devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete pages from pdf reader control application system azure html winforms console Aronson25-part910

2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
813 
together with the introduction of new U.S.-style law schools to train 
these legal professionals.135    
The first law firm merger between elite firms, announced in 1999 
and  completed  in  2000,  created  the  first  Japanese  firm  with  100 
lawyers and ushered in a new era of rapid growth by corporate law 
firms.136  Thereafter, large firm growth accelerated rapidly, primarily 
through the hiring of newly minted attorneys.137  The largest firms 
doubled  in  size  from  2000  to  2005  and  now  number  around  200 
attorneys (see Table 7).  Among the nine or so elite firms, the three 
longstanding first-tier firms were joined by Mori Sogo in the 1990s 
and are now commonly referred to as the Big Four.138  The Big Four 
typically appear on both sides of major transactions. 
________________________________________________________________ 
135.  See Koichiro Fujikura, Reform of Legal Education in Japan:  the Creation of 
Law  Schools  Without  a  Professional Sense  of Mission, 75  T
UL
. L.  R
EV
.  941 (2001) 
(emphasizing  the  shortcomings  of  Japan’s  new  law  schools);  see  also  James  R. 
Maxeiner  &  Keiichi  Yamanaka,  The  New  Japanese  Law  Schools:  Putting  the 
Professional into Legal Education, 13 P
AC
.
R
IM
.
L.
&
P
OL
J. 303, 310 (2004); Setsuo 
Miyazawa, Education and Training of Lawyers in Japan—A Critical Analysis, 43 S. 
T
EX
. L. R
EV
. 491, 493 (2002).  
136.  Misasha Suzuki, The Protectionist Bar Against Foreign Lawyers in Japan, 
China, and Korea: Domestic Control in the Face of Internationalization, 16 C
OLUM
.
J.
A
SIAN 
L. 385, 395 (2003). 
137.  First-year  associate  classes  at  large  firms  expanded  significantly,  as  a 
typical first-year class at one of the four first-tier firms has grown from around five to 
seven attorneys a decade ago to some thirty today.  Interviews with the Author and 
Japanese Attorneys; see also Zadankai, infra note 162, at 39 (speaker: Kosugi) (stating 
that classes of new associates “under ten” continued “for a long time,” but that recent 
classes were in the “20s and 30s”). 
138.  Mori Sogo’s rise into the first tier was significant in that it was the leader 
in  domestic  corporate  law,  unlike  the  other  first-tier  firms,  which  had  focused  on 
transnational  corporate  transactions.  Interviews  with  the  Author  and  Japanese 
Attorneys; see also Zadankai, infra note 162, at 39 (speaker: Ishiguro). The domestic 
corporate market has become significant, and now none of the Big Four firms think of 
themselves  as  international  corporate  specialists.    In  the  last  few  years,  Japan’s 
leading business daily, Nihon Keizai Shinbun, has consistently referred to the first-tier 
firms as the “Big Five,” including the fifth-largest firm, Asahi Koma.  See Table 7); see, 
e.g., Futto Homu Bijinesu (Jo): M&A Saisei Kage de Enshutsu [Rising Legal Business 
(Part 1): Production Due to M&A Restructuring], N
IHON 
K
EIZAI 
S
HINBUN
, July 14, 2005 
(containing a table of the Big Five Japanese Law Firms”).  However, that firm recently 
entered into a merger with Nishimura & Partners (see Table 8), and as a result there is 
no longer any disagreement that the leading firms are the Big Four. 
Delete pages from pdf reader - control application system:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages from pdf reader - control application system:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
814 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
TABLE 7 
ELITE (LARGEST) LAW FIRMS IN JAPAN 
(BY NUMBER OF ATTORNEYS) 
1985 
1999 
2002 
2005 
26 
Nishimura & 
Partners (74) 
Nagashima Ohno  & 
Tsunematsu  (157) 
Mori Hamada 
Matsumot (198) 
25 
Nagashima & 
Ohno (69) 
Mori Hamada 
Matsumoto (149) 
Nagashima Ohno   & 
Tsunematsu (197) 
23 
Anderson & 
Mori  (58) 
Nishimura & 
Partners (130) 
Nishimura & Partners 
(183) 
20 
Mori Sogo (58) 
Anderson Mori (116) 
Anderson Mori  
Tomotsune (179) 
20 
Asahi (54) 
Asahi Koma (108) 
Asahi Koma (140) 
20 
Mitsui Yasuda 
(43) 
Mitsui Yasuda (71) 
TMI (87) 
17 
TMI (34) 
TMI (57) 
Tokyo Aoyama Aoki 
(68) 
17 
Ohebashi (30) 
Tokyo Aoyama   
Aoki (56) 
Ohebashi (64) 
16 
Matsuo Sogo 
(29) 
City-Yuwa (48) 
City-Yuwa (64) 
16 
Iwata (27) 
Tokyo Aoyama 
(26) 
Hamada & 
Matsumoto (25) 
Tsunematsau, 
Yanase   & 
Sekine (24) 
Sources:  39  Jiyu  To  Seigi,  No.  13,  at  61  (1988);  21  International  Lawyers’ 
Newsletter,  No.  4  (July/Aug.  1999);  Japan  Federation  of  Bar  Associations, 
unpublished  survey  (2002)  (on  file  with  author);  Horitsu  Jimusho,  Jinyo  wo 
Zokyo [Law Firms, Build up Their Ranks], NIHON KEIZAI SHINBUN, Feb. 25, 
2005, at 1. 
The first merger was both a shock and a significant wake-up call 
to the  legal services  industry.   It  destroyed  the common view that 
there  might  never  be  a  Japanese  law  firm  with  several  hundred 
lawyers.139  On one level, the merger between the leading Big Four 
________________________________________________________________ 
139.  Firm  division,  rather than  merger, had been the  rule in the past.  The 
traditional small Japanese law office was often just a cost-sharing arrangement, with 
no allocation of income among lawyers.  For some internationally oriented firms in the 
1980s, the model was still a “boss” and his followers, with the name partner or partners 
supplying all of the firm’s equity capital while other “partners” were on salary.  Such a 
structure not only limited a firm’s capital base, it also encouraged a tendency for firms 
to split as soon as an attorney developed a sufficient client base to become a “boss” at 
his own firm.  This also occurred among the firms which ultimately became the Big 
Four  firms.    In  fact,  in  the  1980s  attorneys  spoke  of  a  “rule  of  twenty”  which 
purportedly  described the  upper  limit  of  law  firm  size.   This  history  and attitude 
colored the reaction to the first major merger among Japanese law firms.  Prior to the 
control application system:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
815 
firm Nagashima & Ohno and the smaller, elite, finance-oriented firm 
Tsunematsu,  Yanase  &  Sekine  could  be  explained  simply  as 
Nagashima  &  Ohno  wishing  to  expand  from  its  general  corporate 
strength into the rapidly growing area of financial services.  However, 
the merger also represented a new challenge by a first-tier firm to 
other leading firms in Japan. 
The competitive strategy of Nagashima & Ohno implied by the 
merger shook competitor firms.  For the most part, the reasons given 
for the merger were similar to those provided everywhere for law firm 
mergers:  to meet client demands for greater size, expertise, and one-
stop  shopping  for  large,  complex  matters  with  time  limitations.140  
However,  toward  the  end  of  an  influential  article  in  a  legal 
publication,141  the  founding  partner  of  the  firm,  Yasuharu 
Nagashima,  provided some additional  reasons  for the  merger.   He 
cited the example of the Korean law firm Kim & Chang, which was 
double  the size  of  its  nearest  competitor  among  the  Big  Four  law 
firms in the Korean legal market.142 This raised the possibility that 
Nagashima & Ohno might attempt to use the first-mover advantage 
of its merger to clearly dominate the Big Four firms in Tokyo rather 
than being the first among relative equals. 
Within  a  few  years,  two  other  Big  Four  rivals  and  the  fifth 
largest firm similarly had acquired smaller firms with  well-known 
specialties,  and  the  remaining  Big  Four  firm,  Anderson  Mori, 
undertook its own merger in 2005 (see Table 8).  More importantly, 
merger  announcement,  the  prevailing  view  in  Japan  was  that  it  would  be  “quite 
difficult to expect the creation of a law firm of several hundred lawyers as seen in 
Europe and the U.S.”  See Shoichiro Niwayama & Kazuhiko Yamagishi, Nihon in okeru 
Kyodai Horitsu Jimusho  no Kanosei  [The  Possibility  of  Large-scale  Law  Offices in 
Japan] 49 J
IYU 
T
S
EIGI 
34, 40 (Nov. 1998).  In 1998, the biggest law firm in Japan was 
sixty-three  lawyers,  and  adding  lawyers  to  account  for  a  10%  annual  increase  in 
business would lead to a firm of 170 lawyers in ten years.  In addition, the supply 
constraint on the number of new attorneys meant that it would be difficult for one firm 
to  grow  at  a  substantially  larger  rate  than  the  overall  increase  in  the  attorney 
population.  Id.  This popular analysis did not give any consideration to the possibility 
of a merger between elite firms and most likely underestimated the increase in both 
the demand for corporate legal services and the supply of attorneys, as well as the 
increasing attraction of elite corporate firms for new lawyers.   
140.  There is little direct evidence that clients truly demanded larger law firms 
in  order  to  service  their  legal  needs.    There  is,  however,  anecdotal  evidence  that 
lawyers feared losing client business if they fell behind other firms.  See, e.g., infra note 
141.  On a related matter, there is little evidence that large law firms in Japan have a 
clear view of an efficient or “appropriate” size for corporate law firms.  
141.   See Yasuharu Nagashima, Nihon no Roo Faamu no Gappei to Diakiboka ni 
tsuite [Concerning the Merger and Large-scale Growth of Japanese Law Firms], 50 
J
IYU 
T
S
EIGI 
14 (1999). 
142.  Id. at 24.  In explaining that the first law firm in Japan with over 100 
lawyers was not truly a large firm, Mr. Nagashima noted that even in Korea, Kim and 
Chang had 150 lawyers.  Id.  Taking into account that Korea’s population is roughly 
one-third that of Japan, even to match Korea’s largest firm on a per capita basis, a 
Tokyo firm would require some 450 lawyers.  Id.   
control application system:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
816 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
the stakes were now raised and competition intensified.  In this new 
environment,  mid-sized  firms  (second-tier  firms  of  ten  to  thirty 
lawyers)  in  Tokyo  faced  new  concerns  about  maintaining  a  stable 
business,  as  they  feared  losing  work  from  even  long-established 
clients.  These firms also lost good associates to elite Japanese firms 
and foreign joint venture firms and began to encounter difficulty in 
attracting the best new lawyers.143 Within a few years several of the 
mid-sized  firms  dissolved,  which  was  a  new  phenomenon  in  the 
Japanese legal market.144  In one case, two mid-sized firms merged 
with  the  intention  of  creating  a  firm  that  could  compete  more 
effectively with larger rivals.145  
________________________________________________________________ 
143.  In one typical example, the founding partner of an internationally oriented 
and stable mid-sized corporate firm with some fifteen lawyers stated in a  conversation 
in the fall of 1999 (following the announcement of the Nagashima & Ohno merger) that 
he had no interest in growing his firm and felt no need to do so.  He explained that 
nearly all of his client relationships were longstanding ones of twenty or thirty years 
and expressed confidence in his firm’s ability to continue on its traditional course.  In a 
subsequent meeting with  the same partner less than two years later, he had changed 
his mind.  He complained that clients paid too much attention to law firm size and 
merger announcements and stated that he now intended to substantially increase the 
size of his firm by hiring new attorneys. 
144.  See Table 8. 
145.  As of February 1, 2003, the Law Department of Tokyo City Law & Tax 
Partners merged with Yuwa Partners to form City-Yuwa Partners.  See id.   
control application system:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
www.rasteredge.com
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
817 
TABLE 8 
LAW FIRM MERGERS IN JAPAN 
Effective 
Date 
Merger Partners 
No. of 
Lawyers 
Specialty of 
Smaller Firm 
01-01-2000 
Nagashima & Ohno  
Tsunematsu, Yanase & 
Sekine 
69 
24 
Finance 
05-01-2001 
Tokyo Aoyama/Baker 
McKenzie 
Aoki & Partners 
42 
16 
Securities 
10-01-2002 
Asahi Law Offices 
Komatsu, Koma & 
Nishikawa 
77 
17 
International & 
Corporate 
01-01-2003 
Mori Sogo 
Hamada & Matsumoto 
92 
42 
Securities 
01-01-2003 
Tokyo City 
Yuwa Partners 
27 
20 
Real Estate 
International & 
Corporate 
01-01-2004 
Nishimura & Partners 
Tokiwa Sogo 
137 
14 
Bankruptcy 
01-01-2005 
Anderson Mori 
Tomotsune & Kimura 
134 
23 
Securities 
04-01-2005 
Linklaters 
Group from Mitsui Yasuda 
30 
30 
Finance 
07-01-2005 
Mori Hamada & 
Matsumoto 
Max Law Offices 
191 
13 
Intellectual 
Property 
07-01-2007 
Nishimura & Partners 
Asahi Law Office 
(International Division) 
234 
84 
Source: Firm announcements/websites.  See Anderson, Mori & Tomotsune, 
http://www.andersonmoritomotsune.com/en/ (last visited March 25, 2007); Asahi 
Koma Law Offices, http://www.alo.jp/english/ (last visited March 25, 2007); Baker 
& McKenzie GJBJ Tokyo Aoyama Aoki Law Office, https://www.taalo-
bakernet.com/e/ top.html (last visted March 25, 2007); City-Yuwa Partners, 
http://www.city-yuwa.com/en/ (last visited March 25, 2007); Linklaters, 
www.linklaters.com (last visited March 25, 2007); Mori Hamada & Matsumoto, 
http://www.mhmjapan.com/ home_en/ (last visited March 25, 2007); Nagashima, 
Ohno & Tsunematsu, http://www.noandt.com/english/index.html (last visited 
March 25, 2007); Nishimura & Partners, http://www.jurists.co.jp/en/index.html 
(last visited March 25, 2007); Nishimura & Partners, 
http://www.jurists.co.jp/en/topic/2007/t003.shtml (last visited June 4, 2007).  
The unexpected and continuing rapid growth of large corporate 
law firms from the  year 2000 was due to a  number of  factors.  In 
addition  to  the  steadily  increasing  demand  for  corporate  legal 
services, there was a one-time boost to the number of new attorneys 
in  the  year  2000  and  a  gradually  increasing  supply  of  attorneys 
control application system:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
www.rasteredge.com
control application system:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
818 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
thereafter.146  Another significant factor was the growing recognition 
of both the importance of law and lawyers generally and the rising 
popularity of large corporate law firms in particular.147  Increasing 
competition  among  firms  to  recruit  highly  qualified  attorneys148 
________________________________________________________________ 
146.  The number  of  Institute graduates  per  class  had already doubled  from 
about 500 in 1990 to 1,000 in the year 2000.  Recommendations of the Justice System 
Reform Council, supra note 133, at ch. III, pt. 1-1.  However, the number who chose to 
become attorneys, rather than judges or prosecutors, was relatively steady during the 
period 1995-1999 and averaged in the low 400s per year.  See White Paper, supra note 
123, at 69.  As part of the legal reform program, the length of the Institute training 
program was shortened from  two years to one year, in anticipation of the new law 
schools providing more of the practical training component of legal education.  Id.  As a 
result, two Institute classes  graduated  in  the same year  (2000).   Id.   A  somewhat 
greater percentage of Institute graduates chose to become lawyers than in the recent 
past, with the number of new lawyers in the year 2000 jumping to over 1,100.  Id.  This 
occurred at a time when demand for corporate legal services was increasing, and the 
leading corporate law firms were achieving a higher profile, as exemplified by the first 
merger in 2000.  The large firms stepped up their recruitment efforts, inviting large 
numbers of Institute trainees for recruiting visits at an earlier stage than in the past.   
After the year 2000, the number of Institute graduates again increased from 1,000 to 
1,500 in 2006.  The number of new lawyers increased to roughly 600 in 2001-2002, 700 
in 2003, and over 900 in 2004.  Id. at 69.  The legal reform plan calls for another 
doubling of the number of Institute trainees from the current 1,500 to 3,000 by the year 
2010.  See Recommendations of the Justice System Reform Council Report, supra note 
133, at ch. III, pt.1-1.   
147.  The increasing importance of lawyers could be measured in a number of 
ways.  For a study of the increasing popularity of the bar exam compared with the elite 
public servants’ exam, see Curtis J. Milhaupt & Mark D. West, Law’s Dominion and 
the Market for Legal Elites in Japan, 34 L
AW 
&
P
OL
’Y
I
NT
B
US
. 451 (2003) (discussing 
the increasing  popularity of the  bar  exam compared with the elite public servant’s 
exam). 
Law firms have also received increasing media exposure over the last few years, as 
Japan’s leading business daily, Nihon Keizai Shinbun, created a new full-time beat 
reporter for legal issues.   Similarly, lawyers have appeared more regularly on popular 
television shows and a new legal press, exemplified by a new monthly magazine The 
Lawyer, has begun to appear.  Although there are no regular ranking tables of law 
firms, much of the media exposure focused on the large, elite firms, particularly the Big 
Four  firms.    Young  lawyers  may  have  come  to  view  the  representation  of  large 
corporations in an increasingly positive light as a method of promoting the rule of law 
and contributing  to  Japan’s  recovery from  its  malaise  of the  1990s.   A  number of 
anecdotal reports indicate  that  positions with the leading corporate  law firms  have 
become  the  most attractive career  option for  top  Institute  graduates.   As in  most 
countries, only a relatively small percentage of lawyers work at elite law firms, see 
Table 1, and even a modest increase in that percentage would presumably be sufficient 
to  increase the growth rate.   That appears to be happening in Japan.   Comparing 
percentages between year-end 2001 and year-end 2004, attorneys working at the firms 
with over 100 lawyers increased from 1.3% to 4.15% of the total attorney population, 
and for firms with over fifty lawyers the percentage increased from 2.3% to 5.15%.  See 
Bengoshi  Hakusho  2002  Nenpan  [Attorney  White  Paper  2002  Edition]  41  (Nihon 
Bengoshi Rengokai ed., 2002); White Paper, supra note 123, at 91.   
148.  For recruiting  efforts,  see supra  note 137.   As noted, all new  Japanese 
lawyers, who traditionally had to pass through a hellish exam process with a 2-3% pass 
rate, would presumably make capable attorneys.  See supra note 132 (describing the 
exam process).  Nevertheless, firms complain about declining attorney quality and have 
competed vigorously to find the top candidates.  As student grades at the Institute are 
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
819 
further raised the  profile  of  the  top  firms  as  a  group  among  new 
lawyers.   Law  firm  mergers  added  to  the  base  size  of  firms, thus 
increasing the size of their new attorney classes, and also aided in 
recruiting top talent.149  The internal structure of Japanese firms also 
evolved along with their size, as a number of the top firms developed 
 structure  similar  to  a  partnership,  which  enabled  them  to  take 
advantage  of  opportunities  for  relatively  rapid  growth  in  recent 
years.150  Lateral hiring, although increasing in Japan, has not been 
a significant factor in the rapid growth of elite firms.151     
The activities  and  potential  role  of  foreign  law firms has  also 
been  an  important  question  in  Japan,  as  it  is  the  only  country 
confidential, top candidates are ranked by the prestige of their undergraduate school 
and the speed with which they pass the notoriously difficult bar exam (i.e., on average 
it can take five years of study to pass the exam; a candidate passing on his first or 
second try  would  be  well regarded).   Although this  may  bear little relationship  to 
lawyering skills, as noted earlier, that is also true in other countries such as the United 
States.   In  the Japanese  context,  these  are the  criteria  by  which  firms  signal  the 
prestige of their new hires and the quality of the firm. 
The legal reform program has resulted in a new bar exam for graduates of the new 
law schools, and it is anticipated that the bar passage rate will increase to the range of 
70-80%.  Recommendations of the Justice System Reform Council, supra note 133, at 
ch. III,  pt. 2-2.   Although  this means that the law school attended will provide  an 
additional factor in evaluating a new attorney, it is unlikely that firms’ basic approach 
to identifying the top candidates for recruitment will change significantly.  
149.  Mergers  inevitably  attracted  media  coverage,  raised  firm  profiles,  and 
aided in recruiting, as new attorneys possess very limited information about law firms.  
However, there is little evidence that this effect was long term, especially since new 
mergers took precedence over prior mergers.  In addition, a new Japanese attorney 
with an interest working at a Big Four firm could easily interview all of the relevant 
firms and base a decision on personal impression in addition to firm reputation. 
150.  See  supra  note  139  (describing  the  traditional  firm  structure  in  Japan 
which focused on a boss and followers).  Although until recently there was no formal 
partnership or other legal structure available for law firms under Japanese law, some 
leading  firms  essentially  replicated  such  a  structure  on  a  contractual  basis.    For 
example,  although  the  firm’s  managing  partner  might  sign  an  office  lease  in  his 
individual capacity and not in the firm’s name (as the firm was not a legal entity), the 
contract  among  the  firm’s  partners  would  contain  the  necessary  indemnification, 
contribution, and other provisions to essentially make the lease obligations those of all 
the partners, at least as an internal matter.  Partner/associate ratios have traditionally 
been low, and until recently it was  assumed that the Japanese  practice of lifetime 
employment also prevailed among elite law firms, with every interested associate given 
a good opportunity to become a partner.  With the rapid growth of elite firms in the last 
several  years,  which  has  centered  on  increased  hiring  of  young  attorneys, 
partner/associate  ratios  have  also  increased  and  the  assumption  of  permanent 
employment is now beginning to change.  
151.  Lateral movement by Japanese attorneys is increasing, in response to new 
employment  opportunities  with  foreign  firms,  corporations,  and  others.    Kay-Wah 
Chan, Foreign Law Firms:  Implications for Professional Legal Education in Japan, 20 
J. J
APAN 
L. 55, 67 (2005), available at http://law.anu.edu.au/anjel/documents/ZJapanR/ 
ZJapanR20_08_Chan.pdf.    However,  hiring  by  the large  firms  has  focused on  new 
attorneys.   Foreign  law  firms have  been active in  the  lateral market,  hiring  both 
associates and partners.  Id. at 68.  It is still quite rare for a partner at a Big Four firm 
to make a lateral move.   
820 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
included in this Article where, until as recently as 2005, restrictions 
on the activities of foreign lawyers were a significant issue.152   The 
Japanese  bar  association  has  historically  resisted  liberalization  of 
restrictions  on  foreign  attorneys,  citing  concerns  of  professional 
autonomy  and  the social role of  lawyers.153   Foreign  lawyers were 
first  formally  allowed  to practice  in Japan under  a  law  passed  in 
1986154 and were allowed to  give advice on  the  law of their  home 
country.  They were not, however, allowed to hire or combine with 
Japanese lawyers.155    
Legal services were an issue  in U.S.-Japan trade negotiations, 
and the Japanese proposed a compromise solution: An amendment to 
the  law  in  1994  provided  that  foreign  law  firms  could  ally  with 
Japanese firms in a joint venture relationship (tokutei kyodo jigyo or 
specific joint enterprise) and that the joint venture could employ both 
foreign  and  Japanese  lawyers  in  a  domestic  (Japan  only) 
partnership.156  Foreign firms were still forbidden to hire Japanese 
lawyers directly or to form international partnerships with Japanese 
firms.157  Although these joint ventures were initially insignificant, 
they have now grown to the point where a few of them provide some 
competition with Japanese firms (see Table 9).  In 2003 the Japanese 
parliament passed a law that allowed full integration between foreign 
and Japanese law firms from April 1, 2005, and a number of the joint 
ventures merged with the foreign parent firm.158  
________________________________________________________________ 
152.  See J. Mark Ramseyer, Lawyers, Foreign Lawyers, and Lawyer-Substitutes:  
The Market for Regulation in Japan, 27 H
ARV
.
I
NT
L.
J.
499 (1986). 
153.  These concerns have often been greeted with skepticism outside Japan and 
not only by self-interested lawyers at international law firms.  See, e.g., id. 
154.  See Gaikoku Bengoshi ni Yoru Horitsu Jimu no Toriatsukai in Kansuru 
Tokubetsu  Sochi  Ho  [Special  Measures  Law  Concerning  the  Handling  of  Legal 
Business by Foreign Lawyers], Law No. 66 of 1986.  The law became effective April 1, 
1987.   
155.  Id. 
156.  See id.  It became effective January 1, 1995.  In addition to formation of 
joint enterprises, it permitted foreign firms to use their firm names in Japan rather 
than forcing firms to use the name of the individual partner who registered under the 
law.  It also eased professional experience and reciprocity requirements.  Additional 
minor amendments were enacted in 1996 and 1998 to further liberalize the law.  Id. 
(amended 1989, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1998). 
157.   Id. 
158.  See, e.g., Paul Hastings Announces Integration with Taiyo Law  Office in 
Tokyo, 
Sept. 
12, 
2005, 
available 
at 
http://www.paulhastings.com/ 
NewsDetail.aspx?NewsID=65.    This  permits  Japanese  partners  of  the  local  joint 
venture to become equity partners of the international partnership.  Other firms were 
content to change the names of the Japanese joint ventures.  See e.g., Clifford Chance 
Tanaka  Akita  &  Nakagawa  becomes  Clifford  Chance,  Mar.  30,  2005,  available  at 
www.cliffordchance.com/default.aspx? langID=UK&contentitemid=8290.   
2007] 
                  Elite Law Firm Mergers 
821 
TABLE 9 
LARGEST FOREIGN JOINT VENTURE FIRMS 
Firm 
Japanese Lawyers 
(Bengoshi) 
Foreign Lawyers 
(Gaiben) 
Total 
Lawyers 
Tokyo Aoyama Aoki 
(Baker & McKenzie) 
59 
11 
70 
White & Case 
26 
24 
50 
Linklaters* 
30 
38 
Ito & Mitomi (Morrison 
Foerster) 
21 
12 
33 
Taiyo (Paul Hastings) 
25 
32 
Freshfields 
23 
28 
Jones Day 
24 
27 
(Current as of March 31, 2005) 
*Does not include effect of the merger between Linklaters and a group from Mitsui 
Yasuda, which became effective on April 1, 2005 (see Table 8). 
Source:  2005 White Paper, supra note 123, at 88.  
New interest in the legal market and law firms and the pending 
abolition of the remaining significant restrictions on the activities of 
foreign  law firms also intensified interest  in  international  mergers 
and alliances.  With a growing domestic legal market with relatively 
few players, elite Japanese firms are content to be leaders in their 
domestic market, especially given the relative handicaps of Japanese 
language  and  expertise  in  Japanese  law.    But  this  was  also 
presumably true for German firms.  Lawyers within the Japanese bar 
association who opposed full liberalization of activities of foreign law 
firms  pointed  to  the  German  example  and  warned  that  Japanese 
firms might also be swallowed up by global giants.159    
This fear was put to the test by the first international merger in 
2005 between Linklaters, one of the magic circle U.K. firms, and the 
firm  of  Mitsui  Yasuda  Wani  &  Maeda.    Mitsui  Yasuda  was  the 
number six firm in Japan—a firm which, like Rogers & Wells in the 
United States prior to its merger with Clifford Chance, engaged in 
sophisticated  financial  work but  was  nevertheless unable  to  break 
into the small group of first-tier firms. The press in both the West and 
Japan portrayed this merger, perhaps inaccurately, as a direct result 
of  liberalization  of  the  legal  restrictions  on  foreign  law  firms.160  
________________________________________________________________ 
159.  See Akira Kawamura, Bengoshi Seido Henkaku no Sekaiteki na Choryu to 
WTO [Global Trends in Changes in the Lawyers’ System and the WTO],  53 J
IYU 
T
S
EIGI 
14,  17  (2002) (citing  the upheaval among  German firms  due to  international 
mergers and alliances and the ongoing changes in Japan due to the establishment and 
operations of joint ventures with international law firms, and further predicting that 
complete liberalization of restrictions on foreign lawyers and law firms would cause a 
similar upheaval in Japan).   
160.  See, e.g., Jill Schachner Chanen, Konnichiwa Bengoshi!  Japan is Set to 
Relax Foreign Partnership Rules,  and Competition  for  Mergers  is  On,  A.B.A.  J.  19 
822 
VANDERBILT JOURNAL OF TRANSNATIONAL LAW 
[Vol. 40:763 
Although  the  initial  intention  on  both sides  was  for  Linklaters  to 
absorb the entire firm, Mitsui Yasuda split as a result of the proposed 
merger.161  This unanticipated result may have had a chilling effect 
on the possibility of additional international mergers.  Nevertheless, 
leaders of the Big Four firms, who consistently state that they intend 
to  remain  purely  Japanese  firms,  all  hedge  their  statements  with 
references  to  competitive  market  conditions.162    This  presumably 
means that if a Big Four (i.e., first-tier) firm merged with a foreign 
firm  or  if  one  or  more  foreign  joint  venture  firms  became  serious 
competitors  of  the Big  Four  firms,  all of the  first-tier  firms  would 
accordingly reevaluate their positions.   
The  latest  announced  merger  is  between  the  substantial 
international group of Asahi Law Offices, the fifth largest firm, and 
Nishimura &  Partners, one of the  Big Four firms (see  Table 8).163  
This merger will be significant in that Asahi is not a specialized firm 
that  would  strengthen  an  important  area  of  Nishimura’s  practice.  
Rather,  it  would  appear  to  be  the  first  merger  in  Japan  where 
achieving  size  and  increase  specialization—becoming  the  largest 
Japanese law firm through a merger—can be viewed as an important, 
and perhaps even the primary, consideration for the larger firm.   
(2005);  Legal  Entry:  Japan’s  Lawyers  Discover  Globalization,  E
CONOMIST
July  17, 
2004, at 66; Eihoritsu Jimusho, Mitsui Yasuda wo Kyushu, Kaisei Gaikoku Bengoshiho 
de Hatsu [English Firm to Absorb Mitsui Yasuda, First Under the Revised Foreign 
Attorneys Law] N
IHON 
K
EIZAI 
S
HINBUN
, July 12, 2004, at 1.   It is true that pending 
liberalization acted as an impetus for English (and U.S.) firms to begin a new round of 
approaches to Japanese firms.  It also marked the first time that foreign firms could 
reward  partners  in  their  Japanese  counterpart  firms  with  full  equity  partnership 
positions in the acquiring firm.  However, it is not entirely clear whether liberalization 
of the activities of foreign lawyers had a decisive impact on alliance/merger prospects.  
Over the last few years the foreign affiliated venture firms have grown substantially, 
function fairly well on a daily basis utilizing both U.S. and Japanese attorneys, and 
have  learned  to  reduce  the  expense  and  inconvenience  resulting  from  their  joint 
venture structure to a bare minimum.  In an interview with a leader of the Mitsui 
Yasuda group, which joined Linklaters, he downplayed the role of the new law and 
emphasized his desire to continue to focus on crossborder transactions at a time when 
the  largest  Japanese  firms  were  shifting  to  a  more  domestic-oriented  corporate 
practice.  However, the new law probably did have a significant impact on perceptions, 
as a  Japanese  lawyer  might be more  willing to become  a  full  equity partner  in  a 
London-based global firm than join a joint venture. 
161.  See Chan, supra note 151, at 60-63. 
162.  See,  e.g.,  Zadankai:    Daikibo  Horitsu  Jimusho  no  Gendai  to  Shorai 
[Roundtable: The Present and Future of Large-scale Law Firms] 57 J
IYU 
T
S
EIGI 
12, 
46-49 (May 2006). 
163.  The two  firms  signed  an  agreement  in principle  to integrate their law 
practices on April 14, 2006.  See Nishimura & Partners: Commencement of Discussions 
Towards  Integration  with  Asahi  Koma  Law  Offices  (2006),  available  at 
http://www.jurists.co.jp/ en/topic/2006/t004.shtml.  The merger became effective on July 
1,  2007.    See  Nishimura  &  Partners:  Nishimura  &  Partners  and  Kokusai  Bumon 
International Division) of Asahi Law Offices to Integrate in July-To be the Largest Law 
Firm in Japan- (2007), available at http://www.jurists.co.jp/ en/topic/2007/t003.shtml. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested