devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Copy web pages to pdf Library application class asp.net html web page ajax Aronson22-part907

2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
783 
TABLE 1 
ELITE LAW FIRMS IN SELECTED COUNTRIES 
Total No. of 
Lawyers 
No. of Elite 
Firms 
Percentage of 
Elite Firm 
Lawyers/Total 
No. of Lawyers 
No. of First 
Tier Firms 
United States 
1,084,504 
100 
6.3% 
7-10 
United Kingdom 
141,641 
20-25 
7.3% 
Germany 
116,305 
15 
2.9% 
Australia 
32,300 
12-15 
25.9% 
Japan 
21,174 
5.6% 
Note:    This  table  is  only  intended  to  provide  a  rough  comparison  among  the 
jurisdictions included in this Article.  Results would vary based on a number of factors, 
including the following: (1) the basis for deciding the number of elite firms in each 
jurisdiction, (2) the definition of “lawyer” as opposed to other legal professionals who 
may fulfill similar functions outside the United States (for an illustration of this issue 
with  respect to Japan, see  infra  note 123), and (3) a  focus on  the total number of 
lawyers as opposed to practicing attorneys. 
Sources: See sources listed infra in the country specific tables. 
The theoretical underpinning  for  introducing  this  concept  into 
the academic literature was provided by Gilson and Mnookin in their 
discussion  of  the  difficulty  encountered  by  firms  in  creating  firm-
specific capital and the stability of firms who were successful in doing 
so.41  In the real world there is potentially a huge payoff for a law 
________________________________________________________________ 
41. 
Gilson and Mnookin characterize firm-specific capital as the glue that holds 
firms together, i.e., the client relationships and  firm reputation  that make it more 
attractive for attorneys to stay in the firm rather than move elsewhere.  See Gilson & 
Mnookin,  supra  note  19,  at  355.    They  question  what  was  at  the  time  the  “new 
conventional  wisdom”  that  preferred  partner  compensation  based  on  productivity 
rather  than  the  traditional, seniority-based lockstep system, on  the  basis that  the 
lockstep system helped to maintain firm stability.  Id. at 346-55.  They also anticipated 
that, with the rise of sophisticated in-house counsel, it would become more difficult to 
create firm-specific capital. Id. at 384.  For the purposes of the present analysis, it is 
noteworthy that a decline in stable, long-term client relationships and greater fluidity 
would mean that a firm that wished to build firm-specific capital would logically, and 
perhaps necessarily, turn to means to build its reputation.  The concept of first-tier 
firm  was  also  foreshadowed  by  Karl  Okamoto’s  study  of  the  role  of  lawyers  as 
reputational  intermediaries  in  representing  corporate  clients  in  public  offerings  of 
securities.  See Karl S. Okamoto, Reputation and the Value of Lawyers, 74 O
R
.
L.
R
EV
15  (1995).    He  discusses  segmentation  among  law  firms  based  on  reputation, 
categorizing the top fifty firms, mainly based in New York City, as the high reputation 
group.  Id. at 38-41.  This group would correspond roughly to “elite” law firms as used 
in this Article.  More importantly, he notes the existence of four or five “super-elites,” 
measured by their increasing superiority of revenue per lawyer over other law firms, as 
well as the longevity of such superiority.  Id. at 40.  The idea behind this group shares 
similarities with first-tier law firms as used herein.      
Copy web pages to pdf - Library application class:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Copy web pages to pdf - Library application class:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
784 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
firm  in  being  recognized  in  its  relevant  market  (i.e.,  regional, 
national, or global) by its constituencies as a first-tier firm.  These are 
the firms that attract the best client matters as well as the best new 
attorneys (these firms typically do not utilize laterals, at least at the 
partner level).42  To a much lesser degree, the benefits of being a first-
tier firm might be loosely compared to those that accrue to being one 
of  the  “Big  Four”  accounting  firms.43    In  the  case  of  law  firms, 
however,  the definition of  first-tier is vague and which  firms  meet 
this definition can be subject to disagreement.  Although reputations 
tend  to  be  sticky,  there  is  nevertheless  greater  fluidity  with  the 
potential for both entry into and (unwilling) exit out of the first-tier 
group; firms on the edge may be particularly sensitive to either risks 
to  their  first-tier  status  or  strategic  opportunities  to  obtain  or 
consolidate first-tier status.   
The business and growth strategies of first-tier firms generally 
differ from those of other elite firms.  The first-tier firms, at least in 
large domestic markets like the United States, do not seek to grow as 
fast  as  other elite  firms and do  not  pursue strategies of numerous 
offices  and  areas  of  expertise  (i.e.,  one-stop  shopping)  that  might 
place their high profitability at risk.44  They instead seek to maintain 
________________________________________________________________ 
42. 
See,  e.g.,    Perceptions  of  Partnership,  A.B.A.  Young  Lawyer’s  Division, 
Spring  Conference,  May  2005,  available  at  http://www.abanet.org/yld/elibrary/ 
miami05pdf/PerceptionofPartnership.pdf (“Other firms, such as more traditional and 
‘elite’ New York firms, do not hire lateral partners, fearing dilution of firm values and 
that ‘only those who train together from their earliest years as associates can rely on 
each other  to maintain high  standards of  quality.’” (quoting Anthony  Lin, Cravath 
Hires Tax Partner, Its First Lateral in Decades, N.Y. L.J., Mar. 11, 2005)).  
43. 
This is not a perfect analogy, since, as noted in the text, the benefits are 
substantially less for first-tier law firms, which are a vaguer and more fluid group.  All 
elite firms have a mixture of price-insensitive “high value-added services” and price-
sensitive “commodity services,” with the first-tier firms being known exclusively for the 
more profitable high value–added services.  As a result, first-tier and other elite firms 
typically  service the  same  corporate  clients,  although  providing  a  different  mix  of 
services.  The classification of accounting firms is much more rigid, as firms outside the 
Big Four have very few large publicly held audit clients, and they have been generally 
unsuccessful in picking up such clients from  the Big Four firms,  despite  the large 
number of corporate scandals and allegations of accounting fraud over the past few 
years.  See, e.g., Diya Gullapali, Grant Thornton Battles its Image: No. 5 Accounting 
Firm Struggles to Attract Major Audit Clients, Despite Misfortunes of Big Four, W
ALL 
S
T
.
J.,  June  9,  2005,  at  C1.    This  is  largely  due  to  sticky  reputations  and  the 
unwillingness of  top  corporate officials to  be  required to “explain  that decision” by 
choosing a non-Big Four firm.  See id.  Despite the differences, it is also very important 
for the top law firms to develop their reputations as first-tier firms so as to constitute a 
safe choice for significant corporate matters.   
44. 
Sometimes,  however,  they  resort  to  strategic  behavior  to  maintain  or 
enhance their first-tier status, with one of the most famous examples being Cravath’s 
sudden, significant raise in associate salaries in the mid 1980s. Michael H. Trotter, 
Domino Effect  of  Associate Pay Hikes  Could  Cripple  Some  Firms, F
ULTON 
C
OUNTY 
D
AILY 
R
EP
., Mar. 1, 2000 (“The next major run-up in associate salaries occurred in the 
mid-1980s. Cravath led the pack again with an increase in the starting salaries in 1986 
from $53,000 to $65,000—a 22-percent increase in one year.”).  
Library application class:C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
Then, copy the following lines of code necessary resources for creating web document viewer var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Copy following file and folders to DNN Site project: RasterEdge_Cache. Modify Web.Config file.
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
785 
their highly  profitable  niches at the upper  end of  the market with 
their  focus  on  high  value-added  services  and  to  signal  their 
superiority to  the market.   Consistent  with this strategy,  first-tier 
firms do not pursue mergers.   
Other elite firms are more likely to compete through the pursuit 
of growth, both in terms of geographic area and areas of expertise, 
and to pursue mergers.  This may be viewed as an attempt to capture 
the  wide  middle  of  the  market  in  the  hope  of  maintaining  client 
relationships and volume of work, while at the same time eventually 
increasing  high  value-added  services  and  making  inroads  into  the 
profitable niche at the top of the market dominated by the first-tier 
firms.45  Although this constitutes a plausible business strategy for 
non-first-tier firms, the fact remains that given a choice it is likely 
that any lawyer or firm would much rather be in the market position 
of a first-tier firm.    
Outside the United States, however, first-tier law firms located 
in  smaller  domestic  markets  may  pursue  an  international  growth 
strategy.    The  leading  London  firms  most  notably  fall  into  this 
category.  In this regard, analyzing the response of first-tier firms in 
Europe and Asia to the merger offers of London firms is particularly 
interesting.  In these markets the impact of a strategic decision, such 
as a merger, by a first-tier firm is of far greater significance than a 
similar  action  by  another  elite  firm.    A  merger  or  other  strategic 
action  is  much  more  likely  to  lead  to  defensive  actions,  such  as 
mergers, by competitor firms.  Thus, which firms engage in merger 
activity in a given market is an important factor in explaining and 
predicting both the reaction of competitors and whether mergers will 
become widespread in that market. 
III.
T
HE 
U
NITED 
S
TATES AND THE 
U
NITED 
K
INGDOM
:
N
ATIONAL OR 
G
LOBAL 
M
ARKETS
A.   United States 
The United States has the longest history of elite law firms and 
is the world’s largest market for legal services.  Elite law firms in the 
United States continue to be of primary importance, comprising some 
________________________________________________________________ 
45. 
This concept of market partitioning—e.g., a manufacturer (such as Toyota) 
starting at the low of the car market in the United States and gradually improving to 
crowd out the profitable niche players at the top of the market—has become a popular 
one.    See  C
LAYTON 
M.
C
HRISTENSEN
 T
HE 
I
NNOVATOR
D
ILEMMA
:
W
HEN 
N
EW 
T
ECHNOLOGIES 
C
AUSE 
G
REAT 
F
IRMS 
T
F
AIL
165  (1997).   This is  a relatively  new 
concept for professional service industries, and it is very much an open question as to 
whether any law firms can imitate Toyota.   
Library application class:VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
edited), is less searchable for search engines. The other is the crashing problem when user is visiting the PDF file using web browser.
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
new PDF page(s) to current target PDF document in both web server-side to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
786 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
eighty of the firms in the Global AmLaw 100 ranked by revenue46 and 
providing  the  dominant  model  of  organization  for  legal  service 
providers.  The top U.S. law firms are listed in Table 2.  Perhaps due 
to the large market for legal services and the correspondingly large 
number of prominent law firms, there is no universally accepted first-
tier among the elite firms. 47  The top seven to ten firms are generally 
considered to be first-tier firms.  Virtually all of them are based in 
New  York,  presumably  due  to  its  leading  capital  market,  which 
requires (and pays top dollar for) high value-added services.  Even a 
cursory glance at Table 2 strongly suggests that being in the first-tier 
correlates highly with firm profitability and reputation rather than 
firm size.   
________________________________________________________________ 
46. 
See  The  Global  100  Methodology,  A
M
.
L
AW
.,  Nov.  2004,  and  the 
accompanying  chart  ranking  firms  by  revenue.    In  the  2005  survey,  U.S.  firms 
comprised seventy-six of the  Global 100 ranked  by  revenue  (and sixty-eight of 100 
ranked by the number of attorneys).  See The Global 100, A
M
.
L
AW
., Nov. 2005 at 111, 
117.  
47. 
During  the  last  few  years,  a  few  law  industry  consultants  and 
commentators have begun to refer to the top seven U.S. firms as the “Charmed Circle,” 
which would correspond to the English group of first-tier firms which are well-known 
as  the “Magic  Circle.”  See, e.g.,  International  Law  Firms: Trying to  Get  the Right 
Balance, supra note 27 (stating that “[e]ach city has a small group of highly reputable 
firms whose list of blue chip clients marks them out as special.  In New York, this 
group is seven strong and is known as the ‘Charmed Circle.’  In London, it is known as 
the “Magic Circle” and consists of five leading firms…”). This Article does not use that 
term since to date its usage has not become widespread and, in fact, many U.S. lawyers 
have not yet heard of it.   
Library application class:C# PDF Convert to SVG SDK: Convert PDF to SVG files in C#.net, ASP
convert all PDF document pages to SVG image files in C#.NET class application. Perform high-fidelity PDF to SVG conversion in both ASP.NET web and WinForms
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
NET framework is 4.0 or higher, please copy the content in Right-click “Sites” and select “Add Web Site to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
787 
TABLE 2 
ELITE AND FIRST-TIER FIRMS IN THE UNITED STATES 
Profits per 
Partner (PPP) 
(AmLaw 100 
PPP 
Rank/Revenue 
per Lawyer 
Rank) 
Gross Revenue 
(AmLaw 100 
Rank) 
Vault 100 
Reputational 
Rank 
Number of 
Attorneys 
(AmLaw 
100 Rank) 
Watchell, 
Lipton* 
$3,500,000 (1/1) 
$431,000,000 (44) 
197 (100) 
Cahill Gordon 
$2,455,000 (2/7) 
$227,000,000 (85) 
47 
242 (99) 
Sullivan & 
Cromwell* 
$2,350,000 (3/2) 
$833,000,000 (10) 
589 (52) 
Simpson 
Thacher* 
$2,330,000 (4/5) 
$691,000,000 (19) 
632 (44) 
Cravath, 
Swaine* 
$2,205,000 (5/3) 
$455,000,000 (37) 
389 (87) 
Paul, Weiss  
$2,155,000 (6/6) 
$504,000,000 (30) 
13 
480 (65) 
Cadwalader, 
Wickersham  
$2,110,000 (7/13) 
$416,000,000 (46) 
35 
486 (64) 
Davis Polk*  
$2,005,000 (8/4) 
$604,500,000 (23) 
538 (57) 
Kirkland & Ellis  $1,975,000 (9/8) 
$835,000,000 (9) 
11 
897 (18) 
Milbank, Tweed  $1,900,000 (10/11)  $431,500,000 (43) 
25 
480 (65) 
Schulte Roth 
$1,815,000 (11/15)  $292,000,000 (69) 
79 
354 (93) 
Skadden, Arps* 
$1,735,000 (12/10)  $1,440,000,000 (1) 
1,554 (4) 
Cleary, 
Gottlieb* 
$1,715,000 (13/15)  $695,000,000 (17) 
844 (22) 
Weil, Gotshal 
$1,700,000 (14/14)  $905,000,000 (8) 
1,080 (11) 
Wilkie Farr 
$1,635,000 (15/17)  $416,000,000 (46) 
32 
507 (61) 
Gibson, Dunn 
$1,515,000 (16/8) 
$693,000,000 (18) 
17 
745 (29) 
Debevoise & 
Plimpton 
$1,510,000 (17/12)  $478,500,000 (34) 
14 
536 (58) 
Latham & 
Watkins 
$1,405,000 (18/20)  $1,206,000,000 (3) 
1,502 (5) 
O’Melveny & 
Myers 
$1,310,000 (19/25)  $697,000,000 (16) 
19 
910 (15) 
Dechert 
$1,235,000 (20/52)   $441,500,000 (40) 
60 
678 (34) 
*First-Tier Firms 
Sources:  The American Lawyer (The AmLaw 100, July 2005); Brook Moshan Gesser, et al., 
The Vault Guide to the Top 100 Law Firms, 2005 (7th ed. 2004). 
Library application class:VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
NET framework is 4.0 or higher, please copy the content in Right-click “Sites” and select “Add Web Site to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you can find the detailed instructions and explanations for why Copy the Web Document Viewer
www.rasteredge.com
788 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
In the United States it appears there has been a wave of mergers 
among elite law firms since the late 1990s.48  The number of mergers 
has continued at a relatively high level over the last decade under a 
variety  of economic  conditions,  and  the  size  of  the  firms  resulting 
from  these  mergers  has  continued  to  increase.    Although  some 
industry  commentators  cite  the  activities  of  consultants  as  having 
provided an important impetus to the beginning of the merger boom, 
now most believe that the merger boom has become self-sustaining.49  
Although difficult to measure, the  three  reputational  elements 
introduced earlier appear to have played a significant role in creating 
and, in particular, sustaining the merger boom.  One can certainly 
find any number of quotations to the effect that:  (i) the true purpose 
of a merger is to get on (or stay on) the short list of large corporate 
clients and send a signal  on  firm quality to  such desirable  clients, 
rather  than  to  achieve  any  economies  of  scale,50  (ii)  the  clearest 
measure of a firm’s success is its ability to attract (and retain) lateral 
partners  and  practice  groups,51  and  (iii)  a  firm’s  success  can  be 
measured  by  its  ability  to  attract  and  retain  the  most  highly 
credentialed  law  students  as  new  associates.52    One  can  also  find 
________________________________________________________________ 
48. 
See supra note 16 and accompanying text. 
49. 
See, e.g., Anthony Lin,  Law Firm  Merger Consultants Race  for Booming 
Business,  N.Y.  L.  J.,  June  24,  2002  (describing  the  busy  activities  of  law  firm 
consultants  in  advising on law firm  mergers, but  also  stating  that law firms  have 
become quite conscious of competitive pressures and mergers, so that “[i]f consultants 
previously  played an  important  role  in  proselytizing  the  consolidation  of the  legal 
industry, there is little need for such cheerleading now”). 
50. 
See,  e.g.,  Lisa  Stansky,  The  Aftermath  of  Mergers  can  be  Layoffs, 
Departures, N
AT
L.J., Nov. 18, 2002 (quoting legal consultant Ward Bower of Altman 
Weil Inc.) 
51. 
See, e.g., Bill Myers, Lateral hiring finds favor in Chicago firms, C
HI
.
D
AILY 
L.
B
ULL
., Apr.  18,  2005, available at http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/news/hits/ 
050418cdlb.htm  (quoting  Gary  M.  Wolfson,  partner  of  consulting  firm  Blackman, 
Kallick, as stating that “[f]rankly, the way to judge a firm’s success is by how well 
they’ve been able to attract significant laterals, not just in their overall growth”). 
52. 
This is well illustrated by the competition among elite firms over raising 
and maintaining the  compensation  for new  associates.   See supra note  35, 44 and 
accompanying text.  Elite law firms compete hard to attract the top candidates with 
prestigious  credentials.   See, e.g., Lindsay Fortado, In Focus: Law Schools—Top 50 
Firms Hire Most from Big Names, Prominent Law Schools Feature High on the List, 
N
AT
L
.
L.J. Sept. 12, 2005 (noting that the results of its first ranking of law schools 
based  on  hiring  by  the  top  fifty  law  firms  was  “strikingly  similar”  to  law  school 
rankings that appear in U.S. News & World Report).  These elite law school credentials 
do  not  correlate  closely  with  lawyering  skills,  but  a  firm’s  ability  to  attract  such 
prestigious new attorneys is a further sign of its elite status and serves as a useful 
signal of its quality with respect to the firm’s other constituencies.  Wilkins and Gulati 
also make this point concerning the poor correlation between elite firm hiring criteria 
and lawyering skills.  See Wilkins & Gulati, supra note 21, at 1653 n.226; David B. 
Wilkins & G. Mitu Gulati, Why Are There So Few Black Lawyers in Corporate Law 
Firms? An  Institutional Analysis, 84 C
AL
.
L.
R
EV
. 493, 524-27 (1996); see also Tom 
Ginsberg & Jeffrey A. Wolf, The Market for Elite Law Firm Associates, 31 F
LA
.
S
T
.
U.
L.
R
EV
. 909, 956 (2003-04) (noting “the (perceived) benefits of decentralized recruiting for 
Library application class:C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
viewer creating, you can go to PDF Web Viewer Creation click "Add Reference" and locate .NET Web Viewer DLL. Copy package file "Web.config" content to your
www.rasteredge.com
Library application class:C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
within .NET projects, including ASP.NET web and Window Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF will show how to convert all PDF pages to Jpeg
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
789 
numerous law  firm actions  that support these  statements and  are 
clearly intended to signal reputation to these constituencies. 
Similarly, with respect to herd behavior there are perhaps even 
more  quotations  echoing  the  conventional  wisdom  that  a  law  firm 
needs a national platform and credible mass.53  It is safe to say this 
trend has reached every nationally significant business center in the 
United States.  This is illustrated by a series of mergers over the last 
few  years  involving  firms  in  the  last  stronghold  of  traditional 
regionalism,  Boston, following the  first major merger several  years 
ago by Dana Bingham.54   This process  has progressed to the point 
that there are almost no remaining mid-sized general service firms in 
New  York  or  Los  Angeles,  or  more  recently,  regulatory  firms  in 
Washington, D.C., which might logically provide an entry point for 
expansion to a national platform. 
The  importance  of  first-tier  firms  is more  directly  observable.  
Despite the merger wave, none of the top ten firms listed in Table 2 
has ever engaged in a merger.  It is the other elite firms that must 
consider  their  size  and  platform.    Since  most  of  them  are  based 
outside of New York, they must also consider the necessity of a New 
York office to be recognized as having a national presence.55  Even 
signaling  reputation  and  quality”  as  one  factor  that  explains  why  there  is  a 
decentralized system for associate recruiting at elite law firms in the United States as 
opposed to a centralized system as in Canada).     
53. 
See, e.g., Bruce E. Aronson, Law Firm Mergers: Is Bigger Really Better?, 
C
REIGHTON 
L
AWYER
, Spring 2006 (noting that in the wave of mergers of large firms, 
many firms justify  such mergers by claiming  a need for a national platform and a 
credible mass);  Lisa Stansky, The Aftermath of Mergers Can Be Layoffs, Departures, 
N
AT
L.
J.  Nov. 18, 2002 (stating that the goals cited by Chicago’s Katten Muchin 
Zavis and New York’s Rosenman & Colin for their merger were “gaining a ‘national 
footprint’  and  wooing  laterals”  (Rosenman)  and  “looking  for critical  mass”  (Katten 
Muchin)).   
54. 
A number of traditional, well-known firms in Boston were among the last 
holdouts against the conventional wisdom that bigger is better and that firms require a 
national platform.  But the firm now known as Bingham McCutchen LLP began an 
aggressive expansion program in 1999.  Also, within a few years the old-line Boston 
firm of  Hill & Barlow  dissolved when a  group of  important  partners left for Piper 
Rudnick.  In the last few years all of the major Boston firms have merged to become 
national firms.  See, e.g., Martha Neil, Two Century-Old Firms Tie the Knot:  Changing 
Markets in  Boston, IP Practice  Lead to  Merger,  A.B.A. J. E-R
EPORT
, Nov. 19, 2004 
(discussing merger between Ropes & Gray and Fish & Neave).  
55. 
As noted earlier, it is now quite usual for a law firm to first decide that it 
wants to do a merger and then systematically screen and pursue merger partners until 
the desired result is achieved.  At first blush this may appear to represent proactive 
business  strategizing.   However, the  reality  for  most of  the firms  is  that  they are 
reacting  to  the  now  widespread  market  perception  that  regional  firms  are,  by 
definition, no longer considered to be among the top law firms.  Even some conservative 
regional firms that are not elite firms in the Am Law 100 are now in the process of 
“going national.” 
A typical example of the above phenomenon is reflected in a comment by a partner 
of a regional Los Angeles-based firm about acquiring a firm in New York is: “When you 
go to New York, you get better name recognition and you’re perceived as being more 
790 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
those  firms  that  have  had  success  in  New  York  do  not  generally 
engage in direct competition with the first-tier firms.56  And a first-
tier firm will go to great lengths to combat any perception that it is in 
danger of falling out of the first tier.57    
There  has  been substantial  growth in the  number  of overseas 
offices  and  attorneys  of  elite  law  firms  over  the  last  decade.58  
Nevertheless, the rich U.S. domestic market and U.S. firms’ emphasis 
on profitability have made first-tier firms and some other elite U.S. 
firms  cautious  of  international  expansion.    A  typical  international 
strategy by these firms would be one of selective overseas expansion, 
having a limited number of overseas offices in major financial centers 
with  a  focus  on  giving  advice  on  U.S.  law  and  cross-border 
transactions in high value-added areas such as capital markets and 
M&A  transactions.    A  few  first-tier  firms,  such  as  Cravath,  have 
essentially  eschewed  international  offices  altogether,  claiming  that 
the  best  lawyers  will  also  obtain  top  cross-border  work  and  that 
overseas offices are difficult to administer and monitor for quality.59  
Conversely, some elite firms, such as White & Case and Jones Day, 
have  embraced  a  “going  global”  strategy,  which  encompasses  an 
national.”  Alexei Oreskovic, Sheppard’s Pie,  R
ECORDER
, May 13, 2003, available at 
http://www.sheppardmullin.com/images/ pubs/pub211.pdf (quoting Joseph Coyne Jr., a 
partner and executive committee member of Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton). 
56. 
See Andrew Longstreth, Princes of the City:  Twenty Years After Arriving in 
Manhattan, Latham and Watkins Now Plays in the Highest Tier of New York Firms. Is 
It Too Late for Others? Not If They Can Follow Latham’s Four Rules, A
M
.
L
AW
., June 
2005, at 48 (questioning whether other firms attempting to move into the New York 
City legal market will achieve similar success as firms such as Latham & Watkins did 
when it opened its New York City office twenty years ago). 
57. 
This  has  been  the  recent  history  of  Shearman  &  Sterling.    See,  e.g., 
Anthony Lin, No. 1 Task for Shearman Leader: Keeping the Firm in the Top Tier, N.Y.
L.J., Feb. 24, 2006 (discussing Shearman & Sterling’s strategies for maintaining its 
top-tier  reputation  despite  internal  turmoil,  layoffs,  and  lack-luster  profitability 
compared  to  peer  firms);  Anna  Schneider-Mayerson,  ‘Shearminations’:  Big  Firm 
Urging  Partners  to  Leave,  N.Y.  O
BSERVER
,  Apr.  11,  2005  (analyzing  Shearman  & 
Sterling’s encouragement of partners to leave the firm). 
58. 
See, e.g., Neal Solomon, In Focus: Business of Law, Economic  Principles 
Drive Mergers Among U.S. Firms- Most Recent Law Firm Growth has Occurred Due to 
Branching via M&A, N
AT
L.J., Sept. 26, 2005 (“[T]he last 10 years have . . . witnessed 
an attempt by major U.S. firms to expand into international markets.”).  They have 
been  able  to  expand  their  international  business  because  of  both  the  significant 
opportunity presented by the large expansion of overseas trade and investment by U.S. 
multinational corporations and by utilizing their natural advantages—their ability in 
the  English  language, expertise  in  U.S.  law  (which  is  the  governing law  in many 
international transactions), importance of the U.S. financial markets, and expertise in 
sophisticated financial and M&A transactions.  Id.  
59. 
See, e.g., In Brief—Cravath Swaine Elects a New Presiding Partner, N
AT
L
L. J. Nov. 21, 2005 (describing Cravath as “one of the most conservative [law firms], 
largely eschewing international expansion”).  
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
791 
extensive global network of offices that provide full service on local 
law matters in addition to big ticket cross-border work.60   
A few firms have gone global through transatlantic mergers with 
English firms, either being acquired by a first-tier firm English firm 
(e.g., Rogers & Wells) or acquiring a second-tier elite U.K. firm (e.g., 
Mayer  Brown).    To  date  no  U.S.  first-tier  firm  has  agreed  to  an 
international  merger,  despite  reported  ardent  wooing  by  the  top 
English firms.61  The first and best-known transatlantic merger was 
the 2000 acquisition of Rogers & Wells by London’s Clifford Chance, a 
first-tier  U.K.  firm.    Rogers  &  Wells,  which  apparently  grew 
frustrated by its inability to break into the first tier, instead adopted 
a going global strategy.62  This strategy views the entire world (or at 
least substantial portions of it) as the relevant market and essentially 
seeks  to  execute  a  middle  market  strategy63  with  respect  to 
multinational corporate clients who are present in numerous markets 
around the globe.   
Although the combination of Clifford Chance and Rogers & Wells 
was very big news, it did not lead to any other combinations involving 
first-tier  firms, and  the success of the merger has been  called into 
question.64    Several  subsequent  transatlantic  mergers  have  all 
________________________________________________________________ 
60. 
See, e.g., Anthony Lin, For White & Case, Global Expansion Was the Easy 
Part,  N.Y.  L.  J.  Jan.  12,  2007  (describing  how  the  2,000  lawyer  White  &  Case 
established a global network of almost 40 offices worldwide and its present challenge of 
having more clients utilize its network).  
61. 
See, e.g., Law Firms: The Bigger the Better?, E
CONOMIST
, Dec. 11, 2004, at 
60 (stating that three of the leading U.K. firms have tried but failed to find a suitable 
partner among the top U.S. firms); see also Anthony Lin, Jones Day is Merging with 
Gouldens, N.Y. L.J., Feb. 10, 2003 (stating that “[t]he efforts of larger British firms to 
secure  combinations  with  major  New  York  firms  have  largely  met  with  little 
interest . . .”).  Interviews conducted for this Article have confirmed that two of the 
three magic circle firms cited in the article from The Economist have made offers to 
first-tier U.S. firms, which were rejected, and that these same U.K. firms have also 
declined to follow through on merger discussions with non-first-tier U.S. elite firms 
that had indicated an interest in accepting a merger offer.  This result is consistent 
with predictions of first-tier firm behavior based on the prior discussion in Part II(C) 
(and also consistent with Groucho Marx’s famous quip that he sent a wire to a country 
club announcing his resignation because “I don’t want to belong to any club that will 
accept me as a member.”).  In fact, the unwillingness to consider a merger offer from a 
first-tier  English  firm  might  well  provide  a  good  functional  definition  of  what 
constitutes a first-tier U.S. firm.  
62. 
One important Rogers & Wells partner stated, “We were one of the 20 firms 
that claimed to be the 11th-best firm in New York.”  See Anthony Lin, Grappling with 
Post-Merger Culture Shock, N.Y.
L.J., Nov. 26, 2002 (quoting John Carroll, who became 
Clifford Chance’s managing partner for the Americas following the merger).  
63. 
See supra note 45 and accompanying text. 
64. 
At the time of  the merger  the firm  generally adopted  Clifford Chance’s 
lockstep compensation system but paid much higher compensation to a limited number 
of rainmakers from the former Rogers & Wells. Susan Beck, Still the Biggest, but Still 
Bailing: Four Years After a Merger, Clifford Chance Expected to Hit Calmer Waters; 
The Past Has Brought Anything But, Am. Law., Dec. 1, 2004.  In the following five 
years, some thirty partners have left the New York and Washington, D.C. offices, many 
792 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
involved combinations of non-first-tier elite firms on both sides of the 
Atlantic  who  embraced  a  similar  expansionist,  middle  market 
strategy.  These mergers have not had a significant effect on the U.S. 
market to date and have provoked no competitive reaction from first-
tier U.S. firms.    
B.  United Kingdom 
Although the image of elite English firms is one of a commitment 
to globalization and broad international networks of offices, this is a 
relatively recent and limited phenomenon.   Unlike U.S. firms, law 
firms in London’s financial district, the City, remained small until the 
1980s;  legal  restrictions  kept  members  in  all  partnerships  to  a 
maximum of twenty persons until 1967.65 Deregulation in the 1980s, 
represented  by the  “big  bang”  in  1986,  spurred  dramatic  law  firm 
growth  and  expansion.66    The  elite  firms,  all  centered  in  London, 
represented large English clients and acted as national firms; they 
did not generally branch into other cities and there was no need to 
merge with regional firms to attain national status.   
The  top  firms  dominate  the  legal  services  industry  to  a  far 
greater extent than the leading firms in the United States (see Table 
3).
67  Given the smaller market for legal services, there is a smaller 
number  of  elite  firms  in  the  United  Kingdom  than  in  the  United 
States.68  The five  first-tier  firms,  widely referred  to as  the “magic 
circle,”69 include four out of five of the largest law firms in the United 
of them reportedly due to the compensation system.  See, e.g., Terry Carter, A Delicate 
Balance:  Law  Firms Seek Ways  to Please  Superstars Without Demoralizing Others, 
A.B.A. J., Mar. 2005, at 28, 29.  Another source has claimed that during roughly the 
same period a total of 271  partners have left  Clifford  Chance  worldwide, including 
eighty in the United States.  See Law Firms: The Bigger the Better?, supra note 61.  
65. 
For an overview  of the history  of the  development  of elite firms  in the 
United  Kingdom,  see,  e.g.,  John  Flood,  Megalaw  in  the  U.K.:  Professionalism  or 
Corporatism?  A Preliminary Report, 64 I
ND
.
L.J. 569 (1989). 
66. 
See,  e.g.,  id.  at  581  (stating  that  “[t]he  Big  Bang  of  1986  unleashed  a 
dramatic call for specialized legal services as the securities industry expanded”).  
67. 
The five magic circle firms accounted for 38% of the total revenue of the top 
100 U.K. firms in 2002, up from 37% in 2001.  See 2002: The Silver Age, T
HE 
L
AWYER
available at http://www.the-lawyer.co.uk/LawyerNews/top100/editorialpages/overview_ 
silverage.asp (last visited Apr. 23, 2007).  In 2004 the Big Four among the magic circle 
accounted for 29% of total revenue.  See Catrin Griffiths, London Overview, UK 100 
Annual Report 2005, T
HE 
L
AWYER
, available at http://www.thelawyer.com/uk100/2005/ 
london.html (last visited Apr. 23, 2007). 
68. 
In 2004 the smallest firm in the AmLaw 100 had $227 million in revenue 
(see Table 2), which would place it at roughly number twenty in The Lawyer U.K. 100.  
See id. 
69. 
One of the leading U.K. legal publications, Legal Business, also includes 
Herbert Smith within the magic circle, making it six firms. See, e.g., Legal Services, 
City Business Series, International Financial Services—London, March 2005, Chart 9, 
at  10,  available  at  http://www.ifsl.org.uk/pdf_handler.cfm?file=CBS_Legal_Services_ 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested