devexpress pdf viewer asp.net mvc : Add or remove pages from pdf application Library tool html asp.net azure online 041-20131-part95

11 
The slide in Figure 14 uses a radial gradient fill as the background. 
Figure 14. Radial Gradient Background 
Here is the style template used for Figure 14. 
proc template; 
define style styles.mossgradient; 
parent=styles.powerpointlight; 
scheme "Radial Gradient Background" / 
heading_font = ("Segoe UI Light, <MTsans-serif>, <sans-serif>", 42pt) 
body_font = ("Segoe UI Light, <MTsans-serif>, <sans-serif>", 20pt) 
class body / 
backgroundimage = "radial-gradient(center, #dde6cf, #9cb86e, #156b13)"; 
class headersandfooters / 
background = cxecf5bc; 
class data, table, headersandfooters / 
bordercolor = dark2; 
end; 
This style template is very similar to the previous example. As in linear gradients, the first word in the list enclosed in 
parentheses is the starting position. For radial gradients
, in addition to the word “center,” the starting position can
also 
be a corner such as “top left”
or a pair of percentages that describe the position of the starting point from the top left 
corner. 
For example, “50% 50%” corresponds to “center.”
As in linear gradients the starting point is followed by at 
least two color-stops. 
You can get a complete description of the linear and radial gradient syntax accepted by the destination for 
PowerPoint at http://www.sascommunity.org/wiki/A_First_Look_at_the_ODS_Destination_for_PowerPoint
TRANSPARENT COLORS 
The destination for PowerPoint supports transparent colors, also known as RGBA colors, as the value for the 
BACKGROUNDCOLOR style attribute. Transparent colors RGB colors with an added transparency component. In 
the SAS/GRAPH color-naming scheme, RGBA color codes have the form arrggbbaa, where rrgg, and gg are the 
red, green, and blue components, and aa is the transparency component. The transparency component is a 2-digit 
hexadecimal value between 00 and FF, where 00 is the most transparent and FF is the least transparent. 
In Figure 14, part of the background is hidden by the opaque table row and column headings. If you want to let the 
gradient fill show through the header cells, use a transparent background color in those cells. Compare Figure 15 to 
the previous figure. 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
Add or remove pages from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others
extract pages from pdf on ipad; delete pages from pdf in reader
Add or remove pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc
add and remove pages from pdf file online; export pages from pdf acrobat
12 
Figure 15. Transparent Background Color 
Here is the style template used for this example. The only difference between this and the style template used for the 
previous example is the use of transparent black (a00000000) as the background color in the 
HEADERSANDFOOTERS style element. 
proc template; 
define style styles.mossgradient; 
parent=styles.powerpointlight; 
scheme "Radial Gradient Background" / 
heading_font = ("Segoe UI Light, <MTsans-serif>, <sans-serif>", 42pt) 
body_font = ("Segoe UI Light, <MTsans-serif>, <sans-serif>", 20pt) 
class body / 
backgroundimage = "radial-gradient(center, #dde6cf, #9cb86e, #156b13)"; 
class headersandfooters / 
background = a00000000; 
class data, table, headersandfooters / 
bordercolor = dark2; 
end; 
BACKGROUND IMAGES 
You can use the BACKGROUNDIMAGE attribute to put an image in the background of  
the slide 
a title 
a footnote  
the date and time 
the page number 
a table cell 
a bulleted list 
a text block 
text from an ODS TEXT= statement  
By default the image is stretched or shrunk to fix the box that encloses the text. If you set the 
BACKGROUNDREPEAT attribute to REPEAT, REPEAT_X, or REPEAT_Y, the image retains its original size. The 
destination for PowerPoint tiles the image as necessary to fill the box.  
Statistical tables are best displayed on a plain background but a background image can enhance other types of 
information. The slide shown in Figure 16 uses transparent table borders and a transparent table background to 
display a table of campground information complemented by an image of a forest service road passing through 
Nantahala National Forest. 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
manipulations. Open password protected PDF. Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB
cut pdf pages; copy page from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page Add necessary references: How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; extract pdf pages online
13 
Figure 16: Background Image 
Here is the style template for Figure 16. Use the BACKGROUNDIMAGE attribute on the body style element to specify 
an image for the slide background. 
proc template; 
define style styles.imagebackground; 
parent=styles.powerpointlight; 
class body / 
backgroundimage="nantahala50.jpg"; 
end; 
INLINE FUNCTIONS 
You can use the ODS inline formatting functions to insert special characters and change attributes in titles, footnotes, 
text blocks, bulleted lists, table headers and data. The destination for PowerPoint supports these inline functions: 
dagger 
nbspace 
newline 
sigma 
style 
sub 
super 
unicode 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. Add necessary references: Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
crop all pages of pdf; extract page from pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Remove the password. doc.Save(outputFilePath); C# Sample Code: Add Password to Plain PDF
cut pages out of pdf; deleting pages from pdf document
14 
The next two examples demonstrate some of the things you can do with these functions. Figure 17 shows the effect 
of all the inline functions except the style function. 
Figure 17: Inline Functions 
Figure 18 shows the types of things you can do with the style function. 
Figure 18: Inline Styles 
TITLES AND FOOTNOTES 
Titles and footnotes do not have to always be in the center. The destination for PowerPoint is quite versatile. 
Although titles must always appear at the top and footnotes at the bottom, they can be left- or right-adjusted. The 
date and time and page number can be placed in any corner or in the top center or bottom center. In Figure 19, the 
title and footnote have been left-adjusted, the page number moved to the top left corner, and the date moved to the 
top right corner. 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
extract pages pdf preview; extract pages pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
delete page from pdf file; copy pdf page to clipboard
15 
Figure 19: Repositioned Title, Footnote, Page Number, Date 
Here is the important part of the style template used for Figure 19. The style elements shown in the example control 
the positions of the title, footnote, page number, and date. The horizontal position is controlled by the JUST= 
attribute. The vertical position is controlled by the VJUST= attribute. To move the titles or footnotes left or right, 
change the JUST= attribute in the SystemTitle or SystemFooter style element. To move the page number, change 
the JUST= attribute in the PAGENO style element. To move it to the top or bottom, change the VJUST= attribute in 
the PAGENO style element. To reposition of the date and time, change the JUST= and VJUST= attributes in the 
BodyDate style element. By default, the titles occupy 100% of the slide width. In the normal case, when the footnote, 
page number, and date are on the same line, the footnotes occupy the middle 50%, and the page number and date 
and time occupy 25% on each side of the footnote. You can change these values with the WIDTH= attribute in the 
appropriate style element. In Figure 19, the destination for PowerPoint automatically set the footnote width to 100% 
because the footnote occupies a line by itself. 
proc template; 
define style styles.example; 
parent=styles.powerpointlight; 
class systemtitle, systemfooter /  
just=left; 
class bodydate /  
just=right vjust=top width=50%; 
class pageno /  
just=left vjust=top width=50%; 
end; 
Because the position and width of each element has an effect on the position and width of the other elements, it can 
be difficult to predict the effect of any single change. To understand how a change to one of the elements affects the 
others, it helps to know how the destination for PowerPoint lays out a page. The destination for PowerPoint 
1.  first places the page number on the page. The page number always abuts the top or bottom margin. No other 
element can occupy the same position as the page number. 
2.  then places the date and time. If the date and time have the same vertical and horizontal justifications as the 
page number, it moves the date and time to the nearest unoccupied position. 
3.  then places the titles as near as possible to the top margin. 
4.  finally places the footnotes as near as possible to the bottom margin. 
When adjusting the position of these page elements, it helps to temporarily assign a background color or margin (like 
in Figure 19) to the elements so that you can see their exact dimensions. 
THE DESTINATION FOR POWERPOINT COMPARED TO OTHER ODS DESTINATIONS 
ODS supports many destinations, including PDF, HTML, RTF, SAS data sets, even the primordial SAS listing. The 
destination for PowerPoint has many similarities with other destinations but it also has its quirks. Your experience 
producing reports with other destinations can help you to make presentations using the destination for PowerPoint if 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
Help to add or insert bookmark and outline into PDF file in .NET framework. Ability to remove and delete bookmark and outline from PDF document.
extract page from pdf file; copy pages from pdf to word
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Add metadata to PDF document in C# .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file. Also a PDF metadata extraction control.
deleting pages from pdf in preview; acrobat export pages from pdf
16 
you keep those quirks in mind. PDF and RTF documents have pages the way presentations have slides, so i
t’
s more 
helpful to compare a presentation to one of those destinations than to compare it to a web page or spreadsheet. 
Let us start by looking at a typical page of ODS PDF output. Compare the PDF page shown in Figure 20 with the 
presentation slide shown in Figure 2. Both examples were created using the default style template for the destination. 
Figure 20: ODS PDF Output 
Notice that both examples display SAS procedure output, in this case tables created by the ACECLUS procedure. 
Yes that is obvious, but it bears emphasizing that the purpose of ODS is to display the output of SAS procedures in a 
range of useful formats. However, the older ODS destinations such as PDF, RTF, HTML, and even the SAS listing 
are intended for creating reports to be read by individuals from a printed page or viewed on a computer screen. You 
use the destination for PowerPoint to create presentations narrated by a speaker and usually viewed by groups of 
people on a relatively large display.  
Regarding Figure 20, notice that the PDF page has a portrait orientation. A presentation slide has landscape 
orientation. Of course, a page of PDF and RTF output tends to look like a page in a book. A presentation slide is 
presented on a movie- or television-shaped screen. (How often do you see presentations in portrait orientation?) As a 
result, the presentation slide has less vertical space for output than a PDF or RTF page. Secondly, the font sizes 
used in PDF and RTF output are much smaller than those used by the destination for PowerPoint. In PDF and RTF, 
the font size used for the first title is 11 points. The font size used for table cell data is 8 points. Compare this to the 
presentation output, which uses a 42 point font for the first title and a 20 point font for table cell data. PDF and RTF 
output is designed to be read at typical reading distances of 15”
-
25” and therefore can use small fonts, but 
presentations are designed to be viewed from many feet away. The use of large fonts in presentations also reduces 
the amount of output that can fit on a slide, both vertically and horizontally, than on a PDF or RTF page. The effect of 
less vertical space and larger fonts is why the destination for PowerPoint puts one table on a slide by default when 
PDF and RTF usually put as many tables as will fit. 
Another difference is that the date, time, and page number appear at the top of PDF and RTF output, to the left of the 
title. The presentation style template puts these items on the bottom of the slide. The date and time are on the left 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing
extract pages from pdf reader; copy one page of pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
Add permanent metadata to PDF document in VB .NET framework program. Remove and delete metadata content from PDF file in Visual Basic .NET application.
delete pages out of a pdf; copying a pdf page into word
17 
and the page number on the right. The PDF and RTF page matches the look of traditional SAS listing output. The 
presentation style template mimics the Office theme found in Microsoft Office 2010. 
In both examples the data in the table cells is surrounded by 5 points of padding. In PDF and RTF pages, with their 
small fonts and vertical orientation
, the padding contributes to a “clean” look that still allows plenty of room for output. 
Space for data on presentation slides is already precious, though, and the padding makes it even more so. 
BEST PRACTICES 
The destination for PowerPoint uses large fonts, landscape orientation, and ample cell padding to help you make 
good presentations, but these features limit the amount of space available for your data on a slide. Typically, tables 
with more than 5 to 7 rows and 4, 5, or 6 columns are too big to fit on a single slide, especially if the table has a 
caption. If there is not enough room on the slide to fit the entire table, the destination for PowerPoint divides the table 
into sections that are small enough to fit. If the table is too long each section contains a subset of the rows. If the 
table is too wide, each section contains a subset of the columns. Each section appears on a separate slide. Avoid this 
condition. It’s a lot to ask of your audience to remember the content from an earlier slide when 
they are looking at a 
later section of the table. Too-big tables are especially easy to create with the PRINT, REPORT, FREQ, and 
TABULATE procedures because the table dimensions are open-ended. 
It’s tempting to try using smaller fonts in order to fit more 
data on a slide but this makes the slide unreadable. Here is 
what that looks like. The titles and table in Figure 21 use the same font sizes as PDF and RTF documents. You can 
see that this slide is extremely difficult to read at typical presentation distances and contains more information than 
the reader can understand before the presenter moves on to the next slide.  
Figure 21: A Table Displayed Using a Too-Small Font 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
18 
Tabular data is not the only type of information that suffers when you use too-small fonts. Though it is useful to show 
short snippets of SAS code in a presentation about SAS, 
it’s tempting to
try to squeeze more code into a single slide 
by shrinking the font. Figure 22 is a slide that lists the SAS program code that created Figure 21. The text is in an 8 
point font. You can immediately see that the text is too small to read, much less understand. This is a bad slide. 
Figure 22: SAS Program Code Displayed Using a Too-Small Font 
Here are some best practices for creating a presentation using the destination for PowerPoint. 
Presentations are very different from reports. It will probably be impractical to produce a good presentation and a 
good report with the same SAS program. If you want to produce both a report and a presentation from the same 
output, use the ODS DOCUMENT destination to capture the output and replay it separately for each destination, 
customizing it specifically for the report and the presentation. 
Choose a style template to use for the entire presentation, either one of the presentation style templates supplied 
by SAS or a custom style template. Match your template to the type of information in your presentation. 
Statistical tables are best displayed on plain backgrounds. Use a colorful gradient or image background for 
informal presentations. 
If you want to use your presentation on computers other than the one that you created it with, use fonts that are 
installed on those computers. The destination for PowerPoint does not embed your fonts into the presentation 
file. If your font choices are not available, PowerPoint will choose from the fonts that are available and those 
choices will change the way your slides look. 
Determine what you want to appear on each slide. Use ODS SELECT and ODS EXCLUDE to choose the tables 
and graphs you want to display and suppress the others. 
Use at most two titles and at most one footnote on a slide. 
Keep tables contained to a single slide. 
Avoid batch output. 
Do not succumb to the temptation to use smaller fonts to fit more information on a slide. 
Use a 
ODS POWERPOINT LAYOUT=”layout”;
statement to end the current slide and start a new slide with the 
specified layout. 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
19 
PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS 
So far you have seen a lot of examples of the types of presentations you can make with the destination for 
PowerPoint and learned techniques for making custom presentation style templates. Here are a few practical 
considerations you should keep in mind as you start to use this new destination. 
Like all ODS destination, the destination for PowerPoint creates new, self-contained documents. You cannot 
update an existing presentation. Of course you can create a presentation and then copy tables or graphs into 
from that presentation into another presentation. 
The destination for PowerPoint creates the presentation theme from the style template. You cannot use a theme 
created in PowerPoint. 
The destination for PowerPoint has no support for notes pages, animations, or slide transitions. 
Some inline functions that are supported by other ODS destinations are not supported by the destination for 
PowerPoint. Specifically, the DATE, DEST, LASTPAGE, LEADERS, PAGEOF, RAW, THISPAGE, 
TOCENTRYINDENT, and TOCENTRYPAGE functions are not supported. Some of these functions, like DATE 
and LEADERS, are specific to another destination. Some, like TOCENTRYINDENT and TOCENTRYPAGE, do 
not make sense in a presentation. DEST and RAW are not useful when creating Office Open XML. 
If PowerPoint does not support a style attribute, then the destination for PowerPoint cannot support it either. This 
means that some things you might be used to doing with in HTML or PDF will not work in a presentation. For 
example, although you can use the inline style function to change the color of a single word in a longer section of 
text, you cannot change the background color of that word. The pre-image and post-image style attributes cannot 
be used inside a table cell. In general, if you cannot do it using PowerPoint interactively, you cannot do it with the 
destination for PowerPoint. 
Background images are resized or tiled to fit the box (text box, table cell, and so on) in which they are placed. 
The box is not sized to fit the image. 
CONCLUSION 
The destination for PowerPoint, a new ODS destination for SAS 9.4, creates presentations suitable for display using 
Microsoft PowerPoint 2010. You can use one of two presentation style templates supplied by SAS or a custom style 
based on one of the style templates supplied by SAS. You can create title slides and two-column slides with pre-
defined layout templates. You can customize your presentations by using background gradient fills or images, inline 
functions, or by re-positioning the titles, footnotes, page number, and date and time.  
The slides created by the destination for PowerPoint have landscape orientation, use large fonts, and have limited 
space for tables and graphs compared to PDF or RTF pages. These differences influence the types of output suitable 
for presentations and how the output is displayed. 
REFERENCES 
The photo used in Figure 16 is by Doug Bradley, Doug Bradley Photography, available at 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dougandbecky/2837294812/
SAS Institute Inc, “Sample 48144: Use transparent (RGBA) colors with SAS/GRAPH®,” 
http://support.sas.com/kb/48/144.html 
van Vugt, Wouter, Open XML The Markup Explained,  
http://openxmldeveloper.org/blog/b/openxmldeveloper/archive/2007/08/13/1970.aspx.  
World Wide Web Consortium, 
”CSS Image Values and Replaced Content Module Level 3,” 
http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-css3-images-20110217/ 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 
The ODS destination for PowerPoint could not have been created without the contributions of Wayne Hester, Senior 
Software Developer, and Nancy Goodling, Principal Development Tester. 
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
20 
CONTACT INFORMATION 
Tim Hunter 
SAS Institute Inc. 
SAS Campus Drive 
Cary, NC 27513 
E-mail: tim.hunter@sas.com 
SAS and all other SAS Institute Inc. product or service names are registered trademarks or trademarks of SAS 
Institute Inc. in the USA and other countries. ® indicates USA registration.  
Other brand and product names are trademarks of their respective companies.  
Beyond the Basics
SAS Global Forum 2013
13
3
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested