
R
EV
. 733,747-49 (reviewing 
G
ALANTER 
&
P
ALAY
,  supra  note  13).    This  was  not  true  of  Gilson  and  Mnookin’s 
original  work  on  human  capital  which  dealt  extensively  with  law  firm-client 
relationships, how such relationships might change with the rising importance of in-
house counsel, and the effect of such change on the internal structure of law firms. See 
Gilson & Mnookin, supra note 19.  Although one could object to the classification of 
Gilson and Mnookin’s work as supply side theory for this reason, their focus on internal 
firm structure clearly inspired subsequent supply side efforts like those of Galanter 
and Palay.   
24. 
The partner track at most elite law firms has become a long, arduous three-
tier process (i.e., associate to non-equity partner to equity partner).  In addition, the 
percentage of associates making partner has declined.  Recent surveys indicate that 
the rate of promotion to partner at elite firms in 2004 was 2.5%.  See Leigh Jones, 
Toughest  Case  is  Making  Partner,  N
AT
L.J.,  Aug.  31,  2005,  available  at 
http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1125392710244  (citing  studies  by  Citigroup 
Private Bank).  This contrasts with the higher, stable promotion rates found from the 
1950s through 1980s by Galanter and Palay.  See G
ALANTER 
&
P
ALAY
, supra note 13, at 
104 (finding that the average promotion rates ranged from 5.34-5.85 for Group I firms 
and 5.55-8.19 for Group II firms). 
25. 
It should be noted that, although academics have undertaken great efforts 
to give elaborate economic explanations as to why lawyers work hard in the absence of 
effective monitoring, it may be that this is a result of a socialization process involving 
professional  values  and  attitudes  that  cannot  be  explained  effectively  by  economic 
analysis.  Other commentators have previously raised this possibility.  See, e.g., Gilson 
and Mnookin, supra note 19, at 775-80.  
26. 
See  Randall S. Thomas et.  al.,  Megafirms,  80 N.C.  L. R
EV
.
115,  171-79 
(2001).    Despite  claims  that  clients  are  demanding  multidisciplinary  service  from 
professional  firms,  the  evidence  is  not  clear.  Indeed,  some  fault  multidisciplinary 
practices  for  merely tacking  on  new  services  to  an  existing  structure  rather  than 
meeting  the  needs  of  business  clients  by  assuming  the  more  challenging  role  of 
integrating professional services as a “general contractor.”  See, e.g., Spoilt for Choice, 
supra note 5 (citing former Harvard Business School professor David Maister and also 
Library software component:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
www.rasteredge.com
776 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
demand-side view that law  firms were simply consolidating as had 
accounting  firms  before  them,  as  industry  consolidation  and 
globalization  produced  a  smaller  number  of  “megaprojects”  which 
made it more efficient to create “megafirms” in all professional service 
industries.27  This is an attractive theoretical argument; however, a 
lack of empirical evidence raises important questions concerning its 
factual premises:  Are clients actually demanding multinational one-
stop shopping from legal service providers?  And do law firms actually 
consider theory of the firm efficiencies when entering into mergers?  
Accordingly,  the  basic  puzzle  remains:    Why  would  generally 
conservative  law  firms  undertake  risky  mergers?    This  puzzle 
necessarily involves two underlying assumptions which are difficult 
to demonstrate empirically:  (1) lawyers and law firm managers are 
conservative or risk-averse, 28  and (2) there is a substantial risk that 
stating that  “[p]rofessional-service  firms  insist that  they want  to  diversify because 
their corporate clients demand it.  But the evidence for such a claim is hard to find.”).  
The  significance  of  legal  practices  operated  by  accounting  firms  has  significantly 
declined following the breakup of Anderson Legal, which had been the most aggressive 
accounting firm-related law practice, as well as a new post-Sarbanes-Oxley emphasis 
on potential conflicts of interest in consulting and other services formerly offered by all 
the major accounting  firms.  See  International Law Firms: Trying to Get the Right 
Balance, infra note 27; Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, Pub. L. No. 107-204, 116 Stat. 745, 
Title II, §§ 201, 202 (amending § 10A of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 (15 
U.S.C.A. § 78j-1) (prohibiting  auditing  firms from providing  a number  of non-audit 
services  to  public  companies  and  requiring  pre-approval  by  the  company’s  audit 
committee for any permitted non-audit services). 
27. 
See  Randall  S.  Thomas  et.  al.,  supra  note  26,  at  136-153.    A  detailed 
examination of the complex question of comparing  the law and accounting fields is 
beyond the scope of this Article.  However, law is local, and there is no compelling need, 
as in accounting, to utilize similar principles and treatment throughout the national 
and international operations of a single business organization.  For an argument that 
law firms differ from accounting or advertising firms, and it is unlikely that a small 
group of law firms will ever dominate the legal services industry on a global scale, see 
International Law Firms: Trying to Get the Right Balance, E
CONOMIST
, Feb. 28, 2004, 
at 65.   
28. 
Although trying to prove that lawyers are generally risk-averse might be 
futile in any case, there are a number of persuasive arguments. First, individuals who 
join the legal profession, as opposed to becoming businessmen, tend to be hardworking 
but  risk-averse  individuals.    They  have  been  successful  at  gathering  prestigious 
credentials but often lack clear career goals (i.e., business plans).  Second, a significant 
part  of  a  lawyer’s  work  involves  identifying  risks  and  helping  a  client  avoid  or 
minimize  such  risks  in  business  operations,  often  through  reliance  on  existing 
precedent.  It would be unsurprising that this attitude would carry over to the firm’s 
own business operations.  Many commentators note that, despite becoming substantial 
organizations, law firms are frequently not managed like businesses. For an overview, 
see, e.g., Allen M. Terrell, Jr., Managing the Big Firm, 19
D
EL
.
L
AW
. 24 (Spring 2001).    
Third, although  management of  elite  law  firms has rapidly  been gaining  executive 
authority  and is no longer characterized by detailed discussions at the  partnership 
level to achieve a consensus, both traditional values of autonomy and the increased 
mobility of many lawyers with portable practices mean that management may still be 
relatively  constrained  from  embarking  on  new  risk-taking  endeavors  without  first 
establishing  substantial  firm-wide  support.    Fourth,  from  the  perspective  of 
Library software component:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
777 
law  firm  mergers  will  not  be  successful  in  creating  value  for 
shareholders   (i.e.,  partners).    Although  a  detailed analysis  of  the 
former  is  beyond  the scope of  this Article,  a number  of arguments 
support the proposition that lawyers are generally risk-averse.  
With respect to the risk inherent in mergers, there is almost no 
research available on the relatively recent phenomenon of law firm 
mergers.29  There are no obvious economies of scale or scope for law 
firms in a merger, where productivity is largely a result of billings by 
individual  professionals,  and  such  mergers  can  also  be  highly 
disruptive.30  The  substantial  literature  on  corporate  mergers  may 
organizational  behavior,  even  among  more  directly  comparable  professional  service 
organizations, law firms are often characterized as being more conservative than other 
such organizations.  See, e.g., David Maister, The Trouble With Lawyers:  The Qualities 
That Propel Lawyers to Success Can Also Make Forging a Cohesive Law Firm Nearly 
Impossible.  Can People Who are Trained to be Skeptical and Detached Put the Mistrust 
Aside When Dealing With Their Own Partners?, A
M
.
L
AW
., Apr. 2006, at 97 (arguing 
that  lawyers’  managerial  approach  based  on  autonomy  and  individualism  is  less 
effective than the team approach of other professional service firms in servicing large 
corporate clients). 
29. 
The  few  studies  that  are  available  rely  on  limited  samples  and  are 
produced by law firm consultants that promote  mergers.   See, e.g., Ward  Bower & 
Debra  L.  Rhodunda,  Are Large  Law  Firm  Mergers  Successful?  30 R
EP
.  T
O
L
EGAL
M
GMT
. 6 (Altman Weil, Inc. Sept. 2003) (examining seventeen mergers among large 
law firms and concluding that they were successful in both the short term, since profits 
per partner increased in the first two years compared to the profit level of the larger 
pre-merger firm, and that the seven mergers that occurred more than four years ago 
were also successful in the long term, as the rate of increase in profits per partner was 
higher than for the AmLaw 100 as a whole during the same period).  However, a simple 
change  in  average  profits  per  partner  is  of  less  use  than  measuring  return  on 
investment for corporate mergers, since it is difficult to separate merger performance 
from  unrelated  factors.    See,  e.g.,  Lisa  R.  Smith,  Mergers—How  Do  You  Measure 
Success?,  Nov.  9,  1999,  http://www.hildebrandt.com/Documents.aspx?  Doc_ID=616.  
There  is  also  no  data  on  the  rate  at  which  proposed  law  firm  mergers  are 
consummated,  despite  the  fact  that  it  is  not  unusual  for  merger  attempts  to  be 
unsuccessful due to the  real obstacles of client conflicts and differing compensation 
systems between potential merger partners. 
30. 
There could be productivity gains from mergers if the merging firms used 
the merger as an opportunity to expel or de-equitize non-productive partners, and there 
is anecdotal evidence that this occurs. See, e.g., Carolyn Kolker, Take Down, A
M
.
L
AW
Feb. 2003, at 68 (describing how underperforming partners were eliminated at New 
York’s Winthrop, Stimson, Putnam & Roberts following its January 1, 2001 merger 
with  San  Francisco’s  Pillsbury, Madison  & Sutro).  However,  mergers  or attempted 
mergers can also be highly disruptive and lead to unforeseen consequences.  They may 
lead to unplanned departures, not  only from attorneys  who want to “stick to their 
knitting”  and  fear  the practice style and pressures of  a much  larger  firm but also 
conversely  from  attorneys  who  think  their  firms  did  not  reach  high  enough  in 
establishing a firm’s national platform.  See, e.g., Elisabeth Preis, Postmerger Flight at 
KMZ, A
M
.
L
AW
., July 2002.  And like corporate mergers, proposed law firm mergers 
can  now  have  the  effect  of  “putting  firms  into  play,”  with  various  consequences 
including cherry picking of attorneys, practice groups, or offices and, in the worst case 
scenario, dissolution of the firm.  A recent example of this phenomenon was the failed 
merger of Orrick Harrington and Sutcliffe and Coudert Brothers, with the resulting 
cherry picking of lawyers  by Orrick  and dissolution of Coudert Brothers.  See,  e.g., 
Library software component:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
www.rasteredge.com
778 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
provide some basis for comparison.   That literature generally finds 
that such mergers are not in the interests of shareholders, but rather 
typically  result  from  empire-building  by  CEOs.31    One  parallel 
between the legal and corporate world is that there are very few true 
mergers of equals (although many law firms attempt to characterize 
their  mergers  as  such),  with  the  result  that  one  of  the  firms  is 
ultimately surrendering its autonomy and control of firm policies and 
partner  compensation  for  the  sake  of  being  part  of  a  larger 
organization.  
C.  Developing a More Robust Explanation 
In an effort to provide a multi-causal, more robust explanation of 
the  puzzle  of  law  firm  mergers  and  firm  behavior,  this  Article 
examines reputational competition by incorporating three significant 
reputational elements into the story:  (i) reputational signaling, (ii) 
herd  behavior, and  (iii) the role of first-tier law firms.   Law firms’ 
responses to changing market conditions has led to economic success 
for  many  firms  but  comes  at  the  cost  of  increased  institutional 
instability,32 as even  long-standing  firms  can  be “put  into  play”  or 
breakup on short notice.  Given the higher stakes, high monitoring 
costs, and the difficulty of judging the quality of law firm work, elite 
firms  have  become  desperate  to  signal33  their  credibility  and 
Anthony Lin, Coudert Breakup Voted After Merger Talks Fail, N
AT
L
L. J., Aug. 19, 
2005.   
31. 
See, e.g., Gretchen Morgenson, What Are Mergers Good For?, N.Y.
T
IMES
June 5, 2005 (noting that “[a]cademic research suggests that few mergers add up to 
significantly  more  prosperous  or  successful  companies…”  and  that  the  chief 
beneficiaries may be business executives and investment bankers); Dennis K. Berman 
and  Almar  Latour,  H-P  Reboots;    Too  Big:    Learning  from  Mistakes—Florina’s 
Departure  from  H-P  Reminds  Companies  About  Risks  During  the  Current  Merger 
Boom, W
ALL 
S
T
.
J., Feb. 10, 2005 (citing the research of Sam Rovit, of Bain & Co., that 
only 28% of deals result in a substantial increase in shareholder value); David Harding 
and Sam Rovit, Building Deals on Bedrock, H
ARV
.
B
US
.
R
EV
., Sept. 1, 2004 (concluding 
that mergers are useful only in two limited circumstances). 
32. 
This was noted as early as 1985 by Gilson and Mnookin, at a time when 
many large  firms  were in  the  process  of  transitioning from  lockstep compensation 
systems  to performance-based compensation, which made it more difficult to create 
firm-specific capital and was likely to decrease the stability of large firms.  See Gilson 
& Mnookin, supra note 19, at 387.  This observation is even more accurate today.   
33. 
Signaling theory was used extensively by Wilkins and Gulati.  See Wilkins 
& Gulati, supra note 21.  They focused primarily on the internal labor markets of law 
firms but also noted law firm signaling to clients and law students.  Id. at 1654-55.  
Gilson and Mnookin distinguished between law firms providing direct information to 
clients on firm quality by means such as a Practicing Law Institute seminar (which 
they call “searching”), and providing indirect information on quality (“signaling”).  See 
Gilson & Mnookin, supra note 19, at 362-65.  Use of the term “reputational signaling” 
in a similar vein should be distinguished from another use of the term by Eric Posner, 
who  uses that  term  to represent  an answer  to  the  collective  action  problem.   See 
generally E
RIC 
A.
P
OSNER
,
L
AW AND 
S
OCIAL 
N
ORMS 
(2000) (theorizing that even in the 
Library software component:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
www.rasteredge.com
Library software component:C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
779 
reputation to three core constituencies: clients and potential clients, 
other  law  firms  (potential  laterals),34  and  law  students  (potential 
associates).35  
It should be emphasized that these constituencies do not exist in 
isolation.  There is a considerable spillover and multiplier effect since 
the  most  effective  way  to  send  reputational  signals  is,  in  fact,  to 
emphasize  successes  with  one  of  these constituencies—obtaining  a 
prestigious  new  client,  new  laterals,  or  new  associates  from 
prestigious  law  schools.   This  raises  the  stakes  considerably  since 
success  in  appealing  to one  constituency often  breeds  success with 
others,  while  failure  with  one  constituency  can  quickly  become  a 
vicious circle.  Market information on law firms is also important as 
firms create their own signals and react to market information.  The 
relationships  among  constituencies  and  reputational  signaling  are 
illustrated in Diagram 1.  
absence of regulatory incentives, individuals will contribute to collective goods, even 
when it is not in their immediate economic interest to do so, in order to build up a 
reputation that will encourage others to deal with them in the future).  
34. 
This  constituency  represents  both  a  source  of  supply,  in  the  form  of 
associates and service partners, and demand, in the form of partners with portable 
business.  Firms that are perceived to be successful can add additional attorneys and 
even  new  practice  areas  with  relative  ease,  while  firms  under  pressure  will have 
difficulty in retaining their own attorneys.  The ability to attract laterals also becomes 
a signal of the firm’s quality.  
35. 
Firms  must  also  signal  law  students  about  the  firms’  qualities  and 
prospects in order to attract high quality associates.  As law students have the least 
information  of  any  of  a  law  firm’s  constituencies,  signaling  assumes  particular 
importance.  This is accomplished  by means of competing  with respect to associate 
compensation, summer associate and permanent associate recruitment programs, firm 
rankings, and signaling about firm reputation in general.   
780 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
Diagram 1 
Model of Reputational Signaling by Elite Law Firms 
Relevant Market 
Local   
Regional 
National 
National Plus   
Global 
Law Firm Signaling 
LAW FIRM MARKET INFORMATION 
[Media Rankings, etc.] 
CLIENTS 
[Demand for Legal 
Services] 
OTHER ELITE LAW 
FIRMS 
[Laterals; Competitive 
Pressure]
LAW STUDENTS 
[New Associates] 
LAW FIRM 
[A. Internal Structure 
1. Attorney Structure 
2. Compensation 
3. Governance 
B. Competitive Strategy 
Definition of Relevant Market] 
Market Information Provision and Impact
t
The continuing importance of reputational signaling may seem 
surprising.  One might have  predicted  under  economic theory that 
market  changes  in  the  1980s,  which  led  to  large  corporations 
upgrading  their  in-house  capabilities  and  increased  competition 
among elite law firms, would produce a number of results:  (i) less 
work for law firms as additional in-house capacity resulted in more 
work being brought in-house; (ii) greater price competition among law 
firms (and lower billing rates and profits); and (iii) increased use of 
direct selling of law firm quality to sophisticated in-house counsel, as 
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
781 
opposed to indirect market signaling of firm quality through efforts to 
enhance firm reputation and marketing.36  
In fact, none of the above occurred.  Greater client power has led 
to increased competition among elite law firms but primarily in the 
areas  that  corporate  clients  care  about  the  most:    quality  and 
responsiveness (which make a law firm a safe choice for “bet the firm” 
deals, which are not price sensitive) and anything that might tend to 
indicate these qualities.  Cost is a major concern for more commodity-
type  work,  which  elite  firms  wish  to  minimize.    However,  in  any 
event, law firm billing rates have  continued to rise  at  rates  above 
inflation.37   Reputational  signaling has  increased  and  remains  the 
most important element of law firm marketing activity, despite some 
increase in direct sales activities to corporate clients.38  
The importance of signaling is reinforced by herd behavior.39  If 
it is difficult for clients to judge law firm quality, it also appears to be 
difficult  for  law  firms  to  be  confident  of  what  clients  truly  want.  
Under such circumstances of uncertainty and incomplete information, 
it is unsurprising that there is a tendency for law firms to follow the 
decisions of other firms.  This is particularly true for mergers, which 
result in dramatic attention-grabbing headlines and the promise of a 
new  start  on  a  larger  platform.    Herd  behavior  certainly  has  the 
potential  to  result  in  inefficiencies,  but  it  is  rational  to  follow  the 
prevailing  conventional  wisdom and avoid being  left  behind  if  law 
________________________________________________________________ 
36. 
For a prediction of the looming dominance of in-house counsel over outside 
law firms, see, e.g., A. Chayes & A. Chayes, Corporate Counsel and the Elite Law Firm, 
37  S
TAN
.
L.
R
EV
 277  (1985).    Gilson  and  Mnookin  also  predicted  that  more 
sophisticated in-house counsel would cause both an increase in the use of direct selling 
and a decrease in reliance on general reputation.  See Gilson & Mnookin, supra note 
19, at 384. In their terms, more sophisticated in-house counsel would reduce the value 
of firm-specific capital (which they state is due to “some significant extent” to “high 
information costs and unsophisticated purchasers”).  Id.  
37. 
Billing  rates  have  increased  faster  than  inflation  as  measured  by  the 
Consumer Price Index.  Inflation alone would have caused a 70% increase during the 
period  from  1984-2003,  while  the  actual  rates  reportedly  rose  by  114%  for  senior 
partners and 130% for senior associates, with the gap between inflation and billing 
rates widening after 1995.  See Gary Young, In Focus: Billing, N
AT
L.J., Dec. 1, 2003 
(citing annual surveys by Altman Weil Inc.).      
38. 
Direct sales activities include  a much larger role for competitive beauty 
contests and a modest increase in more general advertising and marketing activities.   
Although there are many anecdotes about elite law firms now resorting to marketing 
and advertising practices they did not utilize in the past, in reality they spend little 
effort on marketing compared  to  corporations.   See,  e.g.,  Larry Bodine, How Much 
Money  Should  I  Spend?,  L.  P
RAC
.,  Mar.  2005,  at  35  (noting  that  while  most 
corporations spend 10-15% of revenues on marketing, according to the 2004 Altman 
Weil Survey  of Law Firm Economics, large law firms spend an  average of 1.5% on 
advertising).   
39. 
See, e.g., Timur Kuran & Cass R. Sunstein, Availability Cascades and Risk 
Regulation, 51 S
TAN
.
L.
R
EV
. 683 (1999).  For a short, non-academic discussion of herd 
behavior on a current topic, see e.g., Robert H. Frank, The Herd Changes Course and 
Runs Away From S.U.V.s, N.Y. T
IMES
, Aug. 3, 2006, at 3. 
782 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
firms are being judged primarily, or even significantly, based on their 
reputation.    As  in  other  fields,  such  as  mutual  fund  managers, 
following the crowd may also result in a less negative reaction if the 
resulting performance is poor. 
In  the  case  of  law  firm  mergers,  the  perceived  conventional 
wisdom is that a major law firm with significant clients now needs a 
national (or, increasingly, international) platform and credible mass 
(with  the  law  firm  size  required  to  achieve  this  nebulous  goal 
increasing very rapidly over the last decade).  Given uncertainty and 
incomplete  information,  it  may  well  appear to law  firms that  it  is 
risky to stand pat and face the possibility of losing existing clients to 
more  aggressive  competitors  who  capture  headlines  through 
substantial  mergers.    If  so,  herd  behavior  would  constitute  a 
significant element in explaining the seeming paradox of conservative 
law firms engaging in risky mergers. 
 third  element  that  may  be  necessary  to  explain  law  firm 
growth and mergers is the importance of first-tier law firms.  To date, 
legal  commentators  have  loosely  and  interchangeably  used  terms 
such as “large” or “elite” law firms; the use of more narrow terms such 
as  “first-tier”  firms  has  been  largely  the  province  of  law  firm 
consultants and the legal press.  Although exact definitions are both 
difficult and unnecessary for this analysis, it is important to have at 
least broad functional definitions, given the significant impact that a 
law firm’s reputation has on its growth and business strategies and 
on its competitors.  It is the reputational element that is most readily 
observable in firm behavior, and it is possible to construct rules of the 
game for law firm mergers based on this concept.  
The leading or first-tier law firms are a small group within the 
elite  firms40  that  have  established  reputations  for  expertise  in 
important  areas  (such  as  M&A,  capital  markets,  and  significant 
commercial litigation) and are known for high value-added services 
that  are  price-insensitive.    In  the  United  States,  they  correspond 
closely to the most profitable firms rather than to the largest firms.  
These firms’ high profitability and strong reputations have allowed 
them to maintain stability and institutional values while most elite 
law firms have undergone significant transformations in response to 
increased competition over the last two decades.  Elite and first-tier 
firms operate in all of the jurisdictions surveyed in this Article, as 
shown in Table 1. 
________________________________________________________________ 
40. 
As a functional definition, elite law firms may be characterized as the firms 
that provide general legal services to large corporations (i.e., not “boutique” firms) and 
use specialized skills to handle large complex matters on a national scale for these 
clients.   In most countries,  such  as  the United States, elite firms correspond fairly 
closely  with  large  corporate  law  firms,  and  the  AmLaw  100  would  likely  be  an 
acceptable proxy for elite law firms in the United States. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested