devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Delete pages of pdf reader control SDK platform web page winforms asp.net web browser Artigo-ACSM-2009_Exercise-and-physical-activity-for-older-adults-610-part923

SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Interventions for addressing low balance
confidence in older adults: a systematic
review and meta-analysis
D
EBBIE
R
AND
1
,W
ILLIAM
C. M
ILLER
2
,J
EANNE
Y
IU
2,3
,J
ANICE
J. E
NG
4
1
Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University,
Tel Aviv, Israel
2
Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
3
Neuroscience Program, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
4
Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Address correspondence to: D. Rand. Tel: (+972) 3 6406551; Fax: (+972) 36409933. Email: drand@post.tau.ac.il
Abstract
Background: low balance confidence is a major health problem among older adults restricting their participation in daily
life.
Objectives: to determinewhat interventions aremost effective in increasing balance confidence in older adults.
Design: systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials including at least one continuous end point of
balance confidence. Studies, including adults 60 years or older without a neurological condition, were included in our study.
Methods: the standardised mean difference (SMD) of continuous end points of balance confidence was calculated to esti-
mate the pooled effect size with random-effect models. Methodological quality of trials was assessed using the Physical
Therapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale.
Results: thirty studies were included in this review and a meta-analysis was conducted for 24 studies. Interventions were
pooled into exercise (n=9 trials, 453 subjects), Tai Chi (n=5 trials, 468 subjects), multifactorial intervention (n=10 trials,
1,233 subjects). Low significant effects were found for exercise and multifactorial interventions (SMD 0.22–0.31) and
medium (SMD 0.48) significant effects were found for Tai Chi.
Conclusion: Tai chi interventions are the most beneficial in increasing the balance confidence of older adults.
Keywords:balanceconfidence,randomisedcontrolledtrials,olderadults,elderly,systematicreview
Introduction
Low balanceconfidence(BC) and/or falls self-efficacy [13]
is a major health problem, which can lead to avoidance of
activities [2], causing restriction of physical activities [4] and
participation in daily life [5]. This restriction can result in
physical frailty, falls and loss of independence [4,6]. Thus it
is important to evaluatethe effectiveness of strategies which
addresstheBCof older adults.
Self-efficacy refers to one’s perception of capability
within a certain domain [7]. Three similar self-report tools
have been created to capture the notion of self-efficacy
with respect to falling or losing one’s balance. The 10-item
Falls Efficacy Scale (FES) and the Modified FES were
designed to capture an individual’s ability to perform activi-
ties of daily living without falling [3,8]. As indicated by the
name of the tool, the 16 Activities-specific Balance
Confidence (ABC) Scale reports on the individual’s per-
ceived ability to perform activities without losing balance
[1]. The ABC was created to extend on the FES’s respon-
siveness by adding items that were deemed to be more
challenging. Whileit could be argued that there is a concep-
tual difference between losing one’s balance and falling,
these tools have been shown to be correlated [1,9], which
may explain why these terms are frequently used inter-
changeably. In this review, we aimed to focus on low BCor
low falls self-efficacy, which negatively affects daily living
297
Ageand Ageing2011; 40: 297–306
doi:10.1093/ageing/afr037
©The Author 2011.Published byOxford University Press on behalfofthe BritishGeriatrics Society.
Allrightsreserved.ForPermissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
Delete pages of pdf reader - control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
www.rasteredge.com
Delete pages of pdf reader - control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
www.rasteredge.com
and has not been specifically researched before. Therefore,
the term BC will be used.
Anumber of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have
assessed the effectiveness of different interventions on BC.
Interventions to increase BC have included balance training
(e.g. [10]), exercise (e.g. [11]) and Tai Chi (e.g. [12]), in
addition to using assistive devises such as hip protectors
(e.g. [13]). In a systematic review, Zijlstra et al. [14] aimed to
determine which interventions were effective to reduce fear
of falling among older adults. However, only 3 of the 19
studies included in the review had a primary goal of redu-
cing fear of falling (others were aimed primarily at reducing
falls), which may have an effect on the clinical applications
of reducing fear of falling [15]. The increased number of
new publications in this field since 2007 enabled us also to
conduct a meta-analyses and we aimed to focus only on
the BC construct.
The objective of this systematic review was to assess the
published peer reviewed literature of RCTs focused on BC
of older adults and to determine what type of interventions
are most effective in increasing BC in older adults.
Methods
This meta-analyses report was written in accordance with
the guidelines of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items
for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement [16].
This statement revised the 1999 QUOROM statement
aiming to improve the quality of reporting meta-analyses of
RCTs.
Searching
During 2008–09, computerised bibliographic databases
including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO
and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (such as the
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews) were searched
for relevant articles published in peer reviewed journals.
In addition we hand searched key journals on aging and
gerontology. See Supplementary data available in Age
and Ageing onlinefor an exampleof the search strategy.
Studyselection
RCTs published by December 2009, including at least one
(primary or secondary) continuous end point of BC (FES,
MFES or ABC), were included. The target age range was a
mean of 60 years or older. Trials were excluded if the
samples included individuals with a neurological condition
(e.g. stroke, Parkinson’s disease). Since fractures are a
common consequence of falling, older adults with ortho-
paedic conditions (e.g. hip fractures) were included in the
study. Trials which used a single question (e.g. ‘Are you
afraid of falling?’) were also excluded since these questions
are not sensitive and measure the construct of fear of
falling (a phobia) rather than BC [17].
Validityassessment
Methodological quality of trials was assessed using the
Physical Therapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale [18].
The scale rates the trial’s methodological quality and ranges
from 0 to10 points. One point is awarded to each of the
11 criterions if it is fully satisfied. The point for the first
item (eligibility criteria) is not included in the total score.
Good quality RCTs were defined as scores ranging from 6
to 8 points, fair quality RCTs had PEDro scores ranging
from 4 to 5 points and poor quality RCTs had 3 points or
less on the PEDro score [19]. Adhering to the Delphi
Principle, a third rater was brought in when any disagree-
ment occurred at all stages of the rating process. The raters
were not blinded to authors’ names or institution.
Data abstraction and study characteristics
Two individuals independently rated the titles and abstracts.
Once the final article list was determined, they reviewed
and extracted information regarding participants, interven-
tions, comparisons, outcomes and study design (PICOS).
Since not all of the studies had retention assessments, base-
line scores were compared with the first assessment after
the end of the intervention. The interventions provided to
the experimental groups were pooled according to type of
intervention and were compared with the control group,
which varied in type of intervention (for example, conven-
tional exercise, usual care and education). When a third
arm of intervention was provided, the experimental group
was compared with the control group and not another
treatment. For trials that provided exercise as the interven-
tion, the type of exercise was determined by assessing its
components; strengthening, functional balance training
(including exercises such as sit to stand) or task specific
exercises (such as stepping, standing). If the intervention
included at least two of the three components, the interven-
tion was termed exercise. If the intervention included only
one component such as balance training the name of the
intervention remained the same as in the trial. Tai Chi was
classified in a category by itself because of the number of
trials using it as an intervention. Multifactorial interventions
were defined if the intervention involved a home and indi-
vidual assessment and treatment planning including;
reduction in environmental hazards, review of medication,
education and exercise/training.
Quantitative data synthesis
The end point outcome measures in the RCTs were all
continuous scales of BC or falls efficacy; the ABC, FES,
MFES (modified FES). These scales measure a similar con-
struct and significant correlations have been reported [9].
Data management and statistical analysis
The mean difference and standard deviation (SD) between
pre and post intervention for both groups were extracted.
298
D. Rand et al.
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 1. The30 trials included in the systematicreviewand meta-analysis divided into the types of interventions
Study
Participants(totaln),
mean(SD)/range age, subjects
End point
outcome
measure
(1/2)
a
PEDro
Score
(_/10)
Intervention;duration(sessionsper week);
focusofintervention
Intervention
received bythe
control group
Results,
+/0*
Exercise
Campbell etal.
[27]
211,mean age84years, women
FES2
8
8weeks(4×week); PTvisit+therapist
prescribedexercisesand walking planto
maintainthree times aweek. Strengthening,
balance, walking, bending, stair climbing.
Weretelephonedfor motivation
Usualcare
0
Williamsetal.
[28]
31,mean 82.8(6.54)years, elderly ABC1
4
16weeks(4–5×week); controlgroup—home
exercise programme with home follow-up
visitsevery2weeks and aphonecall in
alternateweeks. Balanceandmobility tasks
(such astandemand backwardwalking,
stooping andcrouchingto pickup objects
fromthefloor)were included
Exercisewith
efficacy
intervention
0
Brouwer etal.
[29]
30,77.5 (5.3)years, elderlywith
concernsaboutfalling
ABC1
7
8weeks(2×weekfor 40min); warmup,
low-resistanceexercises, reaching,marching
Education
+
Lui-Ambrose
[30]
98,mean 79(3)years,women
ABC1
5
13weeks(2×50min); agilitytraining group
—aimedatchallenging hand-eye
coordination, foot-eye coordination,
balanceandpsychomotor performance.
Included ballgames,relay races, dance
movementsandobstacle; courses
Unsupervised
exercise
+
Schoenfelder
and Rubenstein
[31]
67,84years(range 64–100),
elderly
FES1
6
10weeks(3×weekfor 15–20min); ankle
strengthening; plusasupervised walking
programme
Usualcare
+
Devereuxetal.
[32]
47,mean age73.3 (4),women
mFES1
8
10weeks(2×weekfor 1h)of water-based
exerciseand self-managementprogramme.
(Including warm-up,stretches, aerobic,Tai
Chi, strength, posture,gait,vestibular,
proprioception, andbalanceactivities.)
Usualcare
0
Southard [33]
35,mean age87years, elderly
ABC1
5
4weeks(3×weekfor 20min); control group;
obstaclecourse,sidestepping, marching,
squats
Exercisewith
efficacy
intervention
0
Weerdesteyn
etal. [34]
72,mean age74, fallers
ABC2
4
5weeks(2×weekfor 90min); balance,gait,
coordination, walking exercisesandfall
techniques
Usualcare
+
Araietal.[11]
137,74(5.5),elderly
FES1
5
12weeks(2×week); increasing muscular
strength ofthelowerextremities,balance
functions,flexibilityand daily functions
such asclimbing stairs
Education
0
Tai Chi
McCormack
etal. [35]
27,mean age79.1 (5.9),elderly
mFES1
6
10weeks(2×week); range of motiondance
method (similar toTai Chi)
Conventional
exercise
0
Li [36]
188,mean 72(5.5)years, riskof
falling
ABC1
7
26weeks(3×weekfor 1h)
Unsupervised
exercise
+
Sattin etal. [37] 242,mean age81, elderly
ABC1
6
48weeks(2×week)
Education
+
Zhangetal.
[12]
47,70(4), elderly
FES1
6
8weeks(7×weekfor 1h)
Usualcare
+
Loggheetal.
[38]
141,mean age77(4.7)years,risk
offalling
FES2
8
13weeks(2×weekfor 1h)
Usualcare
0
Multifactoral treatment
Elley etal. [39] 312,mean age80(5.0),fallers
mFES2
8
Homevisitandassessmentbyanurse. She
referredthemto exerciseprogramme, to
an OT for homeadjustments
Social visits
0
Tinetti etal.
[40]
287,mean age78years, riskof
falling
FES2
6
24weeks(1–2weekfor 1h); home-basedleg
strengthening, balanceand walking+
multifactorial intervention involving
adjustmentin medications,behavioural
instructionsand exerciseprogrammes
aimed atmodifying riskfactors
Visits bya social
worker
+
Continued
299
Interventions for addressing low balance confidence in older adults
control SDK platform:C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
www.rasteredge.com
.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 1. Continued
Study
Participants(total n),
mean(SD)/rangeage, subjects
End point
outcome
measure
(1/2)
a
PEDro
Score
(_/10)
Intervention;duration (sessionsper week);
focusof intervention
Intervention
receivedby the
controlgroup
Results,
+/0*
van Haastregt
etal.[41]
235, mean age77 years,fallers
FES2
4
8weeks(3–4× weekfor15 repetitions);
strengthandpostural stabilityexercises+
five visits fromacommunitynurse overa
year
Usual care
+
Clemson[42]
283, mean 78(5.5)years, fallers
mFES2
7
7weeks(2×weekfor 1h); follow-up visit 6
weeksafter programme fromOT. 1.5hof
booster session3monthsafter
programme. Programme incorporateslower
limb balanceandstrengthexercises,coping
withvisualloss, medication management,
environmental and behavioural homesafety
andcommunitysafety
Social visits
0
Huang and
Acton[43]
113, mean 72years(5.5)older
personsdwelling in the
community
FES1
5
Multifactor standardised individualised
intervention—improving theknowledge of
medicationsafety,decreasing homehazards
Usual care
+
Davisonetal.
[44]
182, mean 77(7)years, riskof
falling
ABC2
8
Multifactorialintervention(medical,
physiotherapy, occupationaltherapy).
Medication,visionand cardiovascular
assessmentand treatment
recommendations. Gait/balance
assessmentand interventions. Assessment
ofhomeenvironmentalhazards
Usual care
+
Gitlin etal. [45] 285, mean 79(6)years, riskof
falling
FES1
8
Occupational andphysicaltherapysessions
involving home modificationsandtraining
intheir use. Instructionsandstrategiesof
problem solving, energy conservation,safe
performance and fallrecoverytechniques.
Balance andmusclestrengthtraining
Usual care
+
Zidenetal.
[46]
102, mean age82 (6.8),after hip
fracture
FES1
7
Ageriatric, multi-professional home
rehabilitationprogrammefocusedon
supported discharge,independenceindaily
activitiesandenhancing physical activity
andconfidence in performing daily
activities
Usual care
+
Vindetal.[47] 492, mean age74 years,fallers
dischargedfrom hospital
ABC2
8
Medianof13weeksofintervention,median
ofsixvisitstotheoutpatientclinic.
Participantswere examinedbyateamto
diagnose the reasonofthefall. Participants
weremedicallytreated or referredto
specialists,patientswithdecreasedvisual
acuity were askedto seeaneye specialist.
Physiotherapistsprovided progressive,
individualised exerciseor/and home
exercises
Usual care
+
Ziden[48]
102, mean 81(6)years, hip
fracture
FES1
8
Home rehabilitationprogramme wasspecially
designed foreachparticipant. Pre discharge
goalsetting andpostdischarge of 3weeks
(4.5homevisits)byanOTor PT to
encourage self-efficiencyandphysical
activity
Usual care
+
Other interventions
Cameron etal.
[13]
131, >74yearsof age
community-dwelling women at
risk for hipfracture
FES/
mFES1
8
Hipprotectors
Usual care
+
Hinman [23]
58, mean age 72, elderly
mFES1
4
4weeks(3×weekfor 20min);computerised
balance training programme—exercise
using the BiodexBalanceSystemhome
programme ofbalance exercises
Unsupervised
exercise
0
Hameland
Lajoie [26]
20, 82years(range65–90),
elderlypersonsliving in
housing cooperatives
ABC2
3
6weeks(7×week)of traininginmental
imagery
Usual care
0
Continued
300
D. Rand et al.
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
www.rasteredge.com
When only the median and inter-quartile range were
reported, we used a conversion formula [20] to convert to
the mean and SD. The standard mean difference (SMD)
with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used to calculate
the treatment effect size. The effect size of multiple studies
was calculated with RevMan 5.0 (http://ims.cochrane.org/
revman/download) using the weighted effect size. The
strength of the SMD effect size was defined according to
Cohen’s d; 0.2–0.3 as a small effect size, around 0.5 is a
medium effect size and above 0.8 is considered a large
effect size [21]. To illustrate the cumulative effect of the
different interventions on BC, forest plots were con-
structed. Data were pooled in different subgroups accord-
ing to the intervention provided. In most of the cases the
grouping was done by the intervention provided to the
experimental group but in some cases the intervention pro-
vided to the control group was used for the meta-analysis;
this is stated explicitly in Table1. The degree of heterogen-
eity (I
2
) for each outcome was evaluated with non-
significance (P<0.05) indicating similarity between the
different studies. Heterogeneity was expected since the
populations included in the studies varied. Sensitivity analy-
sis was used to determine the robustness of our findings.
Random effect models were used for evaluating the pooled
intervention effect in order to reduce effects of heterogen-
eity between studies [22]. In addition we examined the
effect of deleting low-quality studies (scores below 5/10 on
the PEDro Scale) from the analysis. Funnel plots were used
to detect possible publication bias.
Results
Figure1 presents the trial flow diagram illustrating that the
initial search strategy identified 965 citations and of these
43 studies met our inclusion criteria. Thirty studies were
finally included in our systematic review, and 24 studies
were included in our meta-analysis.
Studycharacteristics
The study characteristics of the 30 studies are presented in
Table1. Eleven studies included older adults living in the
community or nursing homes, eight studies included older
adults that had fallen in the past year, seven studies
included older adults with a risk of falling and four studies
included only older women or women with osteoporosis or
low-mass bone. The frequency of the end points used in
the 30 trials appears in Table1.
PEDro scores ranged from 3 to 8 points with a
median score of 6 points; 22 studies (71.0%) were
defined as having good quality, 8 studies (25.8%) were
defined as having fair quality and one study was of poor
quality. The PEDro scores for each of the 11 items of
the PEDro scale, for each trial, appear in the
Supplementary data available in Age and Ageing online.
Funnel plots were produced for the exercise and multi-
factoral interventions including 9 or more studies each of
which assured the plots were valid [22]. Both plots
showed a publication bias, i.e. an under-representation of
negative findings in our meta-analysis.
Quantitative data synthesis
Meta-analysis was performed for pooled interventions with
a minimum of three studies (24 of the 30 trials). The 24
studies were divided into subgroups based on the interven-
tion provided; exercise (n=9 trials), Tai Chi (n=5 trials)
and multifactorial intervention (n=10 trials). Information
regarding the individual studies appears in Table 1; the
results for change in BC are summarised as ‘+’ (positive
for the experimental group, P≤0.05) or ‘0’ (no difference,
P≥0.05). The intervention for the control group was usual
care (n=20), but some studies provided the individuals in
the control group with educational and cognitive pro-
grammes, exercise, social visits and attention. Since the
remaining 6/30 studies [1013, 23–26] used diverse
.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 1. Continued
Study
Participants(totaln),
mean(SD)/range age, subjects
End point
outcome
measure
(1/2)
a
PEDro
Score
(_/10)
Intervention;duration(sessionsper week);
focusofintervention
Intervention
received bythe
control group
Results,
+/0*
Fossetal. [25]
218,79years(range 70–92),
elderlywomenwith one
previoussuccessfulcataract
operation
FES2
7
Expeditedsurgery(within amonth)versus
routine surgery (a‘waitinglist’within
13months)
Usualcare
+
Leeetal.[24]
86,Meanage 79,fallers
discharged fromtheemergency
departmentto home
mFES1
7
Useof a PERS(PersonalEmergency
Response System)for2 months
Usualcare
+
Schilling etal.
[10]
19,60–68 years,older adults
ABC1
6
5weeks(3×weekfor 15–30min) balance
exercisesona VersaDisc and CorDisc
devices(air filledrubber discs)while
secured in aharness
Notherapy
+
a
1, Primaryendpoint;2, secondaryend point.
*+statisticallysignificant (P≤0.05)positiveresults, 0no significantdifferenceinbalance confidence.
301
Interventions for addressing low balance confidence in older adults
control SDK platform:C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK platform:C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
www.rasteredge.com
interventions, they could not be grouped together and
meta-analysis could not be performed. See Supplementary
data available in Age and Ageing online for a description of
the individual studies and the effect sizes. The results of
the meta-analysis according to thesubgroups appear below.
Exercise
Nine trials provided exercise training aiming to increase the
low BC of older adults and included a strengthening
component in addition to functional balance exercises or a
task specific component. Once the 9 trials [11, 27–34]
recruiting a total of 453 subjects were combined using a
random effect model, a low significant effect was seen with
aSMD of 0.22, 95% CI 0.07–0.36, P =0.003 (Figure 2).
The heterogeneity was I
2
=0%, which was not significant
(P=0.93), indicating similarity between the nine studies.
When the two studies which had a low PEDro score (≤4
points) [29, 35] were removed, the SMD remained
unchanged and themodel remained significant (P <0.05).
Figure 1. Trial flowdiagram illustrating the search and selection of the studies.
Figure 2. Meta-analysis of exercise aimed at increasing balance confidence (n=453).
302
D. Rand et al.
Tai Chi
The data from five trials [12, 35–38] (n=468 subjects)
examining Tai Chi were combined using a random effects
model (Figure 3). The effect size was large but not statisti-
cally significant (P=0.06). The study by Sattin et al. [37]
provided training for 48 weeks and had a very large effect
size (4.38) compared with the other four studies which pro-
vided treatment for 8–26 weeks and had small effect sizes
ranging from 0.2 to 0.77. The variability of the trials was
large, possibly leading to non-significance. When that study
was removed from the meta-analysis, the effect size was
medium (SMD 0.48, 95% CI 0.11–0.84) and statistically
significant (P=0.01); however, the heterogeneity was high
and significant (I
2
=71%, P=0.02) indicating heterogeneity
between the trials (see Supplementary data available in
Age andAgeing online).
Multifactorial treatment
Ten studies provided multifactorial interventions aimed to
increase low BC. This intervention varied slightly between
trials but included home visits by a nurse, occupational
therapist or physical therapist who assessed the individual’s
needs and provided counselling on home modifications for
asafe environment, medication prescription and education
regarding the risks of falls. In some trials, exercise training
was provided as well (e.g. [39]). Upon combining the 10
trials [39–44,45,46, 47, 48] (n=1,233 subjects) of multi-
factorial treatment using a random model we found a small
statistically and significant effect size [SMD 0.31, 95% CI
(0.15–0.48), P=0.0002]. The heterogeneity was I
2
=74%,
which was statistically significant (P <0.00001), indicating
heterogeneity between trials (Figure4). When the one low-
scoring study (PEDro ≤4) [41] was removed the model
remained unchanged.
Discussion
The majority of the studies addressing reduced BC in
older adults used interventions designed to improve
balance (e.g. lower extremity strengthening or balance exer-
cise) or prevent falls (e.g. multifactoral treatment). Since the
ability to maintain balance has been found as a strong
determinant of BC [4951], the focus on balance seems
logical. Exercise including strengthening exercises in
addition to functional balance training or task specific exer-
cises (e.g. sit to stand, marching or walking through an
obstacle course) was provided in nine of the reviewed trials.
The exercise programmes ranged from two sessions per
week for duration of 5 weeks to amaximum of four to five
sessions aweek for 16 weeks. A small significant effect size
was found when these studies were pooled.
Tai Chi (n=5 studies) was found to have a medium
effect size. Tai Chi training duration also varied consider-
ably ranging from 8 to 48 weeks. Tai Chi, a self-paced
system of gentle physical exercise and stretching, [52] is
known to develop flexibility and coordination. Many of the
postures challenge balance requiring individuals to move
through positions using a reduced base of support (e.g.
standing on one leg). Tai Chi addresses the sensory-motor
Figure 4. Meta-analysis of multifactoraltreatment aimed at increasing balance confidence (n=1,233).
Figure 3. Meta-analysis of Tai Chi aimed at increasing balance confidence (n=300).
303
Interventions for addressing low balance confidence in older adults
aspects of balancewhich may also result in increased BC. It
also addresses the cognitive and emotional areas by pro-
moting relaxation, awareness and focus [52] which again
may improve BC. The combination of physical exercise and
cognitive-emotional stimuli may explain the increased effect
size observed when Tai Chi was used.
A
multifactoral/multifaceted
approach
generally
addressed fall-related issues while reducing barriers in the
person’s environment. Pooling the results (n=10 studies)
resulted in a small effect size which was similar to for exer-
cise only. It seems plausible that not enough emphasis was
placed on the exercise component. For instance in some
cases, therewas no exercise training at all (e.g. [43]), or sub-
jects were referred to an exercise programme (e.g. [39])
where the adherence was poor [39], or the exercise com-
ponent was minimal, consisting of 15 repetitions of strength
and postural exercises three to four times a week [41].
Finally, in somestudiessubjects were encouraged totrain on
their own after therapists provided them with balance and
strengthening techniques (e.g. [45,46]). Sincemost therapists
havenot been trained in progressive balancetraining for fall
prevention the training is often not beneficial [53].
Interestingly, the effectiveness of multifactoral interventions
for preventing falls and related injuries in older people has
not been supported [53]. Since our meta-analysis did find a
small and significant effect size using multifactoral interven-
tions may still bebeneficial for increasing BC despite having
little effecton fallprevention [53].
According to Bandura’s self-efficacy theory [7], per-
formance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal
persuasion and emotional arousal are the four major
sources of efficacy information. Addressing all of these
sources should improve domain-specific self-efficacy. Two
studies [28, 33] included some of these sources of infor-
mation; however, a meta-analysis could not conducted
because there were not enough studies to pool the data.
In both trials the intervention and control groups
received exercise training while only the intervention
group received efficacy training as well, however, the
additional efficacy information did not result in an
improvement in BC.
Components of efficacy training, usually mastery experi-
ences, were often included in multifactoral interventions as
well. These interventions included practising challenging
instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) activities
leading to successful performances which seemed to
increase BC. For example, participants in a multicomponent
home intervention had less difficulty at 6 months with
IADL and ADLs compared with controls [47]. BC may be
mediator between ageing and ADL. Studies have shown
having low confidence is related to greater declines in
ability to perform ADLs [6, 36]; however, it may only be
among individuals with declining physical performance
(gait, balance and arm and leg movement) [54].
Incorporating ADL/IADL practice, particularly those the
subjects identify as difficult, along with exercise may result
in larger effect sizein future RCTs.
The previous systematic review [14] revealed that Tai
Chi, home-based exerciseand fall-related interventions were
shown to reduce fear of falling in older people living in the
community. Our meta-analysis, which included sensitivity
analysis, emphasises Tai Chi to be the best intervention to
treat BC. The small effect sizes observed for exercise and
multifactoral interventions may have resulted from the fact
that BC was not the principal end point in one-third of the
reviewed studies. The subjects in these 10 trials were indi-
viduals who had fallen or had a risk of falling and therefore
the primary aim was to prevent falls. Since BC was a sec-
ondary end point, individuals with high BC may not have
been excluded.
Limitations
Owing tothe publicationbias detected for exerciseandmul-
tifactoral interventions, the study findings should be care-
fully considered. The interventions were very different in
terms of type, durationand intensity. Grouping of the inter-
ventions was based on the short description published in
the articles and therefore might not be accurate. Because
follow-up assessments were not performed in all of the
trials, we used the first assessment done after the interven-
tion therefore the long-term effects of the interventions
cannot be determined. The studysamples varied which may
confoundtheresults.Thelimitednumber of trialsper popu-
lation within each intervention did not enable us to account
for this factor. Therefore the effectiveness of exercise for
homogeneous samples (such as fallers, non-fallers) needs to
befurther investigatedbyconductinghigh-qualityRCTs.
Low BC in older adults can be addressed most effec-
tively by Tai Chi, while exercise was also found to be ben-
eficial but the effect size was smaller. Future studies, which
provide intervention that incorporates sources of efficacy
information and includes practising challenging ADL and
IADL tasks, are warranted since these may enhance effect
sizes and outcomes.
Key points
•Low BC is a major health problem in older adults.
•Determining the most effective interventions to increase
BC in older adults is important.
•Tai Chi/exercise interventions arebeneficial in increasing
the BC of older adults.
Acknowledgements
We would also like to thank Brandon Wong, Zoe Raffard,
Kristina Smith and Elmira Chan for their help with data
collection.
Sponsor’s role
None.
304
D. Rand et al.
Conflict of interest
None declared.
Funding
This work was supported by the Heart and Stroke
Foundation of British Columbia and Yukon of Canada.
Post-doctoral salary support (D.R.) was provided by the
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Canadian Stroke
Network, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)/
Rx&D Collaborative Research Program with AstraZeneca
Canada Inc). Career scientist awards were provided by
CIHR (J.J.E. and W.C.M.) and the Michael Smith
Foundation for Health Research (J.J.E.).
Author contributions
J.J.E. and W.C.M. developed the protocol, D.R. and J.Y. par-
ticipated in literature searching, data extraction, D.R. con-
ducted data analysis, D.R., J.J.E. and W.C.M. participated in
interpretation of data and manuscript preparation. All of
the authors reviewed the manuscript prior to submission.
Supplementary data
Supplementary data mentioned in the text is available to
subscribers in Age and Ageing online.
References
The very long list of references supporting this review has
meant that only the most important are listed here and are
represented by bold type throughout the text. The full list
of references is available at Age and Ageing online.
1. Powell LE, Myers AM. The Activities-specific Balance
Confidence (ABC) Scale. J Gerontol 1995;50: 28–34.
2. Myers AM, Fletcher PC, Myers AH et al. Discriminative and
evaluative properties of the Activities-Specific Balance
Confidence (ABC) Scale. J Gerontol 1998;53: M287–94.
3. Tinetti ME, Richman D, Powell L.Falls efficacy as a measure
of fear of falling.J Gerontol 1990; 45:239–43.
4. Yardley L, Smith H. A prospective study of the relationship
between feared consequences of falling and avoidance of
activity in community-living older people. Gerontologist
2002;42: 17–23.
5. Ko YM, Park WB, Lim JY, Kim KW, Paik NJ. Discrepancies
between balance confidence and physical performance
among community-dwelling Korean elders: a population-
based study.Int Psychogeriatr 2009;21: 738–47.
6. Cumming RG, Salkeld G, Thomas M et al. Prospective study
of the impact of fear of falling on activities of daily living,
SF-36 scores, and nursing home admission. J Gerontol A
BiolSci Med Sci 2000; 55:299–305.
7. Bandura A. Self-efficacy: toward a unifying theory of behav-
ioral change. Psychol Rev 1977;84: 191–215.
8. Hill KD, Schwarz JA, Kalogeropoulos AJ, Gibson SJ.
Fear of falling revisited. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1996;
77: 1025–9.
9. Bruce DG, Devine A, Prince RL. Recreational physical
activity levels in healthy older women: the importance of fear
of falling. JAm Geriatr Soc 2002; 50: 84–9.
10. Schilling BK, Falvo MJ, Karlage RE et al. Effects of unstable
surface training on measures of balance in older adults.
JStrength Cond Res 2009; 23:1211–6.
11. Arai T, Obuchi S, Inaba Y et al. The effects of short-term
exercise intervention on falls self efficacy and the relationship
between changes in physical function and falls self-efficacy in
Japanese older people: a randomized controlled trial. Am J
Phys Med Rehabil2007; 86: 133–41.
12. Zhang JG, Ishikawa-Takata K, Yamazaki H et al. The
effects of Tai Chi Chuan on physiological function and
fear of falling in the less robust elderly: an intervention
study for preventing falls. Arch Gerontol Geriatr 2006;
42: 107–16.
13. Cameron ID, Stafford B, Cumming RG et al. Hip
protectors improve falls self efficacy. Age Ageing 2000; 29:
57–62.
14. Zijlstra R, van Haastregt JCM, van Rossum E et al.
Interventions to reduce fear of falling in community-living
older people: a systematic review. Am Geriatr Soc 2007; 55:
603–15.
15. Messecar DC. Review: several interventions reduce fear of
falling in older people living in the community. Evid Based
Nurs 2008; 11:21.
16. Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA
Group. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews
andMeta-Analyses: the PRISMA statement. PLoS Med 2009;
6:e1000097. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed1000097.
17. Legters K. Fearof falling. Phys Ther 2002;82: 264–72.
18. Sherrington C,Herbert RD, Maher CG et al. PEDro. A data-
base of randomized trials and systematic reviews in phy-
siotherapy. Man Ther 2000;5: 223–6.
19. Foley NC, Teasell RW, Bhogal SK, Speechley MR. Stroke
rehabilitation evidence-based review: methodology. Top
Stroke Rehabil 2003;10: 1–7.
20. Hozo SP, Djulbegovic B, Hozo I. Estimating the mean and
variation from the median, range, and the size of a sample.
BMC Med Res Methodol 2005;5: 13.
21. Cohen J. Statistical power analysis fir the behavioral sciences.
2nd edition. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates,
1998.
22. Sutton AJ, Higgins JPT. Recent developments in
meta-analysis. Statist Med 2008; 27: 625–50.
45. Gitlin LN,Winter L, Dennis MPet al.A randomized trialof a
multicomponent home intervention to reduce functional
difficulties in older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc 2006; 54:
809–16.
46. Zidén L, Frandin K, Kreuter K. Home rehabilitation after
hip fracture. A randomized controlled study on balance con-
fidence,physical function and everyday activities.Clin Rehabil
2008; 22: 1019–33.
49. Maki BE, Holliday PJ, Topper AK. Fear of falling and pos-
tural performance in the elderly. J Gerontol 1991; 46:
M123–31.
50. Myers AM,PowellLE,MakiBEet al. Psychologicalindicators
of balance confidence: relationship to actual and perceived
abilities.J GerontolA BiolSciMed Sci1996;51:37–43.
305
Interventions for addressing low balance confidence in older adults
51. Hatch J, Gill-Body KM, Portney LG. Determinants of
balance confidence in community-dwelling elderly people.
Phys Ther 2003;83: 1072–9.
52. McKenna M. The application of Tai Chi Chaun in rehabilita-
tion and preventive care of the geriatric population. In:
Burkhardt A, Carlson JL, eds. Complementary Therapies
in Geriatric Practice: Selected Topics, Harworth Press Inc.,
2001.
53. Gates S,Fisher JD,Cooke MWet al.Multifactorialassessment
and targeted intervention for preventing falls and injuries
among older people in community and emergency care
settings: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2008; 19:
130–3.
54. Mendes de Leon CF, Seeman TE,Baker DI, Richardson ED,
Tinetti ME. Self-efficacy, physical decline, and change in
functioning in community-living elders: a prospective study. J
GerontolSoc Sci1996;51: S183–90.
Received 1 August 2010; accepted in revised form
8February2011
306
D. Rand et al.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested