devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Cut paste pdf pages software SDK cloud windows wpf azure class Aronson24-part909

2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
803 
and German legal cultures rather than any Anglicization of German 
practice.97    
This  wave  of  mergers  was so  sudden  and  complete  that  some 
have likened it more to a wave of hostile acquisitions by U.K. firms 
than  to  traditional  friendly  mergers.98    Indeed,  in  most  cases  the 
often-quoted  pros  and  cons  of  merger  versus  alliance  were  swept 
aside by the merger wave.  There is little doubt that both the U.K. 
firms and national German firms were frightened that with a limited 
number of desirable partners on each side, they might be left empty-
handed  in  a  game  of  musical  chairs  once  the  music  stopped.    In 
particular, an international merger by a first-tier firm (Pundar) sent 
 shock  through  the  elite  law  firm  community,  resulting  in  herd 
behavior by most first-tier firms and a  significant number of other 
elite, national firms. 
Were mergers the only possible strategy for German firms?  The 
answer is  clearly no, as a number of counterexamples exist.  Most 
prominently, the firm of Hengeler Mueller became the only first-tier 
German  firm  to  maintain  its independence,  which places  it  in  the 
potentially advantageous position of having numerous opportunities 
to cooperate on projects with foreign firms who are reluctant to use 
the local office of a rival.  Rather than an all-or-nothing choice, there 
are, in fact, a  range of options, which include less formal alliances 
and best friends referral relationships.99    
________________________________________________________________ 
97. 
According to this view, the importance of the German market and German 
lawyers assures that enlightened self-interest (including the fear of losing partners to 
other firms) will prevent the U.K. firms from running roughshod over their German 
offices.   Proponents  point  to  the case  of Freshfields,  in which the  German  merger 
partner refused Freshfield’s initial merger offer and negotiated a better deal in which 
the German firm’s names are included in the Freshfield’s name on a worldwide basis 
and in which all practice groups have joint heads, one of which is a German partner.  
See  G
ERMAN 
C
OMMERCIAL 
L
AW 
F
IRMS 
2004:
A
H
AND  BOOK  FOR 
I
NTERNATIONAL 
C
LIENTS
,
available at http://www.juve.de/cgi-bin/juve/ihb_introtxt.cgi?teil=National%20 
Review.  Indeed, the leading German publication on the legal services industry goes so 
far  as  to  say  that  the  mergers  with  U.K.  firms saved  German  firms.  See  id.  The 
German  situation is cited in contrast to that of a  country  like  France, where  it  is 
alleged  that  Anglo-Saxon  firms  consistently  pick  off  the  rising  stars—i.e.,  young 
partners  who  want a  sophisticated, international practice—to the  detriment  of  the 
future development of French firms and legal culture.  See id.  
98. 
See,  e.g. Henssler  &  Terry,  supra  note 85,  at 272 (“[T]he  German legal 
profession has been in turmoil since 1998 when Anglo-Saxon law firms started to enter 
the  German  market  on  a  large  scale.    While  some  would  say  they  behaved  like 
charming grooms, to describe them as acting like a leviathan with a ferocious appetite 
is probably more appropriate.”). 
99. 
Hengeler Mueller has a non-exclusive network of friends in Europe and the 
United States that includes Slaughter & May in the United Kingdom and four first-tier 
firms in the United States.  See Sandburg, supra note 96. Gleis Lutz has a formal 
alliance  with  Herbert  Smith  in  the  United  Kingdom  and  Stibbe  in  Brussels  and 
Amsterdam.  See id. 
Cut paste pdf pages - SDK control project:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Cut paste pdf pages - SDK control project:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
804 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
In  essence,  however,  most  national  German  firms,  although 
having  no  prior  global  ambitions  or  strategy,  suddenly  became 
convinced that they must merge into a large, international law firm 
to compete on a global, or at least pan-European, basis.  A number of 
factors  contributed  to  this  surprising  phenomenon,  and  it  is 
important to emphasize the high profile three-way merger engineered 
by  Clifford  Chance  with  a  first-tier  German  firm.    This  merger 
occurred at a time of great anticipated change, due to the creation of 
the Euro zone and a unified European market, and when there was a 
particular  lack  of  information  about  the  possible  results  of  such 
change.  Under the circumstances it seemed at least plausible that an 
international combination might be necessary.  The conservatism of 
lawyers and the fear of being left behind at a time of rapidly changing 
market conditions may have supplied the necessary impetus. 
The changes in the German legal market following the merger 
wave in  the year 2000 seem  permanent;  only the  likelihood of the 
continued  existence  of  the  few  remaining  significant  independent 
firms remains subject to debate.  The largest independent  German 
firm,  Haarmann  Hemmelrath,  split  up  in  2005  following  the 
departure  of  one  of  its  name  partners  to  set  up  a  new  boutique 
firm.100    The other independents  seem content  for now but  might 
well reassess the necessity of an international merger if there were a 
new dramatic event, such as a transatlantic merger with a first-tier 
U.S. firm.101       
B.  Australia 
Like  Germany,  Australia  has a federal  system, and  law firms 
were initially restricted to practice in a single state.102  During the 
past  twenty  years, as client businesses  became national, law firms 
________________________________________________________________ 
100.  The firm, which was started by partners from Peat Marwick in 1987, was a 
multidisciplinary law and accounting practice, which at its peak in 2002 numbered 350 
lawyers in twenty-four offices.  See Brenda Sandburg, German Disunity: Haarmann 
Hemmelrath,  Germany’s  Largest  Independent  Firm,  Breaks  Up,  and  International 
Firms Gather the Spoils, A
M
.
L
AW
., May 2006, at 206.  The immediate reason for the 
split up seems to relate to restructuring of the partner compensation system in 2004 
and 2005, with subsequent lateral moves by disgruntled partners. Id.  A number of 
groups ended up with U.S. or U.K. firms.  Id. 
101.  Partner  Gerhard  Wegen  of  Gleiss  Lutz  commented,  “[If,  for  example,] 
Slaughter were to merge with Davis Polk, or Freshfields gets a merger partner with 
any of the top five or six firms in New York, it would probably make us think again.”  
See Sandburg, supra note 96, at 204. 
102.  See generally Law Council of Australia, National Practice-the move towards 
 national  legal  profession,  available  at  http://www.lawcouncil.asn.au/ 
natpractice/home.html.  The Law Council adopted a Blueprint for the Structure of the 
Legal  Profession  in  1994,  available  at  http://falcon.law.unsw.edu.au/download.html? 
table=policies&oid=1960506451&index=0, which has guided the movement away from 
strict territorial regulation and towards a national legal profession. 
SDK control project:VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide cutting. C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. In
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
805 
also  went  from  a  system  of  affiliation  between  regional  firms  in 
Sydney and Melbourne (the two most significant and profitable legal 
markets  in  Australia)  to  one,  in  recent  years,  of  merger  and  the 
formation of integrated national partnerships.  During this process 
the number of leading Australian firms gradually shrunk from twelve 
to the current “Big Six” (see Table 6) and became large, national firms 
with roughly 200 partners and  700-1000 lawyers each.103     
TABLE 6 
ELITE AND FIRST-TIER FIRMS IN AUSTRALIA 
FIRM 
REVENUE PER 
LAWYER (Global 
100 Rank for 
Profits per 
Partner) (Unit: 
Australian Dollar) 
REVENUE 
(Unit: One 
Million 
Australian 
Dollars) 
NUMBER OF 
LAWYERS 
(Global 100 
Rank) 
Arnold Bloch Leibler 
615,000 
40m 
65 
Baker & McKenzie 
548,000 
125m 
228 
Corrs Chambers 
Westgarth 
531,000 
200m 
377 
Clayton Utz* 
498,000 (80) 
361.4m 
726 (47) 
Mallesons Stephen 
Jaques* 
474,000 (72) 
445m 
939 (31) 
Gilbert + Tobin 
469,000 
75m 
160 
Allens Arthur Robinson* 
457,000 (90) 
350m 
766 (55) 
Gadens Lawyers 
428,000 
125m 
292 
Henry Davis York 
417,000 
70m 
168 
Freehills* 
392,000 (85) 
417.8m 
1067 (42) 
Deacons 
389,000 
173m 
445 
Minter Ellison* 
366,000 (99) 
405m 
1107 (22) 
Blake Dawson Waldron* 
340,000 (94) 
322m 
946 (51) 
Phillips Fox 
263,000 
211m 
803 
*First-Tier Firms 
Source:  The Global 100, A
M
.
L
AW
., Nov. 2005; Law Firms Revenues Revealed, A
SIAN 
L
EGAL 
B
US
.,  July  2005,  available  at  http://www.asianlegalonline.com/asia 
/detail_article.cfm?articleID=3107. 
________________________________________________________________ 
103.  Although significant in terms of the number of lawyers, Australian firms 
have lower profits than U.S. and U.K. firms.  Compare Table 2 and Table 3 with Table 
6.  The Big Six Australian firms are listed on the AmLaw Global 100.  See The Global 
100, A
M
.
L
AW
., Nov. 2005, at 117, 123.  On the chart for the number of lawyers their 
rankings range from twenty-two to fifty-five, while on the chart for profits per equity 
partner their rankings range from seventy-two to ninety-nine.  See The Global 100, A
M
.
L
AW
., Nov. 2005, at 117, 123; see also Table 5.   
SDK control project:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
www.rasteredge.com
806 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
Australian firms faced the usual challenges involved in merging 
to  create  national  firms,  including  partner  admission  and 
compensation, client conflicts, and cultural differences.104  Today the 
Big Six firms are the largest, but not necessarily the most profitable, 
law  firms  in  Australia.105    The  Big  Six  do,  however,  generally 
monopolize significant corporate transactions for major companies.106   
Although they are collectively referred to in Australia as the top-tier 
firms, there is  considerable debate as to whether the weaker firms 
among the Big Six truly qualify as first-tier firms.107  
Australia has an economy and market for legal services that is 
moderately sized, not growing rapidly, and is mature.  It is one of the 
very  few  countries  where  there  is  a  common  perception  of  an 
oversupply  of  commercial  lawyers.    Although  mergers  to  form 
national firms were justified, as elsewhere, by the need to obtain a 
critical  mass,108  questions remain whether the  Big  Six  firms  have 
________________________________________________________________ 
104.  These have been described as “notoriously difficult in mergers across state 
borders  in  Australia.”    See  Lucinda  Schmidt,  Brand  and  Deliver,  at 
http://www.brw.com.au/stories/20021212/17410p.aspx (last visited July 29, 2003).  In 
one of the successful mergers in July 2001, between Allen Allen & Hemsley of Sydney 
and Arthur  Robinson  &  Heddenwicks  of  Melbourne,  the  firms  had  already  had  a 
strategic alliance for seventeen years and operated jointly in Asia.  Id.  By contrast, in 
November 2001 Middletons Moore & Bevins, a mid-sized federation of a Sydney and 
Melbourne firm split into two separate firms rather than take the path of integrating 
their partnerships on a national basis.  See, e.g., Lucinda Schmidt, Strategy: Double 
Act,  at  http:/www.brw.com.au/stories/20020822/15978p.aspx  (last  visited  July  29, 
2003).   
105.  A  group  of  smaller  firms just  below  the Big  Six have equal or  greater 
profitability.  The trio of “contenders” in the next tier are Arnold Bloch Leibler, Baker 
& McKenzie, and Corrs Chambers Westgarth.  See A Vintage Year, A
SIAN 
L
EGAL 
B
US
., 
July  2006,  available  at  http://www.asianlegalonline.com/asia/detail_article.cfm? 
articleID=4049. Arnold Bloch Leibler has the highest profitability of any Australian 
firm as measured by revenue per lawyer, and Baker & McKenzie is also among the 
highest.  Id.  Phillips Fox was traditionally ranked above these three, but in the last 
few years revenue is down.  See id; see also Table 6. 
106.  See, e.g. Legal500.com, Legal Market: Australia (noting that “[o]f this Big 
Six, it would be  rare to see a major corporate transaction,  structured financing  or 
infrastructure  project  without  at  least  one  of them  on  board”); see also  Law  Firm 
Rankings Revealed, Lawyers Weekly Magazine, May 6, 2005 (noting that the Big Six 
firms  dominated the  twenty-four Practice  Area  Awards contained  in the  2005  Fuji 
Xerox  Australian  Law  Awards,  which  were  endorsed  by  the  Australian  Corporate 
Lawyers Association). 
107.  Minter Ellison lost revenue during 2004-2005 due to a restructuring and is 
said to have suffered from a number of partner departures.  See A Vintage Year, supra 
note 105.  Blake Dawson Waldron similarly suffered partner departures and closed its 
London office.  Id.  Some commentators perceive a split among the Big Six between the 
top three firms and the next group of three firms.  Id.  
108.  See  Lauren  Scott,  Too  Big  to  Profit?,  A
SIAN 
L
EGAL 
B
US
.,  March  2004, 
available  at  http://www.asianlegalonline.com/asia/detail_article.cfm?articleID=1756  
(quoting Philip Clark, managing partner of Minter Ellison, as stating that “[u]ntil you 
get critical mass, you don’t have the resources or the brand or the credibility to play in 
the big league”).   
SDK control project:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
807 
become too large for the local market.
109  They are regularly cited as 
having  far  lower  billing  rates  than  U.S.  and  U.K.  firms,  with 
correspondingly low profitability.110  Foreign firms have historically 
shown  little  interest  in  establishing  substantial  practices  in 
Australia.111   
Following the emphasis on rapid growth and mergers during the 
1990s, over  the past several  years Australian firms have begun to 
place a greater emphasis on profitability over domestic market share 
and revenue expansion.112   This new  emphasis on profitability has 
been accompanied by many of the changes in law firms seen in other 
jurisdictions:    an  increase  in  leverage  (i.e.,  more  associates  per 
partner);  a  longer  and  more  uncertain  partnership  track  for 
associates; an emphasis on productivity (both in terms of pressure to 
increase  billable  hours  and  to  provide  compensation  based  on 
productivity);  increased  competition  for  quality  associates;  firm 
________________________________________________________________ 
109.  The  total  number  of  lawyers  does  not seem  excessive  compared  to  the 
population  or  GDP.    However,  an  unusually  large  percentage  of  the  lawyers  in 
Australia  do  corporate  work  at  elite  firms,  which  may  account  for  the  perceived 
oversupply of commercial  lawyers.  See Table  1.   The Big  Six Australian firms are 
significantly larger, in relation to either population or the number of lawyers, than the 
largest U.S./U.K. firms; some argue that they are too large for the Australian market.  
In the words of the managing partner at Minter Ellison, “you’ve got six monster firms 
crawling over a market that’s half the size of California.”  Scott, supra note 108.  The 
former chief executive partner at another Big Six firm has been cited as suggesting 
that a critical mass in Australia  might be 100 partners, rather than the  200  or so 
partners of the Big Six firms.  See Bernard Kellerman, Value, Not Cost, is the Issue, 
CFO
M
AG
(citing 
Tony 
D’Aloisio 
of 
Mallesons), 
available 
at 
http://www.cfoweb.com.au/freearticle.aspx?relId=9669 (last visited Sept. 17, 2005). 
110.  This prompted a justice of Australia’s high court to note in a speech that:  
In the global economy, Australia’s big legal firms are, in any case, small beer.  
The fees they charge are said to be on average a quarter or a third of the levels 
charged in Britain and the United States.  Perhaps this is why some of the big 
overseas firms will not amalgamate with our local big league.   
See The Honorable Justice Michael Kirby AC CMG, Address at the Australian Law 
Awards 
Annual 
Dinner 
(Mar. 
7, 
2002) 
(transcript 
available 
at 
http://www.hcourt.gov.au/speeches/kirbyj/kirbyj_award.htm). 
111.  Baker & McKenzie is the  major  exception.   It is one of the  three firms 
generally ranked just below the  Big Six and is the only  foreign firm that arguably 
competes  directly  with  the  major  Australian  firms.    See  supra  note  105  and 
accompanying text.  In addition, DLA Piper recently entered into a formal alliance with 
an Australian firm.  See id. 
112.  See, e.g., ALB 30—Critical Mass, A
SIAN 
L
EGAL 
B
US
., March 2006, available 
at http://www.asianlegalonline.com/asia/detail_article.cfm?articleID=3704 (noting that 
large  Australian  firms  have  stopped  growing  and  instead  have  concentrated  on 
reducing the number of lawyers to achieve greater profitability).  Apparently this effort 
has resulted in some success, as the gap between average partner income at top-tier 
firms  and  mid-tier  firms  has  been  increasing.    See  Mahlab  Recruitment,  Private 
Practice  Australia  and  International  Survey  2006,  at  14,  available  at 
http://www.mahlab.com.au/index.cfm?pageID=43  (finding  that  the  average  partner 
compensation in Sydney at a top-tier firm is $1,015,000 and $643,000 in Australian 
dollars at a mid-tier firm).    
SDK control project:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK control project:C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
www.rasteredge.com
808 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
restructurings including easing out of partners; and an active lateral 
market  (including not  only associates  but also partners  at  Big Six 
firms).113     
With  limited  potential  for  rapid  growth  in  the  competitive 
domestic market, the largest Australian firms have had an ongoing 
interest  in  the  potential  for  expansion  into  Asia.    Although 
government policy has encouraged such international expansion,114  
there have been  periods  of both  advance and  retreat over the  past 
twenty years.  The efforts and strategies of the Big Six firms have 
varied,  and  the  results  have  been  mixed.    The  China  boom  has 
perhaps accentuated the differences.  Two of the Big Six have opened 
substantial offices in the China region, one by way of merger.115  The 
other  four  Big  Six  firms  have  displayed  greater  caution,  as  the 
increasingly crowded China market poses a challenge to profitability 
for many firms. In any event, given the size of the large Australian 
________________________________________________________________ 
113.  See generally A Vintage Year, supra note 105.  To give one example, the 
typical partnership track is now twelve years, compared to eight to ten years a few 
years ago.  See Mahlab Recruitment  Survey 2006, supra note 112, at 14.  Although the 
total number of partners at most law firms is not growing, the “churn” rate of partner 
departures is a relatively high 6.7% in firms surveyed.  See id. at 2 (citing a survey by 
The Australian newspaper).   
114.  Over the past few decades Australia has tied its future to Asia, being, for 
example, one of the key players in establishing the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation 
Treaty  (APEC)  in  the  1990s.    The  government  also  established  a  public-private 
committee in 1990 that advises and reports on “Australia’s international performance 
in legal and related services.”  For an overview of the committee (now advisory council) 
and  its 
activities,  see  International 
Legal  Services  Home  Page, 
http://www.ag.gov.au/agd/www/ilsHome.nsf.  In 1999, the advisory council formulated a 
“legal  services  export  development  strategy,”  which  was  updated  in  2003.    For  a 
discussion  of  this  strategy,  see  International  Legal  Services  Advisory  Council, 
Australian  Legal  Services  Export  Development  Strategy  2003-2006,  available  at 
http://www.ag.gov.au/www/agd/agd.nsf/Page/Committeesandcouncils_Councils_Interna
tionalLegalServicesAdvisoryCouncil(ILSAC)_InternationalLegalServicesAdvisoryCoun
cil. 
115.  Mallesons Stephens Jacques changed its go-it-alone policy in 2004 with a 
merger with the Hong Kong firm of Kwok & Yi, making it one of the ten largest firms 
in Hong Kong.  See, e.g., Malleson’s News: Mallesons Stephen Jaques and Kwok & Yih 
Merger Completed, http://www.mallesons.com/news/articles/7556779w.htm (last visited 
Apr.  23, 2007).   Allens  Arthur  Robinson  has also opened two  offices  in China and 
others throughout Asia.  See The Great Expansion Debate, A
SIAN 
L
EGAL 
B
US
., Nov. 
2005, 
available 
at 
http://www.asianlegalonline.com/asia/ 
detail_article.cfm?articleID=3418.  Other firms  emphasize, however,  that  “it’s simply 
not a matter of numbers in a market like that. . . .  It’s all about doing quality work and 
thereby attracting and maintaining quality lawyers.”  Id. (quoting Sam Farrands, the 
managing partner of the Hong Kong office of Minter Ellison).  Malleson’s has a stated 
intention to compete directly with the English magic circle firms in Hong Kong for the 
most profitable (highest value-added) projects, such as capital markets work; others 
are skeptical that Mallesons or any Australian firm can successfully do so.  Id. 
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
809 
firms,  none  of  them  derives  a  large portion  of  their  revenue  from 
overseas operations.116    
Unlike Germany, there were no international mergers involving 
Australian  firms,  despite  the  stated  interest  of  major  Australian 
firms  in  merging  with  large  U.K.  firms.117    There  is  no  Asian 
equivalent to the unified market in Europe that creates expectations 
of  substantial  cross-border work.   The Australian market  for legal 
services is mature, highly  competitive, and  may not  be sufficiently 
profitable.  The major Australian firms are large, and the number of 
partners  could  not  be  as  easily  absorbed  by  a  U.K.  firm  as,  for 
example, a leading German firm. 
Nevertheless, Australian firms appeared to be doing well in the 
late 1990s, with good domestic growth and the potential to act as a 
springboard  for  significant  expansion  into  Asia.    In  1999,  Clifford 
Chance  was  reportedly  contemplating  a  three-way  merger  with 
Pindar of Germany and a major Australian firm; when it was able to 
negotiate a merger with Rogers & Wells in the United States, a more 
attractive  market,  it  shelved  its  plans  regarding  Australia.118    As 
Asia, particularly China, has become an attractive market in the last 
few years, major U.S. and U.K. firms have devised and implemented 
their own Asian strategies independent of Australian firms.119  
Hopes  of  new  relationships  with  foreign  firms  were  rekindled 
recently  as  a  result  of  a  new  alliance  in  June  2006  between  the 
internationally  expansionist  U.S.  firm  DLA  Piper120  and  the 
Australian  firm Phillips Fox.   This is reportedly  the first exclusive 
alliance between an Australian firm and a foreign firm,121  and it is 
too early to evaluate the impact of this alliance on other Australian 
firms.  As the alliance is not a formal merger and, more importantly, 
________________________________________________________________ 
116.  One of the more aggressive Big Six firms in Asia, Allens Arthur Robinson, 
claims that 10% of its revenue is related to Asia.  The Great Expansion Debate, supra 
note 115.   
117.  See,  e.g.  Douglas  McCollam,  The  Global  100  Leaders  and  Laggards, 
Outposts  and  Outlooks:  A  Region-by-Region  Examination  of  the  Worldwide  Legal 
Market Asia and the Pacific Rim: At a Glance Australia, A
M
.
L
AW
. Nov. 2001 (quoting 
the managing partner of one of Australia’s Big Six firms, Minter Ellison, as stating 
that “Merger is on our agenda but not theirs.”). 
118.  See John E. Morris, The New World Order: Clifford Chance and Rogers & 
Wells Are about to Pull Off the First Large-Scale Transatlantic Merger.  Did the Eat-
What-You-Kill Americans Ever Come to Terms with the  Lockstep Brits?   And, More 
Importantly, What Will It Mean for the Competition?, A
M
.
L
AW
., Aug. 1999, at 92. 
119.  See, e.g., Elizabeth Amon, Bar Talk, China’s Next Wave, A
M
.
L
AW
., June 
2004 (noting that by mid-2004 there were 160 law firms in China, thirty of which were 
U.S. firms);  Press Release, Hogan & Hartson L.L.P. Expands Practice in Asia; Firm to 
Open  Office  in  China  (July  23,  2002),  available  at  http://www.prnewswire. 
co.uk/cgi/news/release?id=88506.  
120.  See supra note 1 and accompanying text. 
121.  See, e.g., Our Global Alliance, http://www.phillipsfox.com/alliance/Alliance. 
asp (last visited Apr. 23, 2007).  The website reports that Phillips Fox has become a 
member of the DLA Piper Group and will change its name to DLA Phillips Fox.  Id. 
810 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
neither firm is a first-tier firm, it would be surprising if this alliance 
provoked  a strong competitive reaction from either the global U.K. 
firms or the Australian Big Six firms.  It also remains to be seen if 
operating  within  the  DLA  Piper  group  will  accelerate  change  at 
Phillips Fox and ultimately make it more competitive.122     
V.
T
HE 
E
MERGENCE OF 
E
LITE 
L
AW 
F
IRMS AND 
M
ERGERS IN 
J
APAN
Japan is the most interesting and comprehensive case study in 
this  Article  because  of  recent  events  that  challenge  widespread 
skepticism concerning both the role of lawyers in significant business 
matters  in  Japan  generally and the  permitted  activities  of  foreign 
lawyers  in  particular.    This  skepticism  stems  both  from  objective 
factors,  such  as  the  small  number  of  Japanese  lawyers123  and  a 
traditional lack of large corporate law firms, and also from popular 
views  of  Japan,  which  have  long  emphasized  the  importance  of 
cultural values and the unimportance, if not active dislike, of law and 
lawyers in Japanese society.124  However, growth in the demand for 
corporate legal services, coupled with growth in the supply of lawyers 
and the new attractiveness of corporate law firms for young lawyers, 
has led to the development of large, elite firms and Japan’s own mini-
wave  of  law  firm  mergers  over  the  past  few  years.    The  issues 
discussed  with  respect  to  law  firms  in  other  countries  are  highly 
relevant to Japanese law firms today. 
For much of the postwar era, both the image and reality of law 
practice in Japan centered on lawyers providing general legal services 
in small law offices with a focus on litigation.125  However, from the 
________________________________________________________________ 
122.  As  noted  above,  Australian firms generally  have  shifted  emphasis  from 
growth to profitability over the past few years; some commentators think this process 
has been insufficient and see potential for an efficient foreign firm to effect a more 
radical restructuring in the Australian market. See ALB 30—Critical Mass, supra note 
112.  DLA Piper has reportedly been successful in other low-margin markets (such as 
Scotland)  by  having  a  low  number  of  equity  partners  and  a  strong  performance-
oriented (“eat  what you kill”) compensation system. See  id.   The initial  impact on 
Phillips  Fox  was  seemingly  negative.    It  reportedly  lost  fifteen  of  the  twenty-one 
partners in its Perth office as it integrated that office into the national partnership in 
preparation for its alliance with DLA Piper.  See A Vintage Year, supra note 105.   
123.  The number  of  lawyers  in  Japan,  as of  year-end  2004,  is  21,174.   See 
Bengoshi  Hakusho  2005  Nenpan  [Attorney  White  Paper  2005  Edition]  78  (Nihon 
Bengoshi  Rengokai Ed., 2005)  78 [hereafter White Paper].    Although the  absolute 
number of lawyers (bengoshi) is small, comparisons with other countries are not so 
simple.  Japan has other categories of legal service providers and a large number of 
undergraduate  law  majors,  some  of  whom  provide  legal  services  in-house  for 
corporations  and  other organizations.   For  a comparative discussion  of the various 
categories of legal professionals in Japan, see Masanobu Kato, The Role of Law and 
Lawyers in Japan and the United States, 1987 B.Y.U. L. R
EV
. 627 (1987). 
124.  See generally Kato, supra note 123. 
125.  Id. at 649-51.   
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
811 
early  postwar years there were  also a limited number  of corporate 
law firms in Tokyo, initially headed by American lawyers,126   which 
focused on international corporate matters.  By the 1960s, Japanese 
lawyers trained at these firms had formed their own corporate law 
firms.  Much like their English counterparts based in London, some of 
these  Tokyo-based  corporate  firms  eventually  developed  into  elite 
national law firms.127      
Corporate law firm growth, which progressed slowly but steadily 
in the 1980s and 1990s, was soon to increase.  One of the important 
conditions permitting greater growth was the gradual development of 
a substantial domestic market for corporate legal services beginning 
in the 1990s.  During Japan’s “lost decade” following the collapse of 
the  bubble  economy,  a  host  of  factors,  such  as  financial 
deregulation,128  administrative  reform,  restructuring  of  industry, 
shareholder  derivative  litigation,129  the  rising  importance  of 
________________________________________________________________ 
126.  During the occupation years a number of U.S. citizens were licensed under 
Article 7 of Japan’s attorney law as quasi-members of the Japanese bar (jun-kai-in) 
and  were  permitted  to  practice  the  law  of  their  home  country.  See  Bengoshi  Ho 
[Practicing Attorney Law] (Law No. 205 of 1949); see, e.g., John O. Haley, Redefining 
the Scope of Practice Under Japan’s New Regime for Regulating Foreign Lawyers, 21 
L
AW IN 
J
APAN
18, 21 (1988).   Article 7 was abolished in 1955; however, an estimated 
half of the sixty-eight admitted foreign lawyers practiced law and were grandfathered 
and continued to practice law.  Id. at 21-22.  No new foreign attorneys were registered 
in Japan until 1987, following the enactment of a new law.  Id. at 18. 
127.  Japan  is  a  unitary  rather  than  a  federal  system,  and  business  and 
government remain centered in Tokyo.  In addition, the heavy concentration of lawyers 
in Tokyo (and, to a lesser extent, Osaka) aided the development of elite national firms.  
In 2004, lawyers in Tokyo comprised 48.47% of all lawyers in Japan, while Tokyo’s 
population was 9.69% of the total Japanese population.  White Paper, supra note 123, 
at 77. Thus in Tokyo, there was one lawyer for each 1,206 inhabitants, as opposed to 
the national average of one lawyer per 6,030 inhabitants.  See id.  The potential for 
Japanese lawyers in these leading urban areas to expand their role beyond traditional 
litigation-oriented activities  was recognized by some  at an early stage.   See Takao 
Tanase, The Urbanization of Lawyers and its Functional Significance: Expansion in the 
Range of Work Activities and Change in Social Role, 13 L
AW IN 
J
APAN
20 (Bruce E. 
Aronson  trans.,  1980)  (arguing  that  the  high  concentration  of  lawyers  in  the 
metropolises of Tokyo and Osaka was due to the attractive prospect of expanding their 
traditional range of work activities and social role).    
128.  Whole new fields, such as financial services regulation and advice on on-
site inspections by government examiners, became new sources of demand from both 
Japanese and foreign clients.   In  the last few  years  Japanese clients have  become 
active in new financial products such as securitizations and domestic project finance. 
129.  Shareholder suits highlighted the additional need to both avoid potential 
liability for bad business decisions and to adopt more formal rule-based compliance and 
other policies.  The most dramatic case was a court decision in 2000 related to the well-
known Daiwa Bank scandal, in which a district court awarded $775 million in damages 
to  the plaintiffs  for  directors’  breaches  of  fiduciary duties.   Nishimura v.  Abekawa 
(Daiwa Bank Case), 1721 Hanrei Jiho 3 (Osaka Dist. Ct., Sept. 20, 2000).  For excerpts 
of the decision in English, see Bruce E. Aronson, Learning From Comparative Law in 
Teaching U.S. Corporate Law: Director’s Liability in Japan and the U.S., 22 P
ENN 
S
T
.
I
NT
L.
R
EV
.  213, 227-231 (2003).    For  an analysis  of  the  decision,  see Bruce  E. 
Aronson,  Reconsidering  the  Importance  of Law  in  Japanese  Corporate  Governance:  
812 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
intellectual property, and an increase in foreign direct investment,130 
combined  to  highlight  the  importance  of  legal  services  both  in 
controlling business risks and exploiting new business opportunities.  
These  new,  significant  corporate  matters  meant  that  Japanese 
corporate law firms increasingly needed to provide greater expertise 
and sizable teams of attorneys. 
As the demand for corporate legal services grew, the supply of 
lawyers became a more important issue.131  Industry challenged the 
traditional  constraints  on  the  number  of  lawyers132  with  calls  for 
more  lawyers  and  greater  efficiency  in  the  legal  system.    This 
resulted in a significant process of legal reform beginning in 1999.133  
 doubling  of  the  attorney  population  was  targeted  for  2018,134  
Evidence from the Daiwa Bank Shareholder Derivative Case, 36 C
ORNELL 
I
NT
L.J. 11 
(2003).  For a general discussion of shareholder suits in Japan, see Mark D. West, Why 
Shareholders Sue: The Evidence from Japan, 30 J.
L
EGAL 
S
TUD
. 351 (2001). 
130.  Demand for legal services received a boost when a wave of foreign direct 
investment  began  in  Japan  around  1997,  particularly  in  the  heretofore  off-limits 
financial services area.  When U.S. companies such as GE Capital made an acquisition 
they  naturally  expected  a  significant  team  of  Japanese  lawyers  with  appropriate 
specializations to perform due diligence.  The elite Japanese firms scrambled to meet 
this demand. 
131.  One view  holds  that the  shortage of  lawyers  is  “the  most  fundamental 
problem” facing Japanese law firms in light of the recent rise in demand for business 
lawyers.    See  Yasuharu  Nagashima  &  E. Anthony  Zaloom,  The  Rise  of  the  Large 
Business Law Firm and  its Prospects for the Future, in L
AW  IN 
J
APAN
:
A
T
URNING 
P
OINT
(D
ANIEL 
H.
F
OOTE 
ed., forthcoming). 
132.  The small number of lawyers in Japan has been due primarily to numerical 
restraints on the creation of new attorneys.  See Edward I. Chen, The Legal Training 
and Research Institute of Japan, 22 U. T
OL
.
L.
R
EV
. 975 (1991) (describing the Legal 
Training  and  Research  Institute  of  Japan).    After  graduating  with  a  law  major, 
prospective lawyers had to pass an entrance exam (i.e., bar exam) to gain admittance to 
the government’s Legal Research and Training Institute (the Institute); completion of 
the  Institute’s  two-year  course  was  the sole  path  to  becoming  a  lawyer,  judge,  or 
prosecutor.    Id.    As  the  number  of  trainees  admitted  to  the  Institute  was 
predetermined at a low level (about 500 per year circa 1990), the resulting pass rate for 
entrance  to  the  Institute  was  around 2-3%.   Id.  at 980-81.   In the  mid-1990s  big 
business groups began to demand an end to governmental “administrative guidance” 
and an increase in both the role of law (i.e., transparent legal rules) and the number of 
lawyers.    See,  e.g.,  Keidanren,  Request for  Deregulation/Basic Philosophy, Oct. 28, 
1996,  available  in  English  at  www.keidanren.or.jp/english/policy/pol054/basic.html 
(last visited June 27, 2007) (Japan’s leading business organization publicly calling for 
“eliminating administrative guidance as much as possible” and for the establishment of 
rule-making procedures which permit public participation). 
133.  A  special  legal  reform  council was  created in  the  Cabinet in  1999 and 
issued its final report in 2001.  See Recommendations of the Justice System Reform 
Council–For a Justice System to Support Japan in the 21st Century, June 12, 2001, 
available at http://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/judiciary/2001/0612report.html.  
134.  Id. at ch. III, pt. 1-1.  The report establishes a goal for the total number of 
legal professionals (i.e., lawyers, judges, and prosecutors) to reach 50,000 by 2018.  Id.    
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested